ASEEES Convention Panel/Paper Wanted
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TimestampYour NameYour Email AddressYour Institutional Affiliation (If none, enter 'independent scholar')Your ASEEES Membership StatusIf you are a student, select your current status (we do not accept undergrad presenters)Select ONE category for your proposed panel or paperIf trying to organize a panel, enter the proposed panel title or a brief descriptionSelect all that apply. I am looking for:If you have a paper and would like to be part of a panel, enter your proposed paper topic or a brief descriptionIf you would like to volunteer to serve as chair and/or discussant, select all that apply:Describe topics of interest to you as chair/discussant
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12/20/2017 2:18:52Masumi Kamedamasumikameda@yahoo.co.jpMIT; The Univ. of TokyoCurrent MemberArts/Film/Electronic MediaPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Socialist realism as adaptation of American happiness propaganda under the Great Depression; Soviet and Hollywood musical films in comparisonChairSoviet visual culture of 1930s
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12/21/2017 11:47:30Arpad von Klimoklimo@cua.eduThe Catholic University of AmericaCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Religion and the Cold WarPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Cardinal Mindszenty as a symbol of the Cold War in Italy/Western Europe
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12/21/2017 15:50:55Ambika Natarajannataraam@onid.oregonstate.eduOregon State UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Central and Southeast Europe, 1800-1918Maidservants and Bourgeois Sexualities in fin-de-siecle Vienna Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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12/23/2017 11:00:41Robert F. Slesinskirfsles@aol.comIndependent ScholarCurrent MemberReligion/PhilosophyPresenter(s)Moral Performance: S. L. Frank's Ethics in EnlightenmentChairReligion/Philosophy
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1/1/2018 22:20:49Tony AnemoneAnemoneA@newschool.eduThe New SchoolCurrent MemberArts/Film/Electronic MediaSoviet Cinema in the 1960sPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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1/3/2018 9:14:48Rustis Kamuntaviciusrustisk@centras.ltVytautas Magnus University (Kaunas, Lithuania)Current MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Lie for the sake of objectivity. History manuals in Belarus, Lithuania and PolandDiscussantHistory of Poland, Lithuania, Belarus. History manuals. Conflicting interpretations of the past.
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1/3/2018 18:46:20Bohdan Harasymiwbharasym@ucalgary.caUniversity of CalgaryCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyDoes Curbing Corruption Necessitate Dismantling an Entire Patronal System? The Case of Ukraine
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1/4/2018 23:06:08Marie-Alice L'Heureuxmalheur@ku.eduUniversity of KansasCurrent MemberArts/Film/Electronic MediaPerforming Monuments: Transgressing Space Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Michael Taussig, in Defacement: Public Secrecy and the Labor of the Negative (Stanford University Press, Stanford University, 1999) 2 writes “When the human body, nation’s flag, money or public statue is defaced, a strange surplus of negative energy is likely to be aroused from within the defaced thing itself. It is now in a state of desecration...the closest many of us are going to get to the sacred in this modern world.” Changing and charging objects and places through “performance” are strategies used in many public demonstrations in multiple ways—from Pussy Riot’s gig at Christ the Savior in Moscow to Tiananmen Square when official (secret) ritual and performance initially floundered in the face of the critical power of student improvised theater performed in public in 1989 with Bread and Puppet style symbols of Mao, the Statue of Liberty . These rituals and performances have sprouted up across space and time and at different scales. I am presenting a paper on how ritualistic performances of Soviet events by Russian-speakers eventually destabilized a monument in Estonia that had survived more or less quietly for 16 years after the Soviet collapse. I seek two other papers and a respondent and chair covering similar topics in different geographic areas of the region spanning any time frame that will engage in a theoretical understanding of the power and potential of such action.
Chairany urban or art/architecture topic
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1/5/2018 13:17:26Aleksandra Marciniakaleksma@umich.eduUniversity of Michigan (ANN Arbor)Current MemberPhD StudentArts/Film/Electronic MediaThis panel would consider new media platforms and the genres they support. My own work looks at Youtube culture and Russian battle rap.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My paper considers Barthes' idea of mythology as it applies to Russian battle rap, specifically looking at the "Versus" league and Oxxxymiron.
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1/5/2018 15:52:17Gary Berkovichgaryberkovich@gmail.comindependent scholarCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Modernized Socialist Realism In The Late USSR Architecture (1955–1991).
During the late USSR time (1955-1991) the Soviet architecture was once again ordered by those in power to change its direction, and it is referred to as Modernized Socialist Realism in this paper. In the brief interlude of Khrushchev’s Thaw (1955–1961), some architects went so far as to assume that their profession had regained its modern practices. Moreover, they tried to work in this direction.
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1/5/2018 20:11:10Agnieszka Smelkowskaagnessmelkowska@berkeley.eduUC Berkeley/History DeptCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918population movements of various type (refugees, expellees, repatriates, economic migrants)—as a historical phenomenon, state-building/destroying strategy and a personal experience—throughout the 20th century in central/eastern Europe and Soviet UnionPresenter(s), Discussant(s)war-time and post-war movements of the German minority of Soviet Ukraine (1941-50). Chairpopulation movements/migration, citizenship, personal experience/narrative, nationalism, particularly in the context of WWII and post-war central/eastern Europe & Soviet Union.
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1/8/2018 13:42:00Olena Leipniksoc_ovl@shsu.eduSHSUCurrent MemberAnthropology/Geography/SociologyPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Dramatized ideological performances in the USSR, such as parades, lines, thematic "utrenniki", festive concerts, festivals, and so on. Their visual, audio, spatial, temporal, material, and other constituents, framing and delivering.
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1/10/2018 5:14:33Trevor Wilsonwilson.t.trevor@gmail.comUniversity of PittsburghCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Religion/PhilosophyRussian Philosophy Without Russia (Russian philosophy in diaspora, use of Russian philosophy by non-Russians, etc.)Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Alexandre Koyré in Paris, 1920-1930sChair, DiscussantCritical theory, art history, political philosophy, religious philosophy, psychoanalysis
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1/26/2018 16:28:00Cinzia D Solaricinzia.solari@umb.eduUniversity of Massachusetts BostonCurrent MemberAnthropology/Geography/SociologyPost Soviet MigrationPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Building the “new” Ukraine from the Outside In: Ukrainian Careworkers in Italy

Using in-depth interviews and ethnographic data collected in L’viv, Ukraine and Rome, Italy, this paper shows that Ukrainian nation-state building occurs transnationally. I examines the collective practices of migrants who are building the "new" Ukraine from the outside in. The Ukrainian state, in order to fulfil its First World aspirations of joining Europe and distancing itself from all things Soviet, is pursuing a gendered reorganization of family and work structures to achieve a non-linear transformation from a socialist to a market-based economy. This has created a labor force of migrant grandmothers who carry the new Ukraine on their shoulders. This post-Soviet economic transformation requires a change in the moral order as migrant women struggle to understand how to be "good" mothers and grandmothers and men join women in attempts to teach their children to be successful and honorable people, now that the social rules have drastically changed. In-depth interviews and participant observation with migrants mothers in Italy and non-migrant children in Ukraine allows us to see the production of neoliberal capitalism and Ukrainian nation-state building from the ground up and the outside in.
Chair, DiscussantUkraine, Migration, nationalism, nation-state building, Gender, transnational families, ethnography
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1/13/2018 0:09:20Rosibel Romanrroma004@fiu.eduFlorida International University - graduate studentCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924The social and nuclear production of space in the Southern Urals after 1945; this can encompass a variety of topics related to the social-environmental impacts of radioactive contamination, geopolitical relationships in the history of Soviet nuclear production, the Urals or Southern Urals as a distinct region, rural vs. urban rifts and inequalities in Soviet society, the power dynamics within collective or state farms, the role of livestock/animal husbandry in public safety measuresPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Rurality as a marker of social difference in the hinterlands of post-WWII Tankograd (working title)ChairSocial-environmental issues during the Soviet or post-Soviet periods; environmental history; archival practices and policies; human-animal relationships and/or conceptualization; Russian avant-garde of the early 20th century; Russian futurism/cubo-futurism/zaumism
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1/14/2018 17:00:36Stephen Brucesab2310@columbia.eduColumbia UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentLiterature: Russian and Eurasian19th century travel narratives / Pre-modernist postmodernism / Multilingual fiction / Pushkin era / Russo-Turkish WarsPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)A. F. Veltman's Strannik (1830–31): A Multilingual and Metafictional Journey through Southeastern Europe
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1/14/2018 17:01:35Stephen Brucesab2310@columbia.eduColumbia UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentLiterature: Russian and Eurasian19th century travel narratives / Pre-modernist postmodernism / Multilingual fiction / Pushkin era / Russo-Turkish WarsPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)A. F. Veltman's Strannik (1830–31): A Multilingual and Metafictional Journey through Southeastern Europe
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1/16/2018 5:43:19Kornelije Kvaskornelije.kvas@fil.bg.ac.rsUniversity of Belgrade, Faculty of PhilologyCurrent MemberLiterature: Russian and EurasianI am looking to join a panel. A paper topic proposal: "The Problem of Narrative Irregularity in the Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Demons"Chair, DiscussantLiterature: Comparative; Literature: Central and Southeast Europe; Literature: Russian and Eurasian
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1/19/2018 12:06:20Victoria Khiterervictoria.khiterer@millersville.eduMillersville UniversityCurrent MemberJewish StudiesJewish culture in the Soviet Union. Seeking paper proposals on Soviet Jewish theater, film, music, literature and arts.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Jewish culture in Kyiv in the interwar periodChair, DiscussantImperial Russian and Soviet Jewish History and Culture. The Holocaust.
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1/19/2018 12:12:01Natalia Telepnevanataliatelepneva2017@gmail.comUniversity of WarwickCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Soviet and Eastern European Intelligence in the Third World after 1945: Art or Performance?

Histories of intelligence during the Cold War have long focused on the West, in particular the United States and Western Europe. The study of Soviet and Eastern European intelligence has been predominantly shaped by Western primary sources or accounts by journalists and Soviet Bloc defectors. To date, most studies of Soviet intelligence have focused on the role of intelligence during key Cold War moments, such as the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Prague Spring or the Soviet decision to intervene in Afghanistan. However, recognizing that intelligence officers served in a variety of capacities, including as representatives of cultural and media institutions, educators, and military instructors, this workshop aims to investigate how the practice of secret intelligence was entangled with the performative aspects of Soviet cultural power in the Third World.
This panel aims to investigate some of the ‘performative aspects’ of foreign intelligence and domestic security actors and to how they deployed covert action, engaged in intelligence liaison, and utilized cultural institutions for exercising influence in the Third World. We also aim to investigate how these exchanges affected policies, practices and peoples ‘back home’: in the USSR and Eastern Europe (students, dissidents, military trainees, diplomats and violent non-state actors). The panel looks at these actors’ ability to provide intelligence assessment on a plethora of topics and events unfolding in the Third World - ranging from armed conflicts to broad areas such as the economy.
Presenter(s)
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1/21/2018 16:23:10Payson Croybpaysoncroy@gmail.comIndependent ScholarCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Identities Under Duress: Minority National Identification without Minority RightsPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Cultivating National Identity Through Education: The Assimilative Pressures of German Children's Schooling in Czechoslovakia, 1945-1960
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1/23/2018 9:56:08Gulnaz Sibgatullinagulnazsib@gmail.comLeiden UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Religion/PhilosophyReligion and Russian ethnic nationalismPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)"On the White Islam: Nationalist ideologies of ethnic Russian converts to Islam". Here I discuss the discourse of ethnic Russian converts to Islam who are members of the World Murabitun movementDiscussantReligion in post-Soviet Russia; sociolinguistics of Russian; Tatars/Tatarstan
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1/24/2018 11:26:33Brett Winestockbrettrw@stanford.eduStanford UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and EurasianRussian Literature's Journeys to ArmeniaPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Leonid Tsypkin's novella 'Norartakir' (1973) and the importance of Armenia for Russian writers; topics could include the act of border crossing; travel literature in general; the theme of genocide; ekphrasis
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1/25/2018 2:58:58Nadezda Puriaevanadia_np@mail.ruMoscow State University Current MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and Eurasian19 century female Russian writersChairFemale lierature
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1/25/2018 13:07:02Raymond DeLucarsdeluca@g.harvard.eduHarvard UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentArts/Film/Electronic MediaI am envisioning a panel premised on Animal Studies in Slavic culture/film/literature, etc. This deeply interdisciplinary field has yet to fully exert its influence in Slavic, and I'm hoping to get a cohort of scholars/students from a wide array of specialties/geographies/languages who have something interesting to say about animals in the context of Slavic culture. Without sounding too ambitious, I hope this panel could, in a small way, get our field to start thinking more critically about animals/animal representation. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)"Tarkovksy's Cine-Safari: Reading Animality in the Cinema of Andrei Tarkovsky"Chair, DiscussantAnimals in literature; animals in film; animal theory; animal representation; animal philosophy, etc.
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1/26/2018 12:11:43Joel Janickijoeljanicki@yahoo.comSoochow University (Taipei, Taiwan)Current MemberLiterature: Central and Southeast EuropeMilosz and Slowacki: Exile and Reminiscencethis paper focuses on Milosz’s reading of Godzina mysli (1832) as a poetic reading of the past as a new phase of spiritual development and as a model for expressing his own views on creative imaginationChair, DiscussantPolish Literature/Culture
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1/26/2018 16:28:11
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1/28/2018 21:37:35Olga Khometaolga.khometa@mail.utoronto.caUniversity of Toronto Current MemberPhD StudentLiterature: Russian and EurasianLiterary Relationship Between Nikolai Gogol's The Portrait and Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Double
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1/29/2018 7:33:46Cosmin Mineactm570@bham.ac.ukUniversity of BirminghamNot a Member (Your submissions will be deleted. Become a member first)PhD StudentHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, 1800-1918Late 19th century visual arts in East-Central Europe, beyond the national paradigmPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Other important themes to describe developments in the visual arts in the region, that do not relate to the national ideology. Ways to move beyond the nationalistic paradigm, presuposing that artists had many other concerns, besides national identity construction. Ways in which nationalism has been used to other ends, thus as a cover for more relevant purposes.Discussant
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1/29/2018 20:45:57Daria Ezerovadaria.ezerova@yale.eduYale UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Arts/Film/Electronic MediaCFP: Prague Spring on Screen. For the 2018 ASEEES convention, The Working Group on Cinema and Television is soliciting papers for a stream of panels entitled
Prague Spring on Screen
The year 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, one of the most dramatic events of 1968. The anniversary offers an opportunity for scholars to reflect on the enduring significance of the Prague Spring on the arts across Eastern Europe. We invite papers that explore the events of 1968 in Czechoslovakia and its representation in cinema and television through the years.
· How did the visual arts articulate the intellectual, cultural, and political legacies of the Prague Spring, both in its immediate aftermath and in more contemporary reframings?
· What was the international coverage of the events on both sides of the Iron Curtain?
· How do we position these events in a broader context of 1968?
· What has changed in the cinematic representation of the Prague Spring after the end of Communism?
· How do we consider the reverberations of the events of 1968 in a globalized world, amidst the rise of authoritarian populism and nostalgia for the left?
By addressing such questions, this series of panels will foster an interdisciplinary, cross-media approach to screen representations of Prague Spring and bring together scholars of Slavic Studies across fields.
Please respond off-list to daria.ezerova@yale.edu and jsteffe@emory.edu
Paper *topics* must be submitted by February 15. WGCTV membership not required to participate.
Presenter(s)
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1/29/2018 20:52:28Daria Ezerovadaria.ezerova@yale.eduYale UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Arts/Film/Electronic MediaCFP: Prague Spring on Screen
For the 2018 ASEEES convention, The Working Group on Cinema and Television is soliciting papers for a stream of panels entitled
Prague Spring on Screen
The year 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, one of the most dramatic events of 1968. The anniversary offers an opportunity for scholars to reflect on the enduring significance of the Prague Spring on the arts across Eastern Europe. We invite papers that explore the events of 1968 in Czechoslovakia and its representation in cinema and television through the years.
· How did the visual arts articulate the intellectual, cultural, and political legacies of the Prague Spring, both in its immediate aftermath and in more contemporary reframings?
· What was the international coverage of the events on both sides of the Iron Curtain?
· How do we position these events in a broader context of 1968?
· What has changed in the cinematic representation of the Prague Spring after the end of Communism?
· How do we consider the reverberations of the events of 1968 in a globalized world, amidst the rise of authoritarian populism and nostalgia for the left?
By addressing such questions, this series of panels will foster an interdisciplinary, cross-media approach to screen representations of Prague Spring and bring together scholars of Slavic Studies across fields.
Please respond off-list to daria.ezerova@yale.edu and jsteffe@emory.edu
Paper *topics* must be submitted by February 15. WGCTV membership not required to participate.
Presenter(s)
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1/30/2018 13:50:43Sara Powellsarajopowell@g.harvard.eduHarvard UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentLiterature: Central and Southeast EuropePresenter(s)Kotliarevshchyna as Fandom: Boundary Policing and Identity Formation in Early 19th Century Ukrainian Literature
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1/30/2018 16:08:56Keith Doubtkdoubt@wittenberg.eduWittenberg UniversityCurrent MemberLiterature: Comparative“On Mak’s Mimetic Relation to Homer”
The study examines Mak Dizdar’s close relation to the ancient Greek poet Homer, noting how Dizdar’s poetry deeply recreates the sagas from Homer’s Odyssey with such poignant poems as “Calypso,” “Penelope,” “Polifem,” and “Sirene” in Modra Rijeka [Deep Blue River]. Mak reworks and, in this way, resurrects Homer’s legacy in a modern existential frame. In this manner, Mak makes himself Homer’s heir and likewise makes Bosnia heir to the Greek spirit. For Mak to be recognized as not only a great Bosnian poet, but also a great world poet, it is necessary to examine and appreciate his profound mimetic relation to Homer.
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1/30/2018 16:11:19Keith Doubtkdoubt@wittenberg.eduWittenberg UniversityCurrent MemberAnthropology/Geography/Sociology“Marriage Instead of Blood: On the Moral Significance of Affines in Bosnia-Herzegovina”
Ethnographies of kinship structures in the Balkans overlook the importance of the affinal kinship called prijatelji in Bosnia-Herzegovina. A review of the extant literature is conducted. Findings from interviews and survey data are that affines carry social capital and moral significance in the everyday life of Bosnians in all three major ethnic groups, Bosniak, Croat, and Serb. The cultural order and behavior norms that frame affinal customs is compared to the cultural order and behavioral norms that frame fictive kinship in Serbia. The solidarity of prijatelji is based on a principle of symmetry whereas the solidarity of kumovi is based on a principle of asymmetry.
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2/1/2018 9:18:59Marta Jaworska-Oknińskamarta.krystyna.jaworska@gmail.comUniversity of WarsawCurrent MemberPhD StudentEarly Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies, to 1800I'm looking to join a panel on Early Slavic/Muscovite History to 1800. Proposed paper: Service and Corporate Identity in the Provinces: Collective Petitions and Muscovite Political Culture in 17th Century
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2/1/2018 13:47:55Matthew Schantzmschantz@g.harvard.eduHarvard UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentLiterature: Russian and EurasianI am broadly interested in how Thaw-era writers drew upon earlier literary genres and lineages to push against Stalinist-era socialist realism. Specifically, I would like to discuss how those literatures revived during the Thaw reappeared transformed by the influence of socialist realism.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Returning to Orbit: Shifting Temporalities in Soviet Science FictionChair, DiscussantScience fiction; genre; socialist realism; temporality; the Thaw
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2/2/2018 13:08:32Gregor Kranjcgkranjc@brocku.caBrock UniversityCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Young Slovene Scholars Panel: The Society for Slovene Studies is hosting a panel showcasing current graduate students or recently completed graduates whose research involves Slovenia or Slovenes (all disciplines considered)Presenter(s)
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2/2/2018 19:07:18Anna Shvetsananke2009@mail.ruUniversity of Georgia / Moscow State UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentLiterature: Russian and EurasianImage and Word in Avant-Garde Experiments in Russia (1900-1930): Poetics and PoliticsPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Image and Word in "For the Voice" (1923) (Mayakovsky and El Lisstizky): Performance in Verbal and Visual Media
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2/3/2018 11:22:07Barbara EngelBarbara.Engel@colorado.eduUniversity of ColoradoCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924Chair, DiscussantHistory of women; gender; peasantry; marriage, family and family relations; pre-revolutionary law and legal codes;
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2/3/2018 11:52:51Peter B. Bownpbrown@ric.eduRhode Island CollegeCurrent MemberEarly Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies, to 1800Panel title: "NATURE, ENVIRONMENT, SUBSTANCES: PRE-1900 RUSSIA IN GLOBAL DEVELOPMENTS" We need one paper (already have two and a discussant) and a chair.Presenter(s), Chair
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2/4/2018 10:43:27Amanda Williamsamwilli7@go.olemiss.eduUniversity of LeedsCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Soviet Health Care after StalinPresenter(s), ChairCurrently, the proposed panel has two other papers. One topic examines abortion, mostly under Khrushchev, and the other paper investigates health care, mostly under Brezhnev. Ideally, we would like one more presenter and we need a chair.
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2/4/2018 13:36:17James H. Meyerjames.meyer7@montana.eduMontana State UniversityCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924"Scandal in the Comintern: A Turkish Communist Love Triangle in Wartime Moscow." In this paper I detail a dramatic series of events taking place in Moscow in the early 1940s. A Moscow-based member of the Turkish Communist Party by the name of Alexander Senkevich complained to Comintern head Georgi Dimitrov about an affair that, alleged Senkevich, his wife—the Bulgarian communist Mara Kolarova—was having with Turkish Communist Party leader İsmail Bilen. Drawing upon the Turkish and Russian-language party files of Senkevich, Kolarova, and Bilen housed in Moscow’s RGASPI archive, I discuss the manner in which the scandal developed as well as the punishments that were meted out in the aftermath. I am looking to develop this story into an article, but am frankly still unsure of what to do with it. I therefore hope to present it at ASEEES as a means of developing my ideas about this material further and getting some useful feedback. Chair, DiscussantIslam in Russia from 1783 to the 1920s; Ottoman-Russian relations; Turkey-USSR
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2/4/2018 17:27:18Andrey Gornostaevag1443@georgetown.eduGeorgetown UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Early Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies, to 1800My interests are broad and include the peasantry, migration, social mobility, state control, legality, and deception. Presenter(s)Some proposed topics: "Peasant Deception and Social Mobility," "Runaway Peasants in the Age of Catherine the Great," "Interrogations and Punishments in the 18th Century."
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2/4/2018 20:37:11Volha Isakavavolha.isakava@cwu.eduCWUCurrent MemberArts/Film/Electronic MediaContemporary Russian/East European Cinema as Transnational CinemaPresenter(s)I am looking for presenters who are interested in post-Soviet/post-Socialist cinemas (docu, popular genre, art house...) from transnational perspectives. What constitutes transnational cinema? How do national cinema traditions factor into global cinema market and global festival circuit? The panel can address: import/export of films, transnational collaborations, films that are produced for internal consumption but form distinct transnational connections and more.Chair, DiscussantCinema, Popular Culture
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2/4/2018 20:37:20Volha Isakavavolha.isakava@cwu.eduCWUCurrent MemberArts/Film/Electronic MediaContemporary Russian/East European Cinema as Transnational CinemaPresenter(s)I am looking for presenters who are interested in post-Soviet/post-Socialist cinemas (docu, popular genre, art house...) from transnational perspectives. What constitutes transnational cinema? How do national cinema traditions factor into global cinema market and global festival circuit? The panel can address: import/export of films, transnational collaborations, films that are produced for internal consumption but form distinct transnational connections and more.Chair, DiscussantCinema, Popular Culture
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2/5/2018 10:55:02Yuliya Minkovayuliyam1@vt.eduVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityCurrent MemberLiterature: Russian and EurasianI would like to propose a panel on internal colonization. So far we have two papers: "The Imperial Imaginary in Dostoevsky" by Nadja Berkovich and "The Vagaries of Internal Colonization in Margarita Hemlin's Doznavatel'" by Yuliya Minkova. We are looking for more participants and are open to proposing several panels on this or similar topics. Thank you.Presenter(s), Chair
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2/6/2018 8:52:12Ekaterina Filepekaterina.filep@unifr.chUniversity of FribourgCurrent MemberAnthropology/Geography/Sociology“The Soviet Steppe – Culture, Environment and Politics”. The goal of this panel is to explore cultural, environmental and political aspects of the transformation of the Eurasian steppe during the 20th century, the period when the steppe environment went through land reclamation, irrigation development and industrial agriculture.
Presenter(s), Discussant(s)My paper explores the cultural production of steppe imaginaries in Russian and Soviet artistic and scientific literature from 1890 to 1960.
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2/6/2018 17:06:34Yuliya Minkovayuliyam1@vt.eduVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityCurrent MemberLiterature: Russian and EurasianI would like to propose a panel on internal colonization. So far we have two papers: "The Imperial Imaginary in Dostoevsky" by Nadja Berkovich and "The Vagaries of Internal Colonization in Margarita Hemlin's Doznovatel'" by Yuliya Minkova. We are looking for more participants and are open to proposing several panels on this or similar topics. Thank you.Presenter(s), Chair
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2/7/2018 7:32:31Adelina Stefanadelina.stefan@eui.euEuropean University InstituteCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Together with a colleague from University of Texas at Austin I would like to organize a panel about cultural and material transfers across the Iron Curtain during the 1970s, with a particular focus on tourism and popular culture. While a significant body of literature has regarded the 1960s as a time of inchoate liberalization for many communist regimes in eastern Europe, the 1970s have been rather overlooked in this process. We are interested in papers that reevaluate the 1970s and look at the transnational networks formed between eastern and western Europe during this time period.Presenter(s), Chair
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2/7/2018 15:18:48Adelina Stefanadelina.oana@gmail.comEuropean University InstituteCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Presenter(s), ChairTogether with a colleague from University of Texas at Austin I would like to organize a panel about cultural and material transfers across the Iron Curtain during the 1970s, with a particular focus on tourism and popular culture. While a significant body of literature has regarded the 1960s as a time of inchoate liberalization for many communist regimes in eastern Europe, the 1970s have been rather overlooked in this process. We are interested in papers that reevaluate the 1970s and look at the transnational networks formed between eastern and western Europe during this time period. If interested please write me at adelina.oana@gmail.com or adelina.stefan@eui.eu.

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2/8/2018 10:15:16Anastasiia Gordiienkogordiienko.1@osu.eduThe Ohio State UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Arts/Film/Electronic MediaI would like to propose a panel on criminal/underworld culture in the Soviet Union (in literature, film, music, folklore, etc.) and its paradoxical place within Russian culture and politics today.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My paper examines the phenomenon of the Russian musical genre shanson and its historical predecessors, such as the underworld song (blatnaia pesnia), in their historical socio-cultural context and targets shanson’s complex symbiotic relationship with Putin’s regime.ChairRussian popular culture, Putin, Russian music, folklore
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2/8/2018 11:20:01Karla Huebnercalypsospots@gmail.comWright State UniversityCurrent MemberAnthropology/Geography/SociologyThis panel will look at river-related culture and entertainments. We have two interwar period papers, one on Budapest and one on the Czech tramp culture.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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2/8/2018 17:26:08Alice Underwoodaeunderw@stanford.eduStanford UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Arts/Film/Electronic MediaOfficial Kremlin rhetoric on traditional values (ROC resurgence, retellings of history, etc.), and societal and artistic responses to or variations on this new traditionalism (Pavlensky, "Satisfaction" clip, etc.). Presenter(s), Discussant(s)
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2/9/2018 13:06:15Ekaterina Shubenkinashubenki@usc.eduUniversity of Southern CaliforniaCurrent MemberPhD StudentLiterature: ComparativeI would like to organize a panel devoted to the interactions between visuality and literature, particularly, to various optical devices in Russian literature including, but not limited to the mirror, telescope, camera obscura, photo camera, etc. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Looking into “Stereoscope”: Alexandr Ivanov’s Story through its Topoi
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2/9/2018 15:42:03Yelizaveta Raykhlinayr34@georgetown.eduGeorgetown UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924I am broadly interested in the representation of social groups in Imperial Russia, particularly in the first half of the 19th century.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Shifting Conceptions of the 'Middle Stratum': Categories and Collective Identity in the Northern Bee and the Library for Reading
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2/10/2018 5:06:07Paulina Codognipaulina.codogni@gmail.comInstitute of Political Studies Polish Academy of Science Current MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918“Culture and symbols as tools of civil resistance during three revolutions in Ukraine”. Generally my research is concentrated on using symbols and culture in the CEE region to make protests more sustainable. I will be happy to consider joining panels where I could present also on culture and symbols of other nonviolent protests that took place in CEE after the WWII.
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2/10/2018 13:52:33Alexander Drozninalexander_drozninizrael@g.harvard.eduHarvard UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentLiterature: Russian and Eurasian"Participation and Experience: Martin Buber and the Gogolian Picaresque"
This is a project of rethinking traditional genre classifications of Nikolai Gogol's Dead Souls and Inspector General through the lens of Martin Buber's philosophy of dialogue. I present a new conception of the Gogolian picaresque as a struggle between participation (I-Thou) and experience (I-It), and engage with Bakhtin's theories of dialogic imagination and role of utterances in addressivity-answerability.
Chair, DiscussantMy primary research interests are 18th- and 19th-century Russian literature, Ukrainian-Jewish literary and cultural relations, Soviet dissidence and samizdat, journalism and media studies, and post-Soviet trauma studies.
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2/10/2018 16:47:40Brendan McElroybmcelroy@fas.harvard.eduHarvard UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Comparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyPresenter(s)Imperial Russia’s experience with local representative institutions - such as zemstvo assemblies and municipal dumas - has often been adjudged a disappointment, with chronic absenteeism and high rates of abstention from elections held up as proof of the regime's failure to enlist the cooperation of local elites in sharing the burdens of state administration. In fact, though, levels of participation in local elected assemblies varied wildly, not just across regions but even between neighboring towns and counties within the same province. What can account for such variation? I show that nobles' participation in zemstvo elections during the period 1865-89 responded to changes in the economic viability of their estates, proxied here by trends in landownership and indebtedness. I also find that zemstvos in places where noble landownership was declining rapidly were more likely to assert their prerogatives by petitioning the government. In effect, nobles turned increasingly to their formal political privileges when they could no longer sustain their dominant class position on the basis of de facto economic power alone. My findings have implications both for state building theory and for the study of "premodern" political institutions and regimes.
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2/10/2018 20:17:57Gwyn Bourlakovgbourlakov@ku.eduUniversity of KansasCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Gender/LGBTQ Studies Gender and Monasticism in Imperial and Early Modern RussiaPresenter(s)
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2/11/2018 16:52:43Konstantin Fukskonstantin.fuks@mail.utoronto.caUniversity of TorontoCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Mints Commission interviews on Nazi-Occupied Latvia
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2/13/2018 3:40:08Jan Matti Dollbaumdollbaum@uni-bremen.deResearch Centre for East European Studies at the University of BremenCurrent MemberPhD StudentComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)The paper studies local institutionalization processes of the "Bolotnaya" protests in four Russian regional capitals. It examines both the structural conditions and activists' decisions that lead to (or prevent) continued political activism after the end of mass protests.Chairdemocratization, authoritarian stability, social movements/protest
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2/13/2018 14:58:16Sam Driversamuel_driver@brown.eduBrown UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentArts/Film/Electronic MediaI am looking to gather a relatively broad panel that focuses on the effect or utilization of music and music performance within Russian literature, from 19th century to present day, in an attempt to provide an overview of the different usages and techniques. The description of the panel is purposefully open-ended, as it can evolve depending on who wishes to participate. For a bit of reference, my paper is dedicated to Chekhov's short stories, viewing his representation of music through the lens of Schopenhauer’s notion of music and musical revelation.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Music as Catalyst and Agent of Revelation in Three Short Stories by Anton Chekhov
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2/14/2018 5:13:18Polina Vlasenkopvlasenk@indiana.eduIndiana UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Anthropology/Geography/SociologyMany scholars have shown how the neoliberal restructuring of the global economy since the late 1970's resulted in the emergence of the transnational feminized service industries, such as domestics, nurses, wives, and sex workers. In light of this scholarship, this panel examines the practices of surrogacy and ova donation as new forms of unacknowledged embodied waged reproductive labor outsourced from Western Europe and North America to the global periphery, including the post-Soviet countries in the Eastern Europe.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My presentation documents ethnographically the relations of labor and property associated with the emergence of Ukraine as a new market of donor ova oriented specifically toward (West) European purchasers. As a result, in this presentation I show how the material conditions and frames of understanding required for the production and exchange of ova structure the experiences of ova donors in Ukraine as precarious laborers on the global reproductive labor market by reinforcing the invisibility of their labor and disposability of their bodies. Chair, DiscussantGender, health care, kinship, commodification of female bodies, assisted reproductive technologies and reproductive labor in the post-Soviet context
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2/14/2018 9:30:45Sofia Tipaldousofia.tipaldou@manchester.ac.ukUniversity of ManchesterCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicySocial movements and policy outcomes in post-communist contexts: How right-wing grassroots groups influence foreign policy

The study of the far right in post-communist Central and Eastern Europe and Russia lacks behind when compared to its counterpart in Western democracies. Scholars have started only recently, after the electoral success of far right parties in Central Europe and the Balkans, to systematically use the theoretical tools developed for the study of Western European far right organizations and to make comparative research designs, mostly within the post-communist world. A large number of far-right parties were initially formed as grassroots movements, made up by activists rather than professional politicians. These groups differ from others in the broadly defined far right label in that they maintain their grassroots activities and adopt violent practices. Literature on the rise and consolidation of the far right largely focuses on parties and electoral politics, often grouping together all groups under the ‘far right’ label. The main focus is either on the causes of success of these parties, or their possible contagion effect on policies such as immigration. The distinctive character of far right social movements and their impact on policies beyond immigration is under-theorised. This is particularly true of foreign policy, which despite being closely related to the core far right ideological doctrine of nationalism remains under-researched. Scholarship on international relations researches mostly states, elites and individuals or masses, without including these actors that stand between individuals and elites and that are specialized into transforming grievances and emotions into activism, i.e. social movements. This panel aims to fill this gap by bridging literature on international relations, comparative politics and social movements. It addresses the extent to which the entrenchment of far right social movements influence foreign policy debates in a comparative manner. The panel is open to contributions on one or more case studies from the post-communist group of countries, and encourages its participants to introduce new methodological approaches that will advance our understanding of social movement outcomes on foreign policy.
Presenter(s)Chair, DiscussantRussia, nationalism, far right
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2/14/2018 9:38:25Sofia Tipaldousofia.tipaldou@manchester.ac.ukUniversity of ManchesterCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyRussian grassroots ethnic nationalism and war: The case of Eastern Ukraine

Even before events in Ukraine, in 2014 Russian nationalists had started to move from the fringe to the centre of Russian politics. The annexation of Crimea saw nationalism for the first time used as the main stabilizing force for the political system and Putin’s authority. Putin – who has until then used liberal and nationalist ideologies – presented the annexation both in imperialist terms, gathering Russian lands in a strong Russian state, and in ethnonational terms, as a defence of ethnic Russians abroad, and succeeded in boosting his popularity. However, the grassroots expressions of contemporary Russian imperial and ethnic nationalism have not yet been thoroughly researched. These are made up by non-professional activists who form a network of small, budget-constrained organizations, excluded from the Duma and resemble the new radical right of Western Europe. The aim of the proposed project is to investigate to what extent grassroots Russian ethnic nationalists and imperialists have shaped the country’s foreign policy towards Ukraine. Through critical discourse analysis, the paper presents the main ideological frames of representative nationalist organizations and tracks down ethnic nationalist and imperialist claims related to Ukraine in the elite discourse (2014-2016). This data is then presented on a table covering nationalist frames, governmental discourse (civic, ethnic, imperialist), and nationalist disruptive events (both supporting and opposing government policies). The influence of nationalists is considered as positive if a nationalist frame is adopted by the governmental discourse at a later date and if elite discourse changes after sudden disruption events organized by the nationalists.
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2/14/2018 9:38:44Sofia Tipaldousofia.tipaldou@manchester.ac.ukUniversity of ManchesterCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyRussian grassroots ethnic nationalism and war: The case of Eastern Ukraine

Even before events in Ukraine, in 2014 Russian nationalists had started to move from the fringe to the centre of Russian politics. The annexation of Crimea saw nationalism for the first time used as the main stabilizing force for the political system and Putin’s authority. Putin – who has until then used liberal and nationalist ideologies – presented the annexation both in imperialist terms, gathering Russian lands in a strong Russian state, and in ethnonational terms, as a defence of ethnic Russians abroad, and succeeded in boosting his popularity. However, the grassroots expressions of contemporary Russian imperial and ethnic nationalism have not yet been thoroughly researched. These are made up by non-professional activists who form a network of small, budget-constrained organizations, excluded from the Duma and resemble the new radical right of Western Europe. The aim of the proposed project is to investigate to what extent grassroots Russian ethnic nationalists and imperialists have shaped the country’s foreign policy towards Ukraine. Through critical discourse analysis, the paper presents the main ideological frames of representative nationalist organizations and tracks down ethnic nationalist and imperialist claims related to Ukraine in the elite discourse (2014-2016). This data is then presented on a table covering nationalist frames, governmental discourse (civic, ethnic, imperialist), and nationalist disruptive events (both supporting and opposing government policies). The influence of nationalists is considered as positive if a nationalist frame is adopted by the governmental discourse at a later date and if elite discourse changes after sudden disruption events organized by the nationalists.
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2/14/2018 11:32:54Christy M Brandlychristymonet@uchicago.eduUniversity of ChicagoCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and EurasianTurgenev at 200: Re-Assessing the Author's Life and Works in his Own Time and Their Relevance for Our OwnPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)I am proposing a paper that would put Turgenev in conversation with Shakespeare, Hannah Arendt, and the political problem of the emergence of the new
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2/15/2018 1:19:51Ewa Bachminskaeb583@cornell.eduCornell U. Current MemberArts/Film/Electronic MediaAnimals in Eurasian FilmPresenter(s), Chair"Who Let the Sheep Out? Teaching Eurasian Cultures, Animal Welfare & Conservation through Film"Chair, DiscussantAnimals in Film, Animal Welfare & Conservation
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2/15/2018 5:02:07Karina Vasilevska-Daskarinadas@berkeley.eduUC Berkeley/UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology (PhD candidate)Current MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Anthropology/Geography/SociologyPossible title: Privilege and Post-Socialism: how to think about "class" in the former socialist realm. Brief Description: In this panel I would like to think about how privilege is coded and practically experienced in the former socialist (including former USSR) realm. I am currently using the term "privilege" as a place-holder for "class," but I am open to including this term more prominently in the title, taking into account the complexities that are specific to the region that other scholars (Fehervary 2011, Helemae 2015 and Ost 2015) have already pointed out. My own work in anthropology deals with children's health in Latvia. The paper I would be proposing as part of this panel would focus on parents who use alternative parenting methods and their health beliefs. These parents are usually educated beyond the Latvian average and have good or superior English knowledge. My data is qualitative, which is why I cannot make quantitative suggestions as to what their income levels are, but there is some other data (Ceple 2009) to suggest that parents who are involved in alternative parenting movement in Latvia also might have above average income. I would like to think about privilege (or class or both) in the former socialist realm through this case study and would invite other social science submissions that would compliment this topic. I am willing to contribute my own paper and chair the meeting, but would love to obtain a co-organizer (who can be the chair if so willing), two other papers and a discussant. Thanks! Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)"Privilege and Post-socialism: Alternative parenting and health in Latvia." I am also open to submitting a paper for a panel already in making, which would focus on parents who use alternative parenting methods and their health beliefs. These parents are usually educated beyond the Latvian average and have good or superior English knowledge. My data is qualitative, which is why I cannot make quantitative suggestions as to what their income levels are, but there is some other data (Ceple 2009) to suggest that parents who are involved in alternative parenting movement in Latvia also might have above average income. I would like to think about privilege (or class or both) in the former socialist realm through this case study.
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2/15/2018 8:21:44Tierre Sanfordts3bm@virginia.eduUniversity of VirginiaCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Jewish StudiesThe Holocaust in the Soviet UnionPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Memoirs written by Jews who survived the Minsk Ghetto Chair20th c. Russian literature; Soviet Jewish literature
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2/15/2018 9:44:39Benedict E. DeDominicisbendedominicis@gmail.comCatholic University of KoreaCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyIrredentism and Eurasian Self-Determination and State Formation Presenter(s), Discussant(s)Usage of Twentieth Century Eurasian Historical Analogies in Analyzing the Sources of Post-Cold War Chinese Grand StrategyChair, Discussantgrand strategy, nationalism, Russian foreign policy, US foreign policy, Southeastern European state formation, Bulgarian foreign and domestic policy
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2/16/2018 6:22:33Joe Nicholsonjoseph.nicholson@nottingham.ac.ukUniversity of NottinghamCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My research looks at Bolshevik approaches to traders and the market in the period 1917-1922. I would be interested in joining a panel on food supply and distribution, crime and legality, or broader issues of statehood and governance in the revolution and civil war.
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2/16/2018 14:18:49Marina Darmarosmarinadarmaros@gmail.comUniversidade de São Paulo (USP)Current MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and EurasianThe translation of Brazilian children's literature author Monteiro Lobato into Russian during the Soviet Union - discourse mitigation and the vanishing of Western elements
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2/19/2018 14:57:28Alejandra Pirespires2@illinois.eduUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and EurasianMy co-presenter and I are planning to center our panel on the inter-related themes of the body and death/decay in Soviet literature and cinema. Her work is about cannibalism and mutilated bodies in Platonov's short stories, and mine is on the grotesque and alien body in the necrorealist films of Yevgeny Yufit. If you have a paper along these themes and would like to join us, please let me know. We're also looking for a discussant.Discussant(s)
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2/18/2018 12:59:21Christina Novakov-Ritcheycnovakov@ucla.eduUniversity of California, Los AngelesCurrent MemberPhD StudentAnthropology/Geography/SociologyPerformance as Labor in South-Eastern EuropePresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My paper looks at bajanje (an incantation-based healing practice) as a form of affective labor in the post-socialist former Yugoslavia. I foreground the sensuous body as key to understanding the massive geographic and economic transformations that have unfolded in Serbia and Macedonia over the last twenty years and demonstrate how these healers maintain village health and an ongoing relationship to land. Discussantpost-socialist performance, performance art in the former Yugoslavia, folk-contemporary tensions in art and performance, affective labor
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2/17/2018 18:55:09Jonathan Wurlwurl@stanford.eduStanford UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Gender/LGBTQ StudiesStrong Female Leads: Femininities in Russian and Yiddish LiteraturesPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)ChairGender studies, feminism in Russian and Yiddish literatures
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2/17/2018 23:34:08Ekaterina Chelpanovachelpanovae@ku.eduUniversity of KansasCurrent MemberPhD StudentArts/Film/Electronic MediaWe want to organize a panel on the role of sound/voice in Soviet cinema. We are interested in exploring sound/voice as a narrative device as well as a reflexive device which can subvert, confront or destabilize the visual row. We seek to show how sound/voice in cinema guides interaction with the spectator on the bodily/unconscious level. Papers on the role of voice in literature are also welcome. Presenter(s), ChairTo the Question of Performative Use of Soundtrack in the Soviet Cinema: The Cranes Are Flying by Kalatozov and Long Farewell by Muratova
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2/21/2018 20:54:19Sanami Takahashitakahashi.sanami@slav.hokudai.ac.jpSlavic-Eurasian Research Center, JapanCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)First possible paper title: The Glorification of the Russian Imperial Family in the Russian Church Abroad: The Genealogy of Monarchism among the Russian Immigrants in the US and its impact on the Russian society
Second possible paper title: How Churches Support Society? Social Ministry and International Support after the Euromaidan
ChairRussian Nationalism, Monarchism, Civil Society, Social Activities of Churches in Russia and Ukraine, Russian Orthodox Church Abroad
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2/19/2018 4:17:07Nino Sharashenidzenino.sharashenidze@tsu.geTbilisi State University, GeorgiaCurrent MemberLinguistics/Language PedagogyPresenter(s)The Development of Modal Meaning - Georgian Unda
Grammaticalization has given rise to a new system in Georgian, Beginning from the XIV – XV centuries, major changes were made in the language due to systemic changes of certain forms. The most striking change can be observed with regard to the verb „ndoma“ (want). Its formal and functional changes, as well as numerous cases of grammaticalization related to this form, led to the development of the category of modality.
The semantic change of the form unda is quite peculiar. Grammaticalization often leads to the loss of certain semantic features. However, the analysis of the form „ndoma“ enables us discuss the appearance of new semantics in this form (semantic abundance). The original semantics of “want/desire” gave rise to diverse modal meanings in Georgian. In Georgian, the modal form “unda” can express the content which is usually expressed by means of several verbs in other languages (must, have to, should). This speaks of the semantic abundance of the above form. Hence, we should find out which semantics can be considered primary i.e. existing at the initial stage of grammaticalization, and which semantics was secondary i.e. developed at a later stage.
The analysis of the process of grammaticalization of the verb form „ndoma“ (want) has revealed that the first semantic shift was related not to the third person form, but to the second person form „gina/ginda“. The first stage of grammaticalization of the verb „ndoma“ (want) is related to the semantics of free choice and indifference. The decategorized form „unda“ reveals the same semantics. Later it was enriched by another semantics, that of debitive, obligation, deontic modality and epistemic necessity, which, in their turn, gave rise to numerous sub-semantic contents.
Grammaticalization of the second person form of the verb „gina“ (you want) underwent the following way of development: gina > ginda > gind > gindac > tu ginda / tu gind > tugindac. The form „tugindac“ is already spelt together, which proves that this form is a new functional-semantic unit, the process of grammaticalization means the following transformation: reanalysis > decategorilization > phonological reduction.
The development of the form unda can be represented by the following stages of grammaticalization: reanalysis > decategorilization > abstracting out > phonological reduction. Abstracting out means diverse development of the modal semantics of „unda“, which yields a semantically abundant and multifunctional content in contemporary Georgian. The process of reduction continued in the form „tund“: [una] >unda > tu unda > tunda > tund > tundac.
The process of grammaticalization of the form „უნდა“ is completed in the dialects, and it has turned into a clitic, which is a marker of modality and, due to grammaticalization, has gone far from the original form. Thus, there are two directions of grammaticalization of the form in Georgian dialects: on the one hand - una > na, and, on the other hand, - unda > und > nda > da.

Key words: Grammaticalization, modality, modal meaning, modal form.
ChairLinguistisc, Semantics
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2/19/2018 12:26:42Noor Borbievaborbievn@ipfw.eduIndiana University-Purdue University Fort WayneCurrent MemberGender/LGBTQ StudiesCommittee on the Status of Women is organizing a round table on mentoring. We will be presenting results from our research, but we are eager to hear others' perspectives, especially on the issue of how mentorship affects women's careers.Presenter(s), Discussant(s)
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2/20/2018 4:02:24Olga Porshnevao.s.porshneva@urfu.ruUral Federal university Current MemberGender/LGBTQ StudiesPresenter(s)Creating the "new woman" in the early Soviet period: policy and social practices (based on materials from the Urals region)

Abstract: Gender policy in post-revolutionary Russia became the subject of a number of modern studies of Richard Stites, Barbara Evans Clements, Karen Petrone, Elizabeth E. Wood, N. Pushkareva and other authors. This problem remains, nevertheless, urgent and requires further study, taking into account the phenomenon and nature of social design in the early Soviet state, the study of the role of subjects and objects of designing gender relations in real social transformations. It is important to study the correlation of official discourse, normative models of gender relations and actually existing gender practices in the early Soviet society. The reports of the Women's departments of RKP/VKP (b) comities in the Ural region and other documentary materials are used to reconstruct the real practices of gender relations and problems in this sphere in the early soviet period.
The revolution of 1917 in Russia marked the beginning of a grandiose program of transformations in the sphere of gender relations, which became one of the objects of social design. An important aspect of this program was family policy, designed to realize the progressive beginnings of reforms aimed at the emancipation of women and the formation of a “new man/human being”, which would form the foundation for the future generations of communist society.
The policy of social construction of gender relations in early Soviet society was contradictory: on the one hand, it placed class and ideological restrictions on women's freedom, and, on the other hand, allowed for radical practices of “freedom” of gender and sexual relations (the theory of “glass of water”). It had a dependent and subordinate status in regard to the general tasks of creating a new society, and sought to avoid accusations of “bourgeois feminism”. It was also limited by traditional gender stereotypes and conservative social practices in the sphere of family relations. According to documents, the latter were rooted not only in the village, but also in the city, among all social strata, non-party members and communists alike.
At the same time, through new models of social behavior, women gained “citizenship rights” and advancement, especially in the urban environment, due to the influence of the official policy of emancipating women from the shackles of patriarchal traditions and patriarchal way of life. The Women's departments and other institutions communicated the message to millions of women that they were full-fledged members of the new society, which had a significant impact on the transformation of gender identity.
In the discourse and practice of transformations of maternal and early childhood protection, the rationalist and mythological-utopian components of the Bolshevik project were clearly manifested. It was a combination of the policies and practices of the modern era with the class-ideological programming of gender roles on the basis of the priority of the socialist/progressive over the private/ bourgeois/conservative-patriarchal. Ideological and political engineering of gender roles eventually prevailed over the principles of rationalism and liberty enshrined in the law.
The main problem the government encountered in the process of women's 'upbringing' was that the majority of women coming from peasantry and the working class were uneducated and illiterate, which required the government to take a long-term rather than a short-term perspective in addressing this issue.
The massive involvement of women in social production in the course of industrialization and collectivization, the nomination of women for managerial positions in production, the revival of the ideal of a “stable family”, the curtailment of the diversity of women's public organizations, were all manifestations of the mid-1930s’ trend towards the unification of the gender models, reflecting the formation of a totalitarian political regime.
Historical data demonstrate that the transformations of social relationships, leading to changes in gender roles, could not keep up with the government’s reforms. Thus, we can trace the obvious limitations of social engineering in the early Soviet society.
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2/20/2018 12:51:25Ashley Morseashleymorse@g.harvard.eduHarvard UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Religion/PhilosophyEpistemologies of Schism: Aesthetics and Authority in Early Modern RussiaPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Oracle and Amanuensis: Schism and Mystical Authority in Early Modern Muscovy
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2/20/2018 13:17:47Alfred Evansalfrede@csufresno.eduCalfornia State University, FresnoCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyChanging Civil Society in Contemporary RussiaPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Changing Perceptions of Civil Society in Post-Soviet Russia
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2/20/2018 15:06:27Tatiana Riabovariabova2001@inbox.ru Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia, Saint Petersburg Current MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyI am looking to join a panel. The paper topic proposal “American masculinity in Russian popular geopolitics: A case of U.S. military”
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2/20/2018 15:21:58Oleg Riabovolegria@gmail.comSaint Petersburg State UniversityCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924I am looking to join a panel. My paper title is “The Image of Bear in caricatures of Russian revolution 1905”. The paper deals with the analysis of the role of the Russian bear symbol in legitimation and delegitimation of power by means of satirical prints 1905-1907
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2/21/2018 9:22:31Abby Holekampaah57@georgetown.eduGeorgetown UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924Russian revolutionary history in a history of emotions framework (have two papers — one on Decembrists and one on 1917 — looking for a third)Presenter(s), Discussant(s)Chair, Discussantlate imperial Russian/early Soviet cultural and intellectual history; transnational history
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2/24/2018 7:22:34Richard Zimazima.richard.pf@gmail.comEotvos Lorand University of BudapestCurrent MemberPhD StudentHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Neomarxism as the left opposition of the state-party in East-Central Europe, '60s '70s. Looking to join a panel.DiscussantPolitical Philosophy, Eastern European history 20th century, State socialism, Marxism
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2/20/2018 19:59:02Irina Gorbunova-Fordiring_73@yahoo.comAssociate professorCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924History of the Russian Far East ( 1884-1917)Presenter(s), Discussant(s)ChairHistory of Russian Far East (1884-1917), Social work and charity in Imperial Russia
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2/20/2018 20:02:59Irina Gorbunova-Fordiring_73@yahoo.comAssociate ProfessorCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924History of the Russian Far EastPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Social Support to the Population of the Russian Penal Colony (Katogra) of Sakhalin Island (1884-February 1917)

The paper is devoted to solving the most acute social problems of the former penal servitude on the island of Sakhalin. It describes the activities of state and local authorities, charitable institutions for the social support of the exiled and also free population of Sakhalin. The research describes the forms and methods for providing free assistance to children and women.
This paper describes different categories of the island’ population due to the fact, that Sakhalin katorga was a constant source of the emergence of a large number of beggars, homeless, needy and disabled people. The research also indicated difficulties and issues of establishing a socio-cultural sphere of life and formation of the health and education system on the island. The paper is written on a large array of literary sources and archival documents, many of which the author introduced into scientific circulation at the first time.
Chair
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2/21/2018 15:38:27Jillian Forsythjillian_forsyth@berkeley.eduUniversity of California, BerkeleyCurrent MemberPhD StudentHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924My proposed paper concerns the practice of samizdat and its place within Soviet culture. Given the Cold War rhetoric associated with dissident activity, scholarly treatment of samizdat has often focused on its political dimension, with the main interest presumed to be its content, rather than its material form. Yet, in my paper, I argue that exploring how samizdat was produced and investigating the mechanisms that supported its dissemination provide important insights into the intellectual and cultural context of the late Soviet period. Discussantsamizdat; informal networks; communication networks; dissident activity; human rights; textual culture; radio broadcasting; alternative cultural production; publication practices; late Soviet culture and society
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2/22/2018 4:54:04Maria-Alina Asaveimaria.asavei@fsv.cuni.czCharles UniversityCurrent MemberArts/Film/Electronic MediaTroubled Pasts and Performative Artistic Memory in Central and South-Eastern Europe

The theme of this year convention of the ASEEES is Performance. It was not until recently that the living history and memory projects dealing with troubled pasts have started to emerge in the former Eastern bloc. Body-sensual, conceptual and emotional engagements and reenactments of the difficult pasts are recurrently displayed through art practices to various ends. Performative memory is not a formal script, narrative or speech situated in the nexus of the relations of power but a symbolic gesture (a “speech act”) which creates a social reality by doing rather than describing political emotions about the past. These performative approaches to the turbulent history of the region can increase solidarity (both at the national level and beyond) and alleviate epistemic, social, and economic injustices. In performing troubled pasts there is always a more or less steady relationship between artists (as initiators) of the memory work and their publics. This panel aims to scrutinize the new ways of disentangling performative arts in conveying cultural memories of trauma, distress and suffering. We will look at dance, pantomime, performance art, theater, and other commemorative practices involving performative memories. This panel will examine how cultural memory does not only consist of what is uttered but also of what is unsaid but performed.
Presenter(s)
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2/22/2018 5:26:54Martin Nekolamarnekola@gmail.comindependent scholarCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918East-European Cold War Exiles Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Czechoslovak Émigrés in the West in early Cold War
95
2/22/2018 8:30:29Emma-Lina Löflundemma-lina.loflund@slav.su.seStockholm University (Sweden)Current MemberPhD StudentLiterature: Russian and Eurasian"Theurgic provocation as performance: Maximilian Voloshin's search for myth-creating poetics" The Russian Symbolists' life-creation and myth-creation worldview that ascribed mystical power to the poetic word gave rise to a broad variety of "theurgic art" since every poet interpreted the practice of the creative process in his or her own way. This paper explores how Maximilian Voloshin intertwined religious tradition and folkloric rituals in his quest for the divine word.
ChairRussian literature, Silver Age poetry
96
2/22/2018 8:25:08Maria Asaveimaria.asavei@fsv. cuni.czCharles UnivdrsityCurrent MemberArts/Film/Electronic MediaTroubled Pasts and Performative Artistic Memory in Central and South-Eastern Europe Presenter(s), Discussant(s)
97
2/22/2018 10:34:17Ekaterinaekaterina.filep@unifr.chUniversity of FribourgCurrent MemberLiterature: Russian and EurasianI am looking to join a panel in the field of Russian/Soviet literature or Environmental history. My paper looks at the depictions of Russia’s steppes in the works of Soviet writers and scientists and analyses the meaning (imaginary) they ascribe to this natural environment.
98
2/22/2018 11:05:27milbachjuliette.milbach@hotmail.comEHESS ParisCurrent MemberArts/Film/Electronic MediaPresenter(s)Gelyi Korzhev (1925-2012) : A Soviet painter ?

From the 1990s to his death, Korzhev did not make frequent appearances in the public sphere. But for the last five years, a selection of his paintings has been at the centre of both the artistic and scholarly communities - highlighted by the Tretiakov’s retrospective in 2016. This has, thus, introduced new interpretations of his work.This paper will look deeply into what factors contributed to the internationalization of the muscovite artistic scene during the Taw on Korzhev’s development. The Venice Biennale and Festival of Youth have played a key role in the artistic scene at that time. While there is a collection of studies on foreign influences on “non-official artists”, there is a current lack of scholarly attention on the influence it had on realist painters, such as Korzhev.
99
2/22/2018 11:25:11Adam Farkasadamfarkas1991@gmail.comEotvos Lorand University of BudapestCurrent MemberPhD StudentHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Eastern Bloc - Russia relations, politics, philosophy, culture etcPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Soviet propaganda in the Eastern Bloc - image of Russia after 1945Chair, DiscussantRussian - Hungarian History, Cold war
100
2/23/2018 8:56:52Vesa Oittinenvesa.oittinen@helsinki.fiAleksanteri Institute University of HelsinkiCurrent MemberReligion/PhilosophyOntologism in Russian and Soviet PhilosophyPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Aleksandr Deborin and Soviet "ontological materialism"
101
2/23/2018 9:42:31Diane Nemec Ignashevdignashe@carleton.eduCarleton College, Lomonosov Moscow State UniversityCurrent MemberLinguistics/Language PedagogyIntegrating Off-Campus Study into Home Institution CurriculaPresenter(s)
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