ASEEES Convention Panel/Paper Wanted
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TimestampYour NameYour Email AddressYour Institutional Affiliation (If none, enter 'independent scholar')Your ASEEES Membership StatusIf you are a student, select your current status (we do not accept undergrad presenters)Select ONE category for your proposed panel or paperIf trying to organize a panel, enter the proposed panel title or a brief descriptionSelect all that apply. I am looking for:If you have a paper and would like to be part of a panel, enter your proposed paper topic or a brief descriptionIf you would like to volunteer to serve as chair and/or discussant, select all that apply:Describe topics of interest to you as chair/discussant
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12/14/2019 8:08:34Peter Fraunholtzp.fraunholtz@neu.eduNortheastern UniversityCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924State, Party, and Peripheries, 1914-1921Presenter(s), Discussant(s)An Emerging Triage State: Grain Procurement and Local Authority in Penza ProvinceChairRural Russia; Revolution; Civil War; Russia Peripheries; Peasants
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12/14/2019 20:47:58David Hayterhayterd@vcu.eduVirginia Commonwealth UniversityCurrent MemberMA StudentHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Russian Anarchism and the Alexander Berkman Trial
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12/15/2019 16:01:30John Holianjholian1@hotmail.comindependent scholarCurrent MemberAnthropology/Geography/SociologyPolish-Ukrainian and Jewish-Christian marriages in rural, eastern Poland during the interwar period.ChairInterwar Poland, Western Ukraine
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12/15/2019 17:02:36Louis Howard Porterlouishowardporter@gmail.comUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924"'A Window Open on the World': Soviet Participation in the UNESCO Reading Public, 1957-1967."Chair, DiscussantPost-1945 Soviet history, Cold War, Transnationalism, post-Stalinism
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12/16/2019 14:43:33Arpi Movsesianmovsesian@ucsb.eduUniversity of California, Santa BarbaraCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and EurasianHoly Fools, Clowns, and Saints in 19th-century Russian LiteraturePresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Shakespeare's influence on DostoevskyChair, Discussant19th- & 20th-century Russian literature and philosophy, hagiography, fools, Armenian literature
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12/18/2019 9:44:30Vera Seninavs2562@columbia.eduColumbia UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and EurasianTrying to organize a panel on Chekhov (2020 marks the 160's anniversary of his birth). Currently, the idea is that the panel would focus on the speaking subjects, narrative tendencies, and power hierarchies in Chekhov's short stories. Presenter(s), Discussant(s)Women's voices and omniscient narration in Chekhov's short storiesChair19th century Russian literature, narratology, power, discourse, the woman question
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12/18/2019 15:37:50Irina Gigovagigovai@cofc.eduCollege of CharlestonCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918I would be happy to serve as a discussant/chair on any panel that deals with Eastern European history in the 20th century. I will also consider joining panels that deal with interwar cultural and social history. Chair, DiscussantEastern Europe in the 20th century; Southeastern Europe (late 19th-20th century); Bulgarian history; intellectual and cultural networks and associations; urban history; interwar history; history and memory; cultural internationalism and other similar fields.
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12/20/2019 18:22:34Lynn Tesserlmtesser@gmail.comMarine Corps UniversityCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyThe Geopolitics of Self-Determination: The International Roots of the Nation-State OrderChair, Discussant
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12/20/2019 18:22:52Lynn Tesserlmtesser@gmail.comMarine Corps UniversityCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyThe Geopolitics of Self-Determination: The International Roots of the Nation-State OrderChair, Discussant
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12/21/2019 22:20:01David Hayterhayterd@vcu.eduVirginia Commonwealth UniversityCurrent MemberMA StudentHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924Presenter(s)Trotsky in New York: A Missed Opportunity - Analysis of all of his New York writings and assessment of their impact in America
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12/25/2019 13:24:17Dr. Gary Berkovichgaryberkovich@gmail.comIndepended scholarCurrent MemberJewish StudiesImpact of Jewish Architects on Soviet Architectural Avant-Garde (1917 – 1932)
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12/25/2019 13:24:56Dr. Gary Berkovichgaryberkovich@gmail.comIndepended scholarCurrent MemberJewish StudiesImpact of Jewish Architects on Soviet Architectural Avant-Garde (1917 – 1932)
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12/30/2019 14:09:43SUSAN S. BAKERsjsb40@gmail.comindependent scholarCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, 1800-1918The Bosnian uprising of 1875-1878 led to a major European diplomatic crisis and the turnover of Bosnia and Herzegovina to Austro-Hungarian authorities in 1878. The uprising began in Herzegovina in July 1875. The study of how a group of poor farmers was able to begin and extend a three-year rebellion is aided by the concepts of Duncan Watts in his book SIX DEGREES. I apply Watts' thinking about the seeds and processes of rebellion to Herzegovina in 1974 and 1875. I am interested in forming a panel with others who work on peasant rebellions.
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12/30/2019 18:44:27Ted Weekstadeusz@siu.eduSouthern Illinois University CarbondaleCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Radio, Technology, Modernity in Poland or ECE (even Russia/USSR) 1920s-1940s - time frame can be flexible.Presenter(s)Polish Radio in the 1930s: Culture, Entertainment, and Politics
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1/2/2020 14:48:16Isabelle DeSistoisadesisto@gmail.comHarvard UniversityCurrent MemberMA StudentComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)The role of soft power in Soviet-Cuban exchange programs during the Cold WarChair, DiscussantCultural and educational exchange, Soviet-Third World relations, Soviet internationalism
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1/3/2020 11:51:59Helen Stuhr-Rommereimsthelen@sas.upenn.eduUniversity of PennsylvaniaCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and EurasianClassing Realist Genres and Forms: This panel discusses problems and negotiations around the literary representation of distinct social classes in the context of Russian realism, considering realist form as it grappled with and was shaped by the social transformations of the second half of the 19th c.
Presenter(s), Chair
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1/3/2020 22:14:03John Wrightjcw2119@columbia.eduColumbia UniversityCurrent MemberLiterature: Russian and EurasianTsvetaeva, Silver Age PoetryPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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1/6/2020 20:13:07Sierra Notasnota@stanford.eduStanfordCurrent MemberPhD StudentHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924The Ukrainian estate of Mezhyhirya (Yanukovich's place of residence until 2014, CPSU summer retreat, HQ of Reichskommissariat Ukraine); material/architectural history of the 'palaces' built on the estate from 1935-1945DiscussantUrban/Architectural history; interwar history; 20th century political history; material culture
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1/7/2020 21:33:10Christopher Stevenscstevens@misericordia.eduMisericordia UniversityCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924The Historical Roots of Cooperation and Contention in the post-Soviet spacePresenter(s), Discussant(s): The Historical Roots of Strategic Relations with Russia: A comparison of Belarus, Estonia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, and UkraineChair, DiscussantPolitical Science related topics.
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1/8/2020 12:49:22Victoria Khiterervictoria.khiterer@millersville.eduMillersville UniversityCurrent MemberJewish StudiesJews and the Russian RevolutionPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)The October 1905 Pogrom in Kiev as a Mirror of Jewish RevolutionChair, DiscussantRussian/Soviet Jewish History, the Holocaust
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1/8/2020 14:40:14Mark Taugermbtauger@gmail.comWest Virginia University Current MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Soviet famines, agriculture, agricultural sciences Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)The agricultural-environmental causes of the 1931-1933 famine based on Soviet scientific articles and archival sources
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1/8/2020 15:20:28Robert Niebuhrrobert.niebuhr@asu.eduArizona State UniversityCurrent MemberProfessional Development/TeachingStatus of the Search: Explaining the Job Market and Advice for Job SeekersPresenter(s), Discussant(s)Chair, DiscussantYugoslavia during Cold War, nonalignment, World War I
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1/8/2020 16:44:37Thomas Porterportert@ncat.eduNorth Carolina A&T State UniversityCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924The Soviet Homefront in the Great Patriotic WArPresenter(s)"Peaceful Soviet Citizens;" Stalin's Denial of Jewish Victimhood in the Great Patriotic War"
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1/8/2020 18:01:18Transnational Histories of Science in the Soviet unionfjga@princeton.eduPrinceton UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Presenter(s)The Soviet American Hunt for Dinosaurs in Outer MongoliaDiscussantEconomic History of the Soviet Union
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1/10/2020 12:37:18Anna Ohanyanaohanyan@stonehill.eduStonehill CollegeCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyI am looking for a panelist on a round table discussion which focuses on Russia's foreign policies in the post-Communist space. Speakers with expertise in Russia's domestic politics, nationalism and state capacity, are also welcome. Focus on Central Asia and the Caucasus, and Eastern Europe, will be a fruitful contribution as well. Presenter(s)Chair, DiscussantRussian, Eurasia, security studies, peacebuilding, conflict studies
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1/12/2020 8:58:39Sasha ShapiroAS2CJ@VIRGINIA.EDUUniversity of VirginiaCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and EurasianI am trying to organize a panel on End-of-Life in the Slavic Imagination. I am looking for 2 more panelists and potentially 1 discussant to discuss how dying and end-of-life are represented or understood through Slavic literature, film, theatre, folklore, or any other genre.Presenter(s), Discussant(s)"Dying Decently": Illness and End-of-Life in Turgenev's FictionChairbioethics, illness, medicine, 19th century and 20th century literature
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1/12/2020 14:26:19Cadra McDaniel cadra.mcdaniel@tamuct.edu Texas A&M University-Central Texas Current MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924Discussions of National Status and/or Political/Cultural Crises or DeclinePresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Discussions of Russia's Cultural Status as Compared to Western EuropeChair, DiscussantPolitics or Cultural topics from 1800 to the Present
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1/12/2020 22:25:32Svetlana Rasmussenslego24@gmail.comUniversity of GuamCurrent MemberDigital HumanitiesDH Projects Lightning Round
The lightning round is now a tried and true venue to present your digital humanities research and teaching in a variety of conference settings. The ASEEES Slavic DH Projects Lightning Round is designed for scholars to talk about their Slavic DH projects’ history and significance for research and teaching to a wide range of attendees from a variety of fields and disciplines.

Slavic DH working group encourages the Lightning Round participants to come to the Slavic DH Business meeting and apply to participate in other Slavic DH events and panels, including the Slavic DH pre-conference workshop (https://slavicdh.aseees.hcommons.org/category/pre-conference-workshop/). Follow us on Twitter @SlavicDH and on H-Commons http://slavicdh.aseees.hcommons.org/
Presenter(s)ChairSlavic DH
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1/12/2020 23:22:31Svetlana Rasmussenslego24@gmail.comUniversity of GuamCurrent MemberDigital HumanitiesResearch and Teaching with DH

In this panel/roundtable Slavic DH invites you to talk about researching, administering, or teaching with a digital project or tool. How did you come up with the idea of starting/using a digital project/tool in your research and teaching? What hurdles did you encounter in the process? What moments of encouragement kept you going? How did you engage your students/collaborators with your project? What is the current stage your project is at and what next steps are you planning?

Slavic DH working group encourages the panel participants to come to the Slavic DH Business meeting and apply to participate in other Slavic DH events and panels, including the Slavic DH pre-conference workshop (https://slavicdh.aseees.hcommons.org/category/pre-conference-workshop/). Follow us on Twitter @SlavicDH and on H-Commons http://slavicdh.aseees.hcommons.org/
Presenter(s)Chair, DiscussantSoviet Education, Collectives
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1/15/2020 9:45:37Wiktor Marzecwh.marzec@uw.edu.plUniversity of WarsawCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924Labor politics in EuroasiaPresenter(s)I am looking for people to team up for a panel on labour history, preferably on late tsarist boarderlands. Other combinations are also welcome. My work is on political mobilizations and transformation of the public sphere in Poland (the leading case), Finland, Georgia and Latvia, 1907-1921
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1/16/2020 11:00:08Michael Hancock-Parmermhancock-parmer@ferrum.eduFerrum CollegeCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924Late Tsarist and Early Soviet Nationalism ProjectsPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Mining the Past for Future Identities: Turning Family History into Nationalist RhetoricDiscussantNationalism, Historiography, Comparative History
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1/29/2020 13:31:19N/AN/AN/ACurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924N/APresenter(s)N/A
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1/16/2020 17:32:29Michelle Gasparigaspari.michelle1@gmail.comThe Graduate Center CUNYCurrent MemberPhD StudentAnthropology/Geography/SociologyPresenter(s)My paper will discuss preliminary ethnographic fieldwork done in Bosnia-Herzegovina on the intersection of memories of the Yugoslav Wars with the current discourse on hospitality toward migrants from the Middle East and North Africa. Bordering, post-war affective politics, and memory will be central components.
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1/17/2020 10:27:59Beth Knobelknobel@fordham.eduFordham UniversityCurrent MemberArts/Film/Electronic MediaPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)"The Great Game and the Iterations of Political Talk Shows on Russian State Television." Paper examines the first season of a political talk show on Russian TV with Russian and American hosts, and discusses how the Russian government uses political talk shows to influence public opinion.
Chair, DiscussantRussia media, Post-Soviet Russian politics and history, Political communication, journalism
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1/17/2020 16:29:45Emily Curtinecurtin@gradcenter.cuny.eduCUNY Graduate CenterCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Anthropology/Geography/Sociology"Learn How to Relax! Productive leisure in socialist and post-socialist societies." Looking for social scientists and historians. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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1/27/2020 11:25:55Matthew Klopfensteinklpfnst2@illinois.eduUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and EurasianI am seeking a discussant for a panel on Death and Dying in Russian History and Culture. This interdisciplinary panel (history and literature) is focused on the ways that representations of death intersect with themes of gender, nationality, and status (broadly defined to include cultural, class, and political forms) in a variety of textual forms.Discussant(s)The Metamorphosis of Maria Savina: Image Management and Civil Society in the Death of an Actress (1915)ChairCivil society, celebrity, emotions, the body
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1/22/2020 10:48:22Eliane Fitzéeliane.fitze@unifr.chFribourg, SwitzerlandCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and EurasianImagining Russia through the Countryside: The Russian Peasant and Notions of ‘Russianness’ Throughout Soviet and post-Soviet HistoryPresenter(s), Discussant(s)Imagining 'Russianness' in early Russian-Soviet literatureChairLiterature and the history of ideas, literature and nationalism, imagined communities, "peasant literature", Russian literature/film/culture and South-Slavic literature/film/culture in general: I would be happy to serve as a Chair on different panels, roundtables or lightning rounds in Russian or South Slavic literary studies.
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1/22/2020 19:32:08Diana Sacilowskisacilow2@illinois.eduUIUCCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Central and Southeast EuropeI have a paper on Olga Tokarczuk's 'House of Day, House of Night' and its treatment of time and the past and am looking to join/help organize a panel on time in Polish literature, on time and the past in post-Communist literature, on Tokarczuk's work, etc.Chair, DiscussantPolish literature
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1/28/2020 12:39:06Maria Garthmaria.garth@rutgers.eduRutgers UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Arts/Film/Electronic MediaNew Perspectives on the History of Soviet PhotographyPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Soviet women photographers, photojournalism, avant-garde and formalist aesthetics, proletarian photography, photography in Soviet periodicals, USSR in Construction, Lef and Novyi Lef, Sovetskoe Foto, photo clubs, and photography exhibitions
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1/23/2020 14:53:49Sarah Millssjm2248@columbia.eduColumbia University Current MemberPhD StudentArts/Film/Electronic MediaPresenter(s)I am proposing to present a paper on Russia's role in the Eurovision Song Contest.
In this essay I use Eurovision as a lens to view the way in which Russia presents a narrative of national identity abroad. Using close readings of Russia’s Eurovision performances from 2014 to 2018, I demonstrate how Russia’s Eurovision presence since the annexation of Crimea highlights the struggle to represent national identity apolitically. Within that paradox a new narrative is created wherein Russia is a would-be Eurovision champion hindered only by perceived “Russophobia.” The production and management of Eurovision acts and the way in which the audience reacts to them show how all participating bodies imagine Eurovision itself as a sort of nation-public, wherein participation is a complicated dance between an appreciation for music and a show of national allegiance.
As a country with a severely threatened reputation in Europe, Russia presents a case for considering how presenting national identity abroad by means of popular culture involves careful curation and a general reimagining of the country’s place in a fantasy of European unity.
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1/23/2020 20:54:38Roy Ginsbergrog706@g.harvard.eduHarvard UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentJewish StudiesRemembering and Memorializing Jewish Suffering Under StalinPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)“Translating Grief: Peretz Markish’s ‘Shloyme Mikhoels – An Eternal Flame at Your Coffin’”
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1/24/2020 4:44:35Elena Vasilevavassyuta12@gmail.comIndependent scholar Current MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Arts/Film/Electronic MediaMen of Marble: How History Supplanted Story in Soviet Screenwriting (1930s-1940s). The paper presents a look at two dozens biographical films from the Stalin era as well as trade publications to draw conclusions about major changes to the hallmarks of screenplay structure. The changes affected both peripheral and fundamental aspects of narrative structure - from characterisation to central dramatic conflict. To explain these findings the paper looks at the rise of History in the Soviet public discourse as it shows how the specific vision of teleological historiography adopted under Stalin affected popular storytelling, such as film.
The paper is based on extensive archival research undertaken as part of my PhD dissertation.
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1/24/2020 13:38:18Zosha Winegar-Schultzwineg015@umn.eduUniversity of MinnesotaCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Gender/LGBTQ StudiesPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Maternity Capital, Social Capital. I am interested in finding a panel for my paper on Russia's maternity capital initiative and social, popular media. I examine how the maternity capital program uses language and symbolism of social capital in media to promote nationalist, pro-natalist rhetoric and contemporary Russian parenthood. Congruently, how does this translate into Russian social media and influencers, users who possess and utilize social capital? This paper is a work in progress related to my dissertation, and I am open to altering it one way or another to better fit within a panel. ChairGender, Media, Film, Art.
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1/25/2020 3:53:26Uladzimir Kananovichukananovich@gmail.comIndependent scholarCurrent MemberEarly Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies, to 1800I am trying to form a panel concerning a topic "Rebellion and emotions in pre-modern East Central Europe". Presenter(s), Discussant(s)Honor, Anger and Aristocratic Feud in the Early Sixteenth-Century Grand Duchy of Lithuania. The Case of Duke Michael GlinskiChair, DiscussantMemory of a Rebellion, Emotions of Rebels, Feud
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1/25/2020 14:44:57Bert Beynenkesaphela@aol.comOsher Lifelong Learning Institutes, Temple UniversityCurrent MemberLinguistics/Language PedagogyPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Georgian or Caucasian LinguisticsGeorgian or Caucasian Linguistics
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1/26/2020 22:40:41Agnieszka Smelkowskaagnessmelkowska@berkeley.eduUC BerkeleyCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Religion as rebellion; religion as a source of anxietyPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)German religious communities (Catholics, Lutherans and Baptists) in Central Asia as centers of rebellion against the state. Chair, DiscussantSoviet and Central Asian history; migration, ethnic minorities (Volksdeutsche), nationalism, religion
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1/27/2020 11:57:33Frankee Lyonsflyons2@uic.eduUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Jewish StudiesPresenter(s), ChairMy paper will examine the Polish Jewish repatriation from the Soviet Union to Poland after 1956, focusing on the experience of repatriation itself and subsequent community building. I contextualize these experiences against post-Stalinist antisemitic violence and state perceptions of Jewish mobility during the "liberalizing" Polish Thaw.Discussantpost-war Jewish history, migration, communism
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1/27/2020 14:08:33Alina Ryabovolovaaryabovo@umass.eduUniversity of Massachusetts AmherstCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Anthropology/Geography/SociologyPossible themes: Post-Crimean Russia or Russia vs. the West / Western LiberalismPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)We have two panelists and are looking for another panelist (and possibly a chair/discussant). My paper is about a state-supported multimedia history exhibit (Russia - My History), collaboratively produced by the Russian state and Orthodox-monarchist activists. The other potential panelist's paper is about people who either moved or returned to Russia because they were disillusioned with the West and believed that Russia was a better fit for their "traditional" values.ChairRussian politics and media
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1/27/2020 14:28:25Valeria Provotorovavp5bf@virginia.eduUniversity of VirginiaCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Gender/LGBTQ StudiesI am trying to organize a panel that focuses on women stepping outside expected gender roles in the nineteenth century. The papers can study either literature, history, or anything else that fits into the concept. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)I am writing a paper on some of the first women writers and their ideas on who women are and what their roles in society should be.
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1/27/2020 15:22:24Natan Meirmeir@pdx.eduPortland State UniversityCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924Magic/Folk Rituals in the East European BorderlandsPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)The Cholera Wedding (a magical ritual to stop an epidemic found in Jewish communities in eastern Europe from the early 19th century up to WWII). I would like to form a panel that compares magical rituals across boundaries of religion, ethnic group, empire, etc. Chair, DiscussantJewish studies, subaltern studies, disability studies, late imperial Russia, Ukraine, borderlands
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1/27/2020 15:27:23Natan Meirmeir@pdx.eduPortland State UniversityCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924People with Disabilities in Late Imperial Russia/Eastern Europe Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)I would like to present my research on the life experiences of, and attitudes towards, people with disabilities (including mental illness and developmental disabilities) in Russian Jewish society in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. I welcome potential panelists who would like to present on other aspects of disability studies in imperial Russia or other geographical-political contexts in eastern Europe.
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1/27/2020 17:04:10Joe Colleyshawjoe_colleyshaw@brown.eduBrown University Current MemberPhD StudentComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyLooking to form a panel on the current relationship between the state and citizen and how this is looks in the wake of recent reform under Putin Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Managing Changing Anxieties - the changing faces of opposition in Moscow: looking to the Moscow protests of 2019 and beyond, how can the state maintain itself whilst also responding to the changing desires of the electorate Chair
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1/27/2020 18:34:34Sándor Földvárialexfoldvari@gmail.comDebrecen U HungaryCurrent MemberEarly Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies, to 1800"Early-Printed Cyrillic Books and their Migration between the Great Duchy of Lithuania and the Habsburg Empire"
The territory of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania was the “fatherland” of the innovations in the Cyrillic book-printing as for the genres (“Teaching Gospel” by I. Fyodoroff) and their style, too (gravures, initials, prefaces and afterwards, according to Yaroslaff Isayevich’s works in the field, and others). While it was much spoken about the Reformation lately, thanks to the 500th anniversary, but almost no word was devoted to the “Confessionalisation” as for the Eastern churches of Byzantine Rite. The Uniate Church in the Habsburg Empire were provided by those clergy and the experiences came from the Greek Catholics in the “Land of Crown” (that is, the very Polish territory) and the GDL (the Eastern part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth), thus the identity-shaping, the building of institutions of the Church and monasteries, too, in the Habsburg lands — were based on the previous processes, and lessons learned on the territories of the GDL. Thus, Belarusian and Ukrainian typographies and church culture made great impacts on the processes of Confessionalization of Slavic peoples in the Habsburg Empire; therefore, the comparative analysis of the measure and character of these impacts, coming from the Lithuanian lands, are inevitable.
Panel Organizer's Name
Sandor Foldvari (Member of the ASEEES)
Please contact me with your title, brief anstract and short bio with a link to your profil,
by 8th February or ASAP,
at the address alexfoldvari@gmail.com


Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Diversities in Book-Printing in the “Slavia Orthodoxa” in the 16-17th Centuries
(abstract) As for the early-printed books in "Muscovia" and the Western territories of the "Slavia Orthodoxa", a significant difference can be pointed out; due to the political and aesthetical divergences, as well. As Guseva&Kamenieva (Moscow, 1976) highlight it: those books were printed in Belarusian and Ukrainian typographies of Confraternities (the brotherhoods, civil organisations), distinguished by their quality, engravings, illuminations, also prefaces and afterwords, too. The Russian historian Demin (1981 and 1985) devoted some monographies to the textology of prefaces in the wider cultural context of the book-printing, and came to the conclusion the "Epoch of Troubles" (Smutnoe vremja) caused the decay of the level of printings in both aesthetical and textual aspect. On the other hand, the Ukrainian expert Isaievych followed another approach: according to him, the market-oriented "Western" typographies were smaller and flexible, while the huge Typography in Moscow, the "Printing House" (Pechatnyj Dvor) was an enormously large and unchangable institution under the strict control of the Tsar. (from a lot of works by Isaievich, it is worthy to highlight "Voluntary Brotherhood" Toronto, 2006) The Belarusian and Ukrainian typographies, were managed by brotherhoods on the Western terrritories of the "Slavia Orthodoxa", acquired the new impacts and trends of the baroque, especially from Poland and mainly in the Lithuanian/Belarusian territories (esp. typographies of Wilno/Vilnius and of Suprasl), and these typographies depended rather on the market than on any "Tsarist" orders or commands. Prefaces evidenced the new styles and ideas, even in the liturgical service-books, and illuminations contained symbols and figures of western culture - even in the books for Byzantine Christianity. - Author of this paper researched the activity of Suprasl typography (cf. ASEEES 2015 Convention) and, generally, the import of Ukrainian books from Kiev, Lviv, Pochaev into the Habsburg Empire and the Balkans, too. I agree with Isaievych (whom I consulted much due to personal friendship with him) but I make a contribution as for the Russian books: the Tsar became the patron of "Peoples of Orthodoxy" on the Balkans only after the Treaty Of Kuchuk Kainarji (1774) - thus the Russian books came to the Serbs in larger ratio then, even those were printed earlier, and replaced the Ukrainian ones after this time. On the other hand, the level of gravures and illuminations in the books printed in Moscow, increased by the end of 17th century, and the market-orientation appeared in Moscow, too; after the "Smutnoe vremia" thus I can accept Demin's views, too, with significant corrections. I have investigated the rare varieties of Gospels printed by Ivan Fiodoroff and, too (cf. Congress of ukrainists in Kyiv, 2018) and I demonstrated my results on congresses of Belorusian studies, too (in Kaunas 2014 also 2015, and in Warsaw 2017) also on ASEEES-IAH summer conventions in Lviv (2016 and 2018). Therefore, the Slavic Peoples of the Habsburg Empire imported their liturgical service-books in great ratio from the Ukrainian and Belarusian typographies of the civil Confraternities (brotherhoods). - This paper gives a synthesis on the links between the politics, belief and trade-relations, as these are reflected in the migration of books and by the content also the formation of books themselves.

ChairSlavic and East European History
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1/28/2020 1:41:00Christopher Rasmussenrasmussenc@triton.uog.eduUniversity of GuamCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Twenty-first Century Russian Diaspora: Immigrants, Elites, and AsyleesPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)“A Specter is Haunting the Western Pacific: The Russian Tourists and Asylees in Guam, 1992-2019”Chair, DiscussantCold War propaganda
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1/28/2020 6:43:39Kacper Szuleckikacper.szulecki@stv.uio.noUniversity of OsloCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyDissent and protest in Eastern EuropePresenter(s), Discussant(s)"Eastern Europe’s Dissident Decade: How a transnational figure was forged 1969-79"

When in the late 1960s Western media began reporting on the trial of a group of Soviet intellectuals, the word used to describe them – “dissidents” – was still something of a novelty. Ten years later, “the dissident” was a “new type of intellectual”, according to the Bulgarian-French author Julia Kristeva, and a “star in the theatre of the opposition” as Vaclav Havel – one of the prominent specimen – put it. By 1979 Eastern Europe’s dissidents were stealing the show, to the extent that Western critical intellectuals were complaining that after all they are “dissidents too”. What happened over those ten years and how was this new transnational figure forged?
Chair, DiscussantCentral European politics; dissent and protest; environmental politics; energy policy
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1/28/2020 12:43:36Joie Meierjoimeier@iu.eduIndiana UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentAnthropology/Geography/SociologyCentral Europe and "Cultural Anxiety"Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Mi Hazánk Mozgalom broke away from Jobbik in 2018, after Jobbik made moves to build a coalition between itself and parties on the left in an attempt to defeat Fidesz. The leaders of Mi Hazánk take Jobbik’s farthest right positions, arguing for the ban of the practice of Islam, anti-LGBT laws and anti-Roma policies.Society has come to expect the chauvinist, anti-global and pro-nationalist messages of proto-fascist, ethnonationalist organizations to come from white, masculine bodies. However, the one of the spokespeople of Mi Hazánk and one of its most vehement supporters is a woman named Dúrá Dóra. How do the messages of Mi Hazánk change when espoused by a woman like Dúrá? Does Dúrá’s presence change who can and cannot be a member of Mi Hazánk and what membership means?
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1/28/2020 14:01:16Folahan Olowoyeyefolahan.olowoyeye@gmail.comNorthwestern UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and EurasianThe Great Eve of Destruction: Evolution, Revolution, and Cataclysm in the 20th-c Russian Avant-Garde

This panel will investigate the controversial and turbulent modality occupied by the 20th-century Russian avant-garde amidst the looming cataclysms of war, terror, and genocide.
This panel will investigate how and why the avant-garde manifests from within this destructive ambiance, creation. Some possible topics include:
1) Competing conceptions of the nature of the avant-garde, and its place in creating Modernity;
2) Primitivism vs urbanism in projecting the "art of the future"
3) Historicization of the aesthetic and the aestheticization of history in revolutionary frames
4) Competing frames of the self vis-a-vis organic, industrial, and political worldviews/regimes
5) Competition and blending of ideological, religious, and epistemic approaches to cataclysm and apocalypse
Presenter(s), Discussant(s)contra Modulatio: Metaphysical Harmony vs Poetic Dissonance in Tyutchev and MandelstamChair, Discussantpoetics, avant-garde, hermeneutics, literary theory, philosophy
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1/30/2020 3:23:25Paweł Wawryszukpawel.wawryszuk@gmail.comKazimierz the Great University in BydgoszczCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Yugoslav Military Counterintelligence (KOS) towards Clergymen in Military Service (1952-1966)
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1/29/2020 22:01:17Colleen Luceyluceyc@email.arizona.eduUniversity of ArizonaCurrent MemberGender/LGBTQ StudiesGrotesque Commodities: Female Prostitution in Russian and Yiddish Works // Panel description: In fin de siècle culture, the prostitute often embodied the threat of mass-circulating contagion and the dangers of capitalism. But thinkers of the period also looked to the brothel as an ideal space to explore the theme of awakening, whether it be sexual, socio-political, or spiritual. This panel explores the different ways in which Russian and Yiddish authors harnessed the image of the prostitute to reflect both the commodification of culture and the hopes of liberating the urban poor--particularly prostitutes--through revolutionary agitation and social activism. LeiAnna Hamel (UIUC) will present on he Yiddish novels of Oyzer Warshawski (Smugglers, 1920) and David Bergelson (Judgment, 1929); Colleen Lucey (University of Arizona) will present on works by Leonid Andreev. We are looking for a third presenter. Presenter(s)
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1/30/2020 4:55:38Tamara Polyakovatpolyakova@wisc.eduUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924My paper could be grouped with others to form a panel on the Russian Civil War or other wars, on microhistory, on the making of the Soviet Union, on Soviet center-periphery relations, or on Soviet peasantry.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My paper is on the Red Army's re-occupation of territories in the Russian northwest previously under Finnish and Allied rule, mostly in late 1919-early 1920. My focus is on how Bolsheviks attempted to make these lands and the people they inhabited their "own", with an emphasis on the everyday encounters between the Red Army soldiers and Party agitators and the local population, which mostly consisted of ethnically Karelian peasants.
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1/30/2020 9:42:15Pavel Vasilyevpvasilev@hse.ruHSE University St. PetersburgCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Reproduction in the USSR (broadly conceived, may also include a paper on post-socialism)Presenter(s), ChairChair, DiscussantModern Russian and Soviet History; Gender History; History of Science, Technology and Medicine; History of Crime and Law; History of Alcohol and Drugs; History of Emotions and the Body; History of St. Petersburg
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1/30/2020 13:38:44Zhanna Budenkovazhanna.budenkova@pitt.eduUniversity of PittsburghCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and EurasianWe are working on creating a panel devoted to Soviet science fiction in cinema and literature; one more panelist is needed. Following the theme of the convention, the angle would be anxiety in Soviet sci-fi, be it political, ecological or other forms of anxiety; topic modifications / suggestions are welcome. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)ChairSoviet cinema
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1/30/2020 19:47:26Katherine Frances Caytonfcayton@g.harvard.eduHarvard UniversityCurrent MemberMA StudentComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyThis paper explores the development of Polish right-wing civil society through a close study of the institutionalization of the March of Independence during the 2010s. I examine how the March leverages local activist networks and social media to facilitate both annual participation and year-round conversation on its favored causes. It would pair well with papers discussing populism, civil society, and illiberalism in Poland and East-Central Europe. ChairPolish and East-Central European history (20th century) and politics
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2/10/2020 0:47:12Marie-Alice L'Heureuxmalheur@ku.eduUniversity of KansasCurrent MemberAnthropology/Geography/SociologyI no longer need paper presenters or members for this panel---I was not able to simply delete the request.
Presenter(s), Discussant(s)Discussantart/architecture/urban design Soviet post-Soviet
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1/31/2020 9:16:55Lena Marasinovalenamarassinova@gmail.com, lenamarassinova@mail.ruHigher School of Economics (Moscow) Current MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Early Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies, to 1800“The Seal of Confession in 18th-Century Russia”
This section will be devoted to various aspects of the history of confession in 18th-century Russia: church canon law and punishments for violating confessional privilege according to the Nomokanon; the Ecclesiastical Regulation and Petrine legislation in general concerning violation of the seal of the confessional; the use of church practices in the investigation of political crimes; the control of state authorities over the regular confession of convicts; and the ritual of final confession before execution. The history of confession is closely connected with issues of the relationship between Church and state, and the religious consciousness of Russian individuals and their political worldviews.
“Criminal Investigations and Confessional Privilege in 18th-Century Russia”
The report will be devoted to the circumstances surrounding the violation of the confidentiality of confession in 18th-century Russia, in connection with the protection of the interests of the state and the person of the emperor. In 1722, in accordance with paragraph 11 of the Addendum to the Ecclesiastical Regulation, priests were compelled to report to the authorities if a confessor admitted the intention of committing treason or stirring rebellion. Analysis of a large range of investigations has made it possible to reconstruct how the law was actually enforced, using church practices as a means of countering political crimes. Data from archival documents of the Prikaz of Secret Affairs, the Preobrazhensky Prikaz, the Secret Chancellery and the Secret Expedition reveal that the secrets of the confessional had also beenviolated during the Patriarchate, before the establishment of the Synod and the publication of the Ecclesiastical Regulation, and that failure to inform could result in punishment of the priest and even his subjection to torture. Despite contradiction with Church canon law, the contents of confession, including that of deathbed confessions, was already being reported on a legal basis in the 18th century, with the clergy being required to submit appropriate reports. However, the reality proved much more complex and unpredictable than anticipated in paragraph 11 of the Addendum to the Ecclesiastical Regulation. A defendant’s confession often turned into a deliberate and very dangerous dialogue with the state, in which the confessor would ask the priest to convey everything he said to the higher authorities. In turn, the holy fathers occasionally refused to inform on the content of a confession without permission of the metropolitan.
Thus, the problem of violating confessional privilege in 18th-century Russia opens up an array of complex questions regarding the nature of religious consciousness in Russian society.
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1/31/2020 9:35:37Lena Marasinovalenamarassinova@gmail.comHigher School of Economics (Russia, Moscow)Current MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Early Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies, to 1800“The Seal of Confession in 18th-Century Russia”
This section will be devoted to various aspects of the history of confession in 18th-century Russia: church canon law and punishments for violating confessional privilege according to the Nomokanon; the Ecclesiastical Regulation and Petrine legislation in general concerning violation of the seal of the confessional; the use of church practices in the investigation of political crimes; the control of state authorities over the regular confession of convicts; and the ritual of final confession before execution. The history of confession is closely connected with issues of the relationship between Church and state, and the religious consciousness of Russian individuals and their political worldviews.
“Criminal Investigations and Confessional Privilege in 18th-Century Russia”
The report will be devoted to the circumstances surrounding the violation of the confidentiality of confession in 18th-century Russia, in connection with the protection of the interests of the state and the person of the emperor. In 1722, in accordance with paragraph 11 of the Addendum to the Ecclesiastical Regulation, priests were compelled to report to the authorities if a confessor admitted the intention of committing treason or stirring rebellion. Analysis of a large range of investigations has made it possible to reconstruct how the law was actually enforced, using church practices as a means of countering political crimes.
Data from archival documents of the Prikaz of Secret Affairs, the Preobrazhensky Prikaz, the Secret Chancellery and the Secret Expedition reveal that the secrets of the confessional had also beenviolated during the Patriarchate, before the establishment of the Synod and the publication of the Ecclesiastical Regulation, and that failure to inform could result in punishment of the priest and even his subjection to torture. Despite contradiction with Church canon law, the contents of confession, including that of deathbed confessions, was already being reported on a legal basis in the 18th century, with the clergy being required to submit appropriate reports. However, the reality proved much more complex and unpredictable than anticipated in paragraph 11 of the Addendum to the Ecclesiastical Regulation. A defendant’s confession often turned into a deliberate and very dangerous dialogue with the state, in which the confessor would ask the priest to convey everything he said to the higher authorities. In turn, the holy fathers occasionally refused to inform on the content of a confession without permission of the metropolitan.
Thus, the problem of violating confessional privilege in 18th-century Russia opens up an array of complex questions regarding the nature of religious consciousness in Russian society.
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1/31/2020 21:25:06Tetyana Shlikhartes65@pitt.eduUniversity of PittsburghCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Traumatic Memories of the 20th century.
The panel can embrace papers within the field of History, Memory, Cultural and Film studies.
Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)In my paper, I discuss the traumatic memories of Ukrainians, primarily the artificial famine of 1932-33 (the Holodomor), and deportation of the Crimean Tatars by the Soviet regime, as represented in contemporary Ukrainian cinema.ChairMemory studies, Russo-Ukrainian conflict, film
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2/1/2020 12:46:36Marta Aleksandrowiczmartaale@buffalo.eduUniversity at BuffaloCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: ComparativePresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)If the core of World Literature is often perceived to lie in the so-called ‘West’, my paper asks where to situate semi-peripheral Eastern Europe on the map of this worldliness?
How do the recent crossings between postsocialist and decolonial feminisms that muddle, rather than reverse or replace, the ‘East/‘West’, ‘South’/’North’, ’periphery’/‘center’ dichotomies re-shape World Literature by proposing antidualist and antinationalist notions of the world? By extracting Marxist and feminist legacies of postcolonial theory often sidestepped in postsocialist engagements of a postcolonial perspective, recent mobilizations of postcolonial scholarship in Eastern Europe appeal to a political conceptualization of translation which extends beyond neutral understandings of translation toward approaching and doing translation as “the element of cultural encounter intersected by the axes of forms and relations of power” (Ewa Majewska). In examining this relationship, I'm guided by the works of E. Majewska as well as the collaborative project of M. Tlostanova, S. Thapar-Björkert, and R. Koobak that turns to the writing of Chicana poet and writer Gloria Anzaldúa.

My paper situates these recent mobilizations vis-à-vis Anzaldúa’s work on borderland and writing as an enactnment of borderland, as well as the recent Polish novel Bieguni [Flights] by Olga Tokarczuk.
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2/1/2020 15:54:03Ekaterina Shubenkinashubenki@usc.eduUniversity of Southern California (USC)Current MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and EurasianThe panel will be devoted to Joseph Brodsky. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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2/3/2020 11:52:36Alexander Osipovaosipov1@gmail.comInternational Centre for Ethnic and Linguistic Diversity StudiesCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924The paper’s working title is “From Soviet to post-Soviet territorial autonomy: the case of Crimea”. The case study concerns the meaning of the autonomous status of a region with an ethnically distinct population during the Soviet and post-Soviet period. The Crimean Peninsula enjoyed this status from 1921 to 1945 and from 1991 to 2014 (de jure to date). I intend to demonstrate how in both cases the non-articulation of the autonomy’s ethnic underpinning with pragmatic institutional accommodation of the major ethnic segments contributed to the governability of the region both by the central government and local elites. I also intend to argue about the applicability of the term legacy with regard to the Soviet and post-Soviet techniques of diversity governance
Chair, DiscussantNationalism and ethnicity; diversity policies; autonomy arrangements
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2/3/2020 13:41:39Margarita Balmacedabalmaced@fas.harvard.eduSeton Hall University & HURI Harvard Ukrainian Research InstituteCurrent MemberEconomics/BusinessEconomic Interests, “Oligarchs,” and the future Ukraine’s Donbas and Conflict with RussiaPresenter(s)Chair, DiscussantEnergy, natural resources, conflict, Ukraine, Belarus, Russia, de facto states, oil, natural gas, coal, mining
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2/3/2020 22:26:04Grigory Hakimovgrigoryhakim@umass.eduUniversity of Massachusetts AmherstCurrent MemberPhD StudentComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyWe are working on creating a panel devoted to the state - civil society relations in Russia (and/or other post-communist countries/authoritarian regimes). The panel will discuss a range of topics from the depoliticization of environmental activism to the relationship between labor and democracy in Russia. One more panelist is needed. We also consider an opportunity to participate in other panels devoted to civil society. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My paper discusses depoliticizing ecological activism in contemporary Russia. The paper analyzes the roles that official environmental discourse and state-sponsored civic institutions and movements (the Public Chamber and the All-Russia People’s Front) play to exclude grassroots ecological activists from politics and public sphere.
The other paper is devoted to the relationship between labor and democracy in Russia. The author explains to what extent this relationship conceived by classical democratic theorists is applicable to the Russian case.





Chair, Discussantcivil society, protests, labor, NGOs, political institutions in Russia, authoritarianism, populism
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2/4/2020 10:24:19George Bodieg.bodie.12@ucl.ac.ukUCL SSEESCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Solidarity between state and society in the Eastern Bloc. Looking for papers which explore socialist internationalism or solidarity as a feature of state-society relations across the bloc. This could include solidarity donations, events, practices or discourses. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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2/4/2020 10:42:40Kevin Hoeperkjhoeper@live.unc.eduUniversity of North Carolina, Chapel HillCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918I examine World War I veterans in Czechoslovakia as a lens through which to understand social and political change in post-Habsburg Central Europe
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2/4/2020 12:12:05Ryan Voogtryan.voogt@uky.eduUniversity of KentuckyCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Panel options: in Communist Eastern Europe or Soviet Union, something focused on religion or other social affiliations and social power, officials' attempts to discipline any dynamic social groupings, or restricted to religion in communist eraPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)I have a few paper options that can include various combinations of the Romanian Orthodox, Russian Orthodox, Hungarian Reformed, Russian Baptist Churches, Department of Religions officials, "dissidents," social mobilization, etc-- I'm looking to integrate with others, so I'll adjust based on what panelists present. Please email!Chair, DiscussantAny communist era stuff in Soviet Union or Eastern Europe, any religion stuff in the same era
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2/4/2020 12:21:44Karolina Koczynskakarolina.koczynska@ed.ac.ukUniversity of EdinburghCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Arts/Film/Electronic MediaBetween Rebellion and Tradition: Interwar Art and Culture in Central and East Europe (1917-1939) How did modern artists negotiate between avant-garde practices and tradition in the newly independent states of Central and Eastern Europe? What, if any, expectations were placed on art and culture to respond and support the new states?
Presenter(s), Discussant(s)Chair, DiscussantCentral and East European Avant-Garde Art, Film, Music, Architecture; Interwar Art and Politics; Transnational Artistic Networks
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2/4/2020 15:55:22Marco Jaimesmjaimes3@illinois.eduUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Central and Southeast Europe, 1800-1918I focus on the Habsburg Monarchy in Bohemia and the cult of the monarch. My primary paper that I'm looking to present focuses on the impact of Emperor Franz Joseph's death in the region and among Czechoslovak exiles during WWI.
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2/5/2020 2:59:27Alexander Osipovaosipov1@gmail.comInternational Centre for Ethnic and Linguistic Diversity StudiesCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924I am looking for a panel that could accommodate my paper. Its working title is “From Soviet to post-Soviet territorial autonomy: the case of Crimea”. The case study is to the meaning of the autonomous status of a region with an ethnically distinct population during the Soviet and post-Soviet period. The Crimean Peninsula enjoyed this status from 1921 to 1945 and from 1991 to 2014 (de jure to date). I intend to demonstrate how in both cases the non-articulation of the autonomy’s ethnic underpinning with pragmatic institutional accommodation of the major ethnic segments contributed to the governability of the region both by the central government and local elites. I also intend to argue about the applicability of the term legacy with regard to the Soviet and post-Soviet techniques of diversity governance.Chair, DiscussantEthnicity and nationalism; minority issues; communist legacies; diversity policies; theories of empire
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2/5/2020 9:12:11Konrad Zielińskikonrad.zielinski1@gazeta.plMaria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin/ Warsaw Ghetto MuseumCurrent MemberJewish StudiesNationalist offensive. Warsaw 1912: Duma elections, anti-Semitic hysteria and boycottChairPolish-Jewish Relations before 1939; history of Jews in Poland
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2/5/2020 12:22:14Josef M Djordjevskijdjordje@ucsd.eduUCSDCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Environmental history, 20th/2st centuries. Former Yugoslavia
I would like to present on the relationship between tourism, industry and environmentalism on the Adriatic coast during socialism in Yugoslavia (1945-1991). Willing to shift focus depending on panel topic.
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2/5/2020 12:42:05Milana Nikolkomilananikolko@cunet.carleton.caCarleton University, Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian StudiesCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyPresenter(s)Overcoming the boundaries: strategies of cooperation among Crimean Tatar and Ukrainian diaspora groups in responding to Ukrainian crisis. Case of Canada and Turkey,DiscussantPost-Soviet migration and diaspora, Ukrainian migration, collective memories and traumas
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2/6/2020 8:04:06Lukasz Sicinskil.sicinski@hotmail.comIndiana UniversityCurrent MemberLiterature: Central and Southeast EuropeCrime and Rebellion in Polish culture. The panel explores metaphysical, theological, ethical, and aesthetic dimensions of crime and rebellion in Polish culture. The two papers we have focus on Jerzy Kawalerowicz’s Mother Joan of Angels and S.I. Witkiewicz’s The Crazy Locomotive.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Polish culture
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2/6/2020 14:06:58Botakoz Kassymbekovab.kassymbekova@gmx.netJohn Moores Liverpool UniversityCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Old age in the Soviet Union, 1945-1991. I am looking for presenters who would like to present on any aspect of growing old in the post-war Soviet Union. Of special interest are family relations between old people with family members, friends, colleagues. I am also interested in literary description of aging as well as transgenerational relations. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Chair, DiscussantSoviet history of the everyday
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2/7/2020 7:56:48Svetlana Rasmussenslego24@gmail.comUniversity of GuamCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Soviet Educational Collectives: Kindergartens, Schools, OrphanagesPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My paper will examine the history of collectives in Soviet education and the structures of mutual responsibility and dependency that held them together. Chair, DiscussantSoviet Education, Photography, Slavic DH
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2/7/2020 9:10:56Elena Anatolievna Ivanovaalionavanova@gmail.comPeoples’ Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University)Current MemberProfessional Development/TeachingDiscussantI am a scholar of stereotypes & archetypes. My Ph.D. is in social philosophy; my main field is mass communication/media & mass culture. I’m interested in creative approaches of self-development/growth, teaching and studying. I believe in methodology. I’m also interested in semiotics; interdisciplinary studies; structural linguistics; comparative studies & their methods.
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2/7/2020 12:48:21James Krapfljames.krapfl@mcgill.caMcGill UniversityCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Political Holidays in Central Europe (especially the use of historical anniversaries for political purposes)Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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2/7/2020 13:50:26Nari Shelekpayevnshelekpaev@eu.spb.ruEuropean University at St. PetersburgCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924‘A Man Who Hit the Judge with a Fly Swatter’: Justice, Politics, and Performance in (Post)Socialist KazakhstanChair, DiscussantContemporary history / politics of Central Asia / Russia
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2/7/2020 19:35:20Iryna Voloshynavoloshyna.iryna@gmail.comThe Ukrainian MuseumCurrent MemberArts/Film/Electronic Media"Political Implications of Petrykivka Painting: Anxiety Around Authenticity" - this is a presentation in Folklore Studies that discusses a folk paining style from Eastern Ukraine, and the ways it has been used for particular purposes by different political regimes with different agendas.
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2/8/2020 12:00:37Daniel Rhead.m.rhea@att.netIndependent ScholarCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Discussant(s)Bosnia-Herzegovina: 25 Years After Dayton; Successes, Failures and FutureDiscussantThe Balkans.
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2/8/2020 18:49:49Thomas Sherlockthomas.sherlock@westpoint.eduUS Military Academy, West Point, New YorkCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign Policy75th Anniversary of the Great Patriotic War: Contemporary LessonsPresenter(s)
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2/9/2020 11:53:51Ronald Bobroffrbobroff@bryant.eduBryant UniversityCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924A panel on late Imperial Russian international history/transnational history/political historyPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)a paper on the Franco-Russian alliance
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2/9/2020 16:10:36Ronald Bobroffrbobroff@bryant.eduBryant University Current MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924Roundtable: Politics and Culture of the Era of Alexander IIIPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Alexander III and the Franco-Russian Alliance
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2/10/2020 14:29:30Nelia Martsinkivnmartsin@nd.eduPhD Candidate, University of Notre Dame, IndianaCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Growing Up in Soviet Ukraine and Formation of the Young Ukrainian Intelligentsia: Remembrance of the Holodomor, Second World War, and the Postwar Years.
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2/10/2020 16:18:44Katja Peratkatja.w.perat@gmail.comWashington University in St. LouisCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: ComparativeSubjects of Inbetweenness: Representations of Eastern European Subjectivities in 20th Century Fiction and FilmDiscussant(s)
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2/10/2020 23:03:50Nataliia Kasianenkonatkas@csufresno.eduCal State FresnoCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyThe focus is broadly on contemporary Ukraine-Russia relations, the occupied Donbas and/or Crimea. Presenter(s), Discussant(s)Narrative Framing on Russian Television in the Occupied Donbas. The paper explores how the Russian state-controlled media shape and construct representations of the Ukrainian government, the “republics” in the Donbas, the Russian government, and the West. I highlight how the Russian media may manipulate the saliency of issues associated with the Donbas conflict to win the hearts and minds of the Donbas residents. The paper relies on discourse analysis to specifically examine the framing during the December 2019 Normandy Four negotiations in the top two news programs in the occupied region.Chairnationalism, media studies, Ukraine, Russia, the Donbas conflict
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2/11/2020 15:58:58Olga Lazitski Torresolgalazitskaya@gmail.comUCSDCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Anthropology/Geography/SociologyPresenter(s)Alternative professional journalism in the post-Crimean Russia: resistance to the Kremlin status quo in the contemporary Russian public spheres

ABSTRACT
After 2014, a new community of journalists with a unique identity emerged in Russia. I call it alternative professional journalism (APJ), highlighting its group autonomy and potential for public mobilization. One of the main conditions that made emergence of APJ possible is the development of online and digital platforms that allowed to circumvent a number of structural constraints and attract an important group of politically active millennials who consume media almost solely online. My data demonstrate how flexibility of digital settings allowed APJs to resist the structures of Putin’s hybrid regime. I analyze current changes within the Russian media system and examine material infrastructure that enabled practices of APJ. By examining those practices and the ways in which APJs is offered to reconsider power relations within the society, this article provides an empirical account of a new kind of Russian journalism and challenges the theoretical traditions of studying post-Soviet media.

Chair, DiscussantAlternative Media in contemporary Russia, propaganda effort, resistance, public spheres
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2/12/2020 0:23:49Olga Lazitski Torresolgalazitskaya@gmail.comUCSDCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Arts/Film/Electronic MediaAlternative professional journalism in the post-Crimean Russia: Online resistance to the Kremlin propaganda and status quo
Presenter(s)After 2014, a new community of journalists with a unique identity emerged in Russia. I call it alternative professional journalism (APJ), highlighting its group autonomy and potential for public mobilization. One of the main conditions that made emergence of APJ possible is the development of online and digital platforms that allowed to circumvent a number of structural constraints and attract an important group of politically active millennials who consume media almost solely online. My data demonstrate how flexibility of digital settings allowed APJs to resist the structures of Putin’s hybrid regime. I analyze current changes within the Russian media system and examine material infrastructure that enabled practices of APJ. By examining those practices and the ways in which APJs is offered to reconsider power relations within the society, this article provides an empirical account of a new kind of Russian journalism and challenges the theoretical traditions of studying post-Soviet media.
Chair, DiscussantContemporary Russian media, propaganda, digital resistance
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2/12/2020 1:13:06Kamil Luczajkamil.luczaj@yandex.comUniversity of Information Technology and Management, Rzeszow Current MemberAnthropology/Geography/SociologyTitle: Internationalization at Risk? Three Paradoxes of Higher Education Policies from Poland and Slovakia. Abstract: The policies encouraging internationalization of higher education are compatible with a modernization discourse, in the heart of which there is a belief that researchers are hyper-mobile and serve as “linchpin of development”. By focusing on the life stories of foreign-born scholars working in Poland and Slovakia (140 in-depth interviews), this paper revealed three paradoxes, that should never have happened according to the Western modernization paradigm. The first paradox is related to the fact that, counterintuitively, less integrated academic migrants perform better. This is an outcome of the life strategy of top-performing scholars, who decide to work in CEE only if they receive a prestigious and temporary EU-funded scholarship (e.g., Marie Curie). The second paradox is related to the expectation that clear immigration and integration policies should boost the inflow of highly-skilled self-initiated migrants. Whereas this may be partially true to some extent, it needs to be acknowledged that certain categories of academic migrants came to CEE on a special invitation or were actively seeking a post here because of their family situation (e.g., a partner from CEE), or their area of expertise (e.g., Slavistics). The third paradox stems from the fact that internationally mobile academics representing humanities and social sciences – in their biographical narratives – highly criticize current academic policies focused on internationalization. These scholars truly believed that the results of academic production should be delivered in local language and for local audiences – quite a paradox for a foreign-born academic.ChairHigher education, policy studies, international migration, Poland, Slovakia
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2/12/2020 4:55:35Bulat Akhmetkarimovbakhmetkarimov@gmail.comKazan Federal UniversityCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyPresenter(s)Russia and Turkey: Relations and Mutual Perceptions in the 21st Century
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