ASEEES Convention Panel/Paper Wanted
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TimestampYour NameYour Email AddressYour Institutional Affiliation (If none, enter 'independent scholar')Your ASEEES Membership StatusIf you are a student, select your current status (we do not accept undergrad presenters)Select ONE category for your proposed panel or paperIf trying to organize a panel, enter the proposed panel title or a brief descriptionSelect all that apply. I am looking for:If you have a paper and would like to be part of a panel, enter your proposed paper topic or a brief descriptionIf you would like to volunteer to serve as chair and/or discussant, select all that apply:Describe topics of interest to you as chair/discussant
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12/19/2018 16:41:12Tatiana Isachenkotatiana_isachenko@yahoo.comMGIMO University Current MemberEconomics/BusinessEconomic Diplomacy in Post-Soviet countriesPresenter(s)ChairEconomic development, business, global trade, international economic relations
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12/19/2018 16:44:52Svetlana Rasmussenslego24@gmail.comUniversity of Nebraska-LincolnCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Digital HumanitiesPre-Conference Slavic DH EventPresenter(s), Discussant(s)As an organizer of the Slavic-DH pre-conference event I am seeking a DH project administrator(s) who would like to do a workshop with their project sources/digital methodology or tools/DH research questions for the benefit of the project itself and the increase in Slavic DH visibility and research and teaching outreach. Please contact me for more information. More information about the ASEEES 2018 Slavic DH Pre-Conference event is here https://slavicdh.aseees.hcommons.org/2018/11/11/dh-events-at-aseees-2018/Chair, DiscussantSoviet education, children, Soviet everyday life
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12/19/2018 16:46:31Tatiana Isachenkotatiana_isachenko@yahoo.comMGIMO University Current MemberEconomics/BusinessEconomic Diplomacy in Post-Soviet countriesPresenter(s)ChairEconomic development, business, global trade, international economic relations
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12/19/2018 16:48:45Philip Kifferpbk11@georgetown.eduGeorgetown UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924I am trying to form a panel with other scholars who are studying Soviet domestic intelligence/secret policing. I am especially interested in finding other presenters who have worked/are working with newly declassified NKVD/MGB/KGB materials in Ukraine, Georgia, the Baltics, and other post-Soviet countries with open intelligence archives. My own work focuses on the postwar years, but I think a panel with a broader chronological scope could still work well. Please reach out if interested. I am also looking for a chair and discussant.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Chair, DiscussantSecret Police, Postwar Soviet Society, Intelligence archives, political repression
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12/19/2018 16:51:34Elizaveta Levinaelevina@usc.eduUniversity of Southern CaliforniaCurrent MemberPhD StudentArts/Film/Electronic MediaFictional Countries in Cinema, Literature, and BeyondPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Fictional countries in Soviet/Russian and Slavic filmography (excluding fantasy).
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12/19/2018 16:53:01Alexey Golubevavgolubev@uh.eduUniversity of HoustonCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Global Oceanic Encounters during the Cold War, a panel (or a set of panels) that will serve as a starting point for a bigger discussion on the Global Ocean (and its constituent seas) as a connecting (rather than a divisive) force between various agents of the Cold War from national governments to think tanks and research institutions to individuals to non-human actors. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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12/19/2018 17:04:12Robert F. Slesinskirfsles@aol.comIndependent scholarCurrent MemberReligion/PhilosophyBelieving Philosophy: The Russian School of Integral KnowledgePresenter(s)S. L. Frank's Conception of Knowledge as a Belonging to BeingChair, DiscussantRussian religious philosophy
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12/20/2018 14:36:16Indra Ekmanisindraekm@uw.eduACLSCurrent MemberAnthropology/Geography/SociologyThis paper challenges conventional approaches in the study of minority integration. Concentrating on the case study of Russian-speakers and ethnic titulars in Latvia, I argue the frameworks traditionally used to measure integration do not sufficiently consider everyday experiences, and therefore overlook much of the integration that is occurring on the ground. Rather, banality – or the lived experiences that fade into the hum of everyday life – is an indicator of significant interpersonal and socio-national integration that incorporates minorities as active members of the nation. Empirically, the paper pushes back against a narrative of conflict in Latvian and Russian-speaker relations, arguing that, in many cases, minorities can see themselves as active members of the Latvian cultural and civic nation, not tangential to it. This is an analysis of the Latvian case, but contributes more broadly to the literature on post-Soviet diaspora and migration studies, integration studies, and questions of nationalism and identity in the modern global context.Chair, DiscussantBaltic states, minority integration
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12/20/2018 14:54:34Todd Nelsonhalseynelson@yahoo.comCleveland State UniversityCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign Policy Historical Narratives about StalinismThe use of memorials to amplify the glorification of the Great Patriotic War, to the detriment of narratives about political repression.
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12/21/2018 13:24:04Bryce W. Hechtbwhecht@iu.eduIndiana University-BloomingtonCurrent MemberMA StudentComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyIn my paper, I employ network analysis to assess whether serving as a parliamentary deputy in Russia represents a viable strategy for business owners to protect their property from seizure by the state.
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12/31/2018 14:27:11Nina Murrayhoundart@gmail.comIndependent ScholarCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyA Feminist Foreign Policy: Opportunities and ChallengesPresenter(s), Discussant(s)Chair, DiscussantTranslation; poetry; feminist analyses; Russia; Ukraine; public health and demographics; post-colonialism/post-imperialism
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1/3/2019 10:57:29Barbara Martinbarbara.martin74@gmail.comindependent scholarCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My paper will be about Russian Orthodox dissent and the religious revival in the late Soviet Union. I am looking for a panel or co-panelists working on religion in Eastern Europe/Russia / about late Soviet society / dissent in the Eastern bloc.
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1/3/2019 21:51:02Polina BeliakovaPolina.beliakova@tufts.eduFletcher School, Tufts UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Comparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyCivilian Control of the Military in the First and Second Chechen Wars:
Existing studies point at a variation in civilian control of the military under Yeltsin and in Putin's early years, especially when it comes to the Chechen wars. In this paper, I offer a theory explaining why the counterinsurgency policies of the two presidents had different effects on civilian control. I use process tracing to test the propositions of this theory against the alternative explanations.

Looking for a panel on security institutions (силовые структуры), intrastate conflict, military affairs.
Chair, DiscussantIntrastate Conflict, Defense and Security, International Relations, Conflict in Ukraine, Military Affairs
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1/3/2019 21:53:04Mikhail Nemtsevnemtsev.m@gmail.comGeorgetown UniversityCurrent MemberReligion/PhilosophyIntellectual Legacy of Alexander PiatigorskyPresenter(s), Discussant(s)In this panel discussion I want to actualize ideas developed by Soviet and British philosopher, Buddhologist, writer Alexander Piatigorsky. He wrote many philosophical articles,. several books (among them, 'Symbol and Consciousness' co-authored with Merab Mamardashvili), and three philosophical novels. Nonetheless up till now his ideas are mainly neglected by those who study Russian philosophy. In this panel, I propose to look at his legacy from different points of view. My own submission shall be entitled "Main features of Alexander Piatigorsky's Philosophy of History'Chair, DiscussantSoviet History; Siberia; commemoration; Stalinism; ideologies in Soviet and Post-Soviet countries; Russian and Soviet philosophy
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1/5/2019 12:58:07John Holianjholian1@hotmail.comindependent scholarCurrent MemberAnthropology/Geography/SociologyCourtship and marriage in interwar Galicia
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1/7/2019 11:07:06Alexander Dumanisalexander_dumanis@brown.eduBrown UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentLiterature: Russian and Eurasianethics of metafictionPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Use of Metafiction in Chekhov
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1/7/2019 12:09:30Caterina Predacaterinapreda@gmail.comUniversity of Bucharest, Political ScienceCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyCreating for the state during socialism: the role of artists' unions
During the communist regimes in Eastern Europe, the role of artists’ unions in organizing creative endeavors following the official style of Socialist Realism was paramount. Nonetheless, they have been understudied in the last 30 years and we don’t yet have a refined image of the national differences, or of the unitary model at work in the communist regimes in Eastern Europe. How did these unions function? What was their relation to the other cultural institutions of the communist regimes? How did they change through time, and which are the national temporalities concerning the fine arts? How did the ‘state artists’ adapt during the decades of communism?

If interested in participating to this panel at the ASEEES 2019 in San Francisco (23-26 November 2019) please send a short abstract of 200 words and a short bio to Caterina Preda, at caterinapreda@gmail.com by February 1st.
Presenter(s), Discussant(s)Discussantart and politics, art and memory
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1/8/2019 8:52:10Agnes Katalin KelemenKelemen_Agi@phd.ceu.eduCentral European UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Who should study? -States, Universities and Social Mobility Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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1/8/2019 17:24:51Sarah Rosenthalsar248@georgetown.eduGeorgetown UniversityCurrent MemberMA StudentGender/LGBTQ StudiesI would really love to be part of a panel that examines the historical relationship between (national) security policies and the (criminal) regulation of sexual minorities. Heretofore, I have explored this in the context of Russian history, specifically Revolutionary Russia and the early Soviet Union. However, I know that there is also great work being done by other scholars on the securitization of sexual minorities in other times and spaces.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My work examines how the politics of national security have historically precipitated the regulation of sexual minorities in Russia. My paper uses the framework of securitization theory to query how and why the regulation of sexual diversity by the state has has occurred similarly through discursive processes in Russian history, specifically in the former Soviet Union. This perspective on how and why states choose to promote the regulation of sexualities in times of nation building and socio-economic revolution should prompt scholars, activists, and policy makers to think critically about how history is understood and represented in debates on the political rights of all sexual minorities in Russia today. Chair, DiscussantLGBTQ / Gender Studies, Security Studies, Conceptual History, Material Culture, Russian History, Soviet History
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1/9/2019 12:04:27Janneke Micaela van de Stadtjvandest@williams.eduWilliams CollegeCurrent MemberArts/Film/Electronic MediaRussian appropriations, adaptations or distortions of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland and/or through the Looking Glass.
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1/10/2019 8:35:28Maria Shilinamary.shilina@gmail.comNational Research University Higher School of EconomicsCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Central and Southeast EuropePresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)I'm trying to form a panel with scholars who are studing prospects of the international relations between Eurasian states. My work is concentrated at Eurasian states economic developement, cooperation between the EAEU and China, in particular China-Russia partnership. Especially I'm interested in the international economic integration issues and the Greater Eurasia concept practical construction (the EAEU and the SCO activities). Also I'm looking for researchers who are intersested in the future of Eurasian (EAEU) and European (EU) integration.DiscussantMy scientific interests are international relations, international public law, regional economic integration, international organizations and others.
I am very interested in international relations in Eurasia (first of all between Russia, China). Especially I am interested in multilateral cooperation within the framework of such interstate interaction associations as the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO), the EAEU, the SCO, the EU and also «The Silk Road Economic Belt».
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1/11/2019 16:23:35Milorad Laziclazicm@gwu.eduGeorge Washington UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Looking for a third panelist and discussant/chair. Our panel deals broadly with religion/religious organizations in Yugoslavia. Paper no. 1 is about the Catholic Church, Vatican and Yugoslavia in the 1980s; paper no. 2 is about Islam and Yugoslavia's policy of nonalignment. Papers that deal with the Kingdom of Yugoslavia or post-Yugoslav space are also welcomePresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Chair, DiscussantHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918
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1/14/2019 21:15:57Christina Novakov-Ritcheycnovakov@ucla.eduUCLACurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Panel title: Believing in Modernity: Coloniality and Eurocentrism in Socialist Southeastern Europe. This panel seeks to explore the consequences of the socialist trust in modernity as the antidote to the colonial, capitalist exploitation of the proletariat in Southeastern Europe. We are interested in papers that address Eurocentrism, whiteness, and coloniality in the context of socialist modernity and its legacy in the post-socialist period in Southeastern Europe. Presenter(s), Discussant(s)ChairPost-socialism, the former Yugoslavia, performance, postcolonialism
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1/14/2019 21:34:51Kirill Ospovatospovat@wisc.eduUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonCurrent MemberLiterature: Russian and EurasianWe are seeking a presenter (or a discussant) and two chairs for two panels on Marx and nineteenth-century Russian literature. Marx’s theoretical thinking evolved in response to the same historical and economic challenges as Russian realism -- French and German revolutions, state oppression, economic inequality of the early industrial age – and was explicitly aligned with developments in Russia: Marx learned Russian to read Chernyshevsky and commented on the Russian peasant commune, Dobroliubov’s criticism and “Eugene Onegin”. However, while immediate cases of Marx’s Russian contacts and direct responses to his thought are, obviously, a welcome starting point, our panels have a broader aim. We would like to go beyond histories of Marxism to explore Marxian thought as a historically situated conceptual framework which can shed new light on the interrelated visions of economy, modes of representation, and social critique in Russian realism. We would welcome papers focusing on Russian fiction and literary criticism of the nineteenth century.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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1/15/2019 12:25:07Sharisa Aidukaitissjn5vf@virginia.eduUniversity of VirginiaCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and EurasianRussian and/or Ukrainian poetryPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My paper is a comparative analysis of the poetry of Anna Akhmatova and Lina Kostenko. Akhmatova is the quintessential woman poet of Russia, and Kostenko is the prominent Ukrainian woman poet. I am analyzing their upbringings, political and national leanings, as well as poetic works. I would like to either join or organize a panel that touches on Eastern European poetry.
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1/16/2019 10:14:07Elena Rakhimova-Sommerselena.sommers@rit.eduRochester Institute of TechnologyCurrent MemberGender/LGBTQ StudiesPanel description: Gender and Russian Identity Re-Branding
Chair: Dr. Elena Rakhimova-Sommers
Elena.sommers@rit.edu
The start of the new millennium brought a shift from a retreat to re-engagement on the part of the Russian state in matters of gender in general and women’s bodies in particular. The panel will explore issues such as these:
• current state-financed, large-scale pronatalist campaigns and their attempt to shape gender norms via representations of motherhood and the heteronormative family structure that blend contemporary consumerist visions of "domestic bliss” with neo-traditionalist images of imperialist and Orthodox norms.
• the evolution of the “women’s/gender question”
• the changing dynamics of the state-mother-child triad
• the workings of a new pronatalist ideology that focuses on creating associations between fertility and ethnic and national homogeneity
The panel will welcome 1 or 2 papers on the subject of Russian politics of gender/bio-politics, defined broadly. Please submit a 300 word abstract by January 24th to Elena Rakhimova-Sommers, elena.sommers@rit.edu
Presenter(s)
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1/16/2019 14:30:04Wiktor Marzecwh.marzec@uw.edu.plThe Robert Zajonc Institute for Social Studies University of WarsawCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924Popular contention and provincial political activism on the Tsarist borderlands. Mapping socialist and nationalist mobilization in the inter-revolutionary decade 1907-1917
The proposed panel seeks to address patterns of popular mobilization on the ground. We want to know more about regional activists or shop-floor-workers between the 1905 Revolution and the consequential conjuncture of 1917-1921. We want to zoom in on popular protest and provincial activism, also including their spatialized dimension. This panel aims at tackling a stealth but far reaching transformation of popular resonance to political ideas in the inter-revolutionary decade.
We look for papers on strikes, popular contention, local nationalist activism etc. We have a paper on popular contention in Poland and on Ukrainian nationalism. Papers on Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania, Finland, Georgia, Azerbaijan etc. - welcome!
Presenter(s), Discussant(s)Discussanthistorical sociology, workers' autobiography, labor history
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1/17/2019 22:29:38Marie-Alice L'Heureuxmalheur@ku.eduUniversity of KansasCurrent MemberAnthropology/Geography/SociologyPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)architecture and design in the early post-socialist city--interested in an urban-focused panel whether from a geography or art/architecture/film perspective. Chairart/architecture/urban/soviet post-soviet/Baltic
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1/18/2019 3:24:25Teresa Obolevitchtereza.obolevich@upjp2.edu.plPontifical U of John Paul II (Poland)Current MemberReligion/PhilosophyBelieving Philosophy: The Russian School of Integral KnowledgePresenter(s)The significance of faith in the concept of integral knowledge of Vladimir SolovievRussian religious philosophy
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1/18/2019 4:53:52Tomasz Blaszczakt.blaszczak@gmail.comVytautas Magnus UniveristyCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918With o group of Lithanian scholars we're trying to organize a panel (or panels) "Church and Migration in Central-Eastern Europe". That would cover the topics on migration and religious communities and/or social live of diasporas.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Chair, DiscussantNational Minorities in Central-Eastern Europe, 20th century history of Belarus and Baltic States.
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1/20/2019 5:56:42agnieszka smelkowskaagnessmelkowska@berkeley.eduUC Berkeley Current MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Organizing a panel about ethnic Germans in Eastern Europe/Soviet Union/Central Asia—any aspect, any time period welcome. I already found a chair, looking for participants & a discussant(s). Presenter(s), Discussant(s)Chair, DiscussantSoviet/Eastern European history--particularly migration, ethnicity, nationalism & ethnic minorities
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1/21/2019 3:28:40Tamara Polyakovatpolyakova@wisc.eduUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924Russia's military history/transnational encounters/daily life in the Soviet UnionPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My paper analyzes the relationship of British troops and Russian (Karelian) peasants during the Russian Civil War and could be grouped with papers on Russia's wars, transnational encounters, or on the history of daily life in the Soviet Union.
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2/11/2019 11:07:46Eliyana Adlerera12@psu.eduPenn StateCurrent MemberJewish StudiesWe are organizing a panel on witnessing and coming to terms with the Holocaust from the outside. Rachel Brenner will speak about Polish non-Jewish witnesses. Eliyana Adler will speak about Polish Jewish refugees in the USSR apprehending the information. We would love another panelist to speak about the situation in England, Palestine, Iran or some other relevant location. Chairs or discussants also welcome. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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1/23/2019 16:37:48Jakub Šloufjakub.slouf@centrum.czThe Institute for the Study of Totalitarian Regimes Czech RepublicCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918(Re)thinking the Labor History in Central and Southeast Europe in 20th Century. Panel focuses on the new approaches to the research of industrial proletariat and the development of its culture, structure and social status. Special attention will be simultaneously paid to issues of labor protests and migrations.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)The paper analyzes the development of protest culture of industrial proletariat in Czechoslovakia over the years 1918-1969. It primarily focuses on the changes of status of the blue-collars in various political regimes and on the corresponding development of the means used by the industrial proletariat to establish self-management organizations and assert their interests. I regard the protest as an instrument of communication between the proletariat and hegemon of political power or other social groups. During the respective period the proletariat had adopted the repertoire of its own specific forms of protest actions that was employed continuously across various political regimes (liberal-democratic, authoritarian, fascist and communist). There were also the strong connections between the factory council movements in the years 1918, 1945 and 1968. Primarily the research is based on the analysis of documents from particular factory archives – especially from the heavy engineering branch.
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2/7/2019 6:04:51Dr Mojca Nidorfer Šiškovičmojca.nidorfer-siskovic@ff.uni-lj.siUniversity of Ljubljana, Faculty of ArtsCurrent MemberArts/Film/Electronic MediaPresenter(s)Documentaries - an effective source for studying culture, society and language;

Documentary films provide an important source of information when studying culture, society and language. In countries, such as Slovenia, documentaries are regularly made, however, rarely presented to a larger, esp. non-Slovene audience, neither translated into other languages. According to their educational potential – providing the data, and presenting different theories, close insight in the fields, such as history, art, literature, science, sport, they can significantly update knowledge, and beliefs of their viewers. In the paper, a project that included study, translation, subtitling and screenings of nine documentary films from different fields, carried out in cooperation with 57 universities, will be presented.
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1/24/2019 9:42:42Michael Loadermichael.loader@ires.uu.seUppsala UniversityCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyOrganising an interdisciplinary panel entitled "Managing Nationalism" that includes three papers from distinct disciplines: history/politics/religious studies. One on the centre-periphery relationship in the postwar USSR, followed by two on contemporary Russia – a) on the utilisation of geopolitical visions to legitimise state discourse on the nation, and b) framing by Russian Orthodox clerics and politicians of public expressions of LGBT identity as part of a larger struggle over Russia's spiritual and demographic future. We are looking for a Chair, Discussant and potentially a fourth presenter.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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1/24/2019 14:18:48Mariia Koskinamkoskin1@binghamton.eduBinghamton UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Social and Environmental Dimensions of Hydroelectric Development in Eastern Siberia, 1960s-1970s
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1/24/2019 18:57:19Ekaterina Chelpanovachelpanovae@ku.eduUniversity of KansasCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Arts/Film/Electronic MediaI am seeking to arrange a panel which would explore a belief in the transformative power of "the state of sincerity" in the Russian and Soviet culture. Ellen Rutten argues that sincerity in the Russian context should not be envisioned as an emotion. Rather, it is a particular relationship to the viewer / the reader, and the transformative power of sincerity operates only through interactivity. In the course of the panel, I am seeking to explore the following questions:
- What is a "curative" (Rutten) power of sincerity in the Russian/Soviet context? How does this power operate?
- How can one measure the audiences' response to the "curative" sincerity?
- If sincerity is discovered only in interactivity, how does it guide/transform the viewer/the reader?
Papers which address sincerity in the cultures/contexts other than Russian are more than welcome.
Please contact me chelpanovae@ku.edu (Ekaterina Chelpanova)
Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)DiscussantMedical humanities, interactivity of the film/literature, beliefs associated with healing the traumatic experiences, socially contextualized narratives about overcoming trauma
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1/26/2019 0:27:41Dr. Gary Berkovichgaryberkovich@gmail.comIndepended scholarCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Communist Beliefs in 1920’s Soviet UnionPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Dom-communa as Realization of Communist Beliefs in 1920’s Soviet Union
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1/26/2019 0:29:55Dr. Gary Berkovichgaryberkovich@gmail.comIndepended scholarCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Communist Beliefs in 1920’s Soviet UnionPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Dom-communa as Realization of Communist Beliefs in 1920’s Soviet Union
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1/26/2019 13:14:59Sandor Foldvarialexfoldvari@gmail.comU of Debrecen (Hungary)Current MemberEarly Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies, to 1800"Early-Printed Cyrillic Books and their Migration between the Great Duchy of Lithuania and the Habsburg Empire" -- For the detailed description of this panel please visit: https://wp.me/PD47I-4E For the main topic “Belief”, it is to be highlighted that with the anniversary of the first East-Slavonic Bible printed by F. Skorina (Prague 1517 19), more attention has been and is to be paid for the history of Cyrillic Books. The territory of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania was the “fatherland” of the innovations in the Cyrillic book-printing as for the genres (“Teaching Gospel” by I. Fyodoroff) and their style, too (gravures, initials, prefaces and afterwards, according to Yaroslaff Isayevich’s works in the field, and others). While it was much spoken about the Reformation lately, thanks to the 500th anniversary, but almost no word was devoted to the “Confessionalisation” as for the Eastern churches of Byzantine Rite. The Uniate Church in the Habsburg Empire were provided by those clergy and the experiences came from the Greek Catholics in the “Land of Crown” (that is, the very Polish territory) and the GDL (the Eastern part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth), thus the identity-shaping, the building of institutions of the Church and monasteries, too, in the Habsburg lands — were based on the previous processes, and lessons learned on the territories of the GDL. Thus, Byelorussian and Ukrainian typographies and church culture made great impacts on the processes of Confessionalization of Slavic peoples in the Habsburg Empire; therefore, the comparative analysis of the measure and character of these impacts, coming from the Lithuanian lands, are inevitable. This panel is an organic continuation of similar sessions on past congresses in Europe, however, still none was organized in America, under the umbrella of ASEEES. The organizer of this panel has already arranged panels in related fields =please visit: https://wp.me/PD47I-4EPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Early-Printed Liturgical Books of Ukrainian Origin in the Hungarian Kingdom :
Their Role in the “Confessionalisation” of Slavic Peoples in the Habsburg Empire =for my abstract please visit: https://wp.me/PD47I-4E
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1/26/2019 12:24:15Florence HelbingFLH3@pitt.eduUniversity of PittsburghCurrent MemberPhD StudentArts/Film/Electronic MediaUpgrading the Subject: Technology and the Self in the Soviet Union;
How does power make use of technology to operate on the human body in its quest to produce a docile subject? What does this process look like in the Soviet context?
Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)A comparative analysis of Alexei Gastev's treatment of the Stakhanovite movement and the contemporary Quantified Self movement as efforts to control the working body and do away with the mind-body distinction.
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2/12/2019 23:06:07Martin Blackwellmartin.blackwell@ung.edumartin.blackwell@ung.eduCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s) Chair, Discussant
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1/28/2019 15:57:17Robert K Evansonevansonr@umkc.eduUniversity of Missouri-Kansas CityCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyPresenter(s)Title: "The Challenge of Nuclear Power in Czech-Austrian Relations." Abstract: Since the excellent study by Rick Fawn in 2006, there have been few scholarly studies of the role of nuclear power in Czech-Austrian relations. While the two states have many areas of cooperation, the issue of Czech nuclear power production sitting astride a country that is strongly committed to ecological security and forswore the nuclear option years ago remains a sticking point in between them. I would trace the dispute's history through the present and place it in the context of the two countries' overall relations, trends in central European and EU nuclear policies, and the literature on regional politics.
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1/28/2019 15:57:50Robert K Evansonevansonr@umkc.eduUniversity of Missouri-Kansas CityCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyPresenter(s)Title: "The Challenge of Nuclear Power in Czech-Austrian Relations." Abstract: Since the excellent study by Rick Fawn in 2006, there have been few scholarly studies of the role of nuclear power in Czech-Austrian relations. While the two states have many areas of cooperation, the issue of Czech nuclear power production sitting astride a country that is strongly committed to ecological security and forswore the nuclear option years ago remains a sticking point in between them. I would trace the dispute's history through the present and place it in the context of the two countries' overall relations, trends in central European and EU nuclear policies, and the literature on regional politics.
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1/28/2019 20:05:42Raymond DeLucarsdeluca@g.harvard.eduHarvard UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentArts/Film/Electronic Media"Film and Fashion: The Significance of Dress in Soviet Cinema." This panel seeks to mine the intersection between moving image culture and fashion culture at various moments in Soviet history. We currently have one paper on fashion consumerism in 1970s cinema and one on clothing in Kira Muratova's work. Presenter(s), ChairChair, DiscussantCinema; Visual Culture
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1/29/2019 17:28:23Sara Powellsarajopowell@g.harvard.eduHarvard UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Literature: Russian and EurasianPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Russian Fan Receptions of King Arthur and the Matter of Britain
In recent times there have been several English-language retellings of British legends that have gained popularity (_Merlin_, King Arthur: Legend of the Sword, etc.) In this paper I focus on how Russian fans engage with these works, and through them, overtly or not, engage with the Matter of Britain itself.
ChairUkrainian literature, Gogol, Early Modern Literature, Shevchenko, Gender, Fan Fiction
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1/30/2019 0:40:09Mariya Melentyevamariya.melentyeva@gmail.comUniversity of AlbertaCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924I am looking for presenters to organize a penal which considers the role of women who participated in the intellectual and political life of Imperial Russia by providing assistance to their husbands. As politicians, professors, doctors, and writers, men were visible public figures; their wives and female partners were an integral part of their husbands’ activities and remained in the shadow. I am going to present a paper on the head of the Kiev liberals Ivan Luchitsky and his wife in late 19th-early 20th c and hope to find 2 presenters on other public figures in the provinces or the capitals.Presenter(s), Discussant(s)Chairantisemitism, nationalism, liberalism in Imperial Russia
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2/10/2019 8:24:12Eva-Maria Walthereva-maria.walther@geschichte.uni-regensburg.deGraduate School for East and Southeast European StudiesCurrent MemberPhD StudentAnthropology/Geography/Sociology- PANEL COMPLETE - Looking for one more presenter for a panel on narratives of the Visegrád countries' multi-ethnic past in recent discourses on refugees, immigration and multiculturalism. Papers may explore the usage, exploitation or omission of this heritage in current polarizing debates. Historians, an anthropologist and a political scientist are already involved in the panel.Presenter(s)
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1/31/2019 2:13:34Francesca Volpifrancesca.volpi@unimi.itState University of MilanCurrent MemberPhD StudentArts/Film/Electronic MediaI'd like to join/form a panel dedicated to how the National identity discourse in Russia was (re)framed in the light of the events in Ukraine and especially Crimea in 2013-2014 in Russian press and on television channels, not only in terms of news but also in fiction, advertising, entertainment. It would be interesting to extend the discussion beyond Russia and to include relevant contributions in the Ukrainian and/or Tatar fields. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My research focuses on the Russian media discursive practices about the annexation of the Crimea Peninsula in the 2014. The belief that Crimea belongs, belonged and will always belong inextricably to Russia is deeply rooted in the consciousness of many Russians as well as in government stances and most of the media, at least the State-aligned ones.
My paper intends to examine the question of alleged Russian membership of the Crimea, a captious issue since, due to the multi-century multi-ethnic dimension of the peninsula, no ethnic group can really legitimately claim to be exclusively autochthonous. To do this, on the one hand, will be investigated the official narration of the events of February-March 2014 on the media outlets loyal to the government; on the other, possible counter-narratives on relatively independent web-media will be presented.
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1/31/2019 2:14:51Francesca Volpifrancesca.volpi@unimi.itState University of MilanCurrent MemberPhD StudentArts/Film/Electronic MediaI'd like to join/form a panel dedicated to how the National identity discourse in Russia was (re)framed in the light of the events in Ukraine and especially Crimea in 2013-2014 in Russian press and on television channels, not only in terms of news but also in fiction, advertising, entertainment. It would be interesting to extend the discussion beyond Russia and to include relevant contributions in the Ukrainian and/or Tatar fields. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My research focuses on the Russian media discursive practices about the annexation of the Crimea Peninsula in the 2014. The belief that Crimea belongs, belonged and will always belong inextricably to Russia is deeply rooted in the consciousness of many Russians as well as in government stances and most of the media, at least the State-aligned ones.
My paper intends to examine the question of alleged Russian membership of the Crimea, a captious issue since, due to the multi-century multi-ethnic dimension of the peninsula, no ethnic group can really legitimately claim to be exclusively autochthonous. To do this, on the one hand, will be investigated the official narration of the events of February-March 2014 on the media outlets loyal to the government; on the other, possible counter-narratives on relatively independent web-media will be presented.
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1/31/2019 2:15:58Francesca Volpifrancesca.volpi@unimi.itState University of MilanCurrent MemberPhD StudentArts/Film/Electronic MediaI'd like to join/form a panel dedicated to how the National identity discourse in Russia was (re)framed in the light of the events in Ukraine and especially Crimea in 2013-2014 in Russian press and on television channels, not only in terms of news but also in fiction, advertising, entertainment. It would be interesting to extend the discussion beyond Russia and to include relevant contributions in the Ukrainian and/or Tatar fields. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My research focuses on the Russian media discursive practices about the annexation of the Crimea Peninsula in the 2014. The belief that Crimea belongs, belonged and will always belong inextricably to Russia is deeply rooted in the consciousness of many Russians as well as in government stances and most of the media, at least the State-aligned ones.
My paper intends to examine the question of alleged Russian membership of the Crimea, a captious issue since, due to the multi-century multi-ethnic dimension of the peninsula, no ethnic group can really legitimately claim to be exclusively autochthonous. To do this, on the one hand, will be investigated the official narration of the events of February-March 2014 on the media outlets loyal to the government; on the other, possible counter-narratives on relatively independent web-media will be presented.
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1/31/2019 2:25:52Barbara Kopačbarbi.uppsala636@gmail.comIndependent scholarCurrent MemberPhD StudentComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Language policy framework of national minorities and the role of belief in (keeping) their identityDiscussantPolitical science, linguistics
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1/31/2019 4:47:22Francesca Volpifrancesca.volpi@unimi.itState University of MilanCurrent MemberPhD StudentArts/Film/Electronic MediaI'd like to join or form a panel dedicated to how the National identity discourse in Russia was (re)framed in the light of the events in Ukraine and especially Crimea in 2013-2014 in Russian press and on television channels, not only in terms of news but also in fiction, advertising, entertainment. It would be interesting to extend the discussion beyond Russia and to include relevant contributions in the Ukrainian and/or Crimean Tatar fields.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My research focuses on the Russian media discursive practices about the annexation of the Crimea Peninsula in the 2014. The belief that Crimea belongs, belonged and will always belong inextricably to Russia is deeply rooted in the consciousness of many Russians as well as in government stances and most of the media, at least the State-aligned ones.
My paper intends to examine the question of alleged Russian membership of the Crimea, a captious issue since, due to the multi-century multi-ethnic dimension of the peninsula, no ethnic group can really legitimately claim to be exclusively autochthonous. To do this, on the one hand, will be investigated the official narration of the events of February-March 2014 on the media outlets loyal to the government; on the other, possible counter-narratives on relatively independent web-media will be presented.
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1/31/2019 7:09:51Ashley Morseashleymorse@g.harvard.eduHarvard UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Early Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies, to 1800This panel explores the intersection of aesthetics, belief, and politics in sixteenth and seventeenth-century Muscovy through a discussion of “excess” in cultural production. What can “excess,” as it has been theorized by twentieth-century thinkers such as Georges Bataille and Jean Luc Marion, tell us about changing attitudes towards innovation in cultural production during this period?Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)We are currently looking for a third paper, discussant, and chair.
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1/31/2019 12:27:27Maksym Klymentievclymaxt@yahoo.comKyiv Skovoroda Institute of PhilosophyCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Central and Southeast Europe, 1800-1918Presenter(s)My report concerns itself with the Pugachev rebellion as one of the major events of Russia's early modern history and the ways in which it has been traditionally interpreted by historians who have viewed the event's nature as related to class struggle or economic causes. Instead, I will argue that the nature of the insurrection was informed not so much by the above factors as by cultural and religious issues that directly stemmed from Peter the Great's earlier radical reforms. Russia's westernization and its move towards the values of European Enlightenment started by the tsar some 70 years earlier had reached its peak during the reign of another greatest westernizer of Russia - Catherine II. As Russia's westernization could only proceeded eastward (which was where the insurrection took place), I will argue that the Pugachev rebellion was the last attempt of cultural-religious forces representing the pre-Petrine Muscovy (who included Old Believers, Cossacks, and huge masses of Russians displaced in the wake of Peter's reforms) to halt and to possibly reverse Russia's radically changing civilizational paradigm. I will also argue that, despite being crushed, the Pugachev rebellion ultimately succeeded in that it had informed the distorted ways in which the Enlightenment's values were eventually adopted by the Russian Empire.Chair
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2/9/2019 15:43:34Ewa Siwakewasiwak@txstate.eduTexas State UniversityCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, 1800-1918Discussant(s)“A Habsburg Petting Zoo: The Ukrainian Periphery through a Viennese pince-nez” (Ukrainian Galicia in Viennese print media and exhibits). The paper brings together approaches from postcolonial, nationalism, and cultural studies.DiscussantHabsburg Galicia
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2/1/2019 5:19:34Vladimir Đorđevićvladadjo@yahoo.comMendel Uni, Brno, Czech RepublicCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyEU as an Actor of Human Security in KosovoDiscussantWestern Balkans, EU integration, Democratization
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2/1/2019 9:06:25Jovana Durovicjoxana@gmail.comUniversity of NottinghamCurrent MemberPhD StudentArts/Film/Electronic MediaRebellion in popular Yugoslav youth film: coming of age as the means of political disobedience
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2/1/2019 12:19:28Irina Gigovagigovai@cofc.eduCollege of CharlestonCurrent MemberHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918"Cultural Internationalism in the Interwar Period" - I would love to see a panel that explores how Eastern Europeans participated in the various professional, international organizations, congresses or other initiatives that defined the 1920s and 1930s. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My own focus is on Bulgarian writers, who sought to establish personal and professional contacts with other Europeans and world writers and scholars in a number of different ways.Chair, Discussant20th century Eastern or Southeastern Europe; communist period; art and culture; urban culture; Bulgaria
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2/1/2019 16:54:49Brett Cookebrett-cooke@tamu.eduTexas A&M UniversityCurrent MemberLiterature: Russian and EurasianCognitive approaches to Russian literaturePresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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2/1/2019 20:03:16Robert Argenbrightrobert.argenbright@geog.utah.eduUniversity of UtahCurrent MemberAnthropology/Geography/SociologyUrban material politicsPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)I want to address the Russian solid waste crisis, which started in Mosocw Oblast' and became a national issue.
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2/1/2019 20:06:57Robert Argenbrightrobert.argenbright@geog.utah.eduUniversity of UtahCurrent MemberAnthropology/Geography/SociologyUrban material politicsPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)I want to address the Russian solid waste crisis, which started in Mosocw Oblast' and became a national issue.
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2/2/2019 4:40:04Kristiina Silvankristiina.silvan@gmail.comUniversity of HelsinkiCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924I would like to organize a panel on (communist) legacies and revivals. Ideally, the papers of the panel would analyze communist era practices that have either outlived the end of communist rule or initially disappeared but later re-emerged. The potential papers can also examine legacies & revivals in some other temporal context, for example pre-communist legacies during communism, etc.

Alternatively I would be interested in forming a panel examining state youth policy in the post-communist context.
Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My paper examines the legacy - revival relationship in the context of the Belarusian Republican Youth Union (BRYU), a contemporary state-sponsored youth organization modeled after the Soviet era Komsomol.Chairperestroika, 1990s, Belarus, social movements
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2/2/2019 11:41:12Lena Marasinovalenamarassinova@gmail.comNational Research University Higher School of Economics (Moscow))Current MemberEarly Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies, to 1800PANEL. “THE DEATH PENALTY: IDEOLOGY AND SYMBOLISM OF SELF-DEFENSE OF THE STATE IN RUSSIA: 18TH-19TH CENTURIES.”
It is proposed to consider various cases of death sentences and executions in terms of their historical context, the argument of capital punishment, as well as the symbols of the execution of the sentence.
• The spectrum of crimes for which the final sentence is pronounced reveals the main source of danger from the point of view of the state.
• The symbolism and theatricalization of the execution reproduces the mechanisms of social control.
• The motivation for clemency (mercy) is a source for understanding the channels of self-representation of power.
Studying the various cases of the death penalty and mercy can provide rich material on the relationship between church and government, the law and the court of God and the state. Finally, the attitude towards the death penalty of contemporaries can be an important indicator of the state of minds in society.
Presenter(s)
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2/3/2019 20:29:39Semyon Leonenkosemyon_leonenko@berkeley.eduUC BerkeleyCurrent MemberPhD StudentLiterature: Russian and EurasianCrime and Punishment: Plot, Major and Minor Characters, Sound Images
Papers examining poetics of Dostoevsky's other major fiction are also welcome.
Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My paper deals with sound patterning in Crime and Punishment and its role in the novel's architectonics.
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2/4/2019 12:58:54Barbara Kopačbarbi.uppsala636@gmail.comUniversity of Ljubljana, Faculty of ArtsCurrent MemberPhD StudentComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)We are two discussants, looking for a panel/panel organizer. If anyone has a free slot on their panel, we would be happy to join. In case that case, please, contact me. We are both dealing with education/language learning issues.Chair, DiscussantInternational politics, domestic policy, minority issue, language policies, diplomacy.
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2/4/2019 8:11:39Ammon Cheskinammon.cheskin@glasgow.ac.uk University of GlasgowCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyPresenter(s)Russian and EU security policy: my paper examines how '(diss)information' is securitised in EU and Russian security discourse. The analysis traces how securitisation processes are mutually contingent and how each side reacts to the other side, seeing information in different, increasingly antagonistic terms. Chair, DiscussantPolitics, foreign policy, identities, minority politics, Russia, Baltic states,
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2/4/2019 12:04:18Ariel Otrubaariel.otruba@rutgers.eduRutgers UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Gender/LGBTQ StudiesThe proposed title of this panel is "Gendered Mobilities: Movement as a Politics of Resistance." Gendered mobilities is an important framework for examining stories of ‘everyday forms of resistance’ to the precarious conditions brought on by social fragmentation caused by conflict, displacement, occupation, marginalization and other forms of institutionalized violence. This panel offers case studies from the Caucasus region, which elucidate various practices, discourses, and strategies of migrant agency. These cases exemplify the belief in border transgression as a type of liberatory politics against patriarchy, violence, wars, and borders themselves. We welcome any research projects that focus on migrant/refugee/IDP agency or gendered mobilities. Although the panel has been described as emphasizing case studies from the Caucasus region, we would be happy to expand the regional focus of the panel to include projects concerning other places and populations within Eastern Europe and Eurasia.Presenter(s), Discussant(s)
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2/5/2019 10:55:46Maria Ukhvatovamaria.ukhvatova@gmail.comSt Petersburg State UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Religion/PhilosophyPaper topic: "Blessing of the Guardians": Religious Rhetoric at Inauguration of Governors in Russia. The paper analyses the public speeches by the Russian Orthodox leaders during the governors' inaugurations since 2012 to 2017. The results show “authoritarian” message in the overwhelming majority of speeches. Not only does the Orthodox clergy emphasize spiritual and moral values, which are interpreted as the foundation of state, but it also shows strong support for the lack of alternation of power, ties success and prosperity of regions to the cooperation of regional authorities with the Church and insists on the divine nature of power per se.
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2/5/2019 18:03:52Susan Smith-Petersusan.smithpeter@csi.cuny.eduCollege of Staten Island/ CUNYCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924"The Poetics of Propaganda: Russians Judge America"ChairThis is a panel that consists of myself, Ilya Vinitsky and Ivan Kurilla. Each of us will be discussing a Russian author of the 19th century who critiqued America. Marjorie Hilton is the discussant. We just need a chair. Hope to hear from interested people.
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2/5/2019 22:09:44Klavdia Tatarktata092@uottawa.caUniversity of OttawaCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)Comparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyPanel on post-soviet diasporas in the North AmericaPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)"How to be a [little] fish in the pond and survive: ethnic diasporas as political entrepreneurs in Canada". ChairRussian and Ukrainian diasporas in the North America and Europe
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2/6/2019 4:59:43Andreas Umlandandreas.umland@stanfordalumni.orgInstitute for Euro-Atlantic Cooperation, KyivCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyPresenter(s)Between Frontline and Parliament: Ukrainian Political Parties and Irregular Armed Groups since 2014
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2/6/2019 5:04:07Andreas Umlandandreas.umland@stanfordalumni.orgInstitute for Euro-Atlantic Cooperation, KyivCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyIssues of the Russian-Ukrainian War in the Donets Basin since 2014Between Frontline and Parliament: Ukrainian Political Parties and Irregular Armed Groups since 2014
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2/6/2019 11:20:19Paul Behringerpaul_behringer@hks.harvard.eduHarvard Kennedy SchoolCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924I work on U.S. and Japanese intervention in the Russian Civil War in the Far East (1918-1922). I'd like to join a panel with some type of military, diplomatic, or transnational theme. More particularly, I am hoping to present part of my dissertation that deals with the Nikolaevsk massacre, but I can change the focus to fit the panel topic.
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2/6/2019 12:48:38Joe Colleyshawjoe_colleyshaw@brown.eduBrown UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Looking to join/form a panel on revisionist views of Russia in the contemporary periodPresenter(s), ChairThe Romanov's Revisited - the re-imgination of the Romanov's in Moscow's Russia My history museum Chair, Discussant
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2/6/2019 15:27:09Stefanie Woodard (Krull)skrull@emory.eduEmory UniversityCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Central and Southeast Europe, Since 1918Looking to form a panel on topic of "Protecting Heritage, Constructing Memory: UNESCO Sites & National Narratives in Eastern Europe"Presenter(s), ChairUNESCO World Heritage Site designations in Communist Poland and their connections to Polish nationalism and/or narratives of Polish nationhoodChair, DiscussantEthnic minorities in Eastern Europe, ethnic Germans in Poland, Cold War migration
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2/6/2019 23:35:13Joanna Trzeciakjtrzecia@kent.eduKent State UniversityCurrent MemberReligion/PhilosophyKropotkinPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)I am looking for presenters, a chair, and discussants for a panel on Petr Kropotkin.
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2/6/2019 23:39:51Joanna Trzeciakjtrzecia@kent.eduKent State UniversityCurrent MemberArts/Film/Electronic MediaRepresentations of atrocity in the visual arts, including cinema. Regional focus on the Polish/Ukrainian borderlands in the twentieth century.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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2/7/2019 7:05:56James RyanRyanJ5@cardiff.ac.ukCardiff UniversityCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924The Politics of History and Memory in Putin's RussiaPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Reckoning with the Past: Stalin and Stalinism in Putin's Russia
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2/7/2019 7:37:39Deirdre Ruscitti Harshmand.harshman@hse.ruChristopher Newport University / NRU Higher School of Economics (Moscow)Current MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Chair, Discussant20th c Russian history, focusing specifically on urban history, gender history, or history of everyday life
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2/7/2019 11:52:32Ala Crecunacreciun@umd.eduUniversity of Maryland, College ParkCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924Roundtable: "Russian Press as a Historical Source: Challenges, Opportunities, Collections"Presenter(s)ChairRussia, press, newspapers, nationalism, Alexander III, cultural and social history
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2/7/2019 16:10:31Matthew D. Cottondoc.cotton88@gmail.comMcPherson College/University of WashingtonCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Surviving the Apocalypse: Rebuilding Stalinist Civilization on the Banks of the Volga--A history of the city's first year after the Battle of StalingradDiscussantSoviet history, post World War II, Stalinism, De-Stalinization
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2/7/2019 16:10:51Matthew D. Cottondoc.cotton88@gmail.comMcPherson College/University of WashingtonCurrent MemberPhD Candidate (ABD status)History: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Surviving the Apocalypse: Rebuilding Stalinist Civilization on the Banks of the Volga--A history of the city's first year after the Battle of StalingradDiscussantSoviet history, post World War II, Stalinism, De-Stalinization
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2/7/2019 17:14:46Natan Meirmeir@pdx.eduPortland State UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924Magical Practices in Religious Communities of Eastern Europe -- ideally an interdisciplinary panel bringing together history, religious studies, anthropology, folklore, etc.Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)My paper examines the cholera wedding, a Jewish magico-religious ritual intended to stop the spread of epidemic, in the Russian and Austro-Hungarian empires and interwar Poland.
Chair, DiscussantJewish history, subaltern studies, religious studies, folklore.
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2/7/2019 19:17:19Ksenia Papazovaksegelen@gmail.comUniversity of ManchesterCurrent MemberPhD StudentLiterature: Russian and EurasianParatexts, translation studies, and book culture in Russia/East EuropePresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Paratexts in contemporary Russian book design
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2/8/2019 10:00:42Eralda L Lameborshilameborshi.eralda@gmail.comStephen F. Austin State UniversityCurrent MemberComparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicySino-East European Relations during the Cold War and the Non-Alignment MovementPresenter(s), Discussant(s)We seek to explore the Sino-East European relations as part of a larger, international Non-Alignment Movement, and to examine the ideological trajectories that inspired the perspectives housed under this alternative view of the world during the Cold War. This panel invites contributors who critically engage with the modes or nexus points of exchange between China and countries from the Eastern European bloc via the Soviet Union or other channels. The panel welcomes case studies and papers including, but not limited to: literary studies, film studies, TV and visual studies etc. We structure this panel around questions including: What are the aesthetics of non-alignment vis-a-vis the Warsaw Pact via Chinese influence? How did artists and writers from Eastern Europe respond to and imagine the Chinese ideological influence? What is the enduring potential of these networks of exchange of ideology? We locate our inquiry in the interstitial space delineated by ideological interpellation and exchange between China and Eastern Europe; this space offers a heuristic of engagement with the Soviet Union’s influence in an act of counterbalancing NATO’s presence in Europe. We consider how these changes and contaminations offered possibilities for imagining, and confronting new international futures that existed in relation to and against geographical proximity. Please email proposals of 250-300 words and a CV to the panel organizers, Eralda Lameborshi (lameborshi.eralda@gmail.com) and Victoria Lupascu (lupascu.victoria.6@gmail.com)
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2/8/2019 11:02:44Olena Leipniksoc_ovl@shsu.eduSHSUCurrent MemberAnthropology/Geography/SociologyI am interested in anthropological take on Russian, Ukrainian, and other cultures of the region. Language (linguistics), music, traditions, etc. with relation to the characteristics of the world view, subsistence strategies, ludic practices, structures of power and governing, collective trauma, chosen trauma and culture narratives, language ideology, eroticism, institutionalized forms of play - those are some of the topics of interest. My presentation would be on the key metaphors of Ukrainian culture. Presenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)
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2/8/2019 12:37:33Stephanie Hitztalerstephanie.hitztaler@helsinki.fiAleksanteri Institute, HelsinkiCurrent MemberAnthropology/Geography/SociologyRussian Arctic: Energy and Environment. We are looking for papers on this theme, yet would also welcome any papers considering another aspect of the Russian Arctic, or looking at the issue of energy politics in Russia/Eurasia more broadly. We also welcome any papers addressing climate change in this region. Presenter(s), Discussant(s)
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2/9/2019 4:52:26Anastasia Mitrofanovaanastasia-mit@mail.ruFinancial University, RussiaCurrent MemberReligion/PhilosophyOrthodox social volonteering as a tool for restoring social solidarityChairOrthodox Christianity in Russia today
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2/9/2019 13:24:47Gianfranco Caterinagianfrancocaterina@gmail.comFundação Getulio VargasNot a Member (Your submissions will be deleted. Become a member first)PhD Candidate (ABD status)Comparative Politics/International Relations/Security Studies/Foreign PolicyChair, Discussant(s)Soviet-Brazilian political and economic relations (1947-1985)
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2/9/2019 14:16:58Erin Duszaerin_dusza@yahoo.comIndiana UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentHistory: Central and Southeast Europe, 1800-1918Belief in their heritage: the role 19th century forgeries played in Czech nationalism and identityPresenter(s)
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2/9/2019 16:39:18Gary Berkovichgaryberkovich@gmail.comindepended scholarCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924Communist Beliefs in 1920’s Soviet Union and Their ImpactsPresenter(s), Chair, Discussant(s)Dom-communa as Realization of Communist Beliefs in 1920’s Soviet Union
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2/9/2019 18:50:37Sarah Lewissarahlewis@fas.harvard.eduHarvard UniversityCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, 1800-1924Race, Whiteness, and the History of the Caucasus RegionPresenter(s), Discussant(s)How does the field examine and grapple with the role of the Caucasus region in the construction of racial whiteness in America? We often consider the construction of race as a "black Atlantic" discourse, one focused around the cultures connected through the transatlantic slave trade. How do we historicize the interest in the seemingly disconnected Black Sea region of the Caucasus as a foundational site for the conceptualization of racial whiteness as well? This panel is inspired by my manuscript on this topic (Forthcoming, Harvard University Press). Papers of all vantage points on this topic welcome, from literature and visual culture and beyond. Chair
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2/10/2019 4:18:45Victoria PhillipsLVB3@columbia.eduColumbia UniversityCurrent MemberReligion/PhilosophyChair, DiscussantCultural Diplomacy, Cold War, Arts, Religion, Ph.D. Panels
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2/10/2019 10:23:53Katherine Zubovichkzubovich@ryerson.caRyerson UniversityCurrent MemberHistory: Russian and Eurasian, Since 1924(This panel actually crossed 1924, contrary to the category marked) The panel is all set--we are looking for a DISCUSSANT.
Panel Title: "Geographies and Infrastructures of Power: Center-Periphery Networks in the Russian Empire and Soviet Union"

Panel Description: This panel brings together historians working across the 1917 divide on questions of elite networks, economic relations, and infrastructural development that linked center and periphery in the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union. The panelists focus, in particular, on links between St. Petersburg/Moscow and Ukraine in their analysis of Imperial-era sugar barons, Stalin-era skyscraper building, and defense production under Khrushchev.
Panelists: Orysia Kulick, Olena Petrenko, Katherine Zubovich
Discussant(s)
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2/10/2019 12:17:13Eva TrojeEtroje@princeton.eduPrinceton UniversityCurrent MemberPhD StudentLiterature: Russian and EurasianThrough words and beyond them: silence and scent in Sologub, Ivanov, and AkhmatovaChair, Discussant(s)
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