Sea Turtle Release Protocol and Gear (Responses)
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKL
1
TimestampEnter your full nameemail addressCity, State, Zip CodeCheck all that applyComments
2
9/21/2017 15:43:29Testtest@gulfcouncil.orgTampa, FLOtherTEST
3
10/4/2017 14:10:53Dylan Hubbard
dhubbard@hubbardsmarina.com
Madiera Beach, FL
Charter/Headboat For-Hire
My family business has been fishing central west coast of Florida for nearly 90 years and four generations. Today we operate 6 federally permitted vessels including two 65+ passenger head boats and four federally permitted charter vessels. On top of these permits, I am also here today to represent the Florida Guides association as their Offshore Director. Finally, I am a CCA life member as well. Turtle release gear suggested at this council meeting
We feel flexibility for enforcement officers needs to be added to this process as well. For example, if you don’t have the exact brand of pliers or de hookers in the regs but the ones on board your vessel are close to the ones required but simply a different make or model there shouldn’t be violations. The most glaring example of why flexibility is so important is the de-hookers that were added to the list of gear. These are not even being produced any longer and are unobtainable because the company who holds the patent on these de-hookers has been out of business for a long period. Therefore, flexibility is paramount for our enforcement officers.
4
10/17/2017 17:45:04Doug Stamm
doug@stammphoto.com
Naples FL 34119
Private Recreational Angler
Don't understand the amberjack closing. Don't know who harvests them, we take a couple per year, rarely seen anyone fish for them, see an abundance of amberjack off SW Florida. Why the closing......??????
5
10/28/2017 14:39:57Cristina Vargas
Cdvargas94@gmail.com
39564OtherAs the health of the Gulf Coast is correlative with the wealth of the Gulf Coast, as well as surrounding ecosystems,!I feel that this innovative protocol is exceptional for local and commercial fishermen. I would like to see this ‘trend’ spread beyond the Gulf of Mexico.
6
12/31/2017 9:45:54Joseph Nash
Captjoenash@gmail.com
Orange Beach
Charter/Headboat For-Hire
I think if the charter for hire and commercial fisherman have to have all the gear on board and subject to fines, every recreational angler has to have this equipment as well. They are out here just as much now as we are and it's all about the turtle isn't it?
7
5/8/2018 10:22:17Michael Burke
Mburke80@tampabay.rr. com
Inverness, FL 34450
Private Recreational Angler
No matter what type of gear the Council proposes, means absolutely nothing due to the fact, it’s the individuals on the various Commercial vessels who will be “releasing” the sea turtles safely. Moreover, with any gear, time is of the essence in releasing marine life safely. If for example a sea turtle is caught, how long will the sea turtle live before being brought up to the boat for release. Gear means nothing at that point, it’s the time it took to rescue that life. Thank you.
8
6/13/2018 15:30:00Eric Brazer
eric@shareholdersalliance.org
NGO, OtherJune 13, 2018

Dear Council members and Council staff,

On behalf of the Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Shareholders’ Alliance (Shareholder’ Alliance), please accept this letter as public comment on Reef Fish Amendment 49 – Modifications to the Sea Turtle Release Gear and Framework Procedure for the Reef Fish Fishery. The Shareholders’ Alliance is the largest organization of commercial snapper and grouper fishermen in the Gulf, and we pride ourselves on our dedication to conservation, sustainable wild-harvested seafood, and science-based management.

We appreciate the efforts by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council) to provide additional options for the types of gear allowed on commercial and charter-for-hire vessels to release encountered sea turtles. We also appreciate streamlining the regulatory process in the case that future gear types are certified as allowable by NOAA. We support the following actions and alternatives:
• Action 1, Alternative 2 (Council preferred)
• Action 2, Alternative 2, Options A and B (Council preferred)

However, we would like to stress to the Council the need for continuing to protect sea turtles in the Gulf. The commercial reef fish industry is not the only sector that may have impacts on these endangered species, and in-fact the recreational sector takes an estimated three times more sea turtles per year than the commercial vertical longline fishermen . All five species found in the Gulf of Mexico (loggerhead, green, Kemp’s ridley, hawksbill, and leatherback) are listed as endangered. Continued protective measures are warranted, through considering applicable regulations across reef fish sectors (commercial, charter-for-hire, and private anglers).

According to the Biological Opinion published in 2011 that evaluated the impact of the reef fish fishery on sea turtles and smalltooth sawfish, recreational vertical line fishermen were estimated to interact with 125 sea turtles annually, killing 38 . It is our concern that several factors could mean that these numbers could be lower than the actual impact of the private angler sector including but not limited to:
• potential underestimation of recreational effort as proven in NOAA’s prior recalibration analyses;
• a rapidly expanding private angler sector;
• inconsistent reportings of interactions to the Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network; and
• expansion of sea turtle populations thanks to the successful Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act and the Endangered Species Act.

These factors could also mean that private angler interactions with sea turtles could rise rapidly in coming years. We can’t afford to roll back progress on rebuilding sea turtle species because one of the three fishing sectors in the Gulf is avoiding important conservation requirements.

Therefore, we recommend that the Council build upon its good work with Amendment 49 and initiate a subsequent amendment that would require private anglers to carry sea turtle release gear on-board when targeting reef fish the Gulf of Mexico. Both commercial bottom longline and commercial vertical line fishermen are willing to adapt to new these new regulations in order to help conserve sea turtles. The private angler sector needs to be held to the same standards of conservation and accountability.

Thank you for the opportunity to provide comment and we appreciate your consideration of our request.

Sincerely,

Eric Brazer
Deputy Director
Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Shareholders’ Alliance
9
6/17/18Abby Webster
captainabbywebster@gmail.com
NGOOn behalf of The Charter Fishermen's Association {CFA), please accept these comments on the following issues to be discussed at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Gulf Council) meeting in Key West, FL this week.
The Charter Fishermen's Association supports the following actions and alternatives:

• Action 1, Alternative 2 (Gulf Council preferred)
• Action 2, Alternative 2, (Gulf Council preferred)

CFA would also like to see continued protective measures taken for sea turtles in The Gulf. We recommend The Gulf Council initiate a subsequent amendment that would require private anglers to carry sea turtle release gear on-board when targeting reef fish in The Gulf of Mexico. To sustain the continued improved health of The Gulf of Mexico all sectors should be held to the same standards of conservation and accountability.
10
6/16/18Ken Haddad
khaddad50@gmail.com
I am emailing you because ASA cannot attend the Council meeting in Key West. We want to make sure you know our positions on 3 specific agenda items.
Descending Devices and Venting Tools:
1. We appreciate the progress being made on descending devices and venting tools and agree with the reports presented from the Outreach and Education Technical Committee. Specifically we support the information and recommendations presented in Tab O, No. 4, 4a, and 8.
2. Two motions by the Technical Committee need Council attention and we encourage acceptance and subsequent direction by the council.
3. Technical Committee Motion 1: To recommend that the Council take responsibility as the Gulf coordinating body for reducing discard mortality through best handling practice issues. Further, that the O& E Technical Committee be charged with further development of the Outreach Plan in concert with the states, organizations, and other bodies. Motion carried with no opposition.
4. Technical Committee Motion 2: To recommend the Council instigate a meeting of scientists, managers, and stakeholders to develop an action plan that includes information dissemination and science and monitoring needs that ensure the policy purpose and objectives are both measurable and successful. Motion carried with no opposition.
5. We are concerned that Motion 2 could be disregarded by the Council and strongly support progressing with this recommendation as the Council Policy will not be successful without additional effort identified in the recommendation.
6. We suggest that the Council approach the GSMFC and the States to partner in carrying out Motion 2.
7. We consider the output from the Technical Committee as having all the elements of a successful implementation of the Policy and encourage specific motions by the Council to accept their reports and recommendation and provide specific direction, through motions, for staff to move forward on the two recommendations.
11
6/15/18Eric Brazer
eric@shareholdersalliance.org
On behalf of the Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Shareholders’ Alliance (Shareholders’ Alliance), please accept these comments on the following issues to be discussed at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Gulf Council) meeting in Key West, Florida this week.
Amendment 49 – Modifications to the Sea Turtle Release Gear and Framework Procedure for the Reef Fish Fishery.

We appreciate the efforts by the Gulf Council to provide additional options for the types of gear allowed on commercial and charter-for-hire vessels to release encountered sea turtles. We also appreciate streamlining the regulatory process in the case that future gear types are certified as allowable by NMFS. To that end, we support the following actions and alternatives:
• Action 1: Alternative 2 (Gulf Council preferred)
• Action 2: Alternative 2, Options A and B (Gulf Council preferred)

However, we would like to stress to the Gulf Council the need for continuing to protect sea turtles in the Gulf. The commercial reef fish industry is not the only sector that may have impacts on these endangered species, and in-fact the recreational reef fish sector takes an estimated three times more sea turtles per year than the commercial vertical longline fishermen6. All five species found in the Gulf of Mexico (loggerhead, green, Kemp’s ridley, hawksbill, and leatherback) are listed as endangered. Continued protective measures are warranted, through considering applicable regulations across reef fish sectors (commercial, charter-for-hire, and private anglers).

According to the Biological Opinion published in 2011 that evaluated the impact of the reef fish fishery on sea turtles and smalltooth sawfish, recreational vertical line fishermen were estimated to interact with 125 sea turtles annually, killing 387. It is our concern that several factors could mean that these numbers could be lower than the actual impact of the private angler sector, including but not limited to:
• potential underestimation of recreational effort as proven in NMFS’ prior (and current) recalibration analyses;
• a rapidly expanding private angler sector;
• inconsistent reportings of interactions to the Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network;
and
• expansion of sea turtle populations thanks to the successful Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act and the Endangered Species Act.

These factors could also mean that private angler interactions with sea turtles could rise rapidly in coming years. We can’t afford to roll back progress on rebuilding sea turtle species because one of the three fishing sectors in the Gulf is avoiding important conservation requirements.

Therefore, we recommend that the Gulf Council build upon its good work with Amendment 49 and initiate a subsequent amendment that would require private anglers to carry sea turtle release gear on-board when targeting reef fish the Gulf of Mexico. Both commercial bottom longline and commercial vertical line fishermen are willing to adapt to new these new regulations in order to help conserve sea turtles. The private angler sector needs to be held to the same standards of conservation and accountability.
12
6/20/18Dylan Hubbard
dhubbard@hubbardsmarina.com
Madeira Beach, FLHello, my name is Captain Dylan Hubbard and my family business has been fishing central west coast of Florida for over 90 years and four generations. We operate 6 federally permitted vessels both charter and head boats, and I am here today representing my family business alone. I am also an MREP Graduate. I attended the outreach and education committee meeting and it was so great to see all the effort to preserve our fishery and enhance our fishing access by lowering dead discards. I would like to see the flexibility to continue and not focusing on descending or focusing on venting but presenting both options and how both increase the survivability of discarded fish.

Venting works very well, and we regularly catch fish with venting scars on their sides and we work very hard at venting outreach and education. We do seminars before we leave, on the way out and during the trip we continue to preach venting and proper venting techniques
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
Loading...
 
 
 
Form Responses 1
 
 
Main menu