WM Kindergarten Goals/Links 10.2018
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Mathematics Kindergarten
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Planning Grid (Gantt Chart)
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Links to Materials
Sequence instruction by academic year quarter.
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Click colored cells to download: Worksheet Series / Activities / Related Videos/ LinksIndicate when you are introducing a skill by flagging the appropriate quarter green.
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Worksheet #1Related VideoWorksheet #2Related LinkWorksheet #3Worksheet #4Flag the skill red when students will practice the skill on independent assignments (homework).
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Same background color indicates that these resources are related.
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Blue flag: priority skill- perhaps an IEP goal to be assessed on Progress Monitoring TestsInstructional level of skill: flag greenIndependent level of skill: flag red.
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Place Value and Number Sense (Counting and Cardinality)
Sept-OctNov-JanFeb-MarApr -Jun
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K.CC.1Count to 100 by ones and by tens.
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K.CC.2
Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence (instead of having to begin at 1).
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K.CC.3
Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0–20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects).
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Digit formations 1-5 associated with shape📽 Clay dot patterns under paint bag scaffold shape and numeral production📽 Superimpose Arabic Characters over Icons on a bag of paint. 📽 Whole Body Primary Reference Frame Numeral Production
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📽 Digit Formations 1-5 associated with shape video📽 Point and Call Strategy to write 3,5 and 2 correctlyNumber Formations Corresponding to Icon Patterns 1-10Digit Formation Prompts
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K.CC.4.a

a. When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with
one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object.
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Alternate Whole to Part: After identifying a quantity, count the elements
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K.CC.4.b
b. Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.
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AlternateWhole to Part: After identifying a patterned quantity, take one away, express the then return it
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K.CC.4.c
c. Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger.
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K.CC.5

Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1–20, count out that many objects.
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K.CC.6
Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies.
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K.CC.7
Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.
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📽 Jump on patterns within 5 (X) to learn and compare patterns
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Compare and diagram Numbers 0-5Diagram and compare numbers 1-10Compare 0-5 Linear Diagram MenCompare 6-9 Linear Diagram Men
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K.NBT.1
Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each composition or decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 18 = 10 + 8); understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
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Multimodal Number Encoding 1 to 19 : Claps, Finger Gnosia, Written Expression, Naming Encode and Diagram 2 Digit numbersDiagram and Compare Base 10 Materials and coins Within 20
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Addition and Subtraction within Base Ten
Sept-OctNov-JanFeb-MarApr -Jun
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K.OA.1Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings , sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.
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Finger patterns and Activities 0-5Linear Diagram Addition and Subtraction to 5Addition and Subtraction Sums to 9 using Icons, diagrams and numbers
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K.OA.2
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📽 Linear vertical diagram towerWord Problems to 5 Using Linear Diagrams
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K.OA.3Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).
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Icon Templates and number line 1-10Activities to generate number sentences to 5Decompose Numbers 6 to 10
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K.OA.4For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number.
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📽 Missing Finger Addends to 10Finger Patterns and Activities 0-10
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K.OA.5
Fluently add and subtract within 5.
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5 Subtract n Horizontal and Vertical Format5 Subtraction Blocks, Pennies and diagramsAddtion Sums Within 5
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Geometry
Sept-OctNov-JanFeb-MarApr -Jun
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K.G.1Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.
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K.G.2Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.
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Shape Formations relating to 1-10 IconsPop Bubbles to Define Shape Attributes📽 Pop Bubbles VideoShape Names Notes and Diagrams
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K.G.3Identify shapes as two-dimensional (lying in a plane, “flat”) or three-dimensional (“solid”).
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K.G.4Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number of sides and vertices/“corners”) and other attributes (e.g., having sides of equal length).
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K.G.5Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls) and drawing shapes.
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K.G.6Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes. For example, "Can you join these two triangles with full sides touching to make a rectangle?”
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Measurement and Data
Sept-OctNov-JanFeb-MarApr -Jun
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K.MD.1Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight. Describe several measurable attributes of a single object.
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K.MD.2Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has “more of”/“less of” the attribute, and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as taller/shorter.
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K.MD.3Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.
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