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Course Credit Option Y/NDescriptionPay Option Y/NDutiesAverage weekly commitmentsMinimum Required SemestersContact
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Summer 2020 and BeyondYDr. Michael Crowley LabOur work focuses on the broad area of child and adolescent self-regulation. We study a range of topics related to self-regulation including anxiety, avoidance, risk aversion, ostracism/social exclusion, risk-taking/ substance use risk, reward processing, mindfulness and self-compassion.NTraining will be provided on state-of-the-art EEG data collection techniques. Opportunities are available for undergraduate research projects. Research assistants can be expected to run patients and trials, review literature, and other tasks.8 hours per week. (Flexible)1To apply, contact: Dr. Michael Crowley
michael.crowley@yale.edu
(203) 326-8891
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Summer 2017 - BeyondYesLi Yan McCurdy (graduate student), in Michael Nitabach's lab (Sterling Hall of Medicine)We're interested in understanding what goes on in the fruit-fly's brain during learning. We've known for decades that flies can be classically conditioned (think Pavlov's dogs) to associate odors with punishment, but it's less clear exactly HOW they learn it. We know that mammalian brains learn by performing the same computations that machines use (i.e. machine-learning algorithms), but it's hard to figure out how neurons calculate things, because mammalian brains are big and complicated. On the other hand, fruit-flies have a much simpler nervous system (100k neurons in flies vs 100b neurons in humans), and we have cool genetic tools that let us manipulate and visualize activity in really precise subsets of neurons. So we think flies are a great animal to use to understand how neurons implement computations that generate behavior, which is a really fundamental question in neuroscience. NoResearch assistants will perform behavioral experiments on fruit-flies. They will learn basic fly husbandry, genetics and maintenance, basic wet lab skills (e.g. pipetting), and run sophisticated optogenetic behavioral experiments, in which light is used to artificially activate specific neurons during learning odor-punishment associations, to investigate the role of different neurons during learning. ***Previous experience NOT required. The research project is a great introduction to wet-lab research, where basic wet-lab skills will be taught, whilst performing sophisticated behavioral experiments. Strong emphasis placed on mentoring, so you'll be in good hands!>=8 hours per week, very flexible1liyan.mccurdy@yale.edu
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Spring 2021 onward (subject to change due to COVID-19)YesPree Sareen (Postdoc), in Michael Nitabach's lab (Sterling Hall of Medicine)Our lab is broadly interested in understanding how neural circuits generate complex behaviors in the fruit-fly (Drosophila melanogaster) and worm (C elegans). We use a combination of genetic, neurophysiological, behavioral, and computational tools to probe these circuits. Specifically, this project is focused on understanding how fruit-flies make choices under conflicting taste information. If you're interested in understanding how neural circuits create complex behaviors, and are excited about getting some wet-lab experience, we'd love to have you as part of our team!NoResearch assistants will perform behavioral experiments on fruit-flies. They will learn basic fly husbandry, genetics and maintenance, basic wet lab skills (e.g. making soutions), and run sophisticated optogenetic behavioral experiments, in which light is used to artificially activate/silence specific neurons in freely moving flies, to investigate the role of different neurons during choice-making behavior. The research project is a great introduction to wet-lab research in a genetically-tractable animal model.8 or more h/week. Scheduling is flexible.1preeti.sareen@yale.edu Some background in Biology and quantitative fields will be beneficial.
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Spring 2020 and beyondYesThe Automaticity in Cognition, Motivation, and Emotion Lab - Professor John Bargh (PI: Anton Gollwitzer and John Bargh)There are two projects which we are currently working on. (1) Do lay people exist who can accurately judge the feelings, thoughts, and behaviors of other people? In other words, do ‘super psychologists’ exist in the general population? What cognitive, social, and personality constructs relate to having such an ability? Specific tasks will include reviewing literature, designing experiments, collecting data, editing papers. (2) Does a domain-general dislike of pattern deviancy underlie individuals' prejudice and stigmatization. Can dislike of deviancy even in simple geomtric shapes (one triangle slightly out of line in a row of triangles) predict prejudice and stigmatization? All are welcome to apply! anton.gollwitzer@yale.eduNoSpecific tasks will include reviewing literature, locating and collecting data, statistical analysis. Students may enroll for research experience, a senior project, volunteer, and/or depending on the level of contribution be included as an author on possible papers10 hours per week. Scheduling is flexible.1Simply contact me! anton.gollwitzer@yale.edu
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Spring 2019 and onwardVolunteer positionBrendan Hare ARS in the laboratory of Ronald Duman, Molecular Psychiatry DepartmentThe Duman lab is seeking Yale undergraduates interested in investigating the mechanism of action of rapid acting antidepressants such as ketamine. We approach this topic from numerous directions using molecular and behavioral techniques. The project we are recruiting for will involve using optogenetic techniques to manipulate frontal cortex circuitry that is necessary for the rapid antidepressant response to ketamine. The broad goal of this work is to understand how distinct cellular populations within the medial prefrontal cortex interact with downstream target regions to produce an antidepressant-like response in rodents. NoWe expect research assistants to be involved in all aspects of the project. This would include experiment planning, animal handling, behavioral testing, histology, various molecular techniques, and data analysis. Involvement will vary depending on time available, and the interests of the candidate. You would also be welcome at the Duman lab meeting should you be free during that time period (Monday 12-1pm). 8hrs/week. Weekends available1brendan.hare@yale.edu
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Spring 2021 and beyondYesBrian Scholl (Perception & Cognition Lab)We currently have openings for Yale undergraduates, to help study the nature of seeing and thinking in the Perception and Cognition Laboratory run by Professor Brian Scholl. Our RA collaborators gain experience in all aspects of our laboratory; in particular, most RAs help us design, run, and analyze our various experiments exploring the nature of visual perception, attention, and cognition. Specific topics include phenomena such as attention and awareness, subjective time dilation, intuitive physics, eye gaze, vision and art, and how seeing and thinking interact. For more information, please see http://perception.yale.edu/Brian/misc/jobs.html YesSee http://perception.yale.edu/Brian/misc/jobs.html~ 10 hours / week1See http://perception.yale.edu/Brian/misc/jobs.html
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Fall 2017 - BeyondSocialThe Zigler Center in Child Development & Social Policy - Dr. Chin ReyesThe Climate of Healthy Interactions for Learning and Development (CHILD®) Tool is a research-based, evidence-informed measurement tool that assesses the mental health (or social and emotional) climate of early child care and education settings. Currently implemented in several sites across North America (including the Durham region in Canada), the CHILD is designed to measure and provide explicit and actionable guidelines to foster healthy social and emotional interactions that improve the quality of early learning and ensure equity in the classroom.

The Edward Zigler Center in Child Development and Social Policy, of the Yale Child Study Center, is looking for 2-4 students to assist with photo and video coding using the CHILD Tool. Coders will be trained in use of the CHILD Tool. Following certification, coders will be asked to score videos using the CHILD Tool and code for other designated indicators. Coders may also participate in conversations about coding to assist in the development of “master codes” for each video and may assist in writing a description of why each “master code” is correct for each video.
YesDuties:
Assist with photo and video coding using the CHILD Tool.
-Coders will be trained in use of the CHILD Tool. Following certification, coders will be given online access to a collection of photos and/or videos, which they will score using the CHILD Tool and code for other designated indicators.
-Coders may also participate in conversations about coding to assist in the development of “master codes” for each video.
-Coders may also assist in writing a description of why each “master code” is correct for each video.

Requirements:
Working knowledge of early childhood development and/or early childhood care and education settings. Training in the CHILD Tool will be provided to all new hires.
5-10 hours per week1Please email Valerie (valerie.zielinski@yale.edu) with your CV/resume and a brief description as to why you are interested in this position.
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Anytime!PossiblyThe Zigler Center in Child Development & Social Policy - Dr. Chin ReyesDr. Reyes is working on a study funded by the Spencer Foundation to examine how subtle teaching behaviors that convey social and emotional attunement could potentially account for disparate learning experiences between English Language Learners and non-English Language Learners. She is seeking one or two students who can perform one or both sets of tasks:

TASK A: Data Cleaning and Basic Analyses
TASK B: Literature Review
Tasks:

TASK A: Data Cleaning and Basic Analyses
• conduct basic “cleaning” of datasets, then restructure and then merge multiple datasets;
• run basic descriptive statistics on variables of interest; and
• Explore data for notable findings

TASK B: Literature Review
• Conduct a literature review on educational disparities among English language learners and their peers;
• assist in summarizing the literature

Requirements:
Strong writing and analytic skills.
5-15 hours per week1Please email Valerie (valerie.zielinski@yale.edu) with your CV/resume and a cover letter that states how your experience in data analyses and/or writing makes you the ideal candidate for the job. Students who are interested in co-authoring manuscript should describe how they plan to meaningfully contribute to the writing of the paper or the analyses of the data.
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Summer 2020 and BeyondYesDr. James McPartland, Associate Professor of Child Psychiatry and Psychology (PI). The McPartland Lab, Yale Child Study Center, Yale School of MedicineThe McPartland Lab investigates autism spectrum disorder from a clinical neuroscience perspective. Our lab is part of the Yale Autism Program and the Developmental Disabilities Clinic at the Yale Child Study Center. We are seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in both clinical psychology and developmental neuroscence. Our research focuses on using EEG and eye-tracking techniques, along with behavorial measures and clinical assessments to better understand the social difficulties associated with autism specrtrum disorder in both children and adults. The McPartland lab has multiple ongoing research projects in which interested students will have the opportunity to learn about and become involved in. (http://medicine.yale.edu/lab/mcpartland)NStudents will learn about several aspects of the research process; stimulus creation, literature reviews, data collection and analysis. They will will receive training in several aspects of electrophysiological brain research including experimental design; programming experimental paradigms; analyzing and extracting EEG and ERP data. They will also gain further experience with data management and clinical assessments by helping score and file measures. They will have the oppportunity to observe cases in the autism clinic and help with child supervision during parent feedback sessions. Students can work towards an independent research project, but are required to be involved with our work in the lab for 1 year prior to undertaking a thesis involving original data collection.8-10 hours per week.2james.mcpartland@yale.edu
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Spring 2020 onwardYesAnxiety and Mood Disorders Program at Yale Child Study Center; PIs: Wendy Silverman, Eli Lebowitz, Carla Marin, Yaara ShimshoniThe Anxiety and Mood Disorders Program is engaged in clinical research in the assesment and treatment of anxiety and related disorders in children and adolescents. Main areas of research include: studying familial factors that influence the development of childhood anxiety; identifying anxiety biomarkers; developing and testing novel interventions to treat social anxiety disorder; conducting randomized clinical trials; developing and testing parent based treatments to treat childhood anxiety and picky eating, and using neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, EEG) to identify mechanisms and targets. NoStudents will be trained in the administration of psychological questionnaires to children and adolescents; learn about statistical data analysis; learn about and administer novel approaches to assessing avoidance and anxiety; assist in the collection of saliva and blood samples; recruitment of research participants; attend research and clinical meetings with Program faculty and clinicians. Students also have the opportunity to develop a research project under the mentorship of Program faculty. 10 hours2Please email your CV or resume to Carla Marin (carla.marin@yale.edu) and a brief description why you would like to get involved in the Anxiety and Mood Disorders Program
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Spring 2020 onwardYesDavid Saunders, MD, PhD (PI: Hedy Kober), Clinical & Affective Neuroscience Lab (Psychology, Psychiatry, Neuroscience, Cog Sci), Child Study Center Are you interested in mindfulness and/or meditation practice? Do you enjoy working with children? Do you ever wonder how meditation could impact attention regulation? If so, we are seeking an undergraduate to join the lab to help study mindfulness practices in child and adolescent populations.

Broadly speaking, the Clinical and Affective Neuroscience Lab (PI: Hedy Kober, canlab.yale.edu) studies the regulation of craving from behavioral, clinical, psychophysiological, and functional neuroimaging (fMRI) perspectives. Additionally (and relatedly), the lab has a longstanding interest in mindfulness-based interventions, both within and outside the context of craving/addiction. At present, Drs. Saunders and Kober are running two mindfulness-related projects: a pilot study of a mindfulness-based ADHD treatment for children and a meta-analysis of mindfulness-based interventions in children and adolescents.

Previous research not required. This position is ideal for bright, engaged and interested students from all fields of study.
NoResearch assistants are full members of the CAN lab. You will be included in all aspects of the mindfulness-related projects, with the potential to participate in others. Responsibilities may include interacting with participants (children with ADHD) and their parents in all phases of the clinical trial (recruitment, screening, intervention, follow-up), literature searches, assisting with data management, potentially data analysis and/or data presentation.
10 hours per week (or more)2david.saunders@yale.edu -- Please include a short paragraph describing yourself, your interests, why you want to work in the lab, what you could contribute. Be sure to also include the following information: - Previous research and/or clinical experience (if any); - Previous coursework in relevant fields; - Year, Major, GPA; and a CV.
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Spring 2020 onwardYesEmily Cohodes (PhD student) and Dr. Dylan Gee, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development LabThe Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development Lab is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in clinical psychology resarch. The lab uses fMRI techniques to study the development of anxiety and stress-related disorders.NoResearch assistants will have the opportunity to code and enter data collected from in-depth clinical interviews assessing individuals' histories of exposure to trauma. Research assistants will join a team of fellow undegraduate RAs working on this coding and entry and will meet weekly to conference scores and to meet with graduate student leading project. This is a rare opportuniy to work with clinical data.10 hours/week2Send a CV/resume, paragraph on previous research experience (if any) and interest in the position, class year, major, and GPA to dylan.gee@yale.edu and paola.odriozola@yale.edu
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Spring 2020 and onwardsYesDr. Dylan Gee, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development LabThe Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development Lab is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in clinical psychology and developmental neuroscience. The lab uses behavioral, psychophysiological, and neuroimaging techniques to study the development of anxiety and stress-related disorders across childhood and adolescence. We are especially interested in typical and atypical trajectories of brain development related to emotional behavior, the effects of early-life adversity, and translating knowledge from basic science to optimize clinical treatments.NoResearch assistants will have the opportunity to contribute to many stages of the research process including recruitment, phone screening for clinical participants, data collection (with children, adolescents, parents, and adult participants), preparing participants for the MRI scan, managing and analyzing data, development of experiment-related materials, and discussion of current projects and results at our regular lab meetings. Previous research experience is preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with interests in clinical child & adolescent psychology and neuroscience.10 hours/week2Send a CV/resume, paragraph on previous research experience (if any) and interest in the position, class year, major, and GPA to dylan.gee@yale.edu
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Spring 2020 and beyondYesEmily Cohodes (PhD student) and Dr. Dylan Gee (PI; Assistant Professor of Psychology) in the Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development LabThe Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development Lab is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in clinical psychology. The lab uses fMRI techniques to study the development of anxiety and stress-related disorders. NoResearch assistants will have the opportunity to see many stages of clinical research studies and will assist primarily with coding interviews about experiences of early life stress. Prior experience working with clinical populations is preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with interest in pursuing graduate study in clinical psychology, particualrly with a focus on early life stress. 10 hours/week2Send a CV/resume, paragraph on previous research experience (if any) and interest in the position, class year, major, and GPA to dylan.gee@yale.edu and emily.cohodes@yale.edu
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Spring 2020 and beyondYesHedy Kober, Clinical & Affective Neuroscience Lab (Psychology, Psychiatry, Neuroscience, Cog Sci)How strong is your craving for chocolate? Can you stop yourself from reaching for it when the craving is strong? What are the neural mechanisms that underlie our ability to regulate our craving? The ability to control our craving (and our emotions more generally) is central to mental and physical health, and is particularly critical for those with substance use disorders (AKA ‘addictions’) and binge eating. The work in our lab includes behavioral, clinical, psychophysiological, and functional neuroimaging (fMRI) studies of alcohol drinkers, cigarette smokers, cocaine users, binge eaters, and healthy adults as they regulate craving for food, alcohol, cigarettes, and cocaine, using a variety of strategies. We also investigate how people change following treatment for addictions – do they get better at managing their craving? We investigate both cognitive-behavioral treatments as well as mindfulness-based treatments that include training in meditation.
For more info on our research and some recent press:
canlab.yale.edu
NoThere are a wide variety of opportunities, depending on a combination of interest, experience, skills, availability, and the lab’s needs. These include: recruiting and screening participants, collection and analysis of behavioral data, collection and analysis of psychophysiology data, collection and analysis of fMRI data – including running scans, programming tasks for behavioral and fMRI tasks, and other fun and educational things.10 hours2hedy.kober@yale.edu -- Please include a short paragraph describing yourself, your interests, why you want to work in the lab, what you could contribute. Be sure to also include the following information: - Previous research and/or clinical experience (if any); - Previous coursework in psychology, neuroscience, biology, computer science, or philosophy; - Year, Major, GPA; and a CV.
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Spring 2019, immediate opening, funded till Spring 2021YesDr. Hedy Kober, Associate Professor. Clinical & Affective Neuroscience Lab (Psychology, Psychiatry, Neuroscience, Cog Sci)How strong is your craving for chocolate? How much alcohol do you drink? Can you stop yourself from having it when the craving is strong? What are the neural mechanisms that underlie our ability to regulate our craving? The ability to control our craving (and our emotions more generally) is central to mental and physical health, and is particularly critical for those with substance use disorders (AKA ‘addictions’) and binge eating. The work in our lab includes behavioral, clinical, psychophysiological, and functional neuroimaging (fMRI) studies of alcohol drinkers, cigarette smokers, cocaine users, binge eaters, and healthy adults as they regulate craving for food, alcohol, cigarettes, and cocaine, using a variety of strategies. We also investigate how people change following treatment for addictions – do they get better at managing their craving? We investigate both cognitive-behavioral treatments as well as mindfulness-based treatments that include training in meditation.
For more info on our research and some recent press:
canlab.yale.edu
NoThere are a wide variety of opportunities, depending on a combination of interest, experience, skills, availability, and the lab’s needs. These include: recruiting and screening participants, collection and analysis of behavioral data, collection and analysis of psychophysiology data, collection and analysis of fMRI data – including running scans, programming tasks for behavioral and fMRI tasks, and other fun and educational things.10 hours2hedy.kober@yale.edu -- Please include a short paragraph describing yourself, your interests, why you want to work in the lab, what you could contribute. Be sure to also include the following information: - Previous research and/or clinical experience (if any); - Previous coursework in psychology, neuroscience, biology, computer science, or philosophy; - Year, Major, GPA; and a CV.
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Spring 2019 and beyondYesLab: Clinical & Affective Neuroscience Lab, Postdoctoral Associate Jessica Mollick, Ph. D (PI: Professor Hedy Kober)We often make decisions in our everyday life, including those that balance potential risks (like losing money) and potential rewards (like winning the lottery). Further, we also learn about cues that reliably predict rewards. Are you interested in how people make decisions and learn about rewards? How about the brain mechanisms involved in both decision-making and reward learning, and how these circuits are changed by drug use and addiction? For this project in the Canlab (Clinical and Affective Neuroscience Lab), we are seeking an undergraduate researcher to assist with behavioral and fMRI studies of reward learning and decision making in cocaine users and control subjects. You will have opportunities to learn about the brain circuits involved in reward learning and decision making, as well as computational models of decision making and reward learning. Further, you will have opportunities to study clinical psychology, including structured clinical interviews for diagnosis of substance use disorders. Along with working on reward learning and decision-making projects, there are opportunities to be involved in other lab projects related to the regulation of craving, involving strategies to regulate the desire for food, alcohol and drugs (see descriptions at https://canlab.yale.edu/). Previous research experience is not required, but is a plus. Experience or interest in programming and statistics is also a plus. We are looking for motivated undergraduates with an interest in neuroscience and psychology.NoResearch assistants will be full members of the lab, and included in all aspects of the reward learning and decision-making projects. Opportunities depend on interest, experience, skills, availability and the lab’s needs. Responsibilities may include phone recruitment, interacting with participants (including substance users and healthy controls), literature searches, assisting with scanning sessions, and data management, including potentially analysis and presentation of behavioral and fMRI data, and opportunities to assist with meta-analysis, as well as ongoing lab projects on the regulation of craving.10 hours per week (or more)2Jessica.Mollick@Yale.edu and Hedy.Kober@Yale.edu - Please include a short paragraph describing yourself, your interests, why you want to work in the lab, what you could contribute. Be sure to also include the following information: - Previous research and/or clinical experience (if any); - Previous coursework in psychology, neuroscience, biology, computer science, or philosophy; - Year, Major, GPA; and a CV.
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Spring 2018 and beyondPossiblyAffect Regulation & Cognition Lab

PI: Dr. Jutta Joormann, Professor of Psychology

Supervisor: Ashleigh Rutherford
The goal of this project in the ARC lab at Yale is to better understand the mechanisms that contribute to experiences of diminished reward in depression. We combine a variety of methods in our lab, including EEG, eye-tracking, physiological measures, and computational psychiatry to answer these research questions. We are seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in clinical psychology who will help primarily with data recruitment, collection, and analysis. Quantitative skills and coding experience is preferred, but not required. noResearch assistants are invited to ARC lab meetings (Thursdays at 9 during the semester), and may be included in all aspects of research, including, data collection, participant recruitment, literature review, and data analysis.5-10 hours weekly2Please email ashleigh.rutherford@yale.edu with your CV/Resume and a brief description of your interests in our work.
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Fall 2020 onwardYesBJ Casey, Director of the Fundamentals of the Adolescent Brain (FAB) LabWe are looking for research assistants to help with the national landmark Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) study to track brain development and health in 10,000 children through adolescence (see abcdstudy.org). At Yale, we are enrolling and following 600 families. Experience working with children and teens (either formal or informal) is required. YesThese positions offer experience in recruiting, screening and testing participants. The research will provide opportunities to gain experience in imaging, biospecimen collection, and in neurocognitve and clinical assessments. Contact: bj.casey@yale.edu for more information.10 hours/week2contact bj.casey@yale.edu and provide a resume or CV and a few sentences on why you would like to work on this study.
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Fall 2020 and beyondYes (and volunteers)Dr. Nicholas Turk-Browne (PI: Professor, Psychology)The Turk-Browne lab is interested in how we see (perception), how we control what we see and how it controls us (attention), and how we store what we see in our heads (learning and memory). We use a combination of behavioral, neuroscientific, and computational approaches. These include psychophysics, eye tracking, fMRI, intracranial recording, and machine learning. We use these techniques to answer questions about adult cognition and how it develops in infants (e.g., why we can’t remember anything from early in life).YesInfant research: helping with recruitment, contacting/meeting families, data collection, video coding, and basic data analysis; applicant must be comfortable with young children.

Adult research: assisting with ongoing studies, including data collection and analysis; possibility of (eventually) conducting independent research; programming and statistical experience desirable and a willingness to learn essential.
8-10 hours per week (decided with advisor depending on duties)2If interested in the position, please contact Jonathan at jonathan.daniels@yale.edu with a CV and your availability to meet.
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Fall 2020 & BeyondYesFundamentals of the Adolescent Brain (FAB) Lab (PI: Professor BJ Casey)The FAB Lab is seeking highly motivated undergraduates interested in cognitive, clinical, developmental or social neuroscience to assist with the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. The ABCD Study is the largest long-term study of brain development and child health in the United States. By following more than 11,000 children over 10 years as they go through adolescence, the ABCD Study is well-positioned to answer a number of questions about the developing brain and the many childhood experiences that shape social, emotional, intellectual, and physical growth. Questions that will be addressed include: How does screen time affect social and brain development? Can sports injuries cause brain damage? How do sleep patterns affect academic achievement? What are the long-term effects of ADHD medications on academics and health? Does drinking coffee or energy drinks have negative effects on children? How does tobacco or alcohol use affect learning and health? Are there extracurricular activities or other experiences that help children do better in school and be happier in life?YesResearch assistants will be full members of the lab, and included in all aspects of the research projects. Opportunities depend on interest, experience, skills, availability and the lab’s needs. Responsibilities may include phone recruitment, interacting with ABCD parents and children, literature searches, assisting with scanning sessions, and data management, including potential opportunities to assist with analysis and presentation of data.10 hours per week2BJ.Casey@Yale.edu. Please include in your email your major, year, research experience and experience working with children, parents or families and CV/resume
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Fall 2019 onwardsNoLanguage, Learning and Multisensory Brain (LLAMB); PI: Dr. David LewkowiczThe Language, Learning and Multisensory Brain (LLAMB) lab at Haskins Laboratories is seeking highly motivated undergraduates looking to acquire research experience in developmental science. The work is conducted by senior scientist Dr. David Lewkowicz. The focus of the studies in this lab is on the development of speech, language, and the underlying perceptual, attentional, and cognitive mechanisms that enable infants and young children to process, understand, and acquire speech and language. For more information, please visit our website:YesResearch assistants will have the opportunity to participate in all phases of the research. Opportunities will depend on the student’s interests, skills, prior experience with infant and child testing, availability, and the lab’s needs. Research assistants will be involved in various lab activities, including infant and child recruitment, participant database management, testing of participants in the lab and at museums, data management, and stimulus design. While the lab is focused on behavioral work, students may also have the opportunity to work with various brain imaging techniques.
Seeking 8-10 hours/week, with some weekend hours possible2If interested, please email Nicole.cuneo@yale.edu and include your CV and a brief statement of your research interests.
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Fall 2019 and onwardsYesDavid Saunders, MD, PhD (PI: Hedy Kober), Clinical & Affective Neuroscience Lab (Psychology, Psychiatry, Neuroscience, Cog Sci), Child Study CenterAre you interested in mindfulness and/or meditation practice? Do you enjoy working with children? Do you ever wonder how meditation could impact attention? If so, we are seeking an undergraduate to join the lab to help study mindfulness practices in child and adolescent populations.

Broadly speaking, the Clinical and Affective Neuroscience Lab (PI: Hedy Kober, canlab.yale.edu) studies the regulation of craving from behavioral, clinical, psychophysiological, and functional neuroimaging (fMRI) perspectives. Additionally (and relatedly), the lab has a longstanding interest in mindfulness-based interventions, both within and outside the context of craving/addiction. At present, Drs. Saunders and Kober are running two mindfulness-related projects: a pilot study of a mindfulness-based ADHD treatment for children and a meta-analysis of mindfulness-based interventions in children and adolescents.

Previous research not required. This position is ideal for bright, engaged and interested students from all fields of study.
NoResearch assistants are full members of the CAN lab. You will be included in all aspects of the mindfulness-related projects, with the potential to participate in others. Responsibilities may include interacting with participants (children with ADHD) and their parents in all phases of the clinical trial (recruitment, screening, intervention, follow-up), literature searches, assisting with data management, potentially data analysis and/or data presentation.10 hours per week2david.saunders@yale.edu -- Please include a short paragraph describing yourself, your interests, why you want to work in the lab, what you could contribute. Be sure to also include the following information: - Previous research and/or clinical experience (if any); - Previous coursework in relevant fields; - Year, Major, GPA; and a CV.
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Fall 2019 and onwardYesClinical & Affective Neuroscience Lab (Psychology, Psychiatry, Neuroscience, Cog Sci; PI: Hedy Kober, PhD)How strong is your craving for chocolate? Can you stop yourself from reaching for it when the craving is strong? What are the neural mechanisms that underlie our ability to regulate our craving? The ability to control our craving (and our emotions more generally) is central to mental and physical health, and is particularly critical for those with substance use disorders (AKA ‘addictions’) and binge eating. The work in our lab includes behavioral, clinical, psychophysiological, and functional neuroimaging (fMRI) studies of alcohol drinkers, cigarette smokers, cocaine users, binge eaters, and healthy adults as they regulate craving for food, alcohol, cigarettes, and cocaine, using a variety of strategies. We also investigate how people change following treatment for addictions – do they get better at managing their craving? We investigate both cognitive-behavioral treatments as well as mindfulness-based treatments that include training in meditation.
For more info on our research and some recent press:
canlab.yale.edu
NoThere are a wide variety of opportunities, depending on a combination of interest, experience, skills, availability, and the lab’s needs. These include: recruiting and screening participants, collection and analysis of behavioral data, collection and analysis of psychophysiology data, collection and analysis of fMRI data – including running scans, programming tasks for behavioral and fMRI tasks, and other fun and educational things.10 hours per week2hedy.kober@yale.edu -- Please include a short paragraph describing yourself, your interests, why you want to work in the lab, what you could contribute. Be sure to also include the following information: - Previous research and/or clinical experience (if any); - Previous coursework in psychology, neuroscience, biology, computer science, or philosophy; - Year, Major, GPA; and a CV.
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AnytimeYesCognition and Development Lab (PI: Dr. Frank Keil)The Cognition and Development Lab is seeking enthusiastic and motivated research assistants to help with various projects. Our lab is broadly interested in questions about how children and adults construct causal interpretations of the world around them and how they engage with concepts, explanations, information, and beliefs about their own and others’ knowledge states. We work with adults and children aged 4-11. No[All work is remote/online for Fall 2020] RAs will work closely with a graduate student or postdoc mentor to facilitate research. In doing so, RAs will be exposed to and participate in many aspects of the research process, including study conceptualization, experimental design, and data collection. RAs will also benefit from participation in graduate student-led reading groups to discuss theory, establish a foundation in the relevant literature, and generate their own research ideas. The position for first semester RAs is volunteer; second semester RAs and beyond can receive course credit and are encouraged to pursue their own research projects. Primary duties include conducting literature searches, launching online adult studies, and contributing to communal backend tasks such as recruiting children for online studies and maintaining a database of appointments. 8-10 hours per week2Reach out to the lab manager, Danielle Faulkner, at danielle.faulkner@yale.edu for information on how to apply
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Anytime, but applications are reviewed on a first come first served basis and we may stop reviewing applications if our lab is at capacity. We recommend applying 2 weeks before any given semester begins.One semester volunteer, all other semesters may be done for course credit Dr. Paul Bloom, Brooks and Suzanne Ragen Professor of Psychology & Cognitive ScienceThe Mind and Development Lab is seeking enthusiastic and motivated research assistants to help with various projects. Our lab is broadly interested in how children think about morality. What is right and what is wrong? Do other agents have the same moral status as humans?NoResearch assistants will recruit and run online child participants. They will also be assigned to a senior researcher mentor (lab manager, graduate student, or postdoctoral fellow) who will help them develop higher level research skills such as data analysis and literature review.At least 5 hours, preferred 8-102Please reach out to Katie Vasquez at katherine.vasquez@yale.edu with your resume by email. We also recommend reading our most recent publications to learn about our current work. Please mention research you found particularly interesting in your email.
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Anytime, but applications are reviewed on a first come first served basis and we may stop reviewing applications if our lab is at capacity. We recommend applying 2 weeks before any given semester begins.One semester volunteer, all other semesters may be done for course credit Dr. Yarrow Dunham, Associate Professor of PsychologyThe Social Cognitive Development Lab is seeking enthusiastic and motivated research assistants to help with various lab projects. Our lab is broadly interested in how children think about the social world. Current questions include (but are not limited to) how do children think about wealth inequality? How should we reward people who put in different amounts of effort on a task? How do children learn and use pronouns that do not conform with the gender binary?NoResearch assistants will recruit and run online child participants. They will also be assigned to a senior researcher mentor (lab manager, graduate student, or postdoctoral fellow) who will help them develop higher level research skills such as data analysis and literature review. Our lab is a unique place for mentorship as we have several graduate students looking at a large range of topics.At least 5 hours, preferred 8-102Please reach out to Katie Vasquez at katherine.vasquez@yale.edu with your resume by email. We also recommend reading our most recent publications to learn about our current work. Please mention research you found particularly interesting in your email.
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Spring 2021 and beyondYesDr. Ilker Yildirim, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Statistics & Data ScienceThe Cognitive & Neural Computation Lab (CNCL) works at the intersection of cognitive science, neuroscience, and artificial intelligence. We aim to elucidate biological computations underlying how we see, reason about, and interact with our physical environments. We approach this goal primarily with computational modeling, and we test these models empirically in behavioral and neural experiments to build toward an integrated account of neural function, cognitive processes, and behavior, in precise engineering terms.NoOur work cuts at the intersection of psychology, neuroscience, and artificial intelligence. Undergraduates in our lab work in tandem with the members of the lab at all stages of research projects, including designing experiments, building computational models, and testing these models in behavioral data and neural activity. Multiple projects in computational modeling of higher-level perception and cognition are open. 10 hours2If you are interested, please email the PI (ilker.yildirim@yale.edu) with your up to date CV and a summary description of your research interests.
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Spring 2021 and beyondYesAmanda Royka (PI: Julian Jara-Ettinger), Computational Social Cognition LabThe Computational Social Cognition Lab studies the structure of mental state representations that form the foundation of social cognition. We are starting a project that uses language utterances as recorded in transcripts of child specch to investigate the development of theory of mind. NoThis project would involve working with the CHILDES database and using R to extract and code different communicative usages of interjections as they relate to the knowledge and intentionality of the speaker. Due to the nature of this project, RAs can have very flexible hours. RAs working on this project will recieve close mentorship. A working knowledge of R is preferred, but not required. 5 hours per week (flexible)2If you are interested, please reach out to Amanda Royka at amanda.royka@yale.edu with your resume or CV and a short description of your research interests
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Spring 2021 and beyondMaybeSteele Lab (PI: Dr. Vaughn Steele)Would you like to learn more about substance use disorders (SUDs), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), event-related potentials (ERPs), and/or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) while working to develop an effective treatment for SUDs? If so, consider joining the Steele Lab where we combine these methods to better understand and treat SUDs, a chronic relapsing biological brain disease affecting too many people worldwide. We seek motivated Yale undergraduate students to assist with various SUD-related lab projects at the Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center (ONRC) in Hartford Hospital’s Institute of Living. Current studies involve targeting dysregulated circuits in SUDs with TMS to elicit neuroplastic change and identify malleable circuits that, with chronic treatment, could lead to positive long-term outcomes for individuals with SUDs. For more information, please contact Dr. Steele (vaughn.steele@yale.edu). MaybeResearch volunteers recruit and run participants through IRB-approved protocols. Volunteers will be trained in the necessary aspects of the study (fMRI, ERP, TMS) based on their interested and the need of the study. Motivated individuals interested in learning more have the opportunity to take on more responsibilities such as learning data analysis.5-10 hours per week 2If you are interested, please contat the PI (vaughn.steele@yale.edu) with a description of your research interests and a CV
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Spring 2021 and beyondYesImplicit Social Cognition Lab (PI: Dr. Melissa Ferguson)The Implicit Social Cognition Lab is currently looking for research assistants to become involved in our research that spans social and cognitive psychology. We study the role of implicit cognition in memory updating, prejudice, self-control, and persuasion. See the website for more details.NoAll work is remote for Spring 2021. RAs will work with graduate students and postdocs on all aspects of independent research. For Spring 2021, this will involve helping with research ideas, study design and testing, stimuli development, and data coding. RAs will attend lab meetings. 5-10 hours per week2In you are interested, please contact the PI for an application
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Fall 2021, with possibility of renewal contingent on funding and job performance.Yes (and volunteer)Leah Fleming, 4th year PhD student in Jane Taylor's lab in Molecular Psychaitry Deparment at YaleWe are looking for undergraduates to assist with projects focused on understanding various cognitive behaviors that underlie more complex psychotic symptoms. We study these behaviors in rats and determine how pharmacological and circuit-level manipulations in the brain affect rats' performance. The goal is to try to determine the biological basis of psychotic symptoms experienced by patients (with schizophrenia for instance). This work is in direct collaboration with a human lab using fMRI and TMS to study similar behaviors across different diagnostic groups. No (although option for future paid summer internship if interested)Students will mostly assist with running the various behavioral paradigms, handling rats and immunohistochemistry procedures. You will be exposed to some basic wet lab skills and data analysis. You also have the option to attend weekly lab meetings and various talks in the Molecular Psychaitry Department. 8 or more hours/week, and availability on weekends would be great. >1 preferredIf interested, please contact me (Leah) at leah.fleming@yale.edu with your CV/resume. I look forward to hearing from you!
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Fall 2019 onwardNoLab: STEM Program Evaluation and Research Lab (STEM-PERL)
PI: Mark Graham
Looking for a research assistant/intern interested in education research, studying the outcomes of undergraduate students in various learning environments. We have a focus on STEM courses, but what we learn is relevant to other academic disciplines as well. We collect and analyze data from Yale classrooms as well as other universities in the U.S. We are also interested in data from programs that train faculty, graduate students, and postdocs to be better teachers. ***Here are some of the topics we study: active learning, student interest/motivation, growth mindset, student engagement, student trust, academic performance, teacher training, and more!Yes, hourly payYou will have the opportunity to learn about and engage in many of the following research activities:

- Collect data (such as through student interviews or Qualtrics surveys)
- Analyze quantitative and qualitative data (using SPSS analysis software)
- Become familiar with a comprehensive database environment
- Review relevant background research/literature
- Summarize data into a report format (text and tables/figures)
- Present research findings at a lab/journal club meeting

...along with other tasks that arise throughout the research project
Flexible1 (but 2 is also an option)View full position listing here: https://tinyurl.com/stemperl-RA1920 For more information & to apply contact Melanie Bauer: melanie.bauer@yale.edu
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Spring 2020 and BeyondYes (Volunteer options available as well)Affective Science and Culture Lab (ASCL), PI: Maria GendronThe ASCL studies emotions. Emotions are at the core of our human experience. Yet much of our emotional lives remains shrouded in mystery. Why do some people experience such a diverse range of emotions? When does culture create a barrier to a mutual understanding of each other’s states? We address questions like these with research focused on the dynamic influences of social, affective, and cultural processes on emotional experience, emotion perception and their downstream consequences for the mind, behavior, and relationships. We are seeking undergraduate research assistant to engage in this research with us. RAs get involved in all aspects of the research process, including project conception, design and implementation.N8-10 hours1 but perfer 2email maria.gendron@yale.edu or apply on our website: https://asclab.yale.edu/get-involved-0
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Summer 2020 and BeyondYCarla Stover, Associate Professor Child Study CenterDr. Stover's lab focuses on studies of interventions for high risk families including those with violence and substance misuse. We focus on understanding the causes and correlates of violence and substance misuse and mechanisms to intervene to stop family violence, improve co-parenting relationships and father-child relationships.

NAssist with recruitment of fathers into a randomized pilot of a fatherhood focused family violence education program compared to intervention as usual mandated by the courts. Assist with informed consent, data collection, and data entry, coding on the project. Student will work closely with Dr. Stover and other lab staff to carry out the goals of the project and follow research protocol. Highly motivated students may also participate in data analysis and writing projects. 8-10 hours1 but perfer 2email your CV to carla.stover@yale.edu
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Summer 2020 and BeyondPossiblyDr. Carlos Grilo; Dr. Valentina Ivezaj; Dr. Jessica Lawson (Program for Obesity, Eating, and Weight Research)Seeking a research assistant to join our team at the Program for Obesity, Weight, and Eating Research (POWER) to perform recruitment and administrative tasks for two longitudinal research survey studies examining bariatric (or weight loss) surgery outcomes among diverse groups. This is an excellent opportunity for a committed and detail-oriented student who is passionate about research and wants to gain additional experience with many aspects of the clinical research process, including recruitment and administrative tasks. Clinic location: 301 Cedar St., 2nd floorNThis research assistant will be involved in day-to-day management of two studies including distributing and discussing surveys with participants, which is integral for retention. The research assistant will also have the option of attending bariatric surgery seminars to recruit individuals in New Haven and Fairfield counties. Preferred qualifications: fluent Spanish; available for evening bariatric seminars8-10 hours/week; flexible1 or morePlease submit CV/resume and brief statement of interest to jessica.lawson@yale.edu. Happy to answer questions!
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Summer 2018, Fall 2018 onwardYPhil Corlett, PhD (Belief, Learning, & Memory Lab)This internship is with the Belief, Learning, and Memory Lab, head by Dr. Philip Corlett. This lab focuses on delusion and hallucination research. The team studies the neural basis of human associative learning and belief formation – relating these processes to delusional belief formation. The position is located at Connecticut Mental Health Center.NThe student will be responsible for recruiting, scheduling, and interacting with study participants. We anticipate that these participants will have a range of psychotic illnesses, including schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder, etc. The student can be involved in multiple studies which may involve functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), electroencephalogram (EEG), Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), etc. They will be tasked with recruiting study participants and administering phone screens. They will also assist in running study visits with participants, including collecting informed consent, administering questionnaires, conducting clinical assessments, and carrying out other necessary study procedures. The student will aid in data entry and management. They will be handling sensitive information and documents, following HIPAA and Yale guidelines.8 or more hours. Flexible.1 or morePlease submit CV/resume to philip.corlett@yale.edu and belieflab@yale.edu. Happy to answer questions! Multiple openings.
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Spring 2019 - onwardYes, or Volunteer Brian Bink (PI: Professor Margaret Clark). Yale Relationships Science LaboratoryAre you interested in understanding relationships and what can be done to improve them? Do you want to learn about the ins-and-outs of research, including creating, running, and analyzing studies? And, do you want to work on research that has the potential to improve relationships, increase life-satisfaction, and improve one’s well-being? If these questions excite you, than I encourage you to apply for one of our open research assistant positions at the Clark Relationship Science Laboratory at Yale University. This opportunity is available to volunteers and students requiring course credit, and requires a minimum of 8 hours per week. NoWorking with participants, recruiting participants, analyzing data, literature searches, discussing theories and ideas, planning and preparations for future studiesMinimum of 8 hours per week1 requiredContact Brian.bink@yale.edu
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Fall 2019, Spring 2020, and beyondNoDr. Richard Aslin (LLAMB Lab)
The Language Learning and Multisensory Brain (LLAMB) Lab studies how infants’ brains and minds grow as they learn to process their world. We use neuroimaging (i.e. EEG, fNIRS, fMRI) and eye tracking methods to see how children think, learn, and make decisions. Questions that we are interested include: how do babies recognize objects and produce their first words? How do babies make decisions based on their experiences?YesResearch assistants will have the opportunity to be involved in many aspects of the research process, including: scoring video recordings of infant eye movements, assisting with eye-tracking and neuroimaging (fNIRS and EEG) data collection, sorting databases, and phone scheduling of appointments.
6-8 hours / week1 requiredPlease email Alice Wang (alice.f.wang@yale.edu) and Rebecca Canale (rebecca.canale@yale.edu) with your CV/resume, as well as a brief paragraph describing why you would like to work in the lab and any previous research experience.
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Summer 2020 and BeyondNDr. David Lewkowicz (Haskins Labs)The Communication Development Lab (CDL) at Haskins Laboratories is seeking highly motivated undergraduates looking to acquire research experience in developmental science. The focus of the studies in this lab is on the development of speech, langugage, and the underlying perceptual, attentional, and cognitive mechanisms that enable infants and young children to process, understand, and acquire speech and language.NResearch assistants will have the opportunity to participate in all phases of the research. Opportunities will depend on the student’s interests, skills, prior experience with infant and child testing, availability, and the lab’s needs. Research assistants will be involved in various lab activities, including infant and child recruitment, participant database management, testing of participants in the lab and at museums, data management, and stimulus design.8-10 hours/week, with some weekend hours possible1 required (2 preferred)If interested, please email david.lewkowicz@yale.edu and include your CV and a brief statement of your research interests and whether you have any previous research experience.
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Spring 2020 and beyondYesDr. Helen Pushkarskaya (Yale OCD Research Clinic)Looking for undegraduate research assistants and to hire a postgradute research assistant to work on a large scale data collection project. We aim to investigate individual variaions in a process of perceptual and value-based decision formation in general and clinical population. Will work with Yale SOM on in lab and online data collection. NoRecruitment, data collection, data preprosessing, and data analysis using hierarchical drift diffusion model. For undergaduate research assistants: ~ 10 hours a week flexible. Data collections scheduled for 6-8 during work days, and on weekends.1 required (2 preferred)Email: helen.pushkarskaya@yale.edu
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Spring 2020 and beyondYes (Volunteer options available as well)Lucy Armentano, Aleena Hay, Chance Adkins, Prof. Margaret Clark (PI) of the Clark Relationships LabDo you want to better understand how people strive to belong and to be accepted or how close relationships work? Or find out more about how people convey emotions to one another? We are interested in questions such as: Is what you say more important than what you show when expressing emotion? How do different relational contexts shape our emotional lives? Is the strength of your relationship with your partner related to how you express emotion? Our lab seeks a few motivated research assistants to assist in various studies underway in the lab under the supervision of two graduate students. Tasks may include processing the data from a study examining the communication of emotions in romantic relationships, processing the data from a study examining the experience and expression of emotion across daily contexts, and running future studies examining the emotional lives of participants. Research assistants can start quickly getting trained, learning the ethical guidelines and being approved to work with the data. Previous research experience is preferred, although not necessary. The Clark Lab members are committed to making this a truly educational experience for those broadly interested in research. As such, research assistants will also have access to a weekly series of tailored research methods workshops led by a member of the lab and will receive guidance on independent work.NoResearch assistants will be able to take part in many aspects of research from discussing research designs to potentially running studies to data coding to data analysis. This will involve emotion coding, data management, and theoretical discussions of relevant work, among other things. (Note: We don’t expect applicants to already know how to do these things – they will be trained by our research team.). This will also involve participating in a semester long research design series where we will discuss and generate research questions and hypotheses, create study designs to test them, and execute and analyze the results of one of these study design ideas.8-10 hours with flexible scheduling1 required (2 preferred)Contact Lucy Armentano (lucylle.armentano@yale.edu) as soon as possible for more information or to express interest
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Spring 2020 and beyondYesDr. Molly Crockett, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Crockett Lab Blaise Pascal described human beings as “the glory and scum of the universe”. Each of us carries blueprints for an astonishing range of social behaviors, from the heroic to the atrocious. The Crockett Lab seeks to understand this paradox by investigating the psychological and neural mechanisms of social learning and decision-making. Current research questions include: What makes us behave morally when no one is watching? Why does moral outrage feel so good? How do we decide whether to trust someone? How does social media affect our moral behavior? Our approach integrates social psychology, behavioral economics, neuroscience and philosophy. We use a range of methods including behavioral experiments, computational modeling, brain imaging, and "big data" analyses of social media behavior. NoResearch assistants are full members of the lab and will be included in all aspects of our research, from literature review and experimental design, to study implementation (including participant recruitment and testing), to data analysis and presentation. ~10 hours per week, flexible1 required (2 preferred)To apply for an undergraduate research position, see here for details: http://www.crockettlab.org/undergraduate-research
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Spring 2020 onwardYesAffect Regulation & Cognition Lab

PI: Dr. Jutta Joormann, Professor of Psychology

Supervisor: Colin Stanton, MS, MPhil
The Affect Regulation & Cognition (ARC) Lab is broadly interested in understanding factors the contribute to the development of depression and anxiety disorders. Currently, the ARC Lab is recruiting highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in clinicial psychology with a particular focus on biological approaches. Individuals with depression frequently have difficulty experiencing positive emotions, and a particularly exciting branch of research suggests that this difficulty may be intertwined with immune system functioning in the face of stress. Research assistants will have the opportunity to work on a new study in this area.NoResearch assistants working on this project will have the opportunity to contribute to many stages of the research process, including recruitment, data collection, managing and analyzing data, and discussion of current projects and results at our regular lab meetings. Previous research experience is preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with interests in clinical psychology, especially if interested in biological approaches.6 hours/week1 required, 2 preferredSend a CV/resume, paragraph on previous research experience (if any) and interest in the position, class year, major, and GPA to colin.stanton@yale.edu
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Fall 2020, Spring 2021NDr. Joan Monin, Associate Professor of Public Health (Social and Behavioral Sciences), Social Gerontology and Health LabThe Social Gerontology and Health Lab is a research lab at the Yale School of Public Health. Our goal is to understand how support and interpersonal emotion regulation processes protect caregivers and their partners. We also seek ways to minimize the negative consequences of caregiving, and improve the quality of life and health of caregivers and their partners. We are seeking highly motivated Spanish-speaking Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in social and health psychology and who will help with our Families Coping Together with Alzheimer’s Disease Study (FACT-AD).YResearch assistants will be members of the lab, and will have the opportunity to work directly with participants, help run sessions in Spanish, and help translate study materials and data. RAs must be available throughout the school year, and on some weekends to run participants. RAs will also help recruit for the study.8-12 hours a week (flexible); Weekend hours may be available1 required, 2 preferredTo learn more or apply for a position, please contact Dr. Monin at joan.monin@yale.edu with your CV/Resume.
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Fall 2020, onwardNDr. Joan Monin, Associate Professor of Public Health (Social and Behavioral Sciences), Social Gerontology and Health LabThe Social Gerontology and Health Lab is a research lab at the Yale School of Public Health. Our goal is to understand how support and interpersonal emotion regulation processes protect caregivers and their partners. We also seek ways to minimize the negative consequences of caregiving, and improve the quality of life and health of caregivers and their partners. We are seeking highly motived Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in social and health psychology and who will help with transcription and qualitative coding of audiotaped interviews from our Daily Stress Reduction Intervention for Spouses of Persons with Early Stage Dementia.YResearch assistants will be members of the lab, and will help transcribe audiotaped interviews of spouses receiving training with our stress reduction program and talking about their experience as a spouse of a person with early stage dementia. Ras will also be invited to be part of the qualitative coding team. RAs must be available throughout the school year to come into the lab. Hours are flexible.8-12 hours a week (flexible); Weekend hours may be available1 required, 2 preferredTo learn more or apply for a position, please contact Dr. Monin at joan.monin@yale.edu with your CV/Resume.
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Fall 2020 and beyondYesProfessor Julian Jara-Ettinger (PI), Computational Social Cognition LabOur goal is to understand the structure of mental state representations, to formalize the computations that allow people to infer each other’s thoughts, and to build human-like machine social intelligence. Our research is driven by an engineering philosophy: if we really understand how something works, we should be able to build it. To this end, we build computational models that allow us to ensure that our theories are coherent, precise, and falsifiable.

In tandem to our computational research, our lab has a heavy experimental focus in developmental research. We are particularly interested in understanding the building blocks of social cognition. Our developmental studies explore how young children learn to think about other people’s minds, as well as how this capacity forms the bedrock of human activities like language, fairness, and the social transmission of abstract concepts. To learn more please see our website here: https://compdevlab.yale.edu/
YesResearch assistants will work closely with graduate students and the lab manager in all aspects of our research projects: from study design and theory development, to ongoing online data collection. Students interested in developmental work will primarily work on recruiting families, scheduling, and conducting online Zoom studies with children. Students interested in computational modelling will primarily work on developing models. Thus, computationally focused students are expected to have two semesters of CS coursework, and to be proficient in at least one of the following languages: R, Python, or Javascript.

Additionally, all students are allowed and encouraged to attend our weekly lab meetings and participate in reading group discussions if the topic is of interest to them.
8-10 hours per week (flexible)1 required, 2 preferredContact the lab manager at colin.jacobs@yale.edu with your CV, which area you would be interested in focusing on, and a general description of your research interests.
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Spring 2021 and beyondYesProfessor Julian Jara-Ettinger (PI), Computational Social Cognition LabWe would like specific help with a unique ongoing project: building a model of metacognition of vision. As humans, we sometimes encounter visual illusions — situations where are percepts distort reality. Often, we’re able to realize it when we’re experiencing an illusion; when we see a mirage on a highway, we probably recognize it and say that “our eyes are playing tricks on us.” This ability to recognize false percepts is something that humans have, and AI visual systems lack. We think that this ability comes from being able to represent and think about our own percepts.

Here’s where you come in: we have a model of metacognition that we want to test with a bunch of different artificial visual systems like Detectron2, YOLO, etc.. We need someone to help with setting up the off-the-shelf systems and testing them on custom datasets that you’ll also help us develop. You’ll get experience using state-of-the-art artificial neural networks and putting together a dataset of images and videos to test them on. You’ll also get individualized mentorship from a PhD student and training in cognitive modeling. If you’re interested in work at the intersection of AI and cognitive science, please apply!
YesDuties include: setting up the off-the-shelf artificial visual systems (like Detectron2),
testing them on custom datasets, and helping build these custom dataselts which may involve lightly processing / editing images and videos.
~10 hours per week1 required, 2 preferredContact marlene.berke@yale.edu with your CV and background in programming/psychology
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Fall 2020 + Spring 2021NoDr. John Pachankis, School of Public Health, Esteem LabThe Esteem Lab studies LGBTQ mental health and ways to improve it. We conduct public health research and clinical trials to better understand LGBTQ mental health in the US and around the world. Our current trials test the efficacy of online treatments for LGBTQ young people's depression and suicidality. We are also conducting several studies that seek to understand factors that influence LGBTQ people's mental health in childhood, in families, and in their communities. YesRAs will join a vibrant team of researchers based in New Haven and New York City devoted to understanding and improving LGBTQ mental health. RAs will specifically support recruitment and retention and administration of an online psychotherapy trial for LGBTQ young people across the US and coding transcripts related to positive experiences of racial/sexual identity intersectionality and videotapes of LGBTQ-affirmative psychotherapy. RAs might be required to travel to NYC periodically, but this is flexible.7-10 hours/week (flexible); attendance at weekly lab meetings at YSPH (ideal)1 required, 2 preferredPlease send your CV and/or summary of relevant experience to john.pachankis@yale.edu
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Fall 2020 + Spring 2021Profs. Fred Sigworth (Physiology, BME, MB&B) and Hemant Tagare (Diagnostic Imaging, BME)YesUnder the guidance of Profs. Sigworth and Tagare, research assistants will develop small computer programs to simulate key steps in electron-microscope image formation, and to simulate steps in the subsequent processing of EM images for 3D structure determination. They will use these programs to create video animations for incorporation into a video lecture series. If desired, research assistants may participate in the instructional videos and in Yale's MBB/CMP710b course directly.//1 required, more preferredEmail to fred.sigworth@yale.edu
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Spring 2019-Summer 2021 (Summers also available)YesDr. Steve Chang, Assistant Professor of Psychology and NeuroscienceHow does the human brain make social decisions impacting others? Students will use novel neuroeconomics tasks designed to understand the neural mechanisms of self and other processing using fMRI in humans. Students will work closely with graduate students to design studies, collect data, and analyze data. (http://changlab.yale.edu/gallery/welcome-lab)NoStudents are expected to be a motivated and engaged member of the lab. Programming experiences are strongly encouraged. Students will help design studies, collect data, and analyze data with a graduate student mentor. 10 hours/week1 semester (2 or more preferred)steve.chang@yale.edu
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Fall 2019 and onwardsYes(PI: Dr. Laurie Santos); Comparative Cognition Lab, Canine Cognition LabAt the Center for Canine Cognition at Yale, we’re interested in how dogs think. Our studies explore what dogs know about the physical and social world. By presenting dogs with simple games, we can learn more about how they solve problems and understand how the world works.No Undergraduate research assistants will be involved in many aspects of research. We expect students to attend and participate in a weekly journal club style lab meeting, where we read recent papers and discuss how they relate to our work. In lab, research assistants help with coding of existing datasets, data collection with our visiting canine participants, and science communication with our existing subject dogs' owners6-10 hours/week1+Ellen Stumph (ellen.stumph@yale.edu). View full position listing here: https://caplab.yale.edu/information-students/yale-undergraduate-research-assistant
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YesDr. Sarah Fineberg, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Yale School of MedicineWe're a growing cognitive neuroscience lab focused on clinical psychopathology. Current projects include: testing the novel anti-depressant drug ketamine in Borderline Personality Disorder; testing fMRI-based real time neurofeedback to decrease amygdala activity and symptoms in Borderline Personality Disorder; and computational modeling of social and non-social learning in Borderline Personality Disorder and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Students who work in our lab will have the opportunity to have mentorship from Dr. Fineberg (psychiatrist, physician-scientist), and to work closely with a team of interdisciplinary students (pre-med, medical, nurse-practitioner, pre-psychology, psychiatry residents). Excellent work in the lab will result in authorship on scientific publications.NoResearch interns joining this semester will focus on learning tools for psychiatric assessment and using standardized psychiatric questionnaires to screen potential study participants for our research programs. As part of this experience, students will participate in weekly clinical interviewing trainings to develop nuanced skills in this area. Students who excel in this project in their first semester will have the opportunity to request to become involved in more detailed interviews, scientific writing, and/or data analysis in the second semester. We are seeking applicants with strong interpersonal skills, independent motivation and accountability, and a collaborative work ethic. Previous laboratory/science experience is not required. Interns must work at least 6 hours a week and make a semester-long commitment.At least 6 hours1+Please fill out the following application by Tuesday, September 1.
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Spring 2020 and BeyondYesrick Crouse, 4th year PhD student in Marina Picciotto's lab in Molecular Psychiatry Department (lab above med school Blue State)We often make decisions in our everyday life, including those that balance potential risks (like losing money) and potential rewards (like winning the lottery). Further, we also learn about cues that reliably predict rewards. Are you interested in how people make decisions and learn about rewards? How about the brain mechanisms involved in both decision-making and reward learning, and how these circuits are changed by drug use and addiction? For this project in the Canlab (Clinical and Affective Neuroscience Lab), we are seeking an undergraduate researcher to assist with behavioral and fMRI studies of reward learning and decision making in cocaine users and control subjects. You will have opportunities to learn about the brain circuits involved in reward learning and decision making, as well as computational models of decision making and reward learning. Further, you will have opportunities to study clinical psychology, including structured clinical interviews for diagnosis of substance use disorders. Along with working on reward learning and decision-making projects, there are opportunities to be involved in other lab projects related to the regulation of craving, involving strategies to regulate the desire for food, alcohol and drugs (see descriptions at https://canlab.yale.edu/). Previous research experience is not required, but is a plus. Experience or interest in programming and statistics is also a plus. We are looking for motivated undergraduates with an interest in neuroscience and psychology.NoResearch assistants will be full members of the lab, and included in all aspects of the reward learning and decision-making projects. Opportunities depend on interest, experience, skills, availability and the lab’s needs. Responsibilities may include phone recruitment, interacting with participants (including substance users and healthy controls), literature searches, assisting with scanning sessions, and data management, including potentially analysis and presentation of behavioral and fMRI data, and opportunities to assist with meta-analysis, as well as ongoing lab projects on the regulation of craving.10 hours per week (or more)11 hours per week (or more)Jessica.Mollick@Yale.edu and Hedy.Kober@Yale.edu - Please include a short paragraph describing yourself, your interests, why you want to work in the lab, what you could contribute. Be sure to also include the following information: - Previous research and/or clinical experience (if any); - Previous coursework in psychology, neuroscience, biology, computer science, or philosophy; - Year, Major, GPA; and a CV.
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Fall 2019 and onwardsYesMind & Development Lab (PI: Dr. Paul Bloom)Our lab studies social cognitive development with specific interest in moral judgement. Some of our research investigates the obligation to help others, dehumanization, and how children think about different agent's mental capacities (such as animals and robots). We primarily work with children ages 4-10. For the Fall semester, all research activites will be held remotely. Please visit our website: https://minddevlab.yale.edu/No[All work is remote/ online for Fall 2020] All RAs will be required to dedicate 6-8 hours per week to work in the lab. All scheduled shifts will be between the hours of 10AM and 6PM EST, Monday- Friday. The position is volunteer and we require a 2 consecutive semester commitment. Second semester RAs and beyond can receive course credit (1 credit in Directed Research in Cognitive Science or Psychology). Primary responsibilities include recruiting, scheduling, and running families in online research studies. More info can be found here: https://minddevlab.yale.edu/join-us 6- 8 hours per week2 consecutive semestersEmail the lab manager: katherine.vasquez@yale.edu or one of the lab's graduate students
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Summer 2018 and beyondYRick Crouse, 4th year PhD student in Marina Picciotto's lab in Molecular Psychiatry Department (lab above med school Blue State)Why do we learn about some things faster than others? Why are some memories stronger than others?
We control neuron activity with lasers in the brains of mice to investigate learning and memory. In other words, we use optogenetics (among other techniques) in awake, behaving mice to better understand how certain brain circuits are involved in learning and memory during reward learning.
We are looking for undergraduates to help in every aspect of the project and perhaps design their own related experiments.
N (but possible in the future)Students will handle mice at all stages of the experiment (surgery and behavioral tasks) as well as histology and data analysis. Prior lab experience is NOT required--just dedication and willingness to learn! 10 or more hours per week, with some availability on weekends being ideal. 2 or moreSend your CV to richard.crouse@yale.edu if interested!
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Summer 2019, Fall 2019 onwardYesProgram for Obesity, Eating, and Weight Research (POWER)- PI: Dr. Carlos Grilo (Professor of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine)- Contact: Dr. Janet LydeckerAre you interested in learning about treatment for obesity and loss of control over eating? Do you want to learn about clinical research? We are seeking undergraduates interested in a research-focused internship at the Program for Obesity, Weight, and Eating Research (POWER). This is an excellent opportunity for a committed student who is passionate about research and wants to gain additional experience with all aspects of the clinical research process. Clinic location: 301 Cedar St., 2nd floor. NThis research assistant will be involved in day-to-day management of studies and will be in direct contact with patients. The research assistant will have the option of gaining additional research training, including participating in weekly meetings and working on collaborative and/or independent research projects.8-12 hours per week.2 preferredPlease submit CV/resume and brief statement of interest to Janet.Lydecker@yale.edu. Happy to answer questions!
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Spring 2020 and beyondYes (and volunteers)Dr. Reuma Gadassi-Polack, postdoctoral fellow working with Jutta Joormann (Psychology) and Hedy Kober (Psychiatry)We are looking for RAs for two multi-method studies examining the interplay between cognitive, affective, and interpersonal aspects of the development of depression. The first study examines how children of depressed mothers react to interpersonal situations using a combination of fMRI, experience-sampling diaries, and an observational task. The second study examines how pregnant women react to interpersonal stimuli using a combination of eye-tracking, questionnaires, and hormonal measures.NoResearch assistants will help recruit and run participants to in both studies, perform literature searches and reviews, manage and analyze data, and, depending on commitment length, could participate in writing academic papers. In addition, all RAs are invited to participate in lab meetings (which can be considered as a course).~10 hours a week; depends on the RA's preferences, some duties are relevant to the afternoon/evening/weekends2 preferredreuma.gadassipolack@yale.edu
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Spring 2020 and beyondYesDr. Helena Rutherford, Before and After Baby Lab, Yale Child Study Center We are looking for enthusiastic, reliable, and motivated volunteers to engage in experimental research with families during pregnancy and the postpartum period. We want to understand how men and women transition into their parenting role, and how this may be affected by psychopathology (including depression, anxiety, and addiction). NoResponsibilities may include the collection and analysis of EEG, fMRI, hormonal, and behavioral (observational coding, decision making, accuracy and reaction times) measures. Students may also help with transcribing interviews, recruitment, literature reviews, and manuscript preparation.8-12 hours a week2 preferredIf you are interested, please email helena.rutherford@yale.edu
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Fall 2020and beyondPossiblyProgram for Obesity, Eating, and Weight Research (POWER)- PI: Dr. Carlos Grilo (Professor of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine)- Contact: Dr. Rebecca BoswellAre you interested in learning about treatment for obesity and loss of control over eating? We are seeking a research assistant to join our team at the Program for Obesity, Weight, and Eating Research (POWER) to perform recruitment and administrative tasks for ongoing clinical trials investigating treatment for individuals with binge eating disorder. This is an excellent opportunity for a committed and detail-oriented student who is passionate about research and wants to gain additional experience with all aspects of the clinical research process, including recruitment, medical record management, and administrative coordination tasks. Clinic location: 301 Cedar St., 2nd floor. PossiblyThis research assistant will be involved in day-to-day management of studies and will be in direct contact with patients. The research assistant will have the option of gaining additional research training, including participating in weekly meetings and working on collaborative and/or independent research projects.8-12 hours per week.2 preferredPlease submit CV/resume and brief statement of interest to Rebecca.Boswell@yale.edu. Happy to answer questions!
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Fall 2020 and onwardYes (and volunteers)Dr. Craig Bailey (PI: Associate Research Scientist, Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence) The Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence (http://ei.yale.edu) is hiring part-time and full-time research assistants! Dr. Craig Bailey are seeking highly motivated part-time
undergraduates and recent graduates to fill part-time and full-time (RA) positions in a large, five-year grant funded by the Institute of Education Sciences (R305A180293)
to test the efficacy of RULER, an approach to social and emotional learning, in preschools across Connecticut. All positions focus on data collection and begin Spring 2019. Applications will continue to be welcomed throughout the duration of the project. Both positions require a minimum 3.0 GPA and are contingent on passing applicable background checks.
YesAvailable for school visits in the morning • A commitment of 10 hours a week (minimum) • Multi-semester commitment is preferred, but not required • Preferred experience working with children and/or in schools http://ei.yale.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Yale_YCEI_RA-Flyer.pdf~10 hours/week2 preferredplease submit a (1) letter of interest, (2) CV/resume, and (3) 3 references to the principle investigator, Dr. Bailey: craig.bailey@yale.edu.
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Fall 2020 and beyondNoDr. Roger Jou's lab (Yale Child Study Center)Our lab is a part of the Yale Child Study Center, a leading institution in autism research. We conduct various studies involving genetics and pharmaceutical clinical trials for children and adults living with autism spectrum disorders. We also are engaged with many community outreach initiatives, and manage an on-line and in-person social community of indivuals living with autism and their families.YesIntern responsibilities involve assisting in the research process for current studies, including subject recruitment and data collection procedures. Individuals will work with families in a research, clinical, and community context and have additional opportuntities for clinical shadowing and mentoring an individual living with ASD.5-10 hrs a week, with weekend/ night hours available2 preferredPlease email hope.koene@yale.edu a copy of your CV and a short paragraph explaining your interests in our lab and relevant skills.
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Fall 2020, Spring 2021PossiblyJordon White, Ph.D- Postdoctoral Researcher under Arie Kaffman, MD PhD Department of Psychiatry- Contact Dr. Jordon WhiteThe Kaffman lab is seeking Yale undergraduate interested in investigating the how early-life stress alters developmental trajectories. We approach this topic using molecular, behavioral, and imaging techniques in the rodent. The project we are currently recruiting for will involve identifying and characterizing changes in various cell populations of this hippocampus following early-life stress. The broad goal of this work is to understand how stress impacts the microenvironment of the hippocampus and how this can alter brain development and affect changes in adult emotional and cognitive processing.VolunteerWe expect research assistants to be involved in most aspects of the project. This may include experiment planning, animal handling, behavioral testing, histology, and various molecular techniques. Involvement will vary depending on time available, and the interests of the candidate. You would also be welcome at the Kaffman lab meetings should you be free during that time period (2ndWednesdays of the month 4-5pm).10 hrs per week minimum. This can include some weekend time if that works for you.2 preferred (could include the summer)Please submit CV/resume and a brief statement of interest to jordon.white@yale.edu
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Spring 2020 and onwardsYesDr. Dylan Gee, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development LabThe Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development Lab is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in clinical psychology and developmental neuroscience. The lab uses behavioral, psychophysiological, and neuroimaging techniques to study the development of anxiety and stress-related disorders across childhood and adolescence. We are especially interested in typical and atypical trajectories of brain development related to emotional behavior, the effects of early-life adversity, and translating knowledge from basic science to optimize clinical treatments.NoResearch assistants will have the opportunity to contribute to many stages of the research process including recruitment, phone screening for clinical participants, data collection (with children, adolescents, parents, and adult participants), preparing participants for the MRI scan, managing and analyzing data, development of experiment-related materials, and discussion of current projects and results at our regular lab meetings. Previous research experience is preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with interests in clinical child & adolescent psychology and neuroscience.10 hours a week; specific hours are flexible2 requiredPlease email the lab manager Sarah McCauley (sarah.mccauley@yale.edu) with your CV/resume, class year, major, GPA, and a brief paragraph explaining your interest in the lab and any previous research experiences you have had.
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Spring 2020 and BeyondYesDr. Dylan Gee (PI; Assistant Professor of Psychology), Camila Caballero (PhD student), and Sahana Kribakaran (PhD student) in the Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development LabThe Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development Lab is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in clinical psychology and developmental neuroscience. The lab uses behavioral, psychophysiological, real-time ecological momentary assessment, and neuroimaging techniques to study the development of anxiety and stress-related disorders across childhood and adolescence. We are especially interested in typical and atypical trajectories of brain development related to emotional behavior, the effects of early-life adversity, and translating knowledge from basic science to optimize clinical treatments.NoResearch assistants will have the opportunity to work directly with participants through our ecological momentary assessment study using real-time data collection through mobile devices/SMS messages. In addition to on-boarding and scheduling participants for this study, research assistants will learn how to oversee this type of data collection and gain exposure to related analytical methods. Previous research experience is preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with interests in the emotion regulation, emotion dynamics, and clinical populations across the lifespan.10 hours a week; specific hours are flexible2 requiredTo apply, please send a CV or resume, class year, major, GPA, and a short paragraph about your research interests and previous research experience (if applicable) to camila.caballero@yale.edu & sahana.kribakaran@yale.edu
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Spring 2020 and beyondYesDr. Dylan Gee (PI; Assistant Professor of Psychology) and Camila Caballero (PhD student) in the Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development LabThe Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development Lab under the direction of Dr. Dylan Gee is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in programming analysis related to human neuroimaging. The lab uses fMRI techniques to study the development of emotion regulation processes in individuals following exposure to early-life stress.NoResearch assistants will have the opportunity to see many stages of these studies including writing code that will be a part of analysis pipelines (both behavioral and fMRI) and MRI data collection. Proficiency with computer programming (bash, R, Python, or Matlab) is required. This position is ideal for students with interest in coding projects and human neuroscience, especially in the neurodevelopment of emotion regulation. minimum 10 hours a week; specific hours are flexible2 requiredTo apply, please send a CV or resume, class year, major, GPA, and a short paragraph about your research interests and previous research experience (if applicable) to camila.caballero@yale.edu
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Spring 2020 and beyondYesDr. Dylan Gee, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development LabThe Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development Lab under the direction of Dr. Dylan Gee is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in human neuroimaging. The lab uses fMRI techniques to study the development of anxiety and stress-related disorders.NoResearch assistants will have the opportunity to see many stages of these studies including MRI data collection, quality assurance, and processing. Prior experience working with MRI (e.g., in a research methods class or in a lab) is preferred but not required. Some basic familiarity with computer programming (bash, R, Python, or Matlab) is also preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with interest in human neuroscience including clinical, affective, and developmental neuroscience.minimum 10 hours a week; specific hours are flexible2 requiredTo apply, please send a CV or resume, class year, major, GPA, and a short paragraph about your research interests and previous research experience (if applicable) to paola.odriozola@yale.edu & lucinda.sisk@yale.edu
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Spring 2020 and beyondYesDr. Dylan Gee, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development LabThe Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development Lab is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in developmental neuroscience. The lab uses behavioral and functional neuroimaging techniques to study the development of anxiety and stress-related disorders across childhood and adolescence. We are especially interested in typical and atypical trajectories of brain development related to emotional behavior, the effects of early-life adversity, and translating knowledge from basic science to optimize clinical treatments.NoResearch assistants will have the opportunity to help with developing a novel behavioral task that uses virtual reality for developmental neuroscience research. Advance skills with computer programming (e.g., Python ot Matlab) is required. Prior experience working with behavioral tasks (e.g., in a research methods class or in a lab) is preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with interest in human neuroscience and advanced coding projects.minimum 10 hours a week; specific hours are flexible2 requiredTo apply, please send a CV or resume, class year, major, GPA, and a short paragraph about your research interests and previous research experience (if applicable) to sahana.kribakaran@yale.edu
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Spring 2020 and beyondYesLucinda Sisk (PhD student) and Dr. Dylan Gee, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development LabThe Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development Lab is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in clinical psychology. The lab uses fMRI techniques to study the development of anxiety and stress-related disorders. NoResearch assistants will have the opportunity to work with neuroimaging data and gain mentorship in the application of data science skills to psychology and neuroscience. Experience using python, R, or shell scripting a bonus but not required. This position is ideal for anyone interested in gaining experience in human neuroscience and/or computational neuroscience.10 hours per week2 requiredTo apply, please send a CV or resume, class year, major, GPA, and a short paragraph about your research interests and previous research experience (if applicable) to lucinda.sisk@yale.edu.
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Spring 2020 and beyondYes Dr. Reuma Gadassi Polack (PI: Dr. Jutta Joormann, Professor of Psychology) Affect Regulation & Cognition LabAre you interested in how maternal depression influences children and adolescents social-emotional development? The depression risk project is looking for highly motivated research assistants who are looking to learn how emotion and its regulation in the interpersonal context are related to risk for psychopathlogy in children of mothers with depression. The project combines human neuroimaging, experience-sampling methods/ecological momentary assessment, as well as behavioral observation and hormonal methods.NoResearch assistants are invited to ARC lab meetings (Thursdays at 9 during the semester), and mayb be included in all aspects of research, according to their preferences, from literature review, work on meta-analysis, participant recruitment and testing, to data analysis and presentation. minumum 10 hours2 requiredPlease email project coordinator, Dr. Reuma Gadassi Polack (reuma.gadassipolack@yale.edu or arclab@yale.edu) with your CV/resume, year, and a brief paragraph explaining your interest in the depression risk project and any previous research experiences you have had.
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Spring 2019 and beyondYesDr. Wan-Ling Tseng, Assistant Professor, Yale Child Study Center, YCSC Affective Youth (YAY) LabThe Ycsc (Yale Child Study Center) Affective Youth, i.e., the YAY Lab, is a research lab at the Yale Child Study Center. Our goal is to understand the neural mechanisms of childhood irritability and emotion dysregulation. Understanding these mechanisms can inform how and why irritability develops. We use various techniques such as functional neuroimaging and behavioral tasks to explore this topic. We are seeking motivated undergraduates who are interested in childhood psychopathology and fMRI research. NoResearch assistants will have the opportunity to contribute to many stages of the research process including recruitment, phone screening for potential participants, data collection (with children, adolescents, and parents), preparing participants for the MRI scan, managing and analyzing data, opportunities to be involved in poster presentation and manuscript preparation. Previous research experience is preferred but not required. 10 hours a week; specific hours are flexible2 requiredPlease email Dr. Wan-Ling Tesng (wan-ling.tseng@yale.edu) with your CV/resume, class year, major, and a brief paragraph explaining your interest in the lab and any previous research experiences you have had.
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Any timeYesDr. Dylan Gee, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development LabThe Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development Lab is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in clinical psychology and developmental neuroscience. The lab uses behavioral, psychophysiological, and neuroimaging techniques to study the development of anxiety and stress-related disorders across childhood and adolescence. We are especially interested in typical and atypical trajectories of brain development related to emotional behavior, the effects of early-life adversity, and translating knowledge from basic science to optimize clinical treatments.NoResearch assistants will have the opportunity to contribute to many stages of the research process including recruitment, phone screening for clinical participants, data collection (with children, adolescents, parents, and adult participants), preparing participants for the MRI scan, managing and analyzing data, development of experiment-related materials, and discussion of current projects and results at our regular lab meetings. Previous research experience is preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with interests in clinical child & adolescent psychology and neuroscience. Please note that opportunities for Fall 2020 will be limited to remote opportunities including assisting with managing and analyzing data, conducting quality assessment of MRI data, and conducting literature searches related to stress and anxiety.10 hours a week; specific hours are flexible; remote opportunities are available2 requiredPlease email the lab manager Alexis Broussard (alexis.broussard@yale.edu) with your CV/resume, class year, major, GPA, and a brief paragraph explaining your interest in the lab and any previous research experiences you have had.
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Fall 2017 and beyondYesReuma Gadassi Polack, Ph.D. (PI: Dr. Jutta Joormann, Psychology, Affect Regulation & Cognition LabDepression is a highly prevalent disorder, which typically starts during adolescence. the Yale ARC lab is currently running a project that tries to assess neural biomarkers for depression risk by conducting an innovative multimethod study combining brain imaging (fMRI) and experience-sampling methods (i.e., daily questionnaires). This project focuses on youth (10-13) at high risk for depression due to maternal depression history. The project encourages undergrads to apply if they are interested to learn more about brain imaging and how it results are translated to everyday life. Specifically this project focuses on the interplay between emotion regulation and social experiences.norunning participants (online & in the Brain Imaging Center), helping with literature reviews and meta analysis, cleaning and analyzing data is also possible, as well as assisting in writing papers. Writing Senior thesis using data already collected is encouraged10 hours2 semesters preferredReuma - reuma.gadassipolack@yale.edu
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Spring 2019 - Fall 2020YesPi: Dr. Paul Bloom, Mind & Development Lab; Researchers: Emily Gerdin, Madeline "Gracie" Reinecke, Dr. Matti WIlks (Postdoc)The research carried out in this lab explores the social development of children. Some of our main interests include: moral reasoning and moral action in children and adults; empathy, the common sense conception of the self, third-party punishment, the obligation to help others, how children think of the moral worth of animals & robots. We work with children ages 4 to 10 years old. Please visit our website for more information: minddevlab.yale.edu NoInterns will work closely with lab researchers on new and ongoing studies, participating fully in all aspects of the research process. Interns will become familiar with experimental methods used in child studies, and will immediately become involved in recruiting and testing participants, designing and setting up studies. They will also attend a weekly lab meeting (1.5 hours) where we discuss the theoretical motivation for our studies, experimental data, and relevant research findings from other labs. Interns will have to a minimum of 2 hour call shift during the day.8-10 hours (Flexible) We work around your schedule2 semesters requiredPlease email the lab manager: alexa.sacchi@yale.edu with your resume & CV
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Fall 2020 onwardYesThe Fundamentals of the Adolescent Brain (FAB) Lab, PI: Dr. BJ Casey, Psychology DepartmentThe FAB Lab is part of a large national study, the Adolescent Brain and Cognitve Development (ABCD) Study that is following the brain development and cognitive and health outcomes in over 10,000 9-10 year old children over the next 10 years. Interested undergraduate students at Yale will have the opportunity to be involved in this study and work with the FAB Lab team and over 600 of these youth in the CT and NY area. YesResearch assistants will have the opportunity to see many stages of the study including scheduling, screenings, neurocognitive assessment, biospecimen collection, MRI data collection, quality assurance, processing and back-up. Prior experience working with MRI (e.g., in a research methods class or in a lab) is preferred but not required. Experience with computer programming (UNIX, bash, R, python, or matlab) preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with an interest in human neuroscience including affective, clinical, cognitive and developmental neuroscience.A least 10 hours per week2 semesters requiredPlease email the PI at BJ.Casey@yale.edu
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Fall 2020 + Spring 2021YesDrs. Marc Brackett and Christina Cipriano: Yale Center for Emotional IntelligenceThe Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, under the leadership of Drs. Brackett, Cipriano, Hoffmann, Willner, Pringle, Floman, and Bailey, is seeking high motivated undergraduates to fulfill undergraduate research positions in a large multi-year, investigations to develop a suite of tools, strategies, and data points to assess the emotional health of schools, study and improve RULER, and study creativity in the school and workplace. Interest in emotional intelligence, developmental psychology, school culture, and health preferred. Experience working with schools is a bonus.YesUndergraduate RA’s will be involved in multiple aspects of research (dependent on number of semesters committed). Duties may include, but are not limited to: Reviewing literature on emotion regulation strategy development and social-emotional skill assessments Coding survey data Assisting in assessment development and pilot testing Collecting child and adolescent data in school settings (Spring 2019 and beyond) Attending weekly meetings Minimum of 5 hours/week commitment (10 hours/week commitment preferred)At least 1 semester (A multiple semester commitment is preferred)To apply, please send a letter of interest, CV/resume, and two references to Linda Torv, Program Manager, Research at linda.torv@yale.edu
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Spring 2021 and beyond.YesDr. Amanda M. Dettmer, Associate Research Scientist at Yale Child Study CenterWe study both human and non-human primates (NHPs) to learn more about child development. Human studies are just emerging, and aim to study how early life experiences such as the school environment impact neurological, cognitive, and behavioral development. NHP studies focus on mother-infant interactions and infant congnitive and social behavior as models for child development. NOTE: the NHP research utilizes archival data, including videos of animals. There is not a live/active NHP lab. Due to COVID-19, the human research/school studies are on hold indefinitely.No No previous experience necessary. You will have the opportunity to learn about and engage in the following research activities:

Human research: Recruit participants for studies; Collect data such as hair samples and demographic/behavioral data; analyze hair samples for hormones. Primate research: Score videos of nonhuman primate behaviors for later data analysis; prepare biological specimens for assay/analysis; analyze biological samples; manage research study databases; Both types of research: Analyze quantitative and qualitative data; Review relevant background research/literature; Summarize and present research findings at a lab/journal club meetings, university events, conferences, etc.; Co-author scientific publications emanating from research.
5-10 hours/weekprefer 2+Please fill out this brief application and e-mail it along with your resume to Dr. Dettmer at amanda.dettmer@yale.edu.
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Fall 2020 onwardYesDr. Summer Thompson, postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Jane R Taylor's lab in Molecular Psychiatry We are conducting studies aimed at identifying the role of the gut microbiome in complex behaviors relevant to compulsive features of addiction, OCD, or binge eating. This work provides the opportunity for training in operant behavioral paradigms and molecular biology techniques such as qPCR. We are looking for motivated volunteers who are interested in helping conduct this research.YesResponsibilities may include conducting behavioral experiments in mice and performing molecular biology assays.10 hr/week with weekend hours available, more hours possible during the summerprefer 2+If interested in the position, please contact Summer at summer.thompson@yale.edu with a CV your availability.
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Fall 2019 and onwardsYesChang lab (PI: Dr. Steve Chang)In our lab, we study neural mechanisms underlying social cognition and behaviors in humans as well as in animal models. We work with behavioral, electrophysiological, and functional neuroimgaging data, often collected during real-life social interactions. Highly motivated students with strong background in quantitative analysis are particularly encouraged to contact the lab to discuss research opportunities. Please also note that we prefer to work with undergraduate scholars for at least two years.
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Fall 2019 and onwardsYesCrockett Lab (PI: Dr. Molly Crockett)We study human morality, altruism and decision-making using behavioral experiments, brain imaging, and analysis of social media data. Current research questions include: What makes someone a hypocrite? How does outrage spread on social media? How do people resolve moral dilemmas during the COVID pandemic? For more details, see our undergraduate research page: http://www.crockettlab.org/undergraduate-research
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Fall 2019 and beyondYesLab: Clinical & Affective Neuroscience Lab, Postdoctoral Associate Jessica Mollick, Ph. D (PI: Professor Hedy Kober)We often make decisions in our everyday life, including those that balance potential risks (like losing money) and potential rewards (like winning the lottery). Further, we also learn about cues that reliably predict rewards. Are you interested in how people make decisions and learn about rewards? How about the brain mechanisms involved in both decision-making and reward learning, and how these circuits are changed by drug use and addiction? For this project in the Canlab (Clinical and Affective Neuroscience Lab), we are seeking an undergraduate researcher to assist with behavioral and fMRI studies of reward learning and decision making in cocaine users and control subjects. You will have opportunities to learn about the brain circuits involved in reward learning and decision making, as well as computational models of decision making and reward learning. Further, you will have opportunities to study clinical psychology, including structured clinical interviews for diagnosis of substance use disorders. Along with working on reward learning and decision-making projects, there are opportunities to be involved in other lab projects related to the regulation of craving, involving strategies to regulate the desire for food, alcohol and drugs (see descriptions at https://canlab.yale.edu/). Previous research experience is not required, but is a plus. Experience or interest in programming and statistics is also a plus. We are looking for motivated undergraduates with an interest in neuroscience and psychology.NoResearch assistants will be full members of the lab, and included in all aspects of the reward learning and decision-making projects. Opportunities depend on interest, experience, skills, availability and the lab’s needs. Responsibilities may include phone recruitment, interacting with participants (including substance users and healthy controls), literature searches, assisting with scanning sessions, and data management, including potentially analysis and presentation of behavioral and fMRI data, and opportunities to assist with meta-analysis, as well as ongoing lab projects on the regulation of craving.10 hours per weekJessica.Mollick@Yale.edu and Hedy.Kober@Yale.edu - Please include a short paragraph describing yourself, your interests, why you want to work in the lab, what you could contribute. Be sure to also include the following information: - Previous research and/or clinical experience (if any); - Previous coursework in psychology, neuroscience, biology, computer science, or philosophy; - Year, Major, GPA; and a CV.
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Fall 2019 and beyond
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Fall 2019 - Summer 2021 (flexible) not at this timeCognitive Neuroscience of Affect, Memories, and Stress (PI: Elizabeth Goldfarb, Dept of Psychiatry)We study why we remember certain parts of our experiences, how stress and affect change different memories, and how what we remember guides our behavior. The laboratory is based in the Yale Stress Center within the School of Medicine. We are looking for motivated, detail-oriented research assistants to help investigate these processes in healthy individuals and patients with alcohol use disorder. Our research leverages a broad array of methods including functional neuroimaging, novel behavioral tasks, psychophysiology, and smartphone-based behavioral monitoring. Please email Dr. Goldfarb (elizabeth.goldfarb@yale.edu) if you are interested.
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Spring 2021, Summer 2021, and beyondYesACT Lab (PI: Dr. Samuel McDougle, Dept of Psychology)From acing a tennis serve to playing a complex violin concerto, humans have a seemingly unbounded ability to learn a range of stunning motor skills. How does the human mind (and brain) accomplish such feats? The ACT (Action, Computation, & Thinking) lab has openings for Yale undergraduates interested in the nature of human learning. RAs are encouraged to apply if they want to gain experience in experimental design, data analysis, and computational models of human cognition and brain function. Research projects include studies of the cognitive components of motor skill learning, motor memory consolidation, reward-based learning processes, and habit formation. Visit http://actcompthink.org/index.html for more information, or email Dr. Samuel McDougle (samuel.mcdougle@yale.edu).
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Fall 2017 - plusYesSocial Cognitive Development Lab (PI: Dr. Yarrow Dunham)Our lab studies how children navigate the social world through a wide range of different studies. Some of our research investigates social group membership and how group membership drives favoritism and biases towards others. We also study the cognitive foundations of social hierarchy and fairness. We primarily work with children ages 4-10. We are looking for research assistants to help out with various projects or even help run online studies with families. Please visit our website: http://www.socialcogdev.com/ and email our lab manager, Katie Vasquez with any questions.
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