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Area (Neuroscience, Cognitive, Developmental, Social, and/or Clinical)Course Credit Option Y/NPay Option Y/NResearchersDescriptionDutiesAverage weekly commitmentsMinimum Required SemestersContact
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Summer 2018, Fall 2018 onwardBehavioral NeuroscienceYesYesDr. Summer Thompson, postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Jane R Taylor's lab in Molecular Psychiatry We are conducting studies aimed at identifying the role of the gut microbiome in complex behaviors relevant to compulsive features of addiction, OCD, or binge eating. This work provides the opportunity for training in operant behavioral paradigms and molecular biology techniques such as qPCR. We are looking for motivated volunteers who are interested in helping conduct this research.Responsibilities may include conducting behavioral experiments in mice and performing molecular biology assays.10 hr/week with weekend hours available, more hours possible during the summerprefer 2+If interested in the position, please contact Summer at summer.thompson@yale.edu with a CV your availability.
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Anytime!Behavioral neuroscience, Neurobiology YesNoLi Yan McCurdy (graduate student), in Michael Nitabach's lab (Sterling Hall of Medicine)We're interested in understanding what goes on in the fruit-fly's brain during learning. We've known for decades that flies can be classically conditioned (think Pavlov's dogs) to associate odors with punishment, but it's less clear exactly HOW they learn it. We know that mammalian brains learn by performing the same computations that machines use (i.e. machine-learning algorithms), but it's hard to figure out how neurons calculate things, because mammalian brains are big and complicated. On the other hand, fruit-flies have a much simpler nervous system (100k neurons in flies vs 100b neurons in humans), and we have cool genetic tools that let us manipulate and visualize activity in really precise subsets of neurons. So we think flies are a great animal to use to understand how neurons implement computations that generate behavior, which is a really fundamental question in neuroscience. Research assistants will perform behavioral experiments on fruit-flies. They will learn basic fly husbandry, genetics and maintenance, basic wet lab skills (e.g. pipetting), and run sophisticated optogenetic behavioral experiments, in which light is used to artificially activate specific neurons during learning odor-punishment associations, to investigate the role of different neurons during learning. ***Previous experience NOT required. The research project is a great introduction to wet-lab research, where basic wet-lab skills will be taught, whilst performing sophisticated behavioral experiments. Strong emphasis placed on mentoring, so you'll be in good hands!>=8 hours per week, very flexible1liyan.mccurdy@yale.edu
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Spring 2018 and beyondBehavioral neuroscience, Neurobiology YesNoPree Sareen (Postdoc), in Michael Nitabach's lab (Sterling Hall of Medicine)Our lab is broadly interested in understanding how neural circuits generate complex behaviors in the fruit-fly (Drosophila melanogaster) and worm (C elegans). We use a combination of genetic, neurophysiological, behavioral, and computational tools to probe these circuits. Specifically, this project is focused on understanding how fruit-flies make choices under conflicting taste information. If you're interested in understanding how neural circuits create complex behaviors, and are excited about getting some wet-lab experience, we'd love to have you as part of our team!Research assistants will perform behavioral experiments on fruit-flies. They will learn basic fly husbandry, genetics and maintenance, basic wet lab skills (e.g. making soutions), and run sophisticated optogenetic behavioral experiments, in which light is used to artificially activate/silence specific neurons in freely moving flies, to investigate the role of different neurons during choice-making behavior. The research project is a great introduction to wet-lab research in a genetically-tractable animal model.8 or more h/week. Scheduling is flexible.1preeti.sareen@yale.edu Some background in Biology and quantitative fields will be beneficial.
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Spring 2019 onwardBehavioral NeuroscieneYesNo (although option for future paid summer internship if interested)Leah Fleming, 3rd year PhD student in Jane Taylor's lab in Molecular Psychaitry Deparment at YaleWe are looking for Yale undergraduates to assist with projects focused on understanding various cognitive behaviors that underlie more complex psychotic symptoms. We study these behaviors in rats and determine how pharmacological and circuit-level manipulations in the brain affect rats' performance. The goal is to try to determine the biological basis of psychotic symptoms experienced by patients (with schizophrenia for instance). This work is in direct collaboration with a human lab using fMRI and TMS to study similar behaviors across different diagnostic groups. Students will mostly assist with running the various behavioral paradigms, handling rats and immunohistochemistry procedures. You will be exposed to some basic wet lab skills and data analysis. You also have the option to attend weekly lab meetings and various talks in the Molecular Psychaitry Department. 10 hours/week, and availability on weekends would be great. >1 preferredIf interested, please contact me (Leah) at leah.fleming@yale.edu with your CV. I look forward to hearing from you!
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Spring 2019 - Fall 2019ClinicalYesNoAffect Regulation & Cognition Lab

PI: Dr. Jutta Joormann, Professor of Psychology

Supervisor: Colin Stanton, MS, MPhil
The Affect Regulation & Cognition (ARC) Lab is broadly interested in understanding factors the contribute to the development of depression and anxiety disorders. Currently, the ARC Lab is recruiting highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in clinicial psychology with a particular focus on biological approaches. Individuals with depression frequently have difficulty experiencing positive emotions, and a particularly exciting branch of research suggests that this difficulty may be intertwined with immune system functioning in the face of stress. Research assistants will have the opportunity to work on a new study in this area.Research assistants working on this project will have the opportunity to contribute to many stages of the research process, including recruitment, data collection, managing and analyzing data, and discussion of current projects and results at our regular lab meetings. Previous research experience is preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with interests in clinical psychology, especially if interested in biological approaches.10 hours/week1 required, 2 preferredSend a CV/resume, paragraph on previous research experience (if any) and interest in the position, class year, major, and GPA to colin.stanton@yale.edu
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Spring 2019 ClinicalY (and volunteer) NMolly Crossman (PI: Alan E. Kazdin, PhD), Yale Innovative Interactions LabOur lab is dedicated to learning more about how individuals of all ages interact with animals and robots to improve their own wellbeing and cope with the challenges of daily life. Examples of ongoing projects are an investigation of the influence of pet dogs on maternal-child interactions and a study of emotional contagion between people and dogs. For summer 2018 and Fall 2019, this position will involve recruiting and running participants in lab-based studies, behavioral coding, entering and cleaning data, and participating in day-to-day administration of the lab. Opportunities to learn the Facial Action Coding System (FACS), DogFACS, and/or maternal mind-mindedness (mother-child interaction) coding schemes. Students may also be involved in conducting literature reviews and conducting online studies. This is an excellent experience for students interested in clinical psychology, children and families, human-animal interaction, and research. For more information please see iilab.yale.eduRecruiting, consenting, and running subjects, data entry and management; behavioral coding; literature reviews; and related lab tasks. Opportunities are available to learn behavioral coding schemes and to participate in manuscript preparation. 8-10 hours1molly.crossman@yale.edu
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Summer 2018 and beyondClinicalYNCarla Stover, Associate Professor Child Study CenterDr. Stover's lab focuses on studies of interventions for high risk families including those with violence and substance misuse. We focus on understanding the causes and correlates of violence and substance misuse and mechanisms to intervene to stop family violence, improve co-parenting relationships and father-child relationships.

Assist with recruitment of fathers into a randomized pilot of a fatherhood focused family violence education program compared to intervention as usual mandated by the courts. Assist with informed consent, data collection, and data entry, coding on the project. Student will work closely with Dr. Stover and other lab staff to carry out the goals of the project and follow research protocol. Highly motivated students may also participate in data analysis and writing projects. 8-10 hours1 but perfer 2email your CV to carla.stover@yale.edu
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Spring 2019 and onwardClinicalYesNoEmily Cohodes (PhD student) and Dr. Dylan Gee (PI; Assistant Professor of Psychology) in the Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development LabThe Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development Lab is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in clinical psychology. The lab uses fMRI techniques to study the development of anxiety and stress-related disorders. Research assistants will have the opportunity to see many stages of clinical research studies and will assist primarily with coding interviews about experiences of early life stress. Prior experience working with clinical populations is preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with interest in pursuing graduate study in clinical psychology, particualrly with a focus on early life stress. 10 hours/week2Send a CV/resume, paragraph on previous research experience (if any) and interest in the position, class year, major, and GPA to dylan.gee@yale.edu and emily.cohodes@yale.edu
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Spring 2019 (also available for summer)Clinical Y credit or volunteerN (will support applying for funds through university)Mechanisms of Disinhibition (MoD) Lab (PI: Arielle Baskin-Sommers, PhD)Research in the Mechanisms of Disinhibition (MoD) Lab utilizes multidisciplinary theoretical principles and methods (e.g., electrophysiology, neuroimaging, behavior, self-report) to distinguish the underlying mechanisms and identify correlates at micro, mezzo, and macro levels in order to improve the identification of these syndromes and develop innovative syndrome-specific interventions. Behavior unfolds through multiple stages of information processing from encoding, to clarifying, to interpreting, to responding to a cue. At each of these stages environmental (e.g., exposure to violence), affective (e.g., reward/punishment, positive/negative), and cognitive (perceptual/early selective attention, executive function, and value-based decision-making) factors influence behavior. Dysfunction associated with any one component may disrupt processing associated with any other component. Understanding how these processes affect each other is important and, ultimately, it is the relationships (i.e., interactions) among these processes that determine the specific behavior problems related to distinct forms of disinhibition. Our goal is to identify and specify the common and unique processes contributing to the most chronic and most socially and individually damaging disinhibited behaviors. So as to best accomplish this goal, the MoD Lab explores disinhibited behavior across various populations, including currently incarcerated inmates, community samples, and youth.Depending on time commitment students can enter data/admin, do clinical phone screens, run behavioral sessions, run EEG sessions, conduct in-person clinical interviews4-12 hours per week (decided with adivsor depending on duties)2Dr. Arielle Baskin-Sommers (arielle.baskin-sommers@yale.edu)
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Spring 2017 - Spring 2020Clinical and CommunityYes, volunteer available as wellNoProfessor Joy Kaufman (PI), Department of Psychiatry, Division of Prevention and Community ResearchUsing an implementation science frame, our research team evaluates community-based interventions with the goal of determining the factors that lead to successful implementation of evidenced-based or promising practices and understanding the effecteveness of these interventions in improving the health and safety of community residents. We are seeking two undergraduate research assistants to assist with qualitative coding 1) for a variety of public health projects that focus on cancer control, hypertension, and obesity prevention and 2) for a National evaluation of interventions to reduce domestic violence related homicide. Students will be trained in qualitative data analytic techniques, will be exposed to theories and methods for community-based research and will learn strategies to report research findings to community providers and community members. Please email amy.griffin@yale.edu if interested. Undergraduate assistants will be trained in qualitative data analysis procedures and will apply them to focus group and interview transcripts. Students will be trained to code and analyze data using NVivo software. Students may also be asked to conduct literature reviews or to create written summaries of findings and if desired can be involved in the development of manuscripts. 8-10 hours per week. Scheduling is flexibile.
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Spring 2019 and BeyondClinical, child psychology/psychiatryYesNoDavid Saunders, MD, PhD (PI: Hedy Kober), Clinical & Affective Neuroscience Lab (Psychology, Psychiatry, Neuroscience, Cog Sci), Child Study Center Are you interested in mindfulness and/or meditation practice? Do you enjoy working with children? Do you ever wonder how meditation could impact attention regulation? If so, we are seeking an undergraduate to join the lab to help study mindfulness practices in child and adolescent populations.

Broadly speaking, the Clinical and Affective Neuroscience Lab (PI: Hedy Kober, canlab.yale.edu) studies the regulation of craving from behavioral, clinical, psychophysiological, and functional neuroimaging (fMRI) perspectives. Additionally (and relatedly), the lab has a longstanding interest in mindfulness-based interventions, both within and outside the context of craving/addiction. At present, Drs. Saunders and Kober are running two mindfulness-related projects: a pilot study of a mindfulness-based ADHD treatment for children and a meta-analysis of mindfulness-based interventions in children and adolescents.

Previous research not required. This position is ideal for bright, engaged and interested students from all fields of study.
Research assistants are full members of the CAN lab. You will be included in all aspects of the mindfulness-related projects, with the potential to participate in others. Responsibilities may include interacting with participants (children with ADHD) and their parents in all phases of the clinical trial (recruitment, screening, intervention, follow-up), literature searches, assisting with data management, potentially data analysis and/or data presentation.
10 hours per week (or more)2david.saunders@yale.edu -- Please include a short paragraph describing yourself, your interests, why you want to work in the lab, what you could contribute. Be sure to also include the following information: - Previous research and/or clinical experience (if any); - Previous coursework in relevant fields; - Year, Major, GPA; and a CV.
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Spring 2019 and onwardClinical, Developmental, NeuroscienceYesNoDr. Dylan Gee, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development LabThe Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development Lab is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in clinical psychology and developmental neuroscience. The lab uses behavioral, psychophysiological, and neuroimaging techniques to study the development of anxiety and stress-related disorders across childhood and adolescence. We are especially interested in typical and atypical trajectories of brain development related to emotional behavior, the effects of early-life adversity, and translating knowledge from basic science to optimize clinical treatments.Research assistants will have the opportunity to contribute to many stages of the research process including recruitment, phone screening for clinical participants, data collection (with children, adolescents, parents, and adult participants), preparing participants for the MRI scan, managing and analyzing data, development of experiment-related materials, and discussion of current projects and results at our regular lab meetings. Previous research experience is preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with interests in clinical child & adolescent psychology and neuroscience.10 hours/week2Send a CV/resume, paragraph on previous research experience (if any) and interest in the position, class year, major, and GPA to dylan.gee@yale.edu
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Spring 2019 and BeyondClinical, NeuroscienceYesNoHedy Kober, Clinical & Affective Neuroscience Lab (Psychology, Psychiatry, Neuroscience, Cog Sci)How strong is your craving for chocolate? Can you stop yourself from reaching for it when the craving is strong? What are the neural mechanisms that underlie our ability to regulate our craving? The ability to control our craving (and our emotions more generally) is central to mental and physical health, and is particularly critical for those with substance use disorders (AKA ‘addictions’) and binge eating. The work in our lab includes behavioral, clinical, psychophysiological, and functional neuroimaging (fMRI) studies of alcohol drinkers, cigarette smokers, cocaine users, binge eaters, and healthy adults as they regulate craving for food, alcohol, cigarettes, and cocaine, using a variety of strategies. We also investigate how people change following treatment for addictions – do they get better at managing their craving? We investigate both cognitive-behavioral treatments as well as mindfulness-based treatments that include training in meditation.
For more info on our research and some recent press:
canlab.yale.edu
There are a wide variety of opportunities, depending on a combination of interest, experience, skills, availability, and the lab’s needs. These include: recruiting and screening participants, collection and analysis of behavioral data, collection and analysis of psychophysiology data, collection and analysis of fMRI data – including running scans, programming tasks for behavioral and fMRI tasks, and other fun and educational things.10 hours2hedy.kober@yale.edu -- Please include a short paragraph describing yourself, your interests, why you want to work in the lab, what you could contribute. Be sure to also include the following information: - Previous research and/or clinical experience (if any); - Previous coursework in psychology, neuroscience, biology, computer science, or philosophy; - Year, Major, GPA; and a CV.
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Spring 2019 and beyond
Clinical, Neuroscience, Cognitive
YesNoLab: Clinical & Affective Neuroscience Lab, PI: Professor Hedy Kober, Supervisor: Postdoctoral Associate Jessica Mollick, Ph. DWe often make decisions in our everyday life, including those that balance potential risks (like losing money) and potential rewards (like winning the lottery). Further, we also learn about cues that reliably predict rewards. Are you interested in how people make decisions and learn about rewards? How about the brain mechanisms involved in both decision-making and reward learning, and how these circuits are changed by drug use and addiction? For this project in the Canlab (Clinical and Affective Neuroscience Lab), we are seeking an undergraduate researcher to assist with behavioral and fMRI studies of reward learning and decision making in cocaine users and control subjects. You will have opportunities to learn about the brain circuits involved in reward learning and decision making, as well as computational models of decision making and reward learning. Further, you will have opportunities to study clinical psychology, including structured clinical interviews for diagnosis of substance use disorders. Along with working on reward learning and decision-making projects, there are opportunities to be involved in other lab projects related to the regulation of craving, involving strategies to regulate the desire for food, alcohol and drugs (see descriptions at https://canlab.yale.edu/). Previous research experience is not required, but is a plus. Experience or interest in programming and statistics is also a plus. We are looking for motivated undergraduates with an interest in neuroscience and psychology.Research assistants will be full members of the lab, and included in all aspects of the reward learning and decision-making projects. Opportunities depend on interest, experience, skills, availability and the lab’s needs. Responsibilities may include phone recruitment, interacting with participants (including substance users and healthy controls), literature searches, assisting with scanning sessions, and data management, including potentially analysis and presentation of behavioral and fMRI data, and opportunities to assist with meta-analysis, as well as ongoing lab projects on the regulation of craving.
10 hours per week (or more)
2Jessica.Mollick@Yale.edu and Hedy.Kober@Yale.edu - Please include a short paragraph describing yourself, your interests, why you want to work in the lab, what you could contribute. Be sure to also include the following information: - Previous research and/or clinical experience (if any); - Previous coursework in psychology, neuroscience, biology, computer science, or philosophy; - Year, Major, GPA; and a CV.
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Spring 2019 and beyondClinical, neuroscienceYesYesBJ Casey, Director of the Fundamentals of the Adolescent Brain (FAB) LabWe are looking for research assistants to help with the national landmark Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) study to track brain development and health in 10,000 children through adolescence (see abcdstudy.org). At Yale, we are enrolling and following 600 families. Experience working with children and teens (either formal or informal) is required. These positions offer experience in recruiting, screening and testing participants. The research will provide opportunities to gain experience in imaging, biospecimen collection, and in neurocognitve and clinical assessments. Contact: bj.casey@yale.edu for more information.10 hours/week2contact bj.casey@yale.edu and provide a resume or CV and a few sentences on why you would like to work on this study.
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Summer 2017 - BeyondClinical, NeuroscienceYesNDr. James McPartland, Associate Professor of Child Psychiatry and Psychology (PI). The McPartland Lab, Yale Child Study Center, Yale School of MedicineThe McPartland Lab investigates autism spectrum disorder from a clinical neuroscience perspective. Our lab is part of the Yale Autism Program and the Developmental Disabilities Clinic at the Yale Child Study Center. We are seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in both clinical psychology and developmental neuroscence. Our research focuses on using EEG and eye-tracking techniques, along with behavorial measures and clinical assessments to better understand the social difficulties associated with autism specrtrum disorder in both children and adults. The McPartland lab has multiple ongoing research projects in which interested students will have the opportunity to learn about and become involved in. (http://medicine.yale.edu/lab/mcpartland)Students will learn about several aspects of the research process; stimulus creation, literature reviews, data collection and analysis. They will will receive training in several aspects of electrophysiological brain research including experimental design; programming experimental paradigms; analyzing and extracting EEG and ERP data. They will also gain further experience with data management and clinical assessments by helping score and file measures. They will have the oppportunity to observe cases in the autism clinic and help with child supervision during parent feedback sessions. Students can work towards an independent research project, but are required to be involved with our work in the lab for 1 year prior to undertaking a thesis involving original data collection.8-10 hours per week.2james.mcpartland@yale.edu
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Fall 2018 and beyondClinical, NeuroscienceYesYesThe Fundamentals of the Adolescent Brain (FAB) Lab, PI: Dr. BJ Casey, Psychology DepartmentThe FAB Lab is part of a large national study, the Adolescent Brain and Cognitve Development (ABCD) Study that is following the brain development and cognitive and health outcomes in over 10,000 9-10 year old children over the next 10 years. Interested undergraduate students at Yale will have the opportunity to be involved in this study and work with the FAB Lab team and over 600 of these youth in the CT and NY area. Research assistants will have the opportunity to see many stages of the study including scheduling, screenings, neurocognitive assessment, biospecimen collection, MRI data collection, quality assurance, processing and back-up. Prior experience working with MRI (e.g., in a research methods class or in a lab) is preferred but not required. Experience with computer programming (UNIX, bash, R, python, or matlab) preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with an interest in human neuroscience including affective, clinical, cognitive and developmental neuroscience.A least 10 hours per week2 semesters requiredPlease email the PI at BJ.Casey@yale.edu
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Spring 2018/2019Cognitive, Behavioral NeuroscienceYes (Volunteer options available as well)NoComparative Cognition Lab (PI Prof. Laurie Santos). Researcher Dr. Shay Ben-HaimWe have openings to help in a study on conscious and non-conscious processing in humans.The studies include visual and auditory non-conscious perception tasks run on humans via a computer and will serve as a basis for comparison experiments done in animals and children. RAs will gain experience in all aspects of the research including reading, data analysis, data collection, assist in planning, and programing of experiments (if wishing to). RAs will gain experience in all aspects of the research including data analysis, data collection, reading, assist in planning, and programing of experiments (if wishing to).flexible number of hours and schedjuleNo specific constraintmosheshay.ben-haim@yale.edu
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Spring 2018, Fall 2019Cognitive, Developmental, SocialNoYes, hourly payLab: STEM Program Evaluation and Research Lab (STEM-PERL)
PI: Mark Graham
Looking for a research assistant/intern interested in education research, studying the outcomes of undergraduate students in various learning environments. We have a focus on STEM courses, but what we learn is relevant to other academic disciplines as well. We collect and analyze data from Yale classrooms as well as other universities in the U.S. We are also interested in data from programs that train graduate students and postdocs to be better teachers. ***Here are some of the topics we study: active learning, growth mindset, student engagement, student trust, academic performance, teacher training, and more!You will have the opportunity to learn about and engage in the following research activities:

- Collect data (such as through student interviews or Qualtrics surveys)
- Analyze quantitative and qualitative data (using SPSS analysis software)
- Become familiar with a comprehensive database environment
- Review relevant background research/literature
- Summarize data into a report format (text and tables/figures)
- Present research findings at a lab/journal club meeting

...along with other tasks that arise throughout the research project
Flexible1 (but 2 is also an option)View position listing here: https://tinyurl.com/stemperl-RA1819

For more information & to apply contact Melanie Bauer: melanie.bauer@yale.edu
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Spring 2019 onwardDevelopmentalYesNoTheChildLab.com (run by Drs. Mark Sheskin Frank Keil of the Yale Cognition and Development Lab)We are running a wide range of developmental studies with children ages 5-12 around the world, via video chat. This is a new approach to doing developmental studies, and we are excited about it for several reasons, including the ability to recruit from a more diverse population than just around New Haven (including internationally). For more information, please see TheChildLab.comResearch assistants can get involved with designing and running specific projects (including, but not limited to, investigating children's developing understanding of science), as well as with developing the online platform in general. Interest or previous experience with any of the following are plusses, but not required: working with children, creating videos in iMovie, organizing social media campaigns, and speaking multiple languages fluently. Most importantly, this may be a good fit for you if you are eager to collaborate on building something new. Attendance at a weekly lab meeting (Cognition and Development Lab) is encouraged, and developing an independent project is possible.10 hours per week (flexible)2mark.sheskin@yale.edu
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Fall 2018 and BeyondDevelopmentalYesNoDrs. Marc Brackett and Christina Cipriano: Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence(To see our full AD please click on the text in this cell) The Social and Emotional Developmental Benchmarks Project This project aims to establish empirically-supported developmental benchmarks and tools for assessing children’s social-emotional skills from pre-K through 12th grade. In support of this aim, we are developing a valid, reliable, and practical set of performance-based assessments of children’s social and emotional skills for use in pre-K through 12th-grade. Undergraduate RA’s will be involved in multiple aspects of research (dependent on number of semesters committed). Duties may include, but are not limited to: Reviewing literature on emotion regulation strategy development and social-emotional skill assessments
Coding survey data
Assisting in assessment development and pilot testing
Collecting child and adolescent data in school settings (Spring 2019 and beyond)
Attending weekly meetings
10 Hours a WeekAt Least 1 Semester (A multiple semester commitment is preferred)Please E-mail your application (click on the text in this cell for the application) and most recent unofficial transcript to alexandra.p.harrison@yale.edu
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Anytime!DevelopmentalYesNoPI: Dr. Yarrow Dunham, Social Cognitive Development Lab
Researchers: Various
The Social Cognitive Development Lab is looking for highly motivated Yale undergraduates who are interested in helping us uncover how children and adults perceive the world around them and, more specifically, how they think and reason about social groups and intergroup experiences. If interested, descriptions of graduate student and post-doctoral research interests can be found at http://www.socialcogdev.com/people/. WowResearch assistants will be directly involved in preparation of experiments, facilitation of experiments (within the lab and during school and museum visits) and data collection. RAs may support ongoing projects in the lab or be assigned to a specific study, depending on need. RAs are encouraged to attend weekly lab meetings, weekly reading groups, and have weekend availiability for going to recruitment events and weekend museum shifts. RAs must be comfortable interacting with young children ages 3-12 as well as parents in person and over the phone.8-12 hours per week (flexible). Weekend hours available. 2 preferredTo learn more or apply for a position, please contact the lab manager, Sophie Arnold, at sophie.arnold@yale.edu .


If you are interested in a specific grad student or post-doc’s work, please indicate that in your email.
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Spring 2019DevelopmentalYesNoThe Mind & Development Lab, PI: Dr. Paul Bloom, Researchers: Various, Psychology DepartmentThe research carried out in this lab explores the nature of language and thought, primarily from a developmental perspective. Some of our main interests include: moral reasoning and moral action in babies, children, and adults; empathy, the common sense conception of the self, etc. We work with children ages 4 to 9 years old. Please visit our website for more information: minddevlab.yale.eduInterns will work closely with lab researchers on new and ongoing studies, participating fully in all aspects of the research process. Interns will become familiar with experimental methods used in child studies, and will immediately become involved in recruiting and testing participants, designing and setting up studies. They will also attend a weekly lab meeting where we discuss the theoretical motivation for our studies, experimental data, and relevant research findings from other labs.8-10 hours (Flexible) We work around your schedule2 semesters requiredPlease email the lab manager: alexa.sacchi@yale.edu
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Spring 2019 DevelopmentalYNoThe Yale Infant Cognition Center PI: Dr. Karen Wynn Researchers: Various
Our research broadly focuses on social cognition in infancy. We are running a number of studies with infants & toddlers ranging from 6 months to 4 years old. These studies are largely focused on discovering what infants think about various aspects of the social world. Some of the topics we look at include examining infants' preferences for characters based on their social behavior or group membership and infants' reasoning about the natural world. More information about our research can be found at http://campuspress.yale.edu/infantlab/
Interns will work closely with lab researchers on new and ongoing studies, participating fully in all aspects of the research process. Interns will become familiar with experimental methods used in infant studies, and will immediately become involved in recruiting and testing participants, designing and setting up studies, and coding and analyzing results. They will also attend a weekly lab meeting where we discuss the theoretical motivation for our studies, experimental data, and relevant research findings from other labs.8-10 hrs/wk (Flexible) We will work around your schedule2 requiredPlease contact the lab manager: alexa.sacchi@yale.edu
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Fall 2018, Spring 2019Developmental and CognitiveY (and volunteer)YesProfessor Julian Jara-Ettinger (PI), Computation and Cognitive Development LabOur lab runs a range of studies with children, mainly between the ages of 4 and 9, and adults. Our studies focus on how both children and adults understand abstract social concepts, including thoughts, beliefs, desires, and fairness. We aim to understand how and when these concepts develop over the course of development, and how they are applied by adults. We also investigate how children and adults teach and learn from others. For past studies conducted by Julian Jara-Ettinger visit http://www.compdevlab.com/Research assistants will work closely with graduate students and the lab manager. RA’s will be involved in all aspects of research including data collection, participant recruitment, study design and data coding and analysis. RA’s will collect data at museums (including the Peabody), preschools and in lab. Some weekend availability is strongly preferred, as is experience or comfort with children. There will be an opportunity for RA’s to attend lab meetings
8-10 hours per week (flexible)1 required, 2 preferredcontact the lab manager at madison.flowers@yale.edu
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2017-2019Developmental, Social, SleepPossiblyYesMonica Ordway, PhD, APRN, Yale School of NursingAs part of your experience, you will be mentored, work independently/as a group on projects/tasks, and attend weekly lab meetings. You will be asked to attend home visits with the principal investigator or a member of the research team. You must enjoy interacting with young children and their families. Such work requires multi-tasking, patience, creativity, respect, sensitivity, and the ability to “think on your toes!”5-10 hours flexible1; 2 preferredmonica.ordway@yale.edu
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Fall 2017 and beyondDevelopmental; CognitiveYYAaron Chuey, Emmanuel Trouche (Faculty: Frank Keil); Cognition and Development LabAre you interested in studying our understanding of how things work and how such understandings change as we grow up? The Cognition and Development Lab is looking for a research assistant for next Fall and Winter to assist in one or more studies about children’s and adults’ cognitions concerning mechanisms in biology and various everyday devices. If you are interested in causality, intuitive theories, science education, or cognitive development, this position might interest you. We are seeking 3 part-time paid research assistants for the upcoming academic year. Research assistants will primarily assist in subject recruitment and data acquisition, but with potential to also be involved in stimulus design, data analysis, and general lab tasks. RA's will primarily be working with children ages 5-10, so experience and comfortability with children is a big plus. A car, while not required, is also a plus. Please email aaron.chuey@yale.edu with your resume/CV, research experience, and 1 or 2 professional or academic references.Research assistants will be involved primarily in data collection, but with potential to engage in other aspects of the research process as well (stimulus development, data analysis, etc.). Potential RA's will primarily work with children ages 5-10 at local museums and preschools, and comfortability/experience with children is a must. (Research Assistants will receive extensive training before formal interactions with child participants)5-10 hours (flexible)1 (2 upon satisfactory performance)aaron.chuey@yale.edu
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Spring 2019 and onwardNeuroscienceYesNoPaola Odriozola (PhD student) and Dr. Dylan Gee, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development LabThe Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development Lab is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in human neuroimaging. The lab uses fMRI techniques to study the development of anxiety and stress-related disorders. Research assistants will have the opportunity to see many stages of these studies including MRI data collection, quality assurance, and processing. Prior experience working with MRI (e.g., in a research methods class or in a lab) is preferred but not required. Experience with computer programming (UNIX, bash, R, python, or matlab) preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with interest in human neuroscience including clinical, affective, and developmental neuroscience.10 hours/week2Send a CV/resume, paragraph on previous research experience (if any) and interest in the position, class year, major, and GPA to dylan.gee@yale.edu and paola.odriozola@yale.edu
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Fall 2017 - plusNeuroscienceYesNoDr. Steve Chang, Assistant Professor of Psychology and NeuroscienceHow does the human brain make social decisions impacting others? Students will use novel neuroeconomics tasks designed to understand the neural mechanisms of self and other processing using fMRI in humans. Students will work closely with graduate students to design studies, collect data, and analyze data. (http://changlab.yale.edu/gallery/welcome-lab)Students are expected to be a motivated and engaged member of the lab. Programming experiences are strongly encouraged. Students will help design studies, collect data, and analyze data with a graduate student mentor. 10 hours/week1 semester (2 or more preferred)steve.chang@yale.edu
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Fall 2017 and beyondNeuroscience, developmental, clinicalYNDr. Michael Crowley LabOur work focuses on the broad area of child and adolescent self-regulation. We study a range of topics related to self-regulation including anxiety, avoidance, risk aversion, ostracism/social exclusion, risk-taking/ substance use risk, reward processing, mindfulness and self-compassion.Training will be provided on state-of-the-art EEG data collection techniques. Opportunities are available for undergraduate research projects. Research assistants can be expected to run patients and trials, review literature, and other tasks.8 hours per week. (Flexible)1To apply, contact: Dr. Michael Crowley
michael.crowley@yale.edu
(203) 326-8891
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Spring 2019 onwardSocialYes (and volunteer)NoPI: Dr. Maria Gendron, Affective Science and Culture LabThe Affective Science and Culture lab examines diversity in emotion. We aim to understand why individuals and societies can vary dramatically in what emotions are felt, how they are expressed and perceived, and how they function. A uniting theme of our work is to examine how conceptual knowledge (what we know about emotion) and language (how we label and talk about emotions) shapes how emotional experiences and perceptions of emotion unfold. We are seeking highly motivated students who are interested in gaining research experience in affective science. In many cases, our research has a cultural focus, but it also draws on multiple traditions, including cognitive science and social/affective neuroscience. We employ a variety of methods including experience sampling, field research, lab-based behavioral and physiological experiments, and some neuroimaging (with particular focus on functional near infrared spectroscopy).Research assistants may be directly involved in preparation of experiments, facilitation of data collection and analysis. RAs may also be involved in qualitative data coding (of experimental responses and narrative data). For most types of lab involvement, students with any language/cultural background are welcome to apply. For coding projects, we are specifically seeking research assistants who are either native English speakers or native Mandarin speakers. Depending on interest and experience, research assistants may be invited to assist in analysis of eyetracking or physiological data. Depending on when students become involved in the lab, development of an independent project is possible. All RAs are asked to attend weekly lab meetings8-10 hours per week (flexible). Weekend hours may be available.2 preferredTo learn more or apply for a position, please contact Dr. Gendron at maria.gendron@yale.edu

If you have a current CV or resume, please attach it along with a brief description of your interest in the lab.
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Spring 2019, Summer 2019SocialYesNoNatalie Wittlin, Gender and Intergroup Relations Labs (PIs: Marianne LaFrance and Jack Dovidio)I am seeking motivated and organized undergraduates to assist with research on people’s experiences with their own gender and physical appearance. Interested students should contact me for more details. RAs will be working primarily with a fourth-year PhD candidate and will have opportunities to participate in Gender and Intergroup Relations lab meetings. Students should be familiar with psychological research methods but are not required to have previous research experience. Because RAs will be working with participants and addressing sensitive issues, they should be comfortable interacting with strangers and explicitly discussing identity and emotional experiences.Research Assistants will set up experiments, collect data (i.e., run studies in the lab), code data, clean data, and participate in lab meetings. They may also be involved with data analysis and write-up, to the extent that they are interested. Training and support will be provided.8-12 hours per week (flexible). Weekend hours available.2 preferred (possibly more if interested)To learn more or apply for a position, please contact Natalie Wittlin at natalie.wittlin@yale.edu with the following information: (1) Name; (2) Class year; (3) Major; (4) Psychology courses taken and grades for each course; (5) Resume/CV (should include any previous research experience); (6) A one paragraph description of why you are interested in this position.
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Spring 2018-Spring 2019Social YYSocial Perception and Communication Lab (PI: Dr. Jennifer Richeson)Our research in the SPCL lab broadly focuses on psychological phenomena related to cultural diversity, centering around the predictors and consequences of stereotyping, prejudice, discrimination, and, ultimately, inequality.
The current study aims to replicate and extend research related to physiological consequences of contending with discrimination.
The SPCL research assistant will focus on participant recruitment, coordination, and management. They will be responsible for collecting data for a psychophysiological study, and will be trained in blood pressure and heart rate monitoring methods, as well as videotaping. Additionally, the research assistant will engage in coding and cleaning data. Other tasks include helping facilitate data collection for other graduate-level students in the SPCL lab. 6-10 hours during semester, more available in the summer 1ivy.onyeador@yale.edu, ajua.duker@yale.edu
(cc both of us on the email)
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Fall 2018, and Spring 2019Social NoBrian Bink (PI: Professor Margaret Clark). Yale Relationships Science LaboratoryAre you interested in understanding relationships and what can be done to improve them? Do you want to learn about the ins-and-outs of research, including creating, running, and analyzing studies? And, do you want to work on research that has the potential to improve relationships, increase life-satisfaction, and improve one’s well-being? If these questions excite you, than I encourage you to apply for one of our open research assistant positions at the Clark Relationship Science Laboratory at Yale University. This opportunity is available to volunteers and students requiring course credit, and requires a minimum of 8 hours per week. Working with participants, recruiting participants, analyzing data, literature searches, discussing theories and ideas, planning and preparations for future studiesMinimum of 8 hours per week1 requiredContact Brian.bink@yale.edu
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Spring 2019 and beyondSocial and PersonalityYes, during the semester (Volunteer options available as well)NoLucy Armentano, Aleena Hay, Prof. Margaret Clark (PI) of the Clark Relationships LabDo you want to better understand how communication in close relationships works? Or find out more about how people convey emotions to one another, both in words and through body language? We are interested in questions such as: Is what you say more important than what you show when expressing emotion? Is the strength of your relationship with your partner related to how you express emotion? Our lab seeks a few motivated research assistants to help us to process, code, and analyze data from a large scale, in-lab dyadic study we are just finishing data collection on. In this study we are bringing romantic couples into the lab to discuss their thoughts and experiences while being taped. We are also seeking experimenters to help run an engaging in-lab study that helps to develop a number of research skills. Research assistants can start quickly getting trained, learning the ethical guidelines, and being approved to work with the data. Previous research experience is preferred, although not necessary. The Clark Lab members are committed to making this a truly educational experience for those broadly interested in research. To that end, lab members also participate in a semester long research design workshop where everyone gets direct, hands-on experience in study design, execution, and analysis.Research assistants will be able to take part in many aspects of research, from data coding through data analysis. This will involve emotion coding, data management, and theoretical discussions of relevant work, among other things. (Note: We don’t expect applicants to already know how to do these things – they will be trained by our research team.). This will also involve participating in a semester long research design series where we will discuss and generate research questions and hypotheses, create study designs to test them, and execute and analyze the results of one of these study design ideas.8-10 hours with flexible scheduling1 required (2 preferred)Contact Lucy Armentano (lucylle.armentano@yale.edu) as soon as possible for more information or to express interest
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Fall 2017 - BeyondSocial CognitionYesNoThe Automaticity in Cognition, Motivation, and Emotion Lab - Professor John Bargh (PI: Anton Gollwitzer and John Bargh)There are two projects which we are currently working on. (1) Do lay people exist who can accurately judge the feelings, thoughts, and behaviors of other people? In other words, do ‘super psychologists’ exist in the general population? What cognitive, social, and personality constructs relate to having such an ability? Specific tasks will include reviewing literature, designing experiments, collecting data, editing papers. (2) Does a domain-general dislike of pattern deviancy underlie individuals' prejudice and stigmatization. Can dislike of deviancy even in simple geomtric shapes (one triangle slightly out of line in a row of triangles) predict prejudice and stigmatization? All are welcome to apply! anton.gollwitzer@yale.eduSpecific tasks will include reviewing literature, locating and collecting data, statistical analysis. Students may enroll for research experience, a senior project, volunteer, and/or depending on the level of contribution be included as an author on possible papers10 hours per week. Scheduling is flexible.1Simply contact me! anton.gollwitzer@yale.edu
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Fall 2018 onwardsSocial Neuroscience; Developmental ScienceYesNoDr. Helena Rutherford, Yale Child Study Center We are looking for enthusiastic, reliable, and motivated volunteers to engage in experimental research with families during pregnancy and the postpartum period. We want to understand how men and women transition into their parenting role, and how this may be affected by psychopathology (including depression, anxiety, and addiction). Responsibilities may include the collection and analysis of EEG, hormonal, and behavioral (observational coding, decision making, accuracy and reaction times) measures. Students may also help with recruitment, literature reviews, and manuscript preparation.8-12 hours a week2 preferredIf you are interested, please email helena.rutherford@yale.edu
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Spring 2018, Fall 2018, and beyondSocial, Neuroscience, CognitiveYesNoDr. Molly Crockett, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Crockett Lab Blaise Pascal described human beings as “the glory and scum of the universe”. Each of us carries blueprints for an astonishing range of social behaviors, from the heroic to the atrocious. The Crockett Lab seeks to understand this paradox by investigating the psychological and neural mechanisms of social learning and decision-making. Current research questions include: What makes us behave morally when no one is watching? Why does moral outrage feel so good? What do we think of liars? How do we decide whether to trust someone? Our approach integrates social psychology, behavioral economics, neuroscience and philosophy. We use a range of methods including behavioral experiments, computational modeling, brain imaging, and pharmacology. Research assistants are full members of the lab and will be included in all aspects of our research, from literature review and experimental design, to study implementation (including participant recruitment and testing), to data analysis and presentation. ~10 hours per week, flexible1 required (2 preferred)Email Dr Crockett (molly.crockett@yale.edu) and include a CV and a brief paragraph explaining your interest in the lab and any previous research experience
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Spring 2019-Summer 2021 (Summers also available)Clinical, NeuroscienceYes (and volunteers)NoDr. Reuma Gadassi-Polack, postdoctoral fellow working with Jutta Joormann (Psychology) and Hedy Kober (Psychiatry)We are looking for RAs for two multi-method studies examining the interplay between cognitive, affective, and interpersonal aspects of the development of depression. The first study examines how children of depressed mothers react to interpersonal situations using a combination of fMRI, experience-sampling diaries, and an observational task. The second study examines how pregnant women react to interpersonal stimuli using a combination of eye-tracking, questionnaires, and hormonal measures.Research assistants will help recruit and run participants to in both studies, perform literature searches and reviews, manage and analyze data, and, depending on commitment length, could participate in writing academic papers. In addition, all RAs are invited to participate in lab meetings (which can be considered as a course).~10 hours a week; depends on the RA's preferences, some duties are relevant to the afternoon/evening/weekends2 preferredreuma.gadassipolack@yale.edu
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Spring 2018, onward
Cognitive NeuroscienceYes (and volunteers)Yes
Dr. Nicholas Turk-Browne (PI: Professor, Psychology)
The Turk-Browne lab is interested in how we see (perception), how we control what we see and how it controls us (attention), and how we store what we see in our heads (learning and memory). We use a combination of behavioral, neuroscientific, and computational approaches. Our past studies were mostly in adults, but we are now conducting some of the first fMRI studies in infants, to answer previously intractable questions (e.g., why can’t you remember anything from before age 4-5?). We are focused on recruiting students interested in the infant fMRI project, but also open to students more broadly interested in perception, attention, and memory.Infant research: helping with recruitment, contacting/meeting families, data collection, video coding, and basic data analysis; applicant must be comfortable with young children.

Adult research: assisting with ongoing studies, including data collection and analysis; possibility of (eventually) conducting independent research; programming and statistical experience desirable and a willingness to learn essential.
4-12 hours per week (decided with advisor depending on duties)2 preferredIf interested in the position, please contact Lindsay at lindsay.rait@yale.edu with a CV and your availability to meet.
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Spring 2019 - Summer 2020 (flexible) Educational and Social PsychologyYes (and volunteers)YesDr. Craig Bailey (PI: Associate Research Scientist, Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence) The Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence (http://ei.yale.edu) is hiring part-time and full-time research assistants! Dr. Craig Bailey are seeking highly motivated part-time
undergraduates and recent graduates to fill part-time and full-time (RA) positions in a large, five-year grant funded by the Institute of Education Sciences (R305A180293)
to test the efficacy of RULER, an approach to social and emotional learning, in preschools across Connecticut. All positions focus on data collection and begin Spring 2019. Applications will continue to be welcomed throughout the duration of the project. Both positions require a minimum 3.0 GPA and are contingent on passing applicable background checks.
Available for school visits in the
morning
• A commitment of 10 hours a week
(minimum)
• Multi-semester commitment is
preferred, but not required
• Preferred experience working with
children and/or in schools http://ei.yale.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Yale_YCEI_RA-Flyer.pdf
~10 hours/week2 preferredplease submit a (1) letter of interest, (2) CV/resume, and (3) 3 references to the principle investigator, Dr. Bailey: craig.bailey@yale.edu.
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