Summit Basecamp Glossary
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Summit Learning Program Glossary
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TermDefinition
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Summit Learning PlatformPersonalized Learning Platform
Teacher/Student Platform - This is the platform that you will use all through the 2017-2018 school year. You will use this to view curriculum and look at student performance data. During Summer Training, you will use this to view curriculum.
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Project TimeTime in which students develop deeper learning skills, such as critical thinking, problem-solving and communication skills, as they work collaboratively on rich project-based experiences.
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Final ProductA performance, presentation, or product - the project's outcome - that demonstrates clear evidence of cognitive skills.
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Cognitive SkillsCognitive Skills are higher-level thinking skills that students practice in project-based learning during instructional time with a teacher’s support. Students practice and show their proficiency level on cognitive skills in project-based performance tasks. Teachers give feedback to students and assess students learning using the Cognitive Skills Rubric. This single rubric is used by teachers to assess all projects across all grade levels and all sites. Cognitive skills compose 70% of a student's overall grade in a course.
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CheckpointLocated within projects and are an opportunity within a project to get formative feedback from a teacher. Typically associated with one or more of the cognitive skills. When a student has completed the work associated with the checkpoint the teacher can provide red, yellow, green feedback to the student indicating the student's readiness to move on to the next checkpoint. Checkpoints should als move students meaningfully closer toward the outcomes identified as part of the performance task(s) of the project.
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ResourceWhen setting up the project in the PLP, teachers can nest activities and resources within the checkpoint. A resource is a static file or link that students can refer to in order to complete activities or complete the work associated with the checkpoint itself. With a resource there is one version that all students can view. A resource can be a link to a relevant website or a tool that helps a student complete an activity or a checkpoint.
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ActivityUnlike a resource, activities are not static. Instead, when a student opens an activity the software automatically creates a unique version of the file for them that they can fill out and potentially receive feedback on from a peer or teacher. An activity is an individual or group opportunity to practice a skill or move toward associated checkpoint. An activity can be an outline that students complete, guided notes that help students understand a concept or a graphic organizer that allows students to track their progress.
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Concept Unit (Math)Concept units are opportunities for students to gain an in-depth understanding of mathematical concepts. The units consist of a collection of backwards-planned, carefully-crafted, cognitively-rigorous rich math tasks. The learning experiences in Concept Units require students to engage in problem solving, reasoning, critical thinking and significant cognitive work. Units will be facilitated by a teacher during the normal math course (“Project Time”); the units will take the place of most of the projects and feel similar in many ways (some projects will remain in the math course). The key difference between the units and projects is that mathematical concepts, not cognitive skills, are the driving force behind the units.
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Personalized ActivityPersonalized activities do not require extensive teacher introduction or direction. They are built so that students (individually or in pairs) can complete some work that allows them to prepare for the checkpoint. These are called personalized activities because students can move at their own pace through the activities and are not forced to start and stop the activity with their peers in a batch process. In the example of choosing a topic for the scientific discovery, the personalized activity could be a task card document that reminds students of the outcomes of the project and asks them to do some initial research to think of a few possible topics.
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Small Group InterventionSmall-group intervention activities can be built within the PLP as activities or not. They are typically targeted opportunities to support students who need additional support with a specific cognitive skill, content understanding or task associated with the project. Many small group interventions can be planned in advance of the start of a project when the teacher reviews student cognitive skill and content scores and determines who needs additional support. Other interventions can be designed along the way in reaction to student respond to skill and/or content. While we call these small-group interventions, their size is not the defining characteristic. Instead, an intervention is designed around a specific student need as identified by available data.
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Whole Group InterruptionAt Summit, we think of whole-group learning experiences as interruptions because they interrupt the personalized paths described above and batch students together so they start and stop an activity together. Whole-group learning experiences are often teacher-directed. There are several compelling rationales for whole-group learning experiences including, but not limited to, building culture in the classroom through a circle or shared activity, increasing student motivation/buy-in with a demonstration or shared experience, sharing a text or example with strong teacher modeling and hearing multiple voices to build understanding.
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PLTPersonalized Learning Time
Students learn the content they need to be college-ready. They plan and prioritize their learning based on their individual goals. Students move at their own pace, and receive support from their teachers, mentor and peers.
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SDLSelf-Directed Learning Cycle
The cycle provides a framework for students to apply their self-directed learning skills and a process for setting and achieving their goals while learning from the process.
1. Set a goal
2. Make a plan
3. Learn
4. Show what you know
5. Reflect on your learning
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Power Focus AreasStudents must complete these content specific playlists and master content assessments to receive credit for a course. Power Focus Areas are 21% of course grade.
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Additional Focus AreasStudents are encouraged, but not required, to complete this content for each course. These add up to 9% of a student's grade in a course and therefore can make a difference of nearly a full letter grade.
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Challenge Focus Areas Students can complete to further their content knowledge, but they do not contribute to a student's grade.
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Diagnostic AssessmentOpportunity for students to diagnose what they already know on content objectives and decide what they should focus on as they go through the playlist of a focus area.
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PlaylistA collection of resources (Power Points, worksheets, videos, etc.) meant to guide students through relevant content for a particular focus area.
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Content AssessmentMultiple choice assessment that students request when they are prepared to show mastery of content in a focus area. They assess concepts, knowledge, and discrete skills that can be learned, practiced, and assessed independently.
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MentoringKey aspect of personalized learning environment that is an opportunity for teachers to connect with their students not only on an academic level, but also on a personal level. Teachers conduct weekly 1:1 mentoring sessions with their mentees. All students have a mentor who serves as their coach and advocate,supporting them as they develop strong character, life and self-directed learning skills.
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