MAISA Curated Reading/Writing SAT resources
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Instructional Practice 1: Explicitly teach critical literacy skills across the disciplines.
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Resource TitleDescriptionSubscores Addressed
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MAISA Grammar UnitsThe standards addressed by these lessons are those that naturally fit into the writing process and/or the MAISA writing units. There are additional language standards that will need to be addressed through other curricular components, such as word study and reading instruction.Standard English Conventions
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Write Well Curriculum Grade Level Mini-Lessons for Grammar, Mechanics, and UsageIt is a new, carefully sequenced, coherent K–12 writing curriculum designed to meet Michigan writing standards and the Common Core State Standards.
The WriteWell© Curriculum is designed to provide instruction for a Writer's Workshop. A Writing Workshop Model naturally differentiaties to meet the needs of all students. Note this particular link only takes you to 9th Grade Resources. To visit the Grade Level Mini-Lessons for Grammar, Mechanics, and Usage click in the link at that site with that exact title. They also exist for 10th Grade, 11th Grade, and 12th Grade.
Standard English Conventions
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Think Aloud All About Adolescent LiteracyThink-alouds have been described as "eavesdropping on someone's thinking." With this strategy, teachers verbalize aloud while reading a selection orally. Their verbalizations include describing things they're doing as they read to monitor their comprehension. The purpose of the think-aloud strategy is to model for students how skilled readers construct meaning from a text. Command of Evidence and Words in Context
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Think Aloud Reading ApprenticeshipThink-aloudCrosscutting Concepts
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Think Aloud StrategiesThink-aloudCrosscutting Concepts
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Think-Aloud (Page 6)Think-aloudCrosscutting Concepts
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Fisher & Frey’s PD Resource Center for Close and Critical ReadingClose Reading means reading to uncover layers of meaning that lead to deep comprehensionCommand of Evidence
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Mission Literacy Close ReadingClose ReadingCommand of Evidence, Words in Context, Expression of Ideas
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Flip Books from Mission Literacy (link will not work in Firefox)Close ReadingCommand of Evidence, Words in Context, Expression of Ideas
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ASCD Close ReadingClose ReadingCommand of Evidence
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SAT Implementation Guide (Page 84)OPTIC: The five letters in the word OPTIC (pertaining to the eye) provide a system for remembering the five steps for analyzing a visual or graphic (i.e. cartoons, pictures, graphs and charts). As students view the graphic they may participate in a discussion, write a paragraph, and/or complete a graphic organizer or chart to record the information. OPTIC O is for overview • Conduct a brief overview of the visual. P is for parts • Focus on the parts of the visual. • Read all labels. • Notice any details that seem important. T is for title • Read the title of the visual for a clear understanding of the subject. I is for interrelationships • Use the title to help identify the main idea or the big umbrella that connects the parts of the visual. C is for conclusion • Draw a conclusion about the visual as a whole. • What does it mean? -- Why was it included? • Summarize the visual in a few sentences or a well-constructed paragraph. Crosscutting Concepts
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OPTICOPTICCommand of Evidence
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PPT for Science Using OPTICOPTICCrosscutting Concepts
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Collaborative ConversationsCollaborative Conversations by Fisher and FreyCrosscutting Concepts, Expression of Ideas, Command of Evidence
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SOAPSToneSOAPSTone can be used as an introductory strategy for primary source analysis. It can be used to build fundamental skills for AP work: developing arguments; analyzing points of view, context, and bias; and assessing issues of change and continuity over time. The elements include: SPEAKER: Who or what delivers the message of the passage? (N.B.: This may not always be the author.) OCCASION: Where and when was the passage produced? What was happening there at that time? AUDIENCE: For whom was the document produced? PURPOSE: Why was the document produced? SUBJECT: What is the main topic of the document? TONE: What feeling or attitude does the document express? This strategy can be used to analyze political cartoons, posters, photos, artistic representations, or almost any other primary source.Crosscutting Concepts, Expression of Ideas
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History Soapstone PPT with "I Have a Dream" ModelSoapstone for HistoryCrosscutting Concepts, Expression of Ideas
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History SOAPSTONE TemplateSoapstone for HistoryCrosscutting Concepts, Expression of Ideas
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SOAPStone ExamplesSoapstone for ELA/HistoryCrosscutting Concepts, Expression of Ideas
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Presentation and sample lesson from West EdLiteracy in ScienceCrosscutting Concepts
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R.A.R.E. (pages 5-7)R: Restate
A: Answer
R: Reason
E: Evidence (Examples)

When applied to answering a reading comprehension question in writing, a mnemonic can provide a visual prompt for recollecting a formula, which if acted upon by the student, will produce a well-developed response. An example of such a mnemonic strategy is R.A.R.E., which stands for: • Restate the question • Answer the question • Reasons given • Examples from the text (Adapted from HCPSS, 1997)
Command of Evidence
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Content Literacy from West EdContent Literacy in Science and Social Science resources from West Ed - lessons and resources (see Dropbox at lower left)Crosscutting Concepts, Command of Evidence
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Two Column Notes Supporting Reading and Writing in Non-Fiction TextsThe two-column note-taking method requires active reading, that is, processing must occur for the notes to be taken. Two-column notetaking is an especially useful method for detailed and technical information. The act of separating main ideas from details strengthens the understanding and memory of the content area.Command of Evidence, Crosscutting Concepts, Words in Context
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Two Column Notes TemplateTwo-column notes
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Using the RAFT Writing StrategyRAFT assignments encourage students to uncover their own voices and formats for presenting their ideas about content information they are studying. Students learn to respond to writing prompts that require them to think about various perspectives:
Role of the Writer: Who are you as the writer? A movie star? The President? A plant?
Audience: To whom are you writing? A senator? Yourself? A company?
Format: In what format are you writing? A diary entry? A newspaper? A love letter?
Topic: What are you writing about?
Crosscutting Concepts, Standard English Conventions, Expression of Ideas
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Annotation: Talking to the TextTalking to the Text (TttT) is a Reading Apprenticeship® (RA) routine that helps the reader learn how to figure out the meaning of text based on his or her schema, paying attention to the text, and by focusing on his or her metacognitive processes as the reader reads on to make meaning of the text. Unlike the Think Aloud, which does not require writing, the TttT uses written comments to showcase the student’s thinking and metacognitive thoughts.
Crosscutting Concepts
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Talking to the TextAnnotation: Talking to the TextCrosscutting Concepts
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College Board Words in ContextWords in Context: Students need to know how to find context clues embedded in text, how to use them to understand word meanings, and why they are important.Words in Context
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Vocabulary and Context Questions and Strategies for SAT ReadingWords in ContextWords in Context
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Solving Word Meanings: Engaging Strategies for Vocabulary DevelopmentWords in ContextWords in Context
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Summarizing template from Cal State University NorthridgeSummarizing Expository TextCrosscutting Concepts
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Written ConversationStudents read a text independently and then write a response to the text. The student then passes their writing to a partner and the partner responds in writing. Exchange two or three times before having a small group or whole group conversation about the textCommand of Evidence, Expression of Ideas, Words in Context, Crosscutting Concepts
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ReadworksReadWorks provides research-based units, lessons, and authentic, leveled nonfiction and literary passages.Command of Evidence, Expression of Ideas, Words in Context, Standard English Conventions, Crosscutting Concepts
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Kelly Gallagher Article of the Week ArchivesSource of short expository texts to close read and write responsesCommand of Evidence, Expression of Ideas, Words in Context, Standard English Conventions, Crosscutting Concepts
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Dave Stuart Teaching Article of the Week ProtocolsProtocolsCommand of Evidence, Expression of Ideas, Words in Context, Standard English Conventions, Crosscutting Concepts
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NEWSELAUnlimited access to hundreds of leveled news articles and Common Core–aligned quizzes, with new articles every day.Command of Evidence, Expression of Ideas, Words in Context, Standard English Conventions, Crosscutting Concepts
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Reading to Learn in ScienceReading to Learn in ScienceCommand of Evidence, Expression of Ideas, Words in Context, Standard English Conventions, Crosscutting Concepts
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Vocabulary Tier 1VocabularyTier 1 Secondary Content Area Reading StrategiesWords in Context, Command of Evidence, Crosscutting Concepts
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ReadTheoryProvides short differentiated, computer adaptive passages with comprehension questions including literary devices and logical fallacies.Command of Evidence, Expression of Ideas
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