STEMcoding NGSS Alignment
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ActivityNGSS Content StatementsDisciplinary Core IdeasCrosscutting concepts
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Classical Mechanics (physical science, no trigonometry)
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Move the BlobMS-PS2-2. Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object. Models (e.g., physical, mathematical, computer models) can be used to simulate systems and interactions—including energy, matter, and information flows—within and between systems at different scales.
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Accelerate the BlobMS-PS2-2. Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object. Models (e.g., physical, mathematical, computer models) can be used to simulate systems and interactions—including energy, matter, and information flows—within and between systems at different scales.
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Apollo Moon LandingMS-PS2-2.Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object. Forces that act at a distance (electric, magnetic, and gravitational) can be explained by fields that extend through space and can be mapped by their effect on a test object (a charged object, a magnet, or a ball, respectively
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Bird LauncherHS-PS2-1. Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.Forces that act at a distance (electric, magnetic, and gravitational) can be explained by fields that extend through space and can be mapped by their effect on a test object (a charged object, a magnet, or a ball, respectively
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PongMS-PS2-1. Apply Newton’s Third Law to design a solution to a problem involving the motion of two colliding objectsMotion energy is properly called kinetic energy; it is proportional to the mass of the moving object and grows with the square of its speed.
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HS-PS2-1. Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
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HS-PS3-1. Create a computational model to calculate the change in energy of one component in a system when the change in energy of the other component(s) and energy flows in and out of the system are known.
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Bonk_ioMS-PS2-1. Apply Newton’s Third Law to design a solution to a problem involving the motion of two colliding objectsForces that act at a distance (electric, magnetic, and gravitational) can be explained by fields that extend through space and can be mapped by their effect on a test object (a charged object, a magnet, or a ball, respectively
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MS-PS2-2. Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object.
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Classical Mechanics (physics including trigonometry)
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1. Planetoids game!HS-PS2-1. Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
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2. Lunar descent game!HS-PS2-1. Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
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3. Bellicose birds game!HS-PS2-1. Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
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4. Planetoids with momentum!HS-PS2-1. Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
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HS-PS2-2. Use mathematical representations to support the claim that the total momentum of a system of objects is conserved when there is no net force on the system.
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5. Planetoids with torque!HS-PS2-1. Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
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6. Planetoids with a spring!HS-PS2-1. Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
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7. Bellicose birds with energy!HS-PS2-1. Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.Energy cannot be created or destroyed -- only moved between one place and another place, between objects, and/or fields, or between systems
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HS-PS3-1. Create a computational model to calculate the change in energy of one component in a system when the change in energy of the other component(s) and energy flows in and out of the system are known.
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Astronomy
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Slingshot with gravityHS-PS2-2.Use mathematical representations to support the claim that the total momentum of a system of objects is conserved when there is no net force on the system. ESS1.B. Kepler’s laws describe common features of the motions of
orbiting objects, including their elliptical paths around the sun.
Orbits may change due to the gravitational effects from, or collisions
with, other objects in the solar system (HS-ESS1-4).
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HS-PS2-4. Use mathematical representations of Newton’s Law of Gravitation and Coulomb’s Law to describe and predict the gravitational and electrostatic forces between objects.
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HS-ESS1-4. Use mathematical or computational representations to predict the motion of orbiting objects in the solar system.
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Escape Velocity / Black HolesHS-PS2-4. Use mathematical representations of Newton’s Law of Gravitation and Coulomb’s Law to describe and predict the gravitational and electrostatic forces between objects. ESS1.B. Kepler’s laws describe common features of the motions of
orbiting objects, including their elliptical paths around the sun.
Orbits may change due to the gravitational effects from, or collisions
with, other objects in the solar system (HS-ESS1-4).
Energy cannot be created or destroyed -- only moved between one place and another place, between objects, and/or fields, or between systems
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HS-PS3-1. Create a computational model to calculate the change in energy of one component in a system when the change in energy of the other component(s) and energy flows in and out of the system are known.
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HS-ESS1-4. Use mathematical or computational representations to predict the motion of orbiting objects in the solar system.
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ExoplanetsHS-ESS1-4. Use mathematical or computational representations to predict the motion of orbiting objects in the solar system.ESS1.B. Kepler’s laws describe common features of the motions of
orbiting objects, including their elliptical paths around the sun.
Orbits may change due to the gravitational effects from, or collisions
with, other objects in the solar system (HS-ESS1-4).
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HS-PS2-4. Use mathematical representations of Newton’s Law of Gravitation and Coulomb’s Law to describe and predict the gravitational and electrostatic forces between objects.
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Electromagnetism exercises
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1. Particle Accelerator MS-PS2-3. Ask questions about data to determine the factors that affect the strength of electric and magnetic forces.Forces that act at a distance (electric, magnetic, and gravitational) can be explained by fields that extend through space and can be mapped by their effect on a test object (a charged object, a magnet, or a ball, respectively
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HS-PS2-1.Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
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HS-PS3-5. Develop and use a model of two objects interacting through electric or magnetic fields to illustrate the forces between objects and the changes in energy of the objects due to the interaction.
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2. Particle Accelerator with potentialMS-PS2-3. Ask questions about data to determine the factors that affect the strength of electric and magnetic forces.Forces that act at a distance (electric, magnetic, and gravitational) can be explained by fields that extend through space and can be mapped by their effect on a test object (a charged object, a magnet, or a ball, respectively
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HS-PS2-4. Use mathematical representations of Newton’s Law of Gravitation and Coulomb’s Law to describe and predict the gravitational and electrostatic forces between objects.
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HS-PS3-5. Develop and use a model of two objects interacting through electric or magnetic fields to illustrate the forces between objects and the changes in energy of the objects due to the interaction.
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3. Point charge repulsion HS-PS1-8. Develop models to illustrate the changes in the composition of the nucleus of the atom and the energy released during the process of fission, fusion and radioactive decayPS1-C. Nuclear processes, including fusion, fission, and radioactive decays of unsable nuclei, involve release or absorption of energy. The total number of neutrons plus protons does not change in any nuclear process.Energy cannot be created or destroyed -- only moved between one place and another place, between objects, and/or fields, or between systems
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HS-PS2-4. Use mathematical representations of Newton’s Law of Gravitation and Coulomb’s Law to describe and predict the gravitational and electrostatic forces between objects.
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HS-PS3-1. Create a computational model to calculate the change in energy of one component in a system when the change in energy of the other component(s) and energy flows in and out of the system are known.
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HS-PS3-5. Develop and use a model of two objects interacting through electric or magnetic fields to illustrate the forces between objects and the changes in energy of the objects due to the interaction.
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4. RC circuit HS-PS3-2. Develop and use models to illustrate that energy at the macroscopic scale can be accounted for as a combination of energy associated with the motion of particles (objects) and energy associated with the relative positions of particles (objects). [Clarification Statement: Examples of phenomena at the macroscopic scale could include the conversion of kinetic energy to thermal energy, the energy stored due to position of an object above the earth, and the energy stored between two electrically-charged plates. Examples of models could include diagrams, drawings, descriptions, and computer simulations.]Models (e.g., physical, mathematical, computer models) can be used to simulate systems and interactions—including energy, matter, and information flows—within and between systems at different scales.
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5. Magnetic forces HS-PS3-5.Develop and use a model of two objects interacting through electric or magnetic fields to illustrate the forces between objects and the changes in energy of the objects due to the interaction.
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6. Wave interference HS-PS4-1. Use mathematical representations to support a claim regarding relationships among the frequency, wavelength, and speed of waves traveling in various media
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HS-PS4-3. Evaluate the claims, evidence and reasoning behind the idea that electromagnetic radiation can be described by either a wave model or a particle model, and that for some situations one model is more useful than the other
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Environmental Science exercises
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Earth dayHS LS 2-1. Use mathematical and/or computational representations to support explanations of factors that affect carrying capacity of ecosystems at different scalesScientific knowledge is based on the assumption that natural laws operate today as they did in the past and they will continue to do so in the futureModels (e.g., physical, mathematical, computer models) can be used to simulate systems and interactions—including energy, matter, and information flows—within and between systems at different scales.
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HS LS 2-1. Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.
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HS ESS 3-3. Create a computational simulation to illustrate the relationships among the management of natural resources, the sustainability of human populations, and biodiversity.
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HS ESS 3-5. Analyze geoscience data and the results from global climate models to make an evidence-based forecast of the current rate of global or regional climate change and associated future impacts to Earth's systems
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HS ESS 3-6. Use a computational representation to illustrate the relationships among Earth systems and how those relationships are being modified due to human activity
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