Context-Specific Guidance Overview
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Last updated:August 27, 2020
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In person in music roomIn person on a cartHybridOnline synchronousOnline Asynchronous
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SingingIn the music classroom, children must wear masks, socially distance (6 feet currently recommended for masked singing), and sit in rows all facing the same direction (no circle or half circle configurations). Speaking with masks is currently advised; research is still developing regarding the spread of aerosolized particles while singing, even while masked. The duration of singing matters, as does the size of the room, the amount/type of ventilation, and the time between singing so that the room can be vacant for particles to clear from the air. All children in rows, no circle or half circle configuration - even if the teacher must rearrange the home classroom. Children must wear masks, socially distance (6 feet currently recommended for masked singing). Speaking with masks is currently advised; research is still developing regarding the spread of aerosolized particles while singing, even while masked. The duration of singing matters, as does the size of the room, the amount/type of ventilation, and the time between singing so that the room can be vacant for particles to clear from the air. When in class, either in the music or general education classroom, teachers and students should follow the guidelines for in-person instruction. All children should be masked and in rows facing the same direction with six feet of social distancing maintained. Children who are online should be encouraged to sing aloud if that works for their home environment, see online synchronous.Singing should be encouraged in the home. Be aware that individual students may have situations that limit singing,such as a napping sibling or sharing their remote learning space with others in the household. Partner with families to find solutions that maximize child and caregiver singing.Singing should be encouraged in the home. Ask students and caregivers to use asynchronous materials in places and at times that the child(ren) and/or caregiver singing aloud will be appropriate and welcomed.
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Consider using humming or vocalizing on other closed-lip sounds if/when that makes sense.Consider using humming or vocalizing on other closed-lip sounds if/when that makes sense.Consider using humming or vocalizing on other closed-lip sounds if/when that makes sense.
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MovementChildren should be in a self space, six feet apart. Students should be well informed on the difference between locomotor and non-locomotor movement, and markers on the floor (e.g., hula hoops) to assist students in awareness of movement may be helpful. For outdoor space, use chalk or tape to define the space. Students should be allowed to freely move if they are aware of their own distancing from other students and the instructor. Children should be in a self space, six feet apart. Students should be well informed on the difference between locomotor and non-locomotor movement, and markers on the floor (e.g., hula hoops) to assist students in awareness of movement may be helpful. Students should be allowed to freely move if they are aware of their own distancing from other students and the instructor. Children in person should be in a self space, six feet apart. No interactive body percussion activities. Children online should be encouraged to move freely, but also reminded to keep to non-locomotor movement to prevent injury while moving musically in the home.Invite families to participate in a way that works for them, which may mean camera off at times. If using a camera, help students explore camera angles and settings that allow movement to be shared. For example, students might set their camera for a wide angle and/or adapt movement for the camera (mostly to/from camera, side to side, circles: video from knees up).Invite families to participate in a way that works for them, which may mean camera off at times. If using a camera, help students explore camera angles and settings that allow movement to be shared. For example, students might set their camera for a wide angle and/or adapt movement for the camera (mostly to/from camera, side to side, circles: video from knees up).
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If using scarves as a prop, students should not throw them into the air, because this could result in cross contamination or physical contact with other students.It is not recommended that students use a community movement tool such as a parachute or stretchy band where cross contamination may occur. Consider using imaginary community movement tool instead.
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Instruments Children should not share instruments with others. Teachers must sanitize all used instruments after use. Sanitizing processes vary; for hard surfaces, cleaning with an alcohol solution or spraying with a disinfecting spray and letting the instrument sit for 15 minutes is recommended. See https://nafme.org/covid-19-instrument-cleaning-guidelines/.Some teachers are creating individual music kits with instruments or instrument substitutes, labeled for each student, to be kept within the general classroom. This may be cost or time prohibitive for some teachers. If you are teaching on a cart, you may demonstrate on instruments that you bring, but the students should not use instruments that you bring unless you have time to properly sanitize them between every class, and they should not share instruments.See suggestions for in-person and online instruction. Create instructions for homemade instruments via videos or other means. Note that if the hybrid configuration means some students are attending synchronous instruction from home, and some are attending in person, the home group could be singers and the in-person group could play instruments.Teachers can provide a list of potential "found instruments" for use in the home and partner with students and families to locate or create materials that make similar sounds to those desired for a specific activity.Teachers can provide a list of potential "found instruments" for use in the home and partner with students and families to locate or create materials that make similar sounds to those desired for a specific activity.
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Body Percussion
Children should be in a self space, six feet apart. No interactive body percussion activities (e.g., no partner handclapping games).Children should be in rows in a a self space, six feet apart, even if this means rearranging the home classroom. No interactive body percussion activities (e.g., no partner handclapping games).Children in person should be in a self space equal to a circle six feet in diameter. No interactive body percussion activities. Children online should be encouraged to move freely, but also reminded to keep to non-locomotor movement to prevent injury while moving musically in the home.Students should be encouraged to move freely, but also reminded to keep to non-locomotor movement to prevent injury while moving musically in the home. Students can do interactive body percussion activities such as handclapping games with other members of their household.Students should be encouraged to move freely, but also reminded to keep to non-locomotor movement to prevent injury while moving musically in the home. Students can do interactive body percussion activities such as handclapping games with other members of their household.
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ListeningRecommended that student listening to vocal music be either a pre-recorded performance by the teacher played on a device or another recording. Listening equipment (e.g., headphones at a listening station) should not be shared. Active listening activities that involve movement must preserve social distancing.See in-person guidance. Be sure to intentionally draw listening examples from a wide range of cultures, ensuring high-quality and accurate recordings. Ensure that students see images of the people who are performing the music they are listening to, and that the performers represent a variety of gender expressions and racial and ethnic identities.See In-person and Synchronous online.Any appropriate synchronous listening activity is recommended.Any appropriate asynchronous listening activity is recommended. In addition, listening to outdoor sounds of the neighborhood can be incorporated into a lesson to encourage mindfulness and careful listening.
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