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ABCDLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZAAABACADAEAFAGAHAIAJAKALAMANAOAPAQARASATAUAVAWAXAYAZBABBBCBDBEBFBGBHBIBJBKBLBMBNBOBPBQBRBSBTBUBVBW
1
study_IDlong_citeshort_cite
same_infant
expt_numexpt_conditionnative_langtest_langnativeLabinfant_typemean_age_1min_agemax_agemean_age_2age_range_1gender_1n_1n_2
group_name_1
group_name_2
n_excluded_1
fussersnon_criterioncriterion
exclusionCriteria
mean_age_months
multiple_age_groups
multiple_age_groups_younger_older
words
WdMisAlignMajorStress
Linguistic
number_syllables
passages
edge_alignment
edge_alignment_simple
familiarization_voice
familiarization_register
familiarization_affect
max_trial_duration_fam
test_voice
test_register
age_group_for_index
indexical
max_trial_duration_test
num_test_trials
words_to_passage
familiarization_criterion
methodexposure_phaseresponse_mode
dependent_measure
participant_design
predicted_outcome
OtherNotesx_1SD_1x_2SD_2corrrt
Corr_basis
Fdd_var
p_val_reported
proportion_familiarity_preference
2
JusczykAslin1995
Jusczyk, P.W. & Aslin, R.N. (1995). Infants′ detection of the sound patterns of words in fluent speech. Cognitive Psychology, 29(1), 1-23. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1995.1010
Jusczyk & Aslin (1995)111American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical230217245280.54166666672418413
crying interference failing to look for an average of 3 s to each side exp err
7.512
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA26.53sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
19.7216yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory8.292.097.042.630.44406178762.42formula0.0360.7916666667
3
JusczykAslin1995
Jusczyk, P.W. & Aslin, R.N. (1995). Infants′ detection of the sound patterns of words in fluent speech. Cognitive Psychology, 29(1), 1-23. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1995.1010
Jusczyk & Aslin (1995)222American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical175160191310.416666666724210623
crying interference failing to look for an average of 3 s to each side exp err
611
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA26.53sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
19.7216yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory8.453.547.973.030.8102595561.13formula0.2690.5416666667
4
JusczykAslin1995
Jusczyk, P.W. & Aslin, R.N. (1995). Infants′ detection of the sound patterns of words in fluent speech. Cognitive Psychology, 29(1), 1-23. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1995.1010
Jusczyk & Aslin (1995)333American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical225210242320.541666666724310533
crying interference failing to look for an average of 3 s to each side exp err
7.500
{tup zeet} {gike bawg}
0
mispronounciation
1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA26.53sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
19.7216yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory6.932.486.512.610.69894781371.04formula0.3090.4583333333
5
JusczykAslin1995
Jusczyk, P.W. & Aslin, R.N. (1995). Infants′ detection of the sound patterns of words in fluent speech. Cognitive Psychology, 29(1), 1-23. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1995.1010
Jusczyk & Aslin (1995)444American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical236221249280.41666666672444213
crying failing to look for an average of 3 s to each side exp err
7.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA19.72sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
26.5312no45HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory10.433.878.323.70.69292100913.48formula0.0020.75
6
NewmanJusczyk1996
Newman, R.S. & Jusczyk, P.W. (1996). The cocktail party effect in infants. Perception & Psychophysics, 58(8), 1145-1156. DOI: 10.3758/BF03207548
Newman & Jusczyk (1996)111American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical233211244330.41666666672417343
crying not listening at least 3s to each passage
7.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA26.53sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
19.7216yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory7.712.116.211.930.85.27author00.875
7
NewmanJusczyk1996
Newman, R.S. & Jusczyk, P.W. (1996). The cocktail party effect in infants. Perception & Psychophysics, 58(8), 1145-1156. DOI: 10.3758/BF03207548
Newman & Jusczyk (1996)222American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical219213246330.291666666724213533
crying restlessness failing to meet criterion equipment error experimenter error
7.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA26.53sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
19.7216yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory8.012.296.92.270.73.092author0.00510.75
8
NewmanJusczyk1996
Newman, R.S. & Jusczyk, P.W. (1996). The cocktail party effect in infants. Perception & Psychophysics, 58(8), 1145-1156. DOI: 10.3758/BF03207548
Newman & Jusczyk (1996)333American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical232222249270.333333333324311373
crying failure to meet criterion equipment failure
7.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA26.53sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
19.7216yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory6.741.986.651.620.50.23author0.060.4166666667
9
NewmanJusczyk1996
Newman, R.S. & Jusczyk, P.W. (1996). The cocktail party effect in infants. Perception & Psychophysics, 58(8), 1145-1156. DOI: 10.3758/BF03207548
Newman & Jusczyk (1996)444American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical230215249340.54166666672446223
crying failing to meet criterionexperimenter error falling asleep
7.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA19.72sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
26.5312no45HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_two
nonsignificant
11.344.569.853.770.722.28author0.03220.5833333333
10
TincoffJusczyk1996
Tincoff, R., & Jusczyk, P. W. (1996, July). Are word-final sounds perceptually salient for infants. In Poster presented at the Fifth Conf. on Laboratory Phonology, Evanston, IL, USA.
Tincoff & Jusczyk (1996)111American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical231213244310.416666666724112120
failure to complete the study or extreme fussiness
7.500
kut, dob, bipe, feek
0
mispronounciation
1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNANAfemaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
NA16yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_two
nonsignificant
NANANANA1.34none0.19
11
Kuijpersetal1998
Kuijpers, C.T.L., Coolen, R., Houston, D.M., & Cutler, A. (1998). Using the head-turning technique to explore cross-linguistic performance differences. In: C. Rovee-Collier; L. Lipsitt; H. Hayne (Eds.), Advances in Infancy Research, Vol. 12, 205-220
Kuijpers et al. (1998)111DutchnativeTRUEtypical226.94218.94239.94210.5241191263
crying sleeping criterion not interested at all (included in criterion(
7.500
{bokser karper}{pendel kusten}
0match2
De bokser moet wel een erg sterke man zijn. Hij is de beste bokser van de hele wereld. E!ke dag gaat hij trainen met een andere bokser. Die bokser is echter veel gespierder dan hij. Soms moet hij vechten tegen een nieuwe bokser. Dat is geen oude bokser maar een jonge. Die pendel ligt op het bureau van mijn oom. Hij is dan ook erg trots op de beste pendel. Volgens hem is het al een heel oude pendel. Hij vindt deze nieuwe pendel iets minder apart. De pendel heeft hij in een dure zaak gekocht. Ik heb de andere pendel ook wel eens gebruikt. De karper zwemt in de vijver bij de school. De jongen wil de nieuwe karper gaan vangen. Dan ziet de meester nog een andere karper. Hij moet nu de beste karper met rust laten. Die karper zal nog een hele tijd blijven leven. Nu gaan ze op de foto met de oude karper. De kusten zijn hier bebouwd met hoge hotels. Aan de andere kusten zijn erg veel toeristen. Met de boot varen zij langs de nieuwe kusten. De visser kent alle oude kusten van dit land. Die kusten zijn nog niet door de gasten ontdekt. Morgen ga ik vissen bij de beste kusten.
NA0.3333333333femaleIDSNA21.5femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
2016yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificant
tendency towards novelty pref for three out of four types of passages!
6.842.226.721.930.71521607430.37formula0.7160.4583333333
12
Kuijpersetal1998
Kuijpers, C.T.L., Coolen, R., Houston, D.M., & Cutler, A. (1998). Using the head-turning technique to explore cross-linguistic performance differences. In: C. Rovee-Collier; L. Lipsitt; H. Hayne (Eds.), Advances in Infancy Research, Vol. 12, 205-220
Kuijpers et al. (1998)222DutchnonnativeFALSEtypical228.94216.94238.94220.541666666724213463
crying not meeting criterion not interested (four added to crierion) restless sleeping equipment failure
7.500
{doctor candle}{kingdom hamlet}
0match2
Your kingdom is in a faraway place. The prince used to sail to that kingdom when he came home from school. One day he saw a ghost in this old kingdom. The kingdom started to worry him. So he went to another kingdom. Now in the big kingdom he is happy. Your hamlet lies just over the hill. Far away from here near the sea is an old hamlet. People from the hamlet like to fish. Another hamlet is in the country. People from that hamlet really like to farm. They grow so much that theirs is a very big hamlet. The doctor saw you the other day. He’s much younger than the old doctor. I think your doctor is very nice. He showed another doctor your pretty picture. That doctor thought you grew a lot. Maybe someday you’ll be a big doctor. The candle in the kitchen was almost melted. So Annie bought another candle at the stationery store. She came home and put away the old candle. Fran gave that candle to you later. Then she made a place for the new big candle. Your candle is very pretty and smells nice too.
58.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA21.78femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
20.5516yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificant7.582.938.013.340.79487627441.03formula0.3140.4583333333
13
JusczykHohneBauman1999
Jusczyk, P. W., Hohne, E. A., & Bauman, A. (1999). Infants’ sensitivity to allophonic cues for word segmentation. Perception & psychophysics, 61(8), 1465-1476.
Jusczyk, Hohne, & Baumann (1999)
111American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical272258286280.458333333324110513
crying unresponsiveness to lights LTs less than 3 sec
911
night rates doctor nitrates hamlet
0reparse2
Nitrates are not something that everyone needs. My teacher told us all about nitrates. Farmers use nitrates to help grow their crops. Nitrates are used to preserve food. This storeroom has many different kinds of nitrates. There were boxes of nitrates on all of the shelves. Your hamlet lies just over the hill. Far away from here near the sea is an old hamlet. People from the hamlet like to fish. Another hamlet is in the country. People from that hamlet really like to farm. They grow so much that theirs is a very big hamlet. Night Rates can help us to save some money. Businesses try to use night rates to send their packages. Even the airlines have cheaper night rates. The man wrote out the night rates on the blackboard. Night rates at this hotel are expensive. Many people look for the best night rates. The doctor saw you the other day. He's much younger than the old doctor. I think your doctor is very nice. He showed another doctor your picture. That doctor thought you grew a lot. He was a big doctor himself.
NA0.4583333333femaleIDSNA24femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
1916yes60HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratoryNANANANAnone
14
JusczykHohneBauman1999
Jusczyk, P. W., Hohne, E. A., & Bauman, A. (1999). Infants’ sensitivity to allophonic cues for word segmentation. Perception & psychophysics, 61(8), 1465-1476.
Jusczyk, Hohne, & Baumann (1999)
222American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical276255301460.52425213
crying LTs less than 3 s parental interference
900night dock0embedded1
The dock by the lake has sailboats. Motor boats stay at the old dock. That dock gets very busy. Fishing from the dock looks like fun. People at your dock like to swim too. A family brought their boat to the new dock.
NA0.3333333333femaleIDSNA20femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
1916yes60HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificantNANANANAnone
15
JusczykHohneBauman1999
Jusczyk, P. W., Hohne, E. A., & Bauman, A. (1999). Infants’ sensitivity to allophonic cues for word segmentation. Perception & psychophysics, 61(8), 1465-1476.
Jusczyk, Hohne, & Baumann (1999)
333American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical282265301360.45833333332437233
crying failure to look at lights non-criterion
900night dock0embedded1
Many interesting things happen during night time. Night schools teach people about computers. Teams play night games at baseball fields. Night lights help the players to see. Some ofus even put special clothes on like night caps. My friend wears a different night gown every day.
NA0.3333333333femaleIDSNA20femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
1916yes60HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratoryNANANANAnone
16
JusczykHohneBauman1999
Jusczyk, P. W., Hohne, E. A., & Bauman, A. (1999). Infants’ sensitivity to allophonic cues for word segmentation. Perception & psychophysics, 61(8), 1465-1476.
Jusczyk, Hohne, & Baumann (1999)
444American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical316294342480.54166666672448253
crting sleeping non-criterion
10.512
night rates doctor nitrates hamlet
0reparse2
Nitrates are not something that everyone needs. My teacher told us all about nitrates. Farmers use nitrates to help grow their crops. Nitrates are used to preserve food. This storeroom has many different kinds of nitrates. There were boxes of nitrates on all of the shelves. Your hamlet lies just over the hill. Far away from here near the sea is an old hamlet. People from the hamlet like to fish. Another hamlet is in the country. People from that hamlet really like to farm. They grow so much that theirs is a very big hamlet. Night Rates can help us to save some money. Businesses try to use night rates to send their packages. Even the airlines have cheaper night rates. The man wrote out the night rates on the blackboard. Night rates at this hotel are expensive. Many people look for the best night rates. The doctor saw you the other day. He's much younger than the old doctor. I think your doctor is very nice. He showed another doctor your picture. That doctor thought you grew a lot. He was a big doctor himself.
NA0.4583333333femaleIDSNA20femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
1916yes60HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificantNANANANAnone
17
JusczykHoustonNewsome1999
Jusczyk, P.W., Houston, D.M., & Newsome, M. (1999). The beginnings of word segmentation in English-learning infants. Cognitive Psychology, 39(3), 159-207. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1999.0716
Jusczyk, Houston, & Newsome (1999)
111American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical228214260460.458333333324110643
crying failing to listen 3s on average to passages
7.500
{kingdom hamlet} {candle doctor}
0match2
Your kingdom is in a faraway place. The prince used to sail to that kingdom when he came home from school. One day he saw a ghost in this old kingdom. The kingdom started to worry him. So he went to another kingdom. Now in the big kingdom he is happy. Your hamlet lies just over the hill. Far away from here near the sea is an old hamlet. People from the hamlet like to fish. Another hamlet is in the country. People from that hamlet really like to farm. They grow so much that theirs is a very big hamlet. The doctor saw you the other day. He’s much younger than the old doctor. I think your doctor is very nice. He showed another doctor your pretty picture. That doctor thought you grew a lot. Maybe someday you’ll be a big doctor. The candle in the kitchen was almost melted. So Annie bought another candle at the stationery store. She came home and put away the old candle. Fran gave that candle to you later. Then she made a place for the new big candle. Your candle is very pretty and smells nice too.
58.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA21.78sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
20.5516yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory7.922.776.82.710.71895534582.67formula0.0190.75
18
JusczykHoustonNewsome1999
Jusczyk, P.W., Houston, D.M., & Newsome, M. (1999). The beginnings of word segmentation in English-learning infants. Cognitive Psychology, 39(3), 159-207. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1999.0716
Jusczyk, Houston, & Newsome (1999)
222American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical227218243250.29166666672428513
crying failing to listen failing to look at the light restlessness
7.500
{kingdom hamlet} {candle doctor}
0match2
Your kingdom is in a faraway place. The prince used to sail to that kingdom when he came home from school. One day he saw a ghost in this old kingdom. The kingdom started to worry him. So he went to another kingdom. Now in the big kingdom he is happy. Your hamlet lies just over the hill. Far away from here near the sea is an old hamlet. People from the hamlet like to fish. Another hamlet is in the country. People from that hamlet really like to farm. They grow so much that theirs is a very big hamlet. The doctor saw you the other day. He’s much younger than the old doctor. I think your doctor is very nice. He showed another doctor your pretty picture. That doctor thought you grew a lot. Maybe someday you’ll be a big doctor. The candle in the kitchen was almost melted. So Annie bought another candle at the stationery store. She came home and put away the old candle. Fran gave that candle to you later. Then she made a place for the new big candle. Your candle is very pretty and smells nice too.
58.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA20.55sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
21.7812no45HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory9.592.557.552.840.60733570124.16formula0.00040.8333333333
19
JusczykHoustonNewsome1999
Jusczyk, P.W., Houston, D.M., & Newsome, M. (1999). The beginnings of word segmentation in English-learning infants. Cognitive Psychology, 39(3), 159-207. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1999.0716
Jusczyk, Houston, & Newsome (1999)
333American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical226212246340.52431003experimenter error7.500
{kingdom hamlet} {candle doctor}
0embedded2
Your king groans a lot. The nice big king likes to laugh. The son of the old king will soon visit them. The prince will tell a joke to the king. Then he will tell it to the new king. That king will smile too. The ham for dinner is almost ready. Dad brought home a new ham. Everyone liked that ham for Thanksgiving dinner. Your ham will taste very good. Mom almost baked an old ham that she had last Christmas. It was a spicy baked ham. The dock by the lake had sailboats. Motor boats stay at the old dock. That dock gets very busy. Fishing from the dock looks like fun. People at your dock like to swim too. A family brought their boat to the new dock. The can with the apple sauce is on the shelf. You can holds alphabet soup. Beans from the new can will be good too. We’ll dust off the old can. It is by the big can hiding in the back. It will be hard to reach that can.
600.3333333333femaleIDSNA21.6sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
21.7812no45HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory9.943.7110.53.40.72259973641.03formula0.340.4583333333
20
JusczykHoustonNewsome1999
Jusczyk, P.W., Houston, D.M., & Newsome, M. (1999). The beginnings of word segmentation in English-learning infants. Cognitive Psychology, 39(3), 159-207. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1999.0716
Jusczyk, Houston, & Newsome (1999)
444American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical225215245300.58333333332445203
crying failure to look at light rstlessness
7.500
{king ham} {dock can}
0embedded1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
58.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA20.55sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
19.1612no45HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory9.583.258.583.520.60838358091.63formula0.140.5833333333
21
JusczykHoustonNewsome1999
Jusczyk, P.W., Houston, D.M., & Newsome, M. (1999). The beginnings of word segmentation in English-learning infants. Cognitive Psychology, 39(3), 159-207. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1999.0716
Jusczyk, Houston, & Newsome (1999)
555American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical230217250330.37524510233
crying failing to listen failing to look at the light restlessness experimenter error
7.500
{king ham} {dock can}
0embedded1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
58.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA19.16sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
20.5516yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory7.752.397.062.370.42983178281.33formula0.190.5833333333
22
JusczykHoustonNewsome1999
Jusczyk, P.W., Houston, D.M., & Newsome, M. (1999). The beginnings of word segmentation in English-learning infants. Cognitive Psychology, 39(3), 159-207. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1999.0716
Jusczyk, Houston, & Newsome (1999)
666American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical235216243270.33333333332465123
crying failing to listen restlessness experimenter error
7.500
{king ham} {dock can} spliced from bisyllabic stimuli
0embedded1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
58.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA17.63sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
20.5516yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory8.623.357.742.190.44545430521.4formula0.190.5
23
JusczykHoustonNewsome1999
Jusczyk, P.W., Houston, D.M., & Newsome, M. (1999). The beginnings of word segmentation in English-learning infants. Cognitive Psychology, 39(3), 159-207. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1999.0716
Jusczyk, Houston, & Newsome (1999)
777American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical224217244270.37524710823
crying failing to listen 3s on average to passages
7.511
{guitar device} {beret surprise}
1match2
The man put away his old guitar. Your guitar is in the studio. That red guitar is brand new. The pink guitar is mine. Give the girl the plain guitar. Her guitar is too fancy. Your device can do a lot. Her device only fixes things. My new red device makes ice cream. The pink device sews clothes. We don’t need that old device. I think it is a plain device. The lady is wearing an old beret. She gave her plain beret to the clerk. Your beret is colorful and new. The red beret belongs to Jacques. Your mother bought a pink beret. Her beret is nice too. The big red surprise is for you. The small pink surprise is for Dawn. Your surprise will be fantastic. I think Dawn got the old surprise. Her surprise might not last long. At least she didn’t get a plain surprise.
65.833333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA21.22sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
18.4616yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory7.192.087.552.30.77549591841.19formula0.240.375
24
JusczykHoustonNewsome1999
Jusczyk, P.W., Houston, D.M., & Newsome, M. (1999). The beginnings of word segmentation in English-learning infants. Cognitive Psychology, 39(3), 159-207. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1999.0716
Jusczyk, Houston, & Newsome (1999)
888American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical225215245300.52487403
crying failure to look at the light restlessness
7.511
{tar vice} {ray prize}
0embedded1
The man put away his old guitar. Your guitar is in the studio. That red guitar is brand new. The pink guitar is mine. Give the girl the plain guitar. Her guitar is too fancy. Your device can do a lot. Her device only fixes things. My new red device makes ice cream. The pink device sews clothes. We don’t need that old device. I think it is a plain device. The lady is wearing an old beret. She gave her plain beret to the clerk. Your beret is colorful and new. The red beret belongs to Jacques. Your mother bought a pink beret. Her beret is nice too. The big red surprise is for you. The small pink surprise is for Dawn. Your surprise will be fantastic. I think Dawn got the old surprise. Her surprise might not last long. At least she didn’t get a plain surprise.
65.833333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA22.5sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
18.4616yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory8.452.386.81.850.59477333144.12formula0.00040.7916666667
25
JusczykHoustonNewsome1999
Jusczyk, P.W., Houston, D.M., & Newsome, M. (1999). The beginnings of word segmentation in English-learning infants. Cognitive Psychology, 39(3), 159-207. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1999.0716
Jusczyk, Houston, & Newsome (1999)
999American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical227216246300.41666666672498203
crying restlessness parental interference equipment failure failure to look at the light
7.500
{tar vice} {ray prize}
0embedded1
The man put away his old guitar. Your guitar is in the studio. That red guitar is brand new. The pink guitar is mine. Give the girl the plain guitar. Her guitar is too fancy. Your device can do a lot. Her device only fixes things. My new red device makes ice cream. The pink device sews clothes. We don’t need that old device. I think it is a plain device. The lady is wearing an old beret. She gave her plain beret to the clerk. Your beret is colorful and new. The red beret belongs to Jacques. Your mother bought a pink beret. Her beret is nice too. The big red surprise is for you. The small pink surprise is for Dawn. Your surprise will be fantastic. I think Dawn got the old surprise. Her surprise might not last long. At least she didn’t get a plain surprise.
65.833333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA18.46sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
22.512no45HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory10.883.769.742.870.59065874661.8formula0.080.6666666667
26
JusczykHoustonNewsome1999
Jusczyk, P.W., Houston, D.M., & Newsome, M. (1999). The beginnings of word segmentation in English-learning infants. Cognitive Psychology, 39(3), 159-207. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1999.0716
Jusczyk, Houston, & Newsome (1999)
101010American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical224216245290.416666666724102203crying7.511
{tar vice} {ray prize}
0embedded1
Your guitar is really a fine instrument. But she says that the old guitar is great. In the attic her guitar is hidden away. My pink guitar is not nearly as special. I think that a red guitar is better looking. But if you want to play a plain guitar is fine. She looks for her device to start the project. That old device to bake the bread is broken. It would be wise to try your device to begin. Give the red device to him if you are busy. A plain device to do the job is better. We should bring the pink device to the rescue. Susie is buying her beret on credit. That red beret on the shelf might do. She asked the clerk to put the pink beret on. It was next to the plain beret on the counter. The old beret on the model is my favorite. Your beret on her is very chic. We’ve got a big surprise in store for you. Her surprise in the barn is big too. But it will be a very plain surprise in the box. Your surprise in the closet is very exciting. We hid this red surprise in Joan’s house. The pink surprise in the hallway will astonish you.
23.333333330femaleIDSNA18.46sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
23.6212no45HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory9.684.2610.63.690.3236178885-0.97formula0.340.4166666667
27
JusczykHoustonNewsome1999
Jusczyk, P.W., Houston, D.M., & Newsome, M. (1999). The beginnings of word segmentation in English-learning infants. Cognitive Psychology, 39(3), 159-207. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1999.0716
Jusczyk, Houston, & Newsome (1999)
111111American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical227216238220.541666666724117603crying restlessness7.511
{taris viceto}{rayon prizin}
0reparse2
Your guitar is really a fine instrument. But she says that the old guitar is great. In the attic her guitar is hidden away. My pink guitar is not nearly as special. I think that a red guitar is better looking. But if you want to play a plain guitar is fine. She looks for her device to start the project. That old device to bake the bread is broken. It would be wise to try your device to begin. Give the red device to him if you are busy. A plain device to do the job is better. We should bring the pink device to the rescue. Susie is buying her beret on credit. That red beret on the shelf might do. She asked the clerk to put the pink beret on. It was next to the plain beret on the counter. The old beret on the model is my favorite. Your beret on her is very chic. We’ve got a big surprise in store for you. Her surprise in the barn is big too. But it will be a very plain surprise in the box. Your surprise in the closet is very exciting. We hid this red surprise in Joan’s house. The pink surprise in the hallway will astonish you.
23.333333330femaleIDSNA21.72sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
23.6212no45HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory10.942.28.952.440.059929336673.06formula0.0050.75
28
JusczykHoustonNewsome1999
Jusczyk, P.W., Houston, D.M., & Newsome, M. (1999). The beginnings of word segmentation in English-learning infants. Cognitive Psychology, 39(3), 159-207. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1999.0716
Jusczyk, Houston, & Newsome (1999)
121212American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical319302336340.524125303crying restlessness10.512
{guitar device} {beret surprise}
1match2
The man put away his old guitar. Your guitar is in the studio. That red guitar is brand new. The pink guitar is mine. Give the girl the plain guitar. Her guitar is too fancy. Your device can do a lot. Her device only fixes things. My new red device makes ice cream. The pink device sews clothes. We don’t need that old device. I think it is a plain device. The lady is wearing an old beret. She gave her plain beret to the clerk. Your beret is colorful and new. The red beret belongs to Jacques. Your mother bought a pink beret. Her beret is nice too. The big red surprise is for you. The small pink surprise is for Dawn. Your surprise will be fantastic. I think Dawn got the old surprise. Her surprise might not last long. At least she didn’t get a plain surprise.
65.833333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA21.22sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
18.4616yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory7.482.186.172.170.75205174784.19formula0.00040.75
29
JusczykHoustonNewsome1999
Jusczyk, P.W., Houston, D.M., & Newsome, M. (1999). The beginnings of word segmentation in English-learning infants. Cognitive Psychology, 39(3), 159-207. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1999.0716
Jusczyk, Houston, & Newsome (1999)
131313American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical319299349500.458333333324134113
crying restlessness looking time below criterion parental interference
10.512
{tar vice} {ray prize}
0embedded1
The man put away his old guitar. Your guitar is in the studio. That red guitar is brand new. The pink guitar is mine. Give the girl the plain guitar. Her guitar is too fancy. Your device can do a lot. Her device only fixes things. My new red device makes ice cream. The pink device sews clothes. We don’t need that old device. I think it is a plain device. The lady is wearing an old beret. She gave her plain beret to the clerk. Your beret is colorful and new. The red beret belongs to Jacques. Your mother bought a pink beret. Her beret is nice too. The big red surprise is for you. The small pink surprise is for Dawn. Your surprise will be fantastic. I think Dawn got the old surprise. Her surprise might not last long. At least she didn’t get a plain surprise.
65.833333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA22.5sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
18.4616yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory7.362.476.792.460.56175194041.21formula0.240.5416666667
30
JusczykHoustonNewsome1999
Jusczyk, P.W., Houston, D.M., & Newsome, M. (1999). The beginnings of word segmentation in English-learning infants. Cognitive Psychology, 39(3), 159-207. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1999.0716
Jusczyk, Houston, & Newsome (1999)
141414American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical315304325210.291666666724143103crying restlessness10.512
{taris viceto}{rayon prizin}
0reparse2
Your guitar is really a fine instrument. But she says that the old guitar is great. In the attic her guitar is hidden away. My pink guitar is not nearly as special. I think that a red guitar is better looking. But if you want to play a plain guitar is fine. She looks for her device to start the project. That old device to bake the bread is broken. It would be wise to try your device to begin. Give the red device to him if you are busy. A plain device to do the job is better. We should bring the pink device to the rescue. Susie is buying her beret on credit. That red beret on the shelf might do. She asked the clerk to put the pink beret on. It was next to the plain beret on the counter. The old beret on the model is my favorite. Your beret on her is very chic. We’ve got a big surprise in store for you. Her surprise in the barn is big too. But it will be a very plain surprise in the box. Your surprise in the closet is very exciting. We hid this red surprise in Joan’s house. The pink surprise in the hallway will astonish you.
23.333333330femaleIDSNA21.72sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
23.6212no45HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory8.683.898.733.520.7345134886-0.09formula0.940.5
31
JusczykHoustonNewsome1999
Jusczyk, P.W., Houston, D.M., & Newsome, M. (1999). The beginnings of word segmentation in English-learning infants. Cognitive Psychology, 39(3), 159-207. DOI: 10.1006/cogp.1999.0716
Jusczyk, Houston, & Newsome (1999)
151515American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical321311349380.666666666724156013
restlessness failing to look to little on average failing to look at light in general
10.512
{guitar device} {beret surprise}
1match2
Your guitar is really a fine instrument. But she says that the old guitar is great. In the attic her guitar is hidden away. My pink guitar is not nearly as special. I think that a red guitar is better looking. But if you want to play a plain guitar is fine. She looks for her device to start the project. That old device to bake the bread is broken. It would be wise to try your device to begin. Give the red device to him if you are busy. A plain device to do the job is better. We should bring the pink device to the rescue. Susie is buying her beret on credit. That red beret on the shelf might do. She asked the clerk to put the pink beret on. It was next to the plain beret on the counter. The old beret on the model is my favorite. Your beret on her is very chic. We’ve got a big surprise in store for you. Her surprise in the barn is big too. But it will be a very plain surprise in the box. Your surprise in the closet is very exciting. We hid this red surprise in Joan’s house. The pink surprise in the hallway will astonish you.
23.333333330femaleIDSNA21.22sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
23.6216yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory8.692.956.722.190.76204212525.05formula0.00090.8333333333
32
HoustonJusczyk2000
Houston, D.M. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2000).The role of talker-specific information in word segmentation by infants. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 26(5), 1570-1582. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.26.5.1570
Houston & Jusczyk (2000)111American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical2302162473136112073
crying failure to complete the full set of test trials due to restlesness (fussyness??) failure to look for an average of at least 3s to each stimulus type extreme left-side bias equipment failure
7.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNANA
other.female
IDSNAvoice19.5416yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory8.392.027.532.74none4.210.040.6666666667
33
HoustonJusczyk2000
Houston, D.M. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2000).The role of talker-specific information in word segmentation by infants. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 26(5), 1570-1582. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.26.5.1570
Houston & Jusczyk (2000)222American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical2302132523936214093
crying failure to complete the full set of test trials failure to look for an average of at least 3s to each stimulus type looking only to one side
7.511
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333eitherIDSNANA
other.sex
IDSysex19.22516yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory7.732.467.722.53none0.500.50.6111111111
34
HoustonJusczyk2000
Houston, D.M. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2000).The role of talker-specific information in word segmentation by infants. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 26(5), 1570-1582. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.26.5.1570
Houston & Jusczyk (2000)333American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical237210285752437023
crying failure to complete the full set of test trials failure to look for an average of at least 3s to each stimulus type parental interference equipment failure
7.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333maleIDSNANA
other.male
IDSNAvoice19.2316yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory8.53.17.13.61none7.300.0190.75
35
HoustonJusczyk2000
Houston, D.M. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2000).The role of talker-specific information in word segmentation by infants. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 26(5), 1570-1582. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.26.5.1570
Houston & Jusczyk (2000)444American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical3213043433932415053
crying failure to complete the full set of test trials equipment failure experimenter error
10.512
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333eitherIDSNANA
other.sex
IDSosex19.22516yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory7.222.456.252.38none6.450.0190.65625
36
HoustonJusczykKuijpersCoolenCutler2000
Houston, D.M., Jusczyk, P.W., Kuijpers, C., Coolen, R., & Cutler, A. (2000). Cross-language word segmentation by 9-month-olds. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 7(3), 504-509. DOI: 10.3758/BF03214363
Houston et al. (2000)211_DutchDutchnativeTRUEtypical281275294190.416666666724
1_Dutch
2816.873
crying LT averaging less than 3 sec to the passages not interested or resltess equipment failure exp error parental interference; they explain that the better success rate for the Am lab could be explained by more stringent criteria for time of day scheduling
900
{bokser karper}{pendel kusten}
0match2
De bokser moet wel een erg sterke man zijn. Hij is de beste bokser van de hele wereld. E!ke dag gaat hij trainen met een andere bokser. Die bokser is echter veel gespierder dan hij. Soms moet hij vechten tegen een nieuwe bokser. Dat is geen oude bokser maar een jonge. Die pendel ligt op het bureau van mijn oom. Hij is dan ook erg trots op de beste pendel. Volgens hem is het al een heel oude pendel. Hij vindt deze nieuwe pendel iets minder apart. De pendel heeft hij in een dure zaak gekocht. Ik heb de andere pendel ook wel eens gebruikt. De karper zwemt in de vijver bij de school. De jongen wil de nieuwe karper gaan vangen. Dan ziet de meester nog een andere karper. Hij moet nu de beste karper met rust laten. Die karper zal nog een hele tijd blijven leven. Nu gaan ze op de foto met de oude karper. De kusten zijn hier bebouwd met hoge hotels. Aan de andere kusten zijn erg veel toeristen. Met de boot varen zij langs de nieuwe kusten. De visser kent alle oude kusten van dit land. Die kusten zijn nog niet door de gasten ontdekt. Morgen ga ik vissen bij de beste kusten.
NA0.3333333333femaleIDSNA21.5femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
2016yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificantr² .1417.32.276.312.310.41029850081.95formula0.040.6666666667
37
HoustonSantelmann2004Jusczyk
Houston, D.M., Santelmann, L., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2004). English-learning infants’ segmentation of trisyllabic words from fluent speech. Language and Cognitive Processes, 19(1), 97-136. DOI: 10.1080/01690960344000143
Houston et al. (2004)111_EnglishAmerican EnglishnonnativeFALSEJusczyktypical280263299360.466666666730
1_English
127.233
as above notice that since fussouts/noncriterion are not divided by country I just did it proportional to the overall exclusion rate
900
{bokser karper}{pendel kusten}
0match2
De bokser moet wel een erg sterke man zijn. Hij is de beste bokser van de hele wereld. E!ke dag gaat hij trainen met een andere bokser. Die bokser is echter veel gespierder dan hij. Soms moet hij vechten tegen een nieuwe bokser. Dat is geen oude bokser maar een jonge. Die pendel ligt op het bureau van mijn oom. Hij is dan ook erg trots op de beste pendel. Volgens hem is het al een heel oude pendel. Hij vindt deze nieuwe pendel iets minder apart. De pendel heeft hij in een dure zaak gekocht. Ik heb de andere pendel ook wel eens gebruikt. De karper zwemt in de vijver bij de school. De jongen wil de nieuwe karper gaan vangen. Dan ziet de meester nog een andere karper. Hij moet nu de beste karper met rust laten. Die karper zal nog een hele tijd blijven leven. Nu gaan ze op de foto met de oude karper. De kusten zijn hier bebouwd met hoge hotels. Aan de andere kusten zijn erg veel toeristen. Met de boot varen zij langs de nieuwe kusten. De visser kent alle oude kusten van dit land. Die kusten zijn nog niet door de gasten ontdekt. Morgen ga ik vissen bij de beste kusten.
NANAfemaleIDSNA21.5sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
2016yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratoryr² .1427.292.276.612.960.82019808652.19formula0.040.6666666667
38
MattysJusczyk2001
Mattys, S.L. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2001). Do infants segment words or recurring contiguous patterns?. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27(3), 644. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.27.3.644
Mattys & Jusczyk (2001)111American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical245230258280.37524110803
restless (6) they cried (2) they did not look at the lights (1) or because the computer failed (1).
8.500
dice cash boats seal
0reparse1
d#ice# Weird ice no longer surprises anyone. The experts soon detected that it was flawed ice. The city truck cleared ice and sand from the sidewalk. The rink had been sprinkled with spread ice. Fluid ice is a difficult concept to grasp. Merchants used to trade ice for water. c#ash# Dark ash comes from strong old trees. Sooner or later everyone will begin to like ash. In a fireplace nobody likes to see fake ash. Builders sometimes pack ash in basements. The worker took ash and sand from the cave. Pink ash is becoming difficult to find. b#oats# Crib oats were rather mysterious until recently. People thought they were similar to scab oats. The cheapest kind was called club oats. Knob oats were used to make the cereal. Today we weed the shrub oats in our yard. Jack was told not to plant web oats. s#eel# The nice eel was put on display for months. But people preferred the famous space eel. Very soon it would be a loose eel again. Sophia found a brass eel in an antique shop. This eel was more expensive than she thought. It was lying next to a coarse eel.
NA0.3333333333femaleIDSNANAfemaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
NA16yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory7.142.196.82.52none1.210.28
39
MattysJusczyk2001
Mattys, S.L. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2001). Do infants segment words or recurring contiguous patterns?. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27(3), 644. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.27.3.644
Mattys & Jusczyk (2001)222American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical250224258340.54166666672428503
infants cried (5) they did not to look at the lights (1) or because the computer failed (2)
8.500
dice cash boats seal
0reparse1
d#ice# Weird ice no longer surprises anyone. The experts soon detected that it was flawed ice. The city truck cleared ice and sand from the sidewalk. The rink had been sprinkled with spread ice. Fluid ice is a difficult concept to grasp. Merchants used to trade ice for water. c#ash# Dark ash comes from strong old trees. Sooner or later everyone will begin to like ash. In a fireplace nobody likes to see fake ash. Builders sometimes pack ash in basements. The worker took ash and sand from the cave. Pink ash is becoming difficult to find. b#oats# Crib oats were rather mysterious until recently. People thought they were similar to scab oats. The cheapest kind was called club oats. Knob oats were used to make the cereal. Today we weed the shrub oats in our yard. Jack was told not to plant web oats. s#eel# The nice eel was put on display for months. But people preferred the famous space eel. Very soon it would be a loose eel again. Sophia found a brass eel in an antique shop. This eel was more expensive than she thought. It was lying next to a coarse eel.
NA0.3333333333femaleIDSNA18.74femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
18.4216yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificant7.242.1561.82none6.790.019
40
MattysJusczyk2001
Mattys, S.L. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2001). Do infants segment words or recurring contiguous patterns?. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27(3), 644. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.27.3.644
Mattys & Jusczyk (2001)333American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical251243262190.6252434403restlessness crying8.511
ice ash oats eel
0match1
d#ice# Weird ice no longer surprises anyone. The experts soon detected that it was flawed ice. The city truck cleared ice and sand from the sidewalk. The rink had been sprinkled with spread ice. Fluid ice is a difficult concept to grasp. Merchants used to trade ice for water. c#ash# Dark ash comes from strong old trees. Sooner or later everyone will begin to like ash. In a fireplace nobody likes to see fake ash. Builders sometimes pack ash in basements. The worker took ash and sand from the cave. Pink ash is becoming difficult to find. b#oats# Crib oats were rather mysterious until recently. People thought they were similar to scab oats. The cheapest kind was called club oats. Knob oats were used to make the cereal. Today we weed the shrub oats in our yard. Jack was told not to plant web oats. s#eel# The nice eel was put on display for months. But people preferred the famous space eel. Very soon it would be a loose eel again. Sophia found a brass eel in an antique shop. This eel was more expensive than she thought. It was lying next to a coarse eel.
NA0.3333333333femaleIDSNA16.44femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
18.4216yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificant6.52.826.482.21none0.500.5
41
MattysJusczyk2001
Mattys, S.L. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2001). Do infants segment words or recurring contiguous patterns?. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27(3), 644. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.27.3.644
Mattys & Jusczyk (2001)444American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical257240274340.45833333332445213
e infants were restless (1) they cried (1) they did not look at the lights (1) they did not look to each side for an average of 3 s (1) or because the computer failed (1).
8.500
ice ash oats eel
0match1
#ice# Weird ice no longer surprises anyone. The experts soon detected that it was fake ice. The city truck left ice and sand on the sidewalk. The rink had been sprinkled with some ice. Fool ice is a difficult concept to grasp. Merchants used to give ice for water. #ash# Dark ash comes from strong old trees. Sooner or later everyone will begin to keep ash. In a fireplace nobody likes to see white ash. Builders sometimes store ash in basements. The worker dug ash and sand from the cave. Wood ash is becoming difficult to find. #oats# Crib oats were rather mysterious until recently. People thought they were similar to wheel oats. The cheapest kind was called mock oats. Deep oats were used to make the cereal. Today we weed the smooth oats in our yard. Jack was told not to plant clog oats. The nice eel was put on display for months. But people preferred the famous cat eel. Very soon it would be a swamp eel again. Sophia found a big eel in an antique shop. That eel was more expensive than she thought. It was lying next to a stone eel.
65.833333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA18.04femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
17.816yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory6.481.986.12.22none0.500.5
42
MattysJusczyk2001
Mattys, S.L. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2001). Do infants segment words or recurring contiguous patterns?. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27(3), 644. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.27.3.644
Mattys & Jusczyk (2001)555American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical316290341510.58333333332453003
no looking; computer failure
10.51NA
ice ash oats eel
0match1
d#ice# Weird ice no longer surprises anyone. The experts soon detected that it was flawed ice. The city truck cleared ice and sand from the sidewalk. The rink had been sprinkled with spread ice. Fluid ice is a difficult concept to grasp. Merchants used to trade ice for water. c#ash# Dark ash comes from strong old trees. Sooner or later everyone will begin to like ash. In a fireplace nobody likes to see fake ash. Builders sometimes pack ash in basements. The worker took ash and sand from the cave. Pink ash is becoming difficult to find. b#oats# Crib oats were rather mysterious until recently. People thought they were similar to scab oats. The cheapest kind was called club oats. Knob oats were used to make the cereal. Today we weed the shrub oats in our yard. Jack was told not to plant web oats. s#eel# The nice eel was put on display for months. But people preferred the famous space eel. Very soon it would be a loose eel again. Sophia found a brass eel in an antique shop. This eel was more expensive than she thought. It was lying next to a coarse eel.
NA0.3333333333femaleIDSNA16.44femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
18.4216yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory6.581.846.422.16none0.500.5
43
MattysJusczyk2001
Mattys, S.L. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2001). Do infants segment words or recurring contiguous patterns?. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27(3), 644. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.27.3.644
Mattys & Jusczyk (2001)666American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical398391413220.58333333332464213
restless; crying; non-criterion; not looking at all
131NA
ice ash oats eel
0match1
d#ice# Weird ice no longer surprises anyone. The experts soon detected that it was flawed ice. The city truck cleared ice and sand from the sidewalk. The rink had been sprinkled with spread ice. Fluid ice is a difficult concept to grasp. Merchants used to trade ice for water. c#ash# Dark ash comes from strong old trees. Sooner or later everyone will begin to like ash. In a fireplace nobody likes to see fake ash. Builders sometimes pack ash in basements. The worker took ash and sand from the cave. Pink ash is becoming difficult to find. b#oats# Crib oats were rather mysterious until recently. People thought they were similar to scab oats. The cheapest kind was called club oats. Knob oats were used to make the cereal. Today we weed the shrub oats in our yard. Jack was told not to plant web oats. s#eel# The nice eel was put on display for months. But people preferred the famous space eel. Very soon it would be a loose eel again. Sophia found a brass eel in an antique shop. This eel was more expensive than she thought. It was lying next to a coarse eel.
NA0.3333333333femaleIDSNA16.44femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
18.4216yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory6.883.087.333.02none0.500.5
44
MattysJusczyk2001
Mattys, S.L. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2001). Do infants segment words or recurring contiguous patterns?. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27(3), 644. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.27.3.644
Mattys & Jusczyk (2001)777American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical481469491220.52477303
restless; crying; non-criterion; not looking at all; computer failed
1612
ice ash oats eel
0match1
d#ice# Weird ice no longer surprises anyone. The experts soon detected that it was flawed ice. The city truck cleared ice and sand from the sidewalk. The rink had been sprinkled with spread ice. Fluid ice is a difficult concept to grasp. Merchants used to trade ice for water. c#ash# Dark ash comes from strong old trees. Sooner or later everyone will begin to like ash. In a fireplace nobody likes to see fake ash. Builders sometimes pack ash in basements. The worker took ash and sand from the cave. Pink ash is becoming difficult to find. b#oats# Crib oats were rather mysterious until recently. People thought they were similar to scab oats. The cheapest kind was called club oats. Knob oats were used to make the cereal. Today we weed the shrub oats in our yard. Jack was told not to plant web oats. s#eel# The nice eel was put on display for months. But people preferred the famous space eel. Very soon it would be a loose eel again. Sophia found a brass eel in an antique shop. This eel was more expensive than she thought. It was lying next to a coarse eel.
NA0.3333333333femaleIDSNA16.44femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
18.4216yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory7.22.566.093.04none6.240.02
45
MattysJusczyk2001
Mattys, S.L. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2001). Do infants segment words or recurring contiguous patterns?. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27(3), 644. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.27.3.644
Mattys & Jusczyk (2001)888American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical483472500280.52486423
restless (2) they cried (2) they did not look to each side for an average of 3 s (2).
1600
dice cash boats seal
0reparse1
d#ice# Weird ice no longer surprises anyone. The experts soon detected that it was flawed ice. The city truck cleared ice and sand from the sidewalk. The rink had been sprinkled with spread ice. Fluid ice is a difficult concept to grasp. Merchants used to trade ice for water. c#ash# Dark ash comes from strong old trees. Sooner or later everyone will begin to like ash. In a fireplace nobody likes to see fake ash. Builders sometimes pack ash in basements. The worker took ash and sand from the cave. Pink ash is becoming difficult to find. b#oats# Crib oats were rather mysterious until recently. People thought they were similar to scab oats. The cheapest kind was called club oats. Knob oats were used to make the cereal. Today we weed the shrub oats in our yard. Jack was told not to plant web oats. s#eel# The nice eel was put on display for months. But people preferred the famous space eel. Very soon it would be a loose eel again. Sophia found a brass eel in an antique shop. This eel was more expensive than she thought. It was lying next to a coarse eel.
NA0.3333333333femaleIDSNANAfemaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
NA16yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory7.473.227.382.55none0.50
46
MattysJusczyk2001b
Mattys, S.L. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2001b). Phonotactic cues for segmentation of fluent speech by infants. Cognition, 78(2), 91-121. DOI: 10.1016/S0010-0277(00)00109-8
Mattys & Jusczyk (2001b)111American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical280260312520.45833333332415100
crying computer failure
900
gaffe tove; control: pod fooz
0match1
A.1.1. Phonotactic cues present (the test word is bordered by between-word clusters) GAFFE (duration: 22.25 s)The army is trying a new bean gaffe hold next week. The old pine gaffe house tends to break too often. Of course everyone knows the main gaffe hoist is worn. A spun gaffe heads the list of new inventions. Still some think that a stone gaffe hod is better.A lean gaffe hall is being used for now. TOVE (duration: 22.16 s)A brave tove trusts most forest animals. Few people know that a live tove takes so much care. Some think that an eve tove twists old wheat stalks. The mauve tove tree is hidden in the jungle. Spies are interested in the dove tove territories. On sunny days a groove tove tires very quickly.A.1.2. Phonotactic cues absent (the test word is bordered by within-word clusters)GAFFE (duration: 22.41 s)The army is trying a new fang gaffe tine next week. The old tong gaffe tends to break too often. Of course everyone knows the king gaffe tool is worn. A wrung gaffe tops the list of new inventions. Still some think that a strong gaffe tin is better. A hang gaffe tote is being used for the moment. TOVE (duration: 22.35 s)A gruff tove knows most forest animals. Not many people know that a calf tove needs so much care. Some believe that a skiff tove nibbles old wheat stalks. The roof tove nest is hidden in the jungle. Many scientists are interested in buff tove naval stories. On most sunny days a leaf tove naps quickly.
NA0femaleNANA22.225femaleNANA
not.manipulated
NA12no45HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory
LT presented per word effect driven by one fam word with useful phonotactic cues. Novel words presented separately.
NANANANAnone9.79
47
MattysJusczyk2001b
Mattys, S.L. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2001b). Phonotactic cues for segmentation of fluent speech by infants. Cognition, 78(2), 91-121. DOI: 10.1016/S0010-0277(00)00109-8
Mattys & Jusczyk (2001b)222American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical274256294380.70833333332423200
crying computer failure
900
gaffe tove; control: pod fooz
0match1
A.2.1. Phonotactic cues present only at onset (the test word has a between-word cluster at onset and a within-word cluster at offset)GAFFE (duration: 25.14 s)The army is trying a new bean gaffe tine next week. The old pine gaffe tends to break too often. Of course everyone knows the main gaffe tool is worn. A spun gaffe tops the list of new inventions. Still some think that a stone gaffe tin is better. A lean gaffe tote is being used for now.TOVE (duration: 24.36 s) A brave tove knows most forest animals. Few people know that a live tove needs so much care. Some think that an eve tove nibbles old wheat stalks. The mauve tove nest is hidden in the jungle. Spies are interested in the dove tove naval stories. On sunny days a groove tove naps very quickly.
A.2.2. Phonotactic cues absent (same as in Experiment 1)GAFFE (duration: 25.12 s) TOVE (duration: 26.05 s)
NA0
female (diff from E1)
NANA25.1675
female (diff from E1)
NANA
not.manipulated
NA12no45HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory
LT presented per word effect driven by one fam word with useful phonotactic cues. Novel words presented separately.
NANANANAnone6.67
48
MattysJusczyk2001b
Mattys, S.L. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2001b). Phonotactic cues for segmentation of fluent speech by infants. Cognition, 78(2), 91-121. DOI: 10.1016/S0010-0277(00)00109-8
Mattys & Jusczyk (2001b)333American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical273252308560.33333333332435100
crying computer failure failure to look at the flashing light
900
gaffe tove; control: pod fooz
0match1
A.3.1. Phonotactic cues present only at offset (the test word has a within-word cluster at onset and a between-word cluster at offset)GAFFE (duration: 24.66 s)The army is trying a new fang gaffe hold next week. The old tong gaffe house tends to break too often. Of course everyone knows the king gaffe hoist is worn. A wrung gaffe heads the list of new inventions. Still some think that a strong gaffe hod is better. A hang gaffe hall is being used for now.TOVE (duration: 24.42 s)A gruff tove trusts most forest animals. Few people know that a calf tove takes so much care. Some think that an stiff tove twists old wheat stalks. The roof tove tree is hidden in the jungle. Spies are interested in the buff tove territories. On sunny days a leaf tove tires very quickly. A.3.2. Phonotactic cues absent
(same as in Experiment 1)GAFFE (duration: 25.12 s)TOVE (duration: 26.05 s)
NA0
female (diff from E1)
NANA25.0625
female (diff from E1)
NANA
not.manipulated
NA12no45HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory
LT presented per word effect driven by one fam word with useful phonotactic cues. Novel words presented separately.
NANANANAnone3.64
49
HoustonJusczyk2003
Houston, D.M. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2003). Infants' long-term memory for the sound patterns of words and voices. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 29(6), 1143-1154. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.29.6.1143
Houston & Jusczyk (2003)111American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical233216249330.58333333332418413
failure to complete the full set of test trials due to restlessness and/or crying (4) failure to look for an average of at least 3 s to each stimulus type (2) ear infection (1) and equipment failure (1)
7.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA26.5sameIDSNAmatch19.716yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory has reliability info9.733.688.13.670.82662735863.69formula0.0090.8333333333
50
HoustonJusczyk2003
Houston, D.M. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2003). Infants' long-term memory for the sound patterns of words and voices. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 29(6), 1143-1154. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.29.6.1143
Houston & Jusczyk (2003)233_trainedTalkerAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical225212250380.437532
3_trainedTalker
00007.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA26.5
different female
IDSNAvoice18.616yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificant10.143.459.033.18none4.370.04
51
HoustonJusczyk2003
Houston, D.M. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2003). Infants' long-term memory for the sound patterns of words and voices. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 29(6), 1143-1154. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.29.6.1143
Houston & Jusczyk (2003)333_newTalkerAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical225212250380.437532
3_newTalker
00007.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA26.5
different female
IDSNAvoice18.616yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory8.172.826.972.64none5.160.03
52
HoustonJusczyk2003
Houston, D.M. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2003). Infants' long-term memory for the sound patterns of words and voices. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 29(6), 1143-1154. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.29.6.1143
Houston & Jusczyk (2003)422_10.5American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical324313343300.5242_10.59713
failure to complete the full set of test trials due to restlessness and/or crying (4) failure to look for an average of at least 3 s to each stimulus type (3) and experimenter error (2)
10.512
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA26.5
different female
IDSovoice18.616yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificant7.113.257.113.1none0.50.625
53
HoustonJusczykKuijpersCoolenCutler2000
Houston, D.M., Jusczyk, P.W., Kuijpers, C., Coolen, R., & Cutler, A. (2000). Cross-language word segmentation by 9-month-olds. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 7(3), 504-509. DOI: 10.3758/BF03214363
Houston et al. (2000)122_7.5American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical230218246280.4166666667242_7.52100
crying experimenter error
7.511
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA26.5
different female
IDSyvoice18.616yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory8.673.28.732.97none0.50.5416666667
54
Johnsonetal2003
Johnson, E.K., Jusczyk, P.W., Cutler, A., & Norris, D. (2003). Lexical viability constraints on speech segmentation by infants. Cognitive Psychology, 46(1), 65-97. DOI: 10.1016/S0010-0285(02)00507-8
Johnson et al. (2003)Lexical111_non-viableAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical364350387370.562532
1_non-viable
2.500.53
crying parental interference not meeting criterion of listening at least 3s during test
1200
{lop rush}{rack win}
0embedded1impossible containers for target wordsNANAfemaleIDSNA16.62sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
16.0512NA30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory
estimated t<1 with t = 0.5
NANANANA0.5none0.50.5
55
Johnsonetal2003
Johnson, E.K., Jusczyk, P.W., Cutler, A., & Norris, D. (2003). Lexical viability constraints on speech segmentation by infants. Cognitive Psychology, 46(1), 65-97. DOI: 10.1016/S0010-0285(02)00507-8
Johnson et al. (2003)Lexical111_viableAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical364350387370.562532
1_viable
2.500.53
crying parental interference not meeting criterion of listening at least 3s during test
1200
{lop rush}{rack win}
0embedded1possible containers for target wordsNANAfemaleIDSNA16.62sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
21.3512NA30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratoryNANANANA3.11none0.0090.8125
56
Johnsonetal2003
Johnson, E.K., Jusczyk, P.W., Cutler, A., & Norris, D. (2003). Lexical viability constraints on speech segmentation by infants. Cognitive Psychology, 46(1), 65-97. DOI: 10.1016/S0010-0285(02)00507-8
Johnson et al. (2003)Lexical222_viableAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical365351380290.62532
2_viable
4.5013
crying parental interference not meeting criterion of listening at least 3s during test
1200
{dull fill}{moss tan}
0embedded1possible containers for target wordsNANAfemaleIDSNA16.46sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
21.3312NA30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificant
estimated t<1 with t = 0.5
NANANANA0.5none0.50.5
57
Johnsonetal2003
Johnson, E.K., Jusczyk, P.W., Cutler, A., & Norris, D. (2003). Lexical viability constraints on speech segmentation by infants. Cognitive Psychology, 46(1), 65-97. DOI: 10.1016/S0010-0285(02)00507-8
Johnson et al. (2003)Lexical222_non-viableAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical365351380290.62532
2_non-viable
4.5013
crying parental interference not meeting criterion of listening at least 3s during test
1200
{dull fill}{moss tan}
0embedded1impossible containers for target wordsNANAfemaleIDSNA16.46sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
15.9212NA30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_two
nonsignificant
NANANANA2.36none0.040.75
58
Johnsonetal2003
Johnson, E.K., Jusczyk, P.W., Cutler, A., & Norris, D. (2003). Lexical viability constraints on speech segmentation by infants. Cognitive Psychology, 46(1), 65-97. DOI: 10.1016/S0010-0285(02)00507-8
Johnson et al. (2003)Lexical333_impossibleAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical366353383300.540
3_impossible
1.500.53
crying not meeting criterion of listening at least 3s during test
1200
{lay rise}{low rest}
0embedded1
That slow turtle claims to have beaten the speedy hare in a race. Mr. Matt Plo did not take the news of his defeat very well. The unexpected blow to his ego was a real shock to him. I put the star shaped sticker on the ceiling and watched it glow. The shy winner quailed at the huge flow of racing enthusiasts. The proud young robin puffed out its vivid scarlet breast and sang. Our uniforms were taken to the dry cleaner’s to be cleaned and pressed. The little bird with the odd crest really drew our attention. We had dressed warmly for our weekend hiking trip in the mountains. Our guide had stressed the importance of bringing plenty of water. At harvest time we worked alongside the farmers that flay the wheat. I think we all felt that the first play we saw was simply riveting. Afterwards we made all sorts of silly creatures with the bright clay. Her hair would splay across her shoulders whenever she brushed it. A white sleigh carried the exuberant actors off of the stage. Some fresh hot fries would taste wonderful with a chocolate milkshake. I found a wonderful prize in my box of caramel popcorn. Sun dries our laundry as quickly as any machine can do it. Our most recent announcements were met with happy shouts and cries. Every parent tries to teach their children good eating habits.
00femaleIDSNA16.22sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
22.4512yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_two
nonsignificant
estimated t<1 with t = 0.5
NANANANA0.5none0.50.3
59
Johnsonetal2003
Johnson, E.K., Jusczyk, P.W., Cutler, A., & Norris, D. (2003). Lexical viability constraints on speech segmentation by infants. Cognitive Psychology, 46(1), 65-97. DOI: 10.1016/S0010-0285(02)00507-8
Johnson et al. (2003)Lexical333_possibleAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical366353383300.540
3_possible
1.500.53
crying not meeting criterion of listening at least 3s during test
1200
{lay rise}{low rest}
0embedded1
My boss granted me the furlough I spent in the Great Lakes Region. In Buffalo there is a gigantic grocery store called Wegman’s. I say hello to the friendly stock boy every time I go there. Its often below zero degrees up there near Canada. The tall willow I like parking under shelters my car from the snow. The warm breeze caressed us as we neared the summit that afternoon. We progressed on schedule until we saw the wild billy goats. Our presence caused some unrest when the herd leader spotted us watching. The new bulb I put in our aquarium hood fluoresced brightly. Now I am saving my nickels and dimes to vacation in Bucharest. They should relay the message to our parents in the countryside. During the winter we go to our private chalet to relax. We were expecting the delay to put us a bit behind schedule. I will mislay the directions if I am not terribly careful. The skilled dentist carefully repaired the milkman’s gold inlay. A surprise awaited us once we reached the top of the steep hill. We had to be up by sunrise in order to hear the birds sing. Problems arise when I try to read a compass before breakfast. I was overwhelmed by the detailed map I had to memorize. They will authorize another hiking adventure next summer.
00femaleIDSNA16.22sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
22.3312yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificantNANANANA3.12none0.0090.9
60
Johnsonetal2003
Johnson, E.K., Jusczyk, P.W., Cutler, A., & Norris, D. (2003). Lexical viability constraints on speech segmentation by infants. Cognitive Psychology, 46(1), 65-97. DOI: 10.1016/S0010-0285(02)00507-8
Johnson et al. (2003)Lexical444_impossibleAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical369355381260.5540
4_impossible
2.500.53
crying parental interference not meeting criterion of listening at least 3s during test
1200
{well may}{win rye}
0embedded1
We won’t welt in the sun because they made a lemonade stand. The folks who donated money for the swings have great wealth. They always bring their cute Welsh Terriers when they visit us. The construction workers must weld together the metal frame. A boy playing in the sand found the remains of a white whelk. The cold wind caused icicles to form along the rooftop edge. Every time we reached the top of the big green hill I would wince. The first team to reach the summit and get the puzzle assembled wins a prize. We dragged a heavy toolbox and winch through the obstacle course. Whoever lost would not cry and whinge much because it was fun. Our inherent right to travel in space is often denied. I envy the astronauts that ride to the big yellow moon. I have heard that it is made of cheese and somewhat rife with holes. If the entire place is made of food it must smell quite ripe. Their space shuttles will go over that rise in the distance. The old mate living on the ship never recycles his cans. The weekend maid told me that she was a bit surprised by this. It would make her wonder if the old man cared about the sea. Next time I get a chance I will have to send mail to her. She seems happiest when riding her horse with the tattered mane.
00femaleIDSNA15.94sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
20.0312yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_two
nonsignificant
estimated t<1 with t = 0.5
NANANANA0.5none0.50.45
61
Johnsonetal2003
Johnson, E.K., Jusczyk, P.W., Cutler, A., & Norris, D. (2003). Lexical viability constraints on speech segmentation by infants. Cognitive Psychology, 46(1), 65-97. DOI: 10.1016/S0010-0285(02)00507-8
Johnson et al. (2003)Lexical444_possibleAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical369355381260.5540
4_possible
2.500.53
crying parental interference not meeting criterion of listening at least 3s during test
1200
{well may}{win rye}
0embedded1
That welder is putting together our brand new monkey bars. A short Welsher fellow raised the money for the new playground. My teacher said he is quite wealthy but usually cheap. The mayor’s attendance at the ground breaking will cause a great welter. My best friend will arrive early because she must welcome him. The last time we visited Windsor it was rather chilly out. Even though the weather was nippy we all avoided whingeing. A bald winsome fellow was jogging in shorts and a t-shirt. Travelling in the fall and winter is easiest for us. We watched the parade from that incredibly grand window. If you look towards the stage you can see the pilot rising now. He was such a great writer even before he learned to fly planes. I guess when a man practices so much his skills must ripen. In a small jet the unfortunate rider has little space. The bright rifle case he had was just a toy made out of plastic. The card mailer wrote to let us know it would rain cats and dogs. So the highly anticipated maiden voyage was postponed. The party we have planned will surely lead to shipyard mania. The crew chief encouraged making this celebration a big deal. The bird mated and raised its chicks in a nest below the bridge.
31.666666670femaleIDSNA15.94sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
19.812yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificantNANANANA4.48none0.00090.75
62
NewmanTsayJusczyk2003
Newman, R., Tsay, J., & Jusczyk, P. (2003). The development of speech segmentation abilities. In: D. Houston, A. Seidl, G. Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.), Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk
Newman, Tsay, & Jusczyk (2003)
111American EnglishnonnativeFALSEJusczyktypical234.234210249.44439.4440.27272727271111000exp error7.500
{tou[LH] "head" bei[H] "cup"} {dan[HL] "egg" tian[H] "sky day"}
0match1
Target word: tou "head" Meige ren de tou dou bu yiyang. "Everybody's head is different." Tou keyi cangzai maozi dixia. "A head can be hidden inside a hat."Wo de hao pengyou shi Da-tou. "My best friend is Big Head."Shizi de tou hen qiguai. "The head of a lion is very weird."Tou buyao shenchu che wai. "Don't stick your head outside of the car."Linju de nanhai jiao Xiao-tou. "The neighbor's boy is called Small Head."Target word: dan "egg"Dan fangzai bingxiang li. "Eggs are put in the refrigerator."Wo mai da dan-gao gei ni. "I bought a big cake (lit. egg-cake) for you."Muji xiale haoduo dan. "The hen laid many eggs."Youxie ren bu ai chi dan. "Some people don't like eating eggs."Xiaohua ba dan dapole. "Xiaohua broke the eggs."Dan gundao zhuo-zi dixia qu le. "Eggs rolled down under the table."Target word: tian "sky day"Tian shang you ji duo baiyun. "There are some clouds in the sky."Ta tangzai dishang kan lan-tian. "He is lying on the ground looking at the sky."Women xingqi- tian qu kao rou. "We had a barbecue on Sunday (lit. week-day)."Tian kong feichang de yin'an. "The sky is very dark."Dajia dou xihuan qing tian. "Everybody likes clear days."Xiayu tian bu neng qu dongwu yuan. "One can't go to the zoo in raining days."Target word: bei "cup"Milaoshu zai zhao cha-bei. "Mickey Mouse is looking for a teacup."Zhe ge xiao bei-zi hen piaoliang. "This little cup is very pretty."Bei-zi li you guozhi. "There is juice in the cup."Bei di zuozhe yi zhi qingwa. "There is a frog sitting in the bottom of the cup."Ta ba yi da bei niunai heguangle. "He drank up a big cup of milk."Wo song ni yi ge boli bei. "I'll give you a glass cup."
NANAfemaleIDSNA26.3sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
17.416yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificant5.93.0962.390.7422597527-0.16formula0.50
63
TsayJusczyk2003
Tsay, J. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2003). Detection of words in fluent Chinese by English-acquiring and Chinese-acquiring infants. In: D. Houston, A. Seidl, G. Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.), Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk
Tsay & Jusczyk (2003)111American EnglishnonnativeFALSEJusczyktypical237213289760.58333333332413300restless7.500
{tou[LH] "head" bei[H] "cup"} {dan[HL] "egg" tian[H] "sky day"}
0match1
Target word: tou "head" Meige ren de tou dou bu yiyang. "Everybody's head is different." Tou keyi cangzai maozi dixia. "A head can be hidden inside a hat."Wo de hao pengyou shi Da-tou. "My best friend is Big Head."Shizi de tou hen qiguai. "The head of a lion is very weird."Tou buyao shenchu che wai. "Don't stick your head outside of the car."Linju de nanhai jiao Xiao-tou. "The neighbor's boy is called Small Head."Target word: dan "egg"Dan fangzai bingxiang li. "Eggs are put in the refrigerator."Wo mai da dan-gao gei ni. "I bought a big cake (lit. egg-cake) for you."Muji xiale haoduo dan. "The hen laid many eggs."Youxie ren bu ai chi dan. "Some people don't like eating eggs."Xiaohua ba dan dapole. "Xiaohua broke the eggs."Dan gundao zhuo-zi dixia qu le. "Eggs rolled down under the table."Target word: tian "sky day"Tian shang you ji duo baiyun. "There are some clouds in the sky."Ta tangzai dishang kan lan-tian. "He is lying on the ground looking at the sky."Women xingqi- tian qu kao rou. "We had a barbecue on Sunday (lit. week-day)."Tian kong feichang de yin'an. "The sky is very dark."Dajia dou xihuan qing tian. "Everybody likes clear days."Xiayu tian bu neng qu dongwu yuan. "One can't go to the zoo in raining days."Target word: bei "cup"Milaoshu zai zhao cha-bei. "Mickey Mouse is looking for a teacup."Zhe ge xiao bei-zi hen piaoliang. "This little cup is very pretty."Bei-zi li you guozhi. "There is juice in the cup."Bei di zuozhe yi zhi qingwa. "There is a frog sitting in the bottom of the cup."Ta ba yi da bei niunai heguangle. "He drank up a big cup of milk."Wo song ni yi ge boli bei. "I'll give you a glass cup."
NANAfemaleIDSNA26.3sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
17.416yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory7.322.397.431.930.6486404812-0.29formula0.08
64
TsayJusczyk2003
Tsay, J. & Jusczyk, P.W. (2003). Detection of words in fluent Chinese by English-acquiring and Chinese-acquiring infants. In: D. Houston, A. Seidl, G. Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.), Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk
Tsay & Jusczyk (2003)222MandarinnativeTRUEJusczyktypical228.15NANANA42NANANANANA7.500
{tou[LH] "head" bei[H] "cup"} {dan[HL] "egg" tian[H] "sky day"}
0match1
Target word: tou "head" Meige ren de tou dou bu yiyang. "Everybody's head is different." Tou keyi cangzai maozi dixia. "A head can be hidden inside a hat."Wo de hao pengyou shi Da-tou. "My best friend is Big Head."Shizi de tou hen qiguai. "The head of a lion is very weird."Tou buyao shenchu che wai. "Don't stick your head outside of the car."Linju de nanhai jiao Xiao-tou. "The neighbor's boy is called Small Head."Target word: dan "egg"Dan fangzai bingxiang li. "Eggs are put in the refrigerator."Wo mai da dan-gao gei ni. "I bought a big cake (lit. egg-cake) for you."Muji xiale haoduo dan. "The hen laid many eggs."Youxie ren bu ai chi dan. "Some people don't like eating eggs."Xiaohua ba dan dapole. "Xiaohua broke the eggs."Dan gundao zhuo-zi dixia qu le. "Eggs rolled down under the table."Target word: tian "sky day"Tian shang you ji duo baiyun. "There are some clouds in the sky."Ta tangzai dishang kan lan-tian. "He is lying on the ground looking at the sky."Women xingqi- tian qu kao rou. "We had a barbecue on Sunday (lit. week-day)."Tian kong feichang de yin'an. "The sky is very dark."Dajia dou xihuan qing tian. "Everybody likes clear days."Xiayu tian bu neng qu dongwu yuan. "One can't go to the zoo in raining days."Target word: bei "cup"Milaoshu zai zhao cha-bei. "Mickey Mouse is looking for a teacup."Zhe ge xiao bei-zi hen piaoliang. "This little cup is very pretty."Bei-zi li you guozhi. "There is juice in the cup."Bei di zuozhe yi zhi qingwa. "There is a frog sitting in the bottom of the cup."Ta ba yi da bei niunai heguangle. "He drank up a big cup of milk."Wo song ni yi ge boli bei. "I'll give you a glass cup."
NA0.6666666667femaleIDSNA26.3sameIDSNA
not.manipulated
17.416yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory8.213.279.153.070.9986615867-7.27formula0.0090
65
BarkerNewman2004
Barker, B.A. & Newman, R.S. (2004). Listen to your mother! The role of talker familiarity in infant streaming. Cognition 94: B45-53. DOI:10.1016/j.cognition.2004.06.001
Barker & Newman (2004)111_motherAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical226.3248199.8594255.223855.36440.446428571428
1_mother
15.5101.51.5
crying/fussinss ear infection sleeping caregiver intereference experimenter/apparatus error failing to met criterion of 1.5 s
7.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333motherIDSNANAsameIDSNA
not.manipulated
15.69816yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificant5.682.094.912.260.752.67author0.0090.6428571429
66
BarkerNewman2004
Barker, B.A. & Newman, R.S. (2004). Listen to your mother! The role of talker familiarity in infant streaming. Cognition 94: B45-53. DOI:10.1016/j.cognition.2004.06.001
Barker & Newman (2004)211_strangerAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical226.629199.8594255.223855.36440.446428571428
1_stranger
15.5101.51.5
crying/fussinss ear infection sleeping caregiver intereference experimenter/apparatus error failing to met criterion of 1.5 s
7.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNANAsameIDSNA
not.manipulated
15.69816yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory5.592.375.782.120.77-0.63author0.50.3571428571
67
GoutChristopheMorgan2004
Gout, A., Christophe, A., & Morgan, J.L. (2004). Phonological phrase boundaries constrain lexical access II: Infant data. Journal of Memory and Language, 51(4), 548-567. DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2004.07.002
Gout, Christophe, & Morgan (2004)
111American EnglishnativeTRUENAtypical318.2304.2334.230NA1813002
technical problems restlessness
1011paper beacon0reparse2
Paper / Pay-Per: The outstanding pay persuades him to go to France.The scandalous paper sways him to tell the truth. My friend says that smaller pay perpetuates unhappiness.The girl found the meager paper petulant and annoying. The wealthy tycoon with all the pay pursued his rivals.The young man who often reads the paper sued the lady. The girl with piles of pay perfumed the smelly house.The burning piles of paper fumed through every room. After he was promoted his increased pay permuted into that of his bosses.Although he was conservative his revised paper muted the reply of his colleagues. The abrupt increase in pay pertained to his fine work.The quite sudden rise in paper tainted her good mood. Beacon / Bee-Con: The plastic decorative bee contained the sparkling necklace.The very large and ugly beacon tainted the beautiful skyline. We saw the yellow bee constrained with the weight of its load.The person with the beacon strained to transmit the message. The girl watched the little bee controlling all the rose pollen.The fisherman saw the beacon rolling in the foggy bay. The color of the bee confounded the new beekeeper.The owner of the beacon founded the association. She was surprised to discover the bumble bee confused about flowers.It was amusing to see the overheated beacon fusing to the ice. The vicious bee confronted all the angry crowd.The striped beacon fronted on the rocky shore.
00female IDSNANAfemaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
NA12yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificant
pooledSD here is the SD of the difference score
7.01NA7.01NA0.5none0.50.4444444444
68
GoutChristopheMorgan2004
Gout, A., Christophe, A., & Morgan, J.L. (2004). Phonological phrase boundaries constrain lexical access II: Infant data. Journal of Memory and Language, 51(4), 548-567. DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2004.07.002
Gout, Christophe, & Morgan (2004)
222American EnglishnativeTRUENAtypical403.46389421.4632.46NA1825002
technical problem drowsiness restlessness
1312paper beacon0reparse2as above00female IDSNANAfemaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
NA12yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificant
pooledSD here is the SD of the difference score
7.99NA6.46NA2.9none0.0090.8333333333
69
HoustonSantelmann2004Jusczyk
Houston, D.M., Santelmann, L., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2004). English-learning infants’ segmentation of trisyllabic words from fluent speech. Language and Cognitive Processes, 19(1), 97-136. DOI: 10.1080/01690960344000143
Houston et al. (2004)211American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical232217250330.3928571429281211700
crying restlessness parental interference equipment failure experimenter error
7.500
{baritone cantaloupe}{parachute vestibule}
0match3
The grocery store took away its old cantaloupe. Your cantaloupe is already at home. That red cantaloupe looks extremely strange. The dark cantaloupe tastes delicious. Give the children the plain cantaloupe. They think that her cantaloupe is edible. The dark baritone is very annoying. She plays that old baritone very skilfully. We need to get a plain baritone for the concert. The director really likes your baritone. Her baritone looks complicated. They composed a symphony for a red baritone. Your vestibule has lots of decorations. Her vestibule can fit only one. They are renovating that old vestibule. The small dark vestibule terrifies me. We are considering a plain vestibule. My new red vestibule is very comfortable. Our lieutenant has an old parachute. He gave the plain parachute to the beginner. Your parachute is colourful and new. The red parachute belongs to Timothy. The leader brought a dark parachute. Her parachute looks fantastic.
62.50.3333333333
female English IDS
IDSNA19.2
same female
IDSNA
not.manipulated
1916yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory7.652.536.771.560.57659353982.25formula0.030.6785714286
70
HoustonSantelmann2004Jusczyk
Houston, D.M., Santelmann, L., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2004). English-learning infants’ segmentation of trisyllabic words from fluent speech. Language and Cognitive Processes, 19(1), 97-136. DOI: 10.1080/01690960344000143
Houston et al. (2004)322American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical227211254430.3214285714282141300
crying restlessness experimenter error
7.500
{bari canta}{para vesti}
0embedded2
The grocery store took away its old cantaloupe. Your cantaloupe is already at home. That red cantaloupe looks extremely strange. The dark cantaloupe tastes delicious. Give the children the plain cantaloupe. They think that her cantaloupe is edible. The dark baritone is very annoying. She plays that old baritone very skilfully. We need to get a plain baritone for the concert. The director really likes your baritone. Her baritone looks complicated. They composed a symphony for a red baritone. Your vestibule has lots of decorations. Her vestibule can fit only one. They are renovating that old vestibule. The small dark vestibule terrifies me. We are considering a plain vestibule. My new red vestibule is very comfortable. Our lieutenant has an old parachute. He gave the plain parachute to the beginner. Your parachute is colourful and new. The red parachute belongs to Timothy. The leader brought a dark parachute. Her parachute looks fantastic.
62.50.3333333333
female English IDS
IDSNA19.1
same female
IDSNA
not.manipulated
1916yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory8.422.87.822.970.70117194971.42formula0.170.5357142857
71
HoustonSantelmann2004Jusczyk
Houston, D.M., Santelmann, L., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2004). English-learning infants’ segmentation of trisyllabic words from fluent speech. Language and Cognitive Processes, 19(1), 97-136. DOI: 10.1080/01690960344000143
Houston et al. (2004)433American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical232202272700.607142857128311713
failure to look at the flashing lights (2) restlessness (7) parental interference (1) and orientation times averaged less than 3 s (1).
7.500
{ton loupe}{chute bule}
0embedded1
The grocery store took away its old cantaloupe. Your cantaloupe is already at home. That red cantaloupe looks extremely strange. The dark cantaloupe tastes delicious. Give the children the plain cantaloupe. They think that her cantaloupe is edible. The dark baritone is very annoying. She plays that old baritone very skilfully. We need to get a plain baritone for the concert. The director really likes your baritone. Her baritone looks complicated. They composed a symphony for a red baritone. Your vestibule has lots of decorations. Her vestibule can fit only one. They are renovating that old vestibule. The small dark vestibule terrifies me. We are considering a plain vestibule. My new red vestibule is very comfortable. Our lieutenant has an old parachute. He gave the plain parachute to the beginner. Your parachute is colourful and new. The red parachute belongs to Timothy. The leader brought a dark parachute. Her parachute looks fantastic.
62.50.3333333333
female English IDS
IDSNA19.1
same female
IDSNA
not.manipulated
1916yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory
Also does omnibus ANOVA for exp 1-3 no interaction
7.262.066.562.690.32532424021.32formula0.20.6428571429
72
HoustonSantelmann2004Jusczyk
Houston, D.M., Santelmann, L., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2004). English-learning infants’ segmentation of trisyllabic words from fluent speech. Language and Cognitive Processes, 19(1), 97-136. DOI: 10.1080/01690960344000143
Houston et al. (2004)544American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical225212241290.531253247500
crying restlessness equipment failure
7.500
{cavalier magazine}{jamboree lemonade}
1match3
The old jamboree was still very exciting. Everybody left the funny jamboree in the morning. Tomorrow we’ll buy tickets to the expensive jamboree. The baritone at the good jamboree was incredible. Their jamboree was truly spectacular. In the summertime he had a bright jamboree. On the sidewalk we discovered an expensive magazine. The bright magazine was filled with colorful pictures. Unfortunately my old magazine has deteriorated. A funny magazine was in the convenience store. You must ask politely to see their magazine. We recovered a good magazine from the parachute. Their lemonade was advertised at the corner. Using strange ingredients they mixed bright lemonade. We are replacing the old lemonade that is not refreshing. Sally knows a recipe for making good lemonade. At the supermarket expensive lemonade is discounted. The funny lemonade tastes like cantaloupe. In the front vestibule stands a good cavalier. Somebody took the old cavalier from the festivities. The expensive cavalier is rather ordinary. We prefer the funny cavalier in the entryway. The bright cavalier talks of extraordinary adventures. The citizens are going to cheer for their cavalier.
52.50.3333333333
female English IDS
IDSNA18.9
same female
IDSNA
not.manipulated
2016yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory7.592.877.632.880.6176389098-0.09formula0.930.46875
73
HoustonSantelmann2004Jusczyk
Houston, D.M., Santelmann, L., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2004). English-learning infants’ segmentation of trisyllabic words from fluent speech. Language and Cognitive Processes, 19(1), 97-136. DOI: 10.1080/01690960344000143
Houston et al. (2004)655American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical226199242430.56253259413
crying (3) restlessness (1) orientation times averaged less than 3 seconds (2) parental interference (1) failure to look at the side lights (1) andequipment failure (1)
7.500
{lier zine}{ree nade}
0embedded1
The old jamboree was still very exciting. Everybody left the funny jamboree in the morning. Tomorrow we’ll buy tickets to the expensive jamboree. The baritone at the good jamboree was incredible. Their jamboree was truly spectacular. In the summertime he had a bright jamboree. On the sidewalk we discovered an expensive magazine. The bright magazine was filled with colorful pictures. Unfortunately my old magazine has deteriorated. A funny magazine was in the convenience store. You must ask politely to see their magazine. We recovered a good magazine from the parachute. Their lemonade was advertised at the corner. Using strange ingredients they mixed bright lemonade. We are replacing the old lemonade that is not refreshing. Sally knows a recipe for making good lemonade. At the supermarket expensive lemonade is discounted. The funny lemonade tastes like cantaloupe. In the front vestibule stands a good cavalier. Somebody took the old cavalier from the festivities. The expensive cavalier is rather ordinary. We prefer the funny cavalier in the entryway. The bright cavalier talks of extraordinary adventures. The citizens are going to cheer for their cavalier.
52.50.3333333333
female English IDS
IDSNA18.6
same female
IDSNA
not.manipulated
2016yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory8.443.047.462.460.53828673992.06formula0.040.6875
74
HoustonSantelmann2004Jusczyk
Houston, D.M., Santelmann, L., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2004). English-learning infants’ segmentation of trisyllabic words from fluent speech. Language and Cognitive Processes, 19(1), 97-136. DOI: 10.1080/01690960344000143
Houston et al. (2004)766American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical225210250400.5326151413
crying restlessness equipment failure
7.500
{cava maga}{jambo lemo}
1embedded2
The old jamboree was still very exciting. Everybody left the funny jamboree in the morning. Tomorrow we’ll buy tickets to the expensive jamboree. The baritone at the good jamboree was incredible. Their jamboree was truly spectacular. In the summertime he had a bright jamboree. On the sidewalk we discovered an expensive magazine. The bright magazine was filled with colorful pictures. Unfortunately my old magazine has deteriorated. A funny magazine was in the convenience store. You must ask politely to see their magazine. We recovered a good magazine from the parachute. Their lemonade was advertised at the corner. Using strange ingredients they mixed bright lemonade. We are replacing the old lemonade that is not refreshing. Sally knows a recipe for making good lemonade. At the supermarket expensive lemonade is discounted. The funny lemonade tastes like cantaloupe. In the front vestibule stands a good cavalier. Somebody took the old cavalier from the festivities. The expensive cavalier is rather ordinary. We prefer the funny cavalier in the entryway. The bright cavalier talks of extraordinary adventures. The citizens are going to cheer for their cavalier.
52.50.3333333333
female English IDS
IDSNA17.9
same female
IDSNA
not.manipulated
2016yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory
Also does omnibus ANOVA for exp 4-6 no interaction
7.492.677.512.78-1.154763829-0.02formula0.970.53125
75
SinghMorganWhite2004
Singh, L., Morgan, J.L., & White, K.S. (2004). Preference and processing: The role of speech affect in early spoken word recognition. Journal of Memory and Language, 51(2), 173-189. DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2004.04.004
Singh, Morgan, & White (2004)
1_happyTest1
1_neutral_to_happy
American EnglishnativeTRUESinghtypical238221252310.57520
1_neutral_to_happy
7.5102
crying and disconnected cable
7.511
{bike hat}{tree pear}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSneutral20female
between infants half IDS half neutral
yaffectNA16yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory
within participants: split mixed design
7.3492.5887.4522.29none0.45
76
SinghMorganWhite2004
Singh, L., Morgan, J.L., & White, K.S. (2004). Preference and processing: The role of speech affect in early spoken word recognition. Journal of Memory and Language, 51(2), 173-189. DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2004.04.004
Singh, Morgan, & White (2004)
1_happyTest11_happy_to_happyAmerican EnglishnativeTRUESinghtypical238221252310.57520
1_happy_to_happy
7.5102
crying and disconnected cable
7.511
{bike hat}{tree pear}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDShappy20female
between infants half IDS half neutral
ymatchNA16yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory
within participants: split mixed design
10.2315.7617.4522.29none0.65
77
SinghMorganWhite2004
Singh, L., Morgan, J.L., & White, K.S. (2004). Preference and processing: The role of speech affect in early spoken word recognition. Journal of Memory and Language, 51(2), 173-189. DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2004.04.004
Singh, Morgan, & White (2004)
1_neutralTest1
1_neutral_to_neutral
American EnglishnativeTRUESinghtypical238221252310.57520
1_neutral_to_neutral
7.5102
crying and disconnected cable
7.511
{bike hat}{tree pear}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSneutral20female
between infants half IDS half neutral
ymatchNA16yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory
within participants: split mixed design
5.5412.7036.711.907none0.35
78
SinghMorganWhite2004
Singh, L., Morgan, J.L., & White, K.S. (2004). Preference and processing: The role of speech affect in early spoken word recognition. Journal of Memory and Language, 51(2), 173-189. DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2004.04.004
Singh, Morgan, & White (2004)
1_neutralTest1
1_happy_to_neutral
American EnglishnativeTRUESinghtypical238221252310.57520
1_happy_to_neutral
7.5102
crying and disconnected cable
7.511
{bike hat}{tree pear}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDShappy20female
between infants half IDS half neutral
yaffectNA16yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory
within participants: split mixed design
7.2762.9856.711.907none0.5
79
SinghMorganWhite2004
Singh, L., Morgan, J.L., & White, K.S. (2004). Preference and processing: The role of speech affect in early spoken word recognition. Journal of Memory and Language, 51(2), 173-189. DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2004.04.004
Singh, Morgan, & White (2004)
2_happyTest2
2_neutral_to_happy
American EnglishnativeTRUESinghtypical325301344430.47520
2_neutral_to_happy
3.51.502
crying non-English home environment
10.512
{bike hat}{tree pear}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSneutral20female
between infants half IDS half neutral
oaffectNA16yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory
within participants: split mixed design
7.5813.4267.4043.249none0.55
80
SinghMorganWhite2004
Singh, L., Morgan, J.L., & White, K.S. (2004). Preference and processing: The role of speech affect in early spoken word recognition. Journal of Memory and Language, 51(2), 173-189. DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2004.04.004
Singh, Morgan, & White (2004)
2_happyTest22_happy_to_happyAmerican EnglishnativeTRUESinghtypical325301344430.47520
2_happy_to_happy
3.51.502
crying non-English home environment
10.512
{bike hat}{tree pear}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDShappy20female
between infants half IDS half neutral
omatchNA16yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory
within participants: split mixed design
9.0824.2317.4043.249none0.8
81
SinghMorganWhite2004
Singh, L., Morgan, J.L., & White, K.S. (2004). Preference and processing: The role of speech affect in early spoken word recognition. Journal of Memory and Language, 51(2), 173-189. DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2004.04.004
Singh, Morgan, & White (2004)
2_neutralTest2
2_neutral_to_neutral
American EnglishnativeTRUESinghtypical325301344430.47520
2_neutral_to_neutral
3.51.502
crying non-English home environment
10.512
{bike hat}{tree pear}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSneutral20female
between infants half IDS half neutral
omatchNA16yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory
within participants: split mixed design
4.9421.2796.0652.029none0.3
82
SinghMorganWhite2004
Singh, L., Morgan, J.L., & White, K.S. (2004). Preference and processing: The role of speech affect in early spoken word recognition. Journal of Memory and Language, 51(2), 173-189. DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2004.04.004
Singh, Morgan, & White (2004)
2_neutralTest2
2_happy_to_neutral
American EnglishnativeTRUESinghtypical325301344430.47520
2_happy_to_neutral
3.51.502
crying non-English home environment
10.512
{bike hat}{tree pear}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDShappy20female
between infants half IDS half neutral
oaffectNA16yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory
within participants: split mixed design
9.0474.8586.0652.029none0.8
83
SinghMorganWhite2004
Singh, L., Morgan, J.L., & White, K.S. (2004). Preference and processing: The role of speech affect in early spoken word recognition. Journal of Memory and Language, 51(2), 173-189. DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2004.04.004
Singh, Morgan, & White (2004)
3_10.533_10.5American EnglishnativeTRUESinghtypical319304334300.5625163_10.56002
for both age groups collapsed: failure to complete session (7) computer error (1) having two or more trials that constituted outliers (2)
10.512
{bike hat}{tree pear}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSneutral20femalehappyoaffectNA12yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory5.9262.5027.4271.2850.03980233052-2.17formula
84
SinghMorganWhite2004
Singh, L., Morgan, J.L., & White, K.S. (2004). Preference and processing: The role of speech affect in early spoken word recognition. Journal of Memory and Language, 51(2), 173-189. DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2004.04.004
Singh, Morgan, & White (2004)
3_7.533_7.5American EnglishnativeTRUESinghtypical231224239150.3125163_7.54002
for both age groups collapsed: failure to complete session (7) computer error (1) having two or more trials that constituted outliers (2)
7.511
{bike hat}{tree pear}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSneutral20femalehappyyaffectNA12yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_two
nonsignificant
8.4833.4838.7362.627-0.0179009668-0.23formula
85
Bortfeldetal2005
Bortfeld, H., Morgan, J.L., Golinkoff, R.M., & Rathbun, K. (2005). Mommy and me familiar names help launch babies into speech-stream segmentation. Psychological Science, 16(4), 298-304. DOI: 10.1111/j.0956-7976.2005.01531.x
Bortfeld, et al. (2005)11
1_alternative_name
American EnglishnativeTRUEtypical1911672063924
1_alternative_name
21.500fussiness sleepiness600
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1passages with preceding familiar or unfamiliar name (own name and other child's name)NANAfemaleIDSNA30female IDSNA
not.manipulated
NA12no30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratoryNANANANA-0.88none0.5
86
Bortfeldetal2005
Bortfeld, H., Morgan, J.L., Golinkoff, R.M., & Rathbun, K. (2005). Mommy and me familiar names help launch babies into speech-stream segmentation. Psychological Science, 16(4), 298-304. DOI: 10.1111/j.0956-7976.2005.01531.x
Bortfeld, et al. (2005)211_nameAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEtypical1911672063924
1_name
21.500fussiness sleepiness600
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1passages with preceding familiar or unfamiliar name (own name and other child's name)NANAfemaleIDSNA30female IDSNA
not.manipulated
NA12no30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratoryd=0.28NANANANA2.4none0.04
87
Bortfeldetal2005
Bortfeld, H., Morgan, J.L., Golinkoff, R.M., & Rathbun, K. (2005). Mommy and me familiar names help launch babies into speech-stream segmentation. Psychological Science, 16(4), 298-304. DOI: 10.1111/j.0956-7976.2005.01531.x
Bortfeld, et al. (2005)322_mommyAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEtypical1881681983020
2_mommy
7.5400
fussiness or crying sleepiness sibling interferenc e equipment failure or two for having looking times +2SD from infans mean
600
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
Passages with preceding Mommy (or word used in household to refer to mother) matched with versions of Lola
NANAfemaleIDSNA30female IDSNA
not.manipulated
NA12no30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificantd = 0.40NANANANA2.55none0.009
88
Bortfeldetal2005
Bortfeld, H., Morgan, J.L., Golinkoff, R.M., & Rathbun, K. (2005). Mommy and me familiar names help launch babies into speech-stream segmentation. Psychological Science, 16(4), 298-304. DOI: 10.1111/j.0956-7976.2005.01531.x
Bortfeld, et al. (2005)422_tommyAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEtypical1881681983020
2_tommy
7.5400
fussiness or crying sleepiness sibling interferenc e equipment failure or two for having looking times +2SD from infans mean
600
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
Passages with preceding Mommy (or word used in household to refer to mother) matched with versions of Lola
NANAfemaleIDSNA30female IDSNA
not.manipulated
NA12no30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_two
nonsignificant
NANANANA-0.76none0.5
89
Bortfeldetal2005
Bortfeld, H., Morgan, J.L., Golinkoff, R.M., & Rathbun, K. (2005). Mommy and me familiar names help launch babies into speech-stream segmentation. Psychological Science, 16(4), 298-304. DOI: 10.1111/j.0956-7976.2005.01531.x
Bortfeld, et al. (2005)533_tommyAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEtypical1881692104120
3_tommy
4.5300
fussiness or crying equipment failure sibling interference
600
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
Passages with preceding Mommy-neighbor Tommy (or word used in household to refer to mother) matched with versions of Lola
NANAfemaleIDSNA30female IDSNA
not.manipulated
NA12no30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratoryNANANANA-1.35none0.5
90
Bortfeldetal2005
Bortfeld, H., Morgan, J.L., Golinkoff, R.M., & Rathbun, K. (2005). Mommy and me familiar names help launch babies into speech-stream segmentation. Psychological Science, 16(4), 298-304. DOI: 10.1111/j.0956-7976.2005.01531.x
Bortfeld, et al. (2005)633_lolaAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEtypical18816921041203_lola4.5300
fussiness or crying equipment failure sibling interference
600
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
Passages with preceding Mommy-neighbor Tommy (or word used in household to refer to mother) matched with versions of Lola
NANAfemaleIDSNA30female IDSNA
not.manipulated
NA12no30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_two
nonsignificant
NANANANA-0.93none0.5
91
Hollichetal2005
Hollich, G., Newman, R.S., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2005). Infants' use of synchronized visual information to separate streams of speech. Child Development, 76(3), 598-613. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2005.00866.x
Hollich, Newman, & Jusczyk (2005)
111_videoAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical225.94214.94240.94260.5301_video0000none7.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333
female (voice +congruent video) with a male ADS at 0 dB SNR
IDSNA22female IDSNA
not.manipulated
NA8noNAHPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory10.913.2315630898.932.9029295550.68048672534.39formula0.0009
92
Hollichetal2005
Hollich, G., Newman, R.S., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2005). Infants' use of synchronized visual information to separate streams of speech. Child Development, 76(3), 598-613. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2005.00866.x
Hollich, Newman, & Jusczyk (2005)
222_incongruentAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical219.94205.52227.9422.420.530
2_incongruent
1100fussiness7.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333
female (voice +INcongruent video from resp other passage) with a male ADS at 0 dB SNR
IDSNA22female IDSNA
not.manipulated
NA8noNAHPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory9.733.6149688810.243.3958798570.64227276930.94formula0.5
93
Hollichetal2005
Hollich, G., Newman, R.S., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2005). Infants' use of synchronized visual information to separate streams of speech. Child Development, 76(3), 598-613. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2005.00866.x
Hollich, Newman, & Jusczyk (2005)
333_staticAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical222.94206.52239.9433.420.5303_static1100fussiness7.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333
female (voice +static face) with a male ADS at 0 dB SNR
IDSNA22female IDSNA
not.manipulated
NA8noNAHPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory9.693.0672463229.292.5195237650.16none0.5
94
Hollichetal2005
Hollich, G., Newman, R.S., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2005). Infants' use of synchronized visual information to separate streams of speech. Child Development, 76(3), 598-613. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2005.00866.x
Hollich, Newman, & Jusczyk (2005)
444_oscilloscopeAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical222.94213.94240.94270.530
4_oscilloscope
1100fussiness7.500
{cup dog}{bike feet}
0match1
His bike had big black wheels. The girl rode her big bike. Her bike could go very fast. The bell on the bike was really loud. The boy had a new red bike. Your bike always stays in the garage. She put on her hat to play in the snow. The hat was soft and warm. Her brother had knitted the hat. The hat was blue and white. She liked how the hat covered her ears. Her friends also liked her hat. The tree was a hundred years old. The tree grew in the man's back yard. He liked to look outside at the tree. Hanging from the tree was a swing. The man's grandchild played in the tree. The leaves on the tree were yellow. The juicy green pear came from the basket. The pear is her favorite fruit. She wanted to eat the biggest pear. The pear in the basket looked very good. Next to the pear was an apple. She ate the whole pear.
63.333333330.3333333333
female (voice + oscilloscope) with a male ADS at 0 dB SNR
IDSNA22female IDSNA
not.manipulated
NA8noNAHPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory11.072.8481572999.643.5054243680.43063245612.28formula0.04
95
Johnson2005
Johnson, E.K. (2005). English-Learning Infants' Representations of Word Forms With Iambic Stress. Infancy, 7(1), 99-109. DOI: 10.1207/s15327078in0701_8
Johnson (2005)111_familiarAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical318304333290.555555555627
1_familiar
4.540.53
orientation times less than 3 sec
10.500
{ginome tupong} mispronunciations of these and totally unfamiliar words
0match2
The old stone ginome could tell a great story. One ginome clowned around with a spinning bear. The pine ginome carelessly tangoed all through the night. We can see how well the short tune ginome cooks. Some lone ginome cradled a squirrel in his arms. The tall tin ginome cut flowers for his cousin. Live tupong teach painting every other night. I plan to cartwheel with the mauve tupong troop. We like the green weave tupong tie around their forts. The brave tupong told us singing is an art form. Some suave tupong traded a soccer ball for us. The love tupong tap-danced at the talent show.
53.333333330
female English IDS
IDSNA18.9
same female
IDSNA
not.manipulated
15.9512noNAHPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificant8.512.27.32.6none0.04
96
Johnson2005
Johnson, E.K. (2005). English-Learning Infants' Representations of Word Forms With Iambic Stress. Infancy, 7(1), 99-109. DOI: 10.1207/s15327078in0701_8
Johnson (2005)211_mispronouncedAmerican EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical317304335310.407407407427
1_mispronounced
4.540.53
orientation times less than 3 sec
10.500
{ginome tupong} mispronunciations of these and totally unfamiliar words
0
mispronounciation
2
The old stone ginome could tell a great story. One ginome clowned around with a spinning bear. The pine ginome carelessly tangoed all through the night. We can see how well the short tune ginome cooks. Some lone ginome cradled a squirrel in his arms. The tall tin ginome cut flowers for his cousin. Live tupong teach painting every other night. I plan to cartwheel with the mauve tupong troop. We like the green weave tupong tie around their forts. The brave tupong told us singing is an art form. Some suave tupong traded a soccer ball for us. The love tupong tap-danced at the talent show.
53.333333330
female English IDS
IDSNA18.9
same female
IDSNA
not.manipulated
15.9512noNAHPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_two
nonsignificant
6.62.27.32.5none0.11
97
Nazzietal2005
Nazzi, T., Dilley, L.C., Jusczyk, A.M., Shattuck-Hufnagel, S., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2005). English-learning infants' segmentation of verbs from fluent speech. Language and Speech, 48(3), 279-298. DOI: 10.1177/00238309050480030201
Nazzi et al. (2005)111_10.5_exp1American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical321304331270.708333333324
1_10.5_exp1
7423
fussy/crying; orientation times less than 3s to the passages, not turning to the lights
10.511
{tickets orbits} {visits outlaws}
0match2
The policeman tickets speeding drivers. Meanwhile, the clerk keeps track of how many he tickets. The meter maid tickets people who park illegally. However, diplomats’ cars are not ones that she tickets. The new guard tickets trucks blocking the door. A friendly baggage clerk tickets the suitcases. The queen visits Canada quite frequently. All the towns are decorated whenever she visits. The prince visits children in the hospital. Everyone in town is happy if the king visits. My cousin visits his teachers during the summers. The young man next door never visits the neighbors. The earth orbits the sun once a year. Astronomers know how far Neptune orbits. The comet orbits every 50 years. The scientists don’t believe that a quasar orbits. A brand new satellite orbits around Saturn. A small asteroid orbits the nearest star. A new rule outlaws smoking in the building. The congress is never sure of how much it outlaws. This old document outlaws sales on Sundays. That politician always checks on what she outlaws. No one ever outlaws the practice of good behavior. The dean outlaws cheating in the classroom.
NA0.3333333333femaleIDSNA19.85femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
22.7516yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificant6.922.966.843.13none0.500.5
98
Nazzietal2005
Nazzi, T., Dilley, L.C., Jusczyk, A.M., Shattuck-Hufnagel, S., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2005). English-learning infants' segmentation of verbs from fluent speech. Language and Speech, 48(3), 279-298. DOI: 10.1177/00238309050480030201
Nazzi et al. (2005)221_10.5_exp2American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical319298341430.6562532
1_10.5_exp2
13813
fussy/crying; orientation times less than 3s to the passages, not turning to the lights; falling asleep; parental interference
10.511
{discount incite} {permit import}
1match2
The mother often permits her son to help. Her boss permits everyone to take a day off. We know what the red thing permits. In the park, his aunt permits everyone to swing. That’s something the teacher never permits. She permits only quiet games. She discounts the peaches on Fridays. It’s surprising what the store often discounts. Buying this thing discounts the price per pound. Our aunt discounts the shoes every fall. The baker never discounts the pastries. There’s no telling what his boss discounts. The company never imports by airplane. The boss imports the goods across the ocean. Wegman’s often imports cheese from France. It’s not the same as what your aunt imports. We’ll see how much her new thing imports. She imports rice from India. Our boss incites a lot of activity. My aunt incites the students to learn. He almost never incites the children to yell. We can’t tell what reaction she incites. The teeter-totter often incites them to play. It’s amazing how much commotion that thing incites.
NA0.3333333333femaleIDSNA20femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
23.516yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory6.392.356.072.38none0.500.5
99
Nazzietal2005
Nazzi, T., Dilley, L.C., Jusczyk, A.M., Shattuck-Hufnagel, S., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2005). English-learning infants' segmentation of verbs from fluent speech. Language and Speech, 48(3), 279-298. DOI: 10.1177/00238309050480030201
Nazzi et al. (2005)311_13.5_exp1American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical404392426340.583333333324
1_13.5_exp1
7613
fussy/crying; orientation times less than 3s to the passages
13.51NA
{tickets orbits} {visits outlaws}
0match2
The policeman tickets speeding drivers. Meanwhile, the clerk keeps track of how many he tickets. The meter maid tickets people who park illegally. However, diplomats’ cars are not ones that she tickets. The new guard tickets trucks blocking the door. A friendly baggage clerk tickets the suitcases. The queen visits Canada quite frequently. All the towns are decorated whenever she visits. The prince visits children in the hospital. Everyone in town is happy if the king visits. My cousin visits his teachers during the summers. The young man next door never visits the neighbors. The earth orbits the sun once a year. Astronomers know how far Neptune orbits. The comet orbits every 50 years. The scientists don’t believe that a quasar orbits. A brand new satellite orbits around Saturn. A small asteroid orbits the nearest star. A new rule outlaws smoking in the building. The congress is never sure of how much it outlaws. This old document outlaws sales on Sundays. That politician always checks on what she outlaws. No one ever outlaws the practice of good behavior. The dean outlaws cheating in the classroom.
NA0.3333333333femaleIDSNA19.85femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
22.7516yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twosignificant7.353.35.732.59none9.600.003
100
Nazzietal2005
Nazzi, T., Dilley, L.C., Jusczyk, A.M., Shattuck-Hufnagel, S., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2005). English-learning infants' segmentation of verbs from fluent speech. Language and Speech, 48(3), 279-298. DOI: 10.1177/00238309050480030201
Nazzi et al. (2005)421_13.5_exp2American EnglishnativeTRUEJusczyktypical421395438430.541666666724
1_13.5_exp2
191073
fussy/crying; orientation times less than 3s to the passages, not turning to the lights, technical problems
13.51NA
{discount} {permit}
1match2
The mother often permits her son to help. Her boss permits everyone to take a day off. We know what the red thing permits. In the park, his aunt permits everyone to swing. That’s something the teacher never permits. She permits only quiet games. She discounts the peaches on Fridays. It’s surprising what the store often discounts. Buying this thing discounts the price per pound. Our aunt discounts the shoes every fall. The baker never discounts the pastries. There’s no telling what his boss discounts. The company never imports by airplane. The boss imports the goods across the ocean. Wegman’s often imports cheese from France. It’s not the same as what your aunt imports. We’ll see how much her new thing imports. She imports rice from India. Our boss incites a lot of activity. My aunt incites the students to learn. He almost never incites the children to yell. We can’t tell what reaction she incites. The teeter-totter often incites them to play. It’s amazing how much commotion that thing incites.
58.333333330.3333333333femaleIDSNA20femaleIDSNA
not.manipulated
23.516yes30HPPfamiliarizationbehaviorlooking_timewithin_twoexploratory7.42NA4.73NAnone4.500.007
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