Lessonly’s Onboarding Process Flow Chart by Lessonly
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLM
1
Note: To edit this document for your organization, just select “Make a copy...” from the “File” menu. For further assitance, just email kenzie@lessonly.com.
2
Lessonly’s Onboarding Process Flow Chart
3
Forming to Storming to Norming to Performing
4
Forming
5
This stage is typically referred to as orientation and will normally include only the first day of work (or, in some cases, the first month). Forming is the part of the on boarding process where an employee is typically spoonfed general company knowledge, standard onboarding procedures, and very basic job-specific training.
6
7
Storming
8
This phase of the employee on-boarding process will usually include the first months of work. Storming is when the new hire gets to learn the nitty-gritty details of their specific role, get to know the other members of the team better, become comfortable with the lay of the land in the office, and start to understand where they can provide value.
9
10
Norming
11
This phase will last from the second week until the seventh month of employment. Norming is where an employee starts to become comfortable with their new surroundings and begins to move beyond the barriers of learning the basics of the company and their role. This phase should not be ignored by onboarding programs as it is critical to transition from this phase to the next.
12
13
Performing
14
The performing stage of the onboarding process is typically marked by the eighth month of employment until the individual exits the company. This is the goal of the new hire process as it is when the employee begins to provide true added value to the team and truly earn their paycheck. An added benefit of team members in this stage is that they can help newer hires through the onboarding process as mentors and help create training materials.
15
Adapted from Bruce Tuckman's Stages of Group Development
Loading...
Main menu