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Conditions and Procedures:
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Orders must be prepaid or guaranteed with a credit card. Institutions requiring an invoice should submit all forms and indicate an invoice is required; payment of the invoice must be received prior to release of the order.
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Reproduction does not imply permission to reproduce under United States copyright law, nor does it indicate that the Spokane Valley Heritage Museum owns copyright or non-exclusive license rights.
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The Museum does not provide exclusive right for the use of its material. Permission is granted for one-time use only. Subsequent use of an image requires written permission and payment of additional fees.
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The Museum does not allow image modification or out of context representation.
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Special requests will be considered and are subject to special agreements. We reserve the right to charge additional fees for items that pose unusual difficulty in scanning or reproduction.
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Spokane Valley Heritage Museum members receive a 10% discount on reproduction fees.
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REPRODUCTION FEES
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Photographic Reproductions - 8" x 10" $10/image - 11" x 14" $20/image - 16" x 20" $30/image Digital Image - 300dpi $10/image - 8-bit, RGB, TIFFs @8" x 10" 600dpi $15/image - Large Format Digital Image (300dpt only)
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(Audiovisual materials requiring transfer from unsupported media to CD or DVD will be charged the cost of transfer, in addition to the duplication cost.)
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OTHER FEES
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Staff Research Time $20/hr. plus photocopies,Postage and handling Shipping and Handling Spokane..............$1.00 Washington State.....$2.00 Out-of-State.........$3.00 Usage Fees - (in addition to reproduction costs) Usage fees apply to images which are published in any book, magazine, calendar, non-print media, etc., or which are used for advertising purposes or promotional display, etc. Revenue generated from reproduction and usage fees are used to maintain the Society's collections and are levied in accordance with RCW 27.34.070.1(g).
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National Commercial...$120
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Mailing Address: Photos have been altered to protect their value. Reproductions will be unaltered.
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12114 Sprague Ave
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PO Box 141341
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Spokane Valley WA 99206
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Agriculture
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A portion of the autos which took part in the auto trip through the southern end of the County July 7th 1916.The picture was taken on the Marchall Field section owned by Morrison's southeast of Fairfield. 25 autos were in line at this time.
Alaska peas in the orchard of the Peirce Investment Company
near Opportunity, May 16, 1916.


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Mr. A.B. Curryer, RFD, Hillyard, in his winter wheat, June 7, 1915. This wheat made a yield of 32,000 lbs. per acre of fodder.Anderson Brothers Holsteins at Foothills.
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Spokane County- Greenacres apple treesA portion of the crowd of tourists who took part in the first auto tour made through Spokane County at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Long where strawberries and cream were served. Mr. Long’s place is north of Vera Store. On this tour fields of vetch and peas were visited. Examinations were made of the girdling of trees, and orchards intercropped with strawberries were inspected.
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Beans in the field of M.D. Parkhurst near Freeman. The beans to the left below Mr. Parlhurst had not been inoculated while those to the right up the hills have been inoculated.Beet seed on the farm of C.P. Mayer, Buckeye. These beets were very heavily loaded with seed. Photo taken August 20, 1914.
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Bert & Ruth Porter loading Hearts of Gold Cantalope on their farm 14819 e 4th 1952.The clover seed crop in W.J. Boy's 23 acres near Freeman. This clover was very short to harvest with an ordinary mower, however with a self-rake reaper it would be possible to harvest this sweet clover seed.
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Byron Hunter in field of peas of W. J. Boy Freeman, July 25, 1917. These peas were grown on clover sod plowed under in the early spring. Carnegie Farm I
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Carnegie Farm IICarnegie Farm III
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Souvenir of the Fair - Case engine doing Stunts.C.E. Taylor silo at Newman Lake showing the method of closing the continuous door.
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Chick peas - Edward Pierce orchard."Chick peas" grown by Edward Pierce, Opportunity. This picture was intended to show the nodules but does not do so very distinctly. This is a small podded pea with fairly large peas. Three peas per pod. Plants contain from 60 to 75 pods.
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C. J. Soss, Latah, in his pea patch a portion of which was inoculated on the lower ground while the other was not on the hill higher up.C. J. Soss, Latah, in his pea patch a portion of which was inoculated on the lower ground while the other was not on the hill higher up.
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Clover and Timothy used for the second year hay crop on farm of Anderson Bros., Foothills. Photo June 8, 1915.Clover and Timothy on J.D. Martin's place near Freeman which have been seeded with spring wheat in 1915. The clover did not appear to be making a good stand but Mr. Martin left in in order that it might inoculate the soil. This clover made better than 2 tons of hay in the acre in 1916. Photo taken July 12, 1916.
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