NEA/ART Spring 2018 session proposal collaboration connection hub
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NAMEPOSITION/AFFILIATIONEMAILPITCH
POSSIBLE COLLABORATORS (include your name, email, what you would bring to this session)
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Nicole GreenhouseArchivist, Center for Jewish Historyngreenhouse@cjh.orgAdvocating from the bottom up, how do new archivists/project archivists/soft money positions work to get their institutions to make change that can benefit their position/institution/individual in the long run. How can we as powerless in our institution leverage ourselves to get the resources we needJuliana Magro, juliana.magro@brooklyn.cuny.edu (I would like to talk about my experience as a project archivist in my institution. I proposed a system to better manage the orders that go to our conservation lab. This will not only improve control over the materials that are in the conservation lab, but also provide metrics in volume of orders, types of materials, conservation issues and treatments employed by the conservator. This system will be beneficial to my project, but also to the institution in the long run)
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Stephanie BredbennerBeinecke Library, Yalestephanie.bredbenner@yale.eduCommunity archives, including how institutional context impacts the work archivists can/should do with community archives; collaborations with community members; facilitating mutually beneficial communication and outcomes; and working flexibly with resources and standards. My portion would focus on indigenous archives. Polly Cancro / polly.cancro@gmail.com / Graduate student (MLIS / MS Art History), Pratt Institute / I am especially interested in the issue of the culturally-responsive care of indigenous material in non-native institutions, and challenging the archival profession to rethink methodology and consider alternative forms of knowledge organization in order to “decolonize” archives. I would be interested in giving an overview of the issue (e.g. the history, development, and reception of NAGPRA and the Protocols for Native American Archival Materials, as well as examples of information professionals embracing these guidelines for collaborative archival projects), as it remains a highly relevant and contentious topic.
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Jessica SteytlerCongregational Library & Archives, Boston
jsteytler@14beacon.org / jessica.steytler@gmail.com
Work/life balance (s407) and stress in the workplace (s204), sessions at SAA2017, started conversations that need further discussion and an opportunity to offer solutions on how to manage stress. I liked the SAA sessions, but both felt like it only introduced the topic and didn't provide enough on the "What now" side. Recommend this session quickly describe stressors that we come across at work, what factors are a stress in general, and spend the majority of the time focusing on what has worked for others with fellow participants. It's important to destigmatize discussion of mental health in the professional sphere, make time and space for self care, and acknowledge that the degree of stress on all of us just due to the political climate. Erik Bauer, bauer@noblenet.org, Gayle Schechter, gayle.schechter@gmail.com [I'd like to discuss these issues as they pertain to students/recent graduates navigating the job market, based on my personal experience and observations]
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Conrad LochnerProject Manager & Digital Archivist, PEN Americaarchives@pen.orgThe importance of (re)gaining community access to archives once they have been gifted to larger institutions. Where and how do community archives justify their value without falling into the paradigm of value being determined by virtue of its commodification? Finally, archive as a tool for advocacy in the digital environment. I would be happy to collaborate with others. Conrad Lochner, conrad@pen.org. I can bring the recently completed PEN America Digital Archive (https://archive.pen.org), a NEH-funded, 2 year project that digitized over 50 years of cultural heritage multimedia-and the efforts that made this possible, including elements of advocacy in archives, and reclaiming community archives from larger institutions.
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Andrea Belair President's Office, Yale Universityandreabelair@gmail.comweb archiving and its role in documenting global events and historically significant records. Ideally a panel of representatives from collections that have documented marginalized voices, communities of dissent or worked to integrate communities through web archiving. See http://netpreserve.org/web-archiving/case-studies/ for examples.
I am looking for collaborators or panelists who are involved in web archiving or can represent collections of web archives that reflect the theme of the meeting
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Cate Peebles
Postgraduate Associate/ NDSR Art, Yale Center for British Art
catherine.peebles@yale.eduThis presentation will explore the need for and role of advocacy for digital preservation within institutions and communicating digital preservation strategies and procedures with colleagues from professions outside the library and archives. How can archival practices be applied to digital preservation needs within institutions? What works, what doesn't, is this being done? How do you communicate digital preservation issues with other colleagues? Presentations and discussion of case studies, tools, and resources for collaboration among professions as we create and enact digital preservation policies. It would be interesting to hear the perspectives of different institutions: museums, academic, non-profit, corporate, historic, etc.
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1. Michelle Interrante, 2. Katherine Meyers Satriano 1. Archives Asst. at Harvard Art Museums, 2. Assoc. Archivist at Harvard's Peabody Museum 1. michelle.interrante@gmail.com, 2. katiegmeyers@gmail.comArchives situated within larger institutions can conduct outreach on more than one front. Both internal and external outreach are important, especially because outreach to one audience can build on or promote outreach to another audience in interesting ways. For example, museum archives at Harvard University might reach out to colleagues within their museums, the university community, and the larger community of researchers from around the world through exhibitions of archival material or one-on-one archival reference interviews. We aim to explore the different forms internal and external outreach take, how they can influence each other, and what kinds of challenges they may present.We are looking for collaborators!
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Amber LaFountainProject Archivist, Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of MedicineAmber_LaFountain@hms.harvard.eduResearch data management has become a popular and important topic in recent years across a wide set of professional communities (archives, libraries, researchers, funding organizations, publishers, host institutions). While these communities all recognize a need for research data management, there are often disconnects between each community, in what they envisage/require and what they can support. Cross-professional collaboration and advocacy can help to fill in those gaps, allow for better support of research data management, and help ensure future access to important research data sets.

My presentation would focus on the necessity of advocating for descriptive best practices both within and outside of the archival profession, since the ways in which research data are created and described during active research will affect archivists’ ability to preserve and provide access to a useful, discoverable, and comprehensible set of data down the line. I will introduce a set of recommended metadata elements for use by health sciences researchers and archivists, which was developed in collaboration with the University of Alberta Libraries by consulting archival descriptive standards, research data metadata standards, and various stakeholders (researchers, lab managers, information technology professionals).
I am interested in collaborating with others who are interested in advocacy/education/collaboration related to research data management and research data archiving.
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Jennifer WilliamsHead of Archives & Special Collections at Emerson Collegejennifer_williams@emerson.eduArchives and records management activities are intertwined within the records life cycle model and are often implemented in tandem to ensure the successful management of information. This being the case, it is very important for archivists and records managers to work together in order to promote each other’s activities. When records managers stress the importance of archives in maintaining permanent records it helps to provide a compelling argument for the funding of archival activities. Likewise, if archivists stress the need for a fully developed records management program in order to ensure that all permanent records are properly maintained it helps to bolster support for records programs. This session will focus on how archivists and records managers can work together to advocate for one another as well as promote a more complete information management program within their organization.Andrea Belair, President's Office, Yale University. We are looking for other collaborators as well!
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