Physical Science
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZAAAB
1
8/8/17HS Physical Science
2
3
4
HS-PS1-1 (Matter and Its Interactions)Concepts
5
Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level and the composition of the nucleus of atoms.Different patterns may be observed at each of the scales at which a system is studied, and these patterns can provide evidence for causality in explanations of phenomena.
6
7
8
Clarification StatementEach atom has a charged substructure.
9
Physical Science: Examples of properties that could be predicted from patterns could include metals, nonmetals, metalloids, number of valence electrons, types of bonds formed, or atomic mass. Emphasis is on main group elements.
Chemistry: Examples of properties that could be predicted from patterns could include reactivity of metals, types of bonds formed, numbers of bonds formed, atomic radius, atomic mass, or reactions with oxygen. Emphasis is on main group elements and qualitative understanding of the relative trends of ionization energy and electronegativity.
An atom’s nucleus is made of protons and neutrons and is surrounded by electrons.
10
11
The periodic table orders elements horizontally by number of protons in the nucleus of each element’s atoms and places elements with similar chemical properties in columns.
12
13
14
The repeating patterns of this table reflect patterns of outer electron states.
15
16
Patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms can provide evidence for the relative properties of elements at different scales.
17
18
Science and Engineering PracticeDisciplinary Core IdeaAttraction and repulsion between electric charges at the atomic scale explain the structure, properties, and transformations of matter, as well as the contact forces between material objects.
19
Developing and using models: Modeling in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to using, synthesizing, and developing models to predict and show relationships among variables between systems and their components in the natural and designed worlds.

• Develop, revise, and/or use a model based on evidence to illustrate and/or predict the relationships between systems or between components of a system.
STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF MATTER
Each atom has a charged substructure consisting of a nucleus, which is made of protons and neutrons, surrounded by electrons. (HS.PS1A.a)

The periodic table orders elements horizontally by the number of protons in the atom's nucleus and places those with similar chemical properties in columns. The repeating patterns of this table reflect patterns of outer electron states.(HS.PS1A.b)

TYPES OF INTERACTIONS
Attraction and repulsion between electric charges at the atomic scale explain the structure, properties, and transformations of matter, as well as the contact forces between material objects.(HS.PS2B.c)
20
21
Ways to check for understanding
22
Use the periodic table as a model to provide evidence for relative properties of elements at different scales based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms in main group elements.
23
24
25
26
Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms in main group elements.
27
28
29
30
31
Caddo Science Symbaloo
32
33
34
35
Crosscutting Concepts
36
PATTERNS
Different patterns may be observed at each of the scales at which a system is studied and can provide evidence for causality in explanations of phenomena.
37
38
39
40
HS-PS1-2 (Matter and Its Interactions)Concepts
41
Construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties.The periodic table orders elements horizontally by number of protons in the nucleus of each element’s atoms and places elements with similar chemical properties in columns.
42
43
44
Clarification StatementThe repeating patterns of the periodic table reflect patterns of outer electron states.
45
Physical Science: Examples of chemical reactions could include the reaction of sodium and chlorine, carbon and oxygen, or hydrogen and oxygen. Reaction classification includes synthesis, decomposition, single displacement, double displacement, and acid-base.
Chemistry: Examples of chemical reactions could include the reaction of sodium and chlorine, carbon and oxygen, or carbon and hydrogen. Reaction classification aids in the prediction of products (e.g. synthesis, decomposition, single displacement, double displacement, and acid-base).
46
The fact that atoms are conserved, together with knowledge of the chemical properties of the elements involved, can be used to describe and predict chemical reactions.
47
48
49
Different patterns may be observed at each of the scales at which a system is studied, and these patterns can provide evidence for causality in explanations of phenomena.
50
51
52
Ways to check for understanding
53
Science and Engineering PracticeDisciplinary Core IdeaUse valid and reliable evidence (obtained from students’ own investigations, models, theories, simulations, and peer review) showing the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and patterns of chemical properties to construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction.
54
Constructing explanations and designing solutions:
Constructing explanations (science) and designing solutions (engineering) in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to explanations and designs that are supported by multiple and independent student-generated sources of evidence consistent with scientific ideas, principles, and theories.

• Construct and revise an explanation based on valid and reliable evidence obtained from a variety of sources (including students' own investigations, models, theories, simulations, peer review) and the assumption that theories and laws that describe the natural world operate today as they did in the past and will continue to do so in the future.
STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF MATTER
The periodic table orders elements horizontally by the number of protons in the atom's nucleus and places those with similar chemical properties in columns. The repeating patterns of this table reflect patterns of outer electron states. (HS.PS1A.b)

CHEMICAL REACTIONS
The fact that atoms are conserved, together with knowledge of the chemical properties of the elements involved, can be used to describe and predict chemical reactions. (HS.PS1B.c)
55
56
57
58
Use the assumption that theories and laws that describe the outcome of simple chemical reactions operate today as they did in the past and will continue to do so in the future.
59
60
61
Observe patterns in the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and chemical properties.
62
63
Use the conservation of atoms and the chemical properties of the elements involved to describe and predict the outcome of a chemical reaction.
64
65
66
67
Caddo Science Symbaloo
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
Crosscutting Concepts
76
PATTERNS
Different patterns may be observed at each of the scales at which a system is studied and can provide evidence for causality in explanations of phenomena.
77
78
79
80
HS-PS1-7 (Matter and Its Interactions)Concepts
81
Use mathematical representations to support the claim that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved during a chemical reaction.As matter and energy flow through different organizational levels of living systems, chemical elements are recombined in different ways to form different products.
82
83
84
Clarification StatementAs a result of these chemical reactions, energy is transferred from one system of interacting molecules to another.
85
Physical Science: Emphasis is on using mathematical ideas to communicate the relationship between masses of reactants and products as well as balancing chemical equations.
Chemistry: Emphasis is on using mathematical ideas as they relate to stoichiometry to communicate the proportional relationships between masses of atoms in the reactants and the products, and the translation of these relationships to the macroscopic scale using the mole as the conversion from the atomic to the macroscopic scale. Emphasis is on assessing students' use of mathematical thinking and not on memorization and rote application of problem-solving techniques.
86
Cellular respiration is a chemical process in which the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and new compounds are formed that can transport energy to muscles.
87
88
89
Cellular respiration also releases the energy needed to maintain body temperature despite ongoing energy transfer to the surrounding environment.
90
91
92
Energy cannot be created or destroyed—it only moves between one place and another place, between objects and/or fields, or between systems.
93
94
95
Science and Engineering PracticeDisciplinary Core IdeaWays to check for understanding
96
Using mathematics and computational thinking:
Using mathematics and computational thinking: Mathematical and computational thinking in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to using algebraic thinking and analysis, a range of linear and nonlinear functions, including, computational tools for statistical analysis to analyze, represent, and model data. Simple computational simulations are created and used based on mathematical models of basic assumptions

• Use mathematical, computational, and/or algorithmic representations of phenomena or design solutions to describe and/or support claims and/or explanations.
CHEMICAL REACTIONS
The fact that atoms are conserved, together with knowledge of the chemical properties of the elements involved, can be used to describe and predict chemical reactions. (HS.PS1B.c)
Construct an evidence-based model, to illustrate that cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and the bonds in new compounds are formed, resulting in a net transfer of energy.
97
98
99
100
Use their understanding of energy flow and conservation of energy to illustrate the inputs and outputs of the process of cellular respiration.
Loading...
Main menu