Barbie Bungee – Oakland, CA (Responses)
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
1
TimestampWhat are do's?What are don't do's?
2
7/7/2014 13:42:27-encourage the experimentation
-give students a chance to revisit their prediction
-include a sequel
-too much structure
-too much step by step
-perhaps too much leading students in the direction the teacher wanted to go
-not enough data collected
-gave entire structure, including equations, tables, labeled axis, etc.
3
7/7/2014 13:42:47- Remember the mantra "you can always add information but can't take it away"
- Have scaffolding ready when needed
- Let students identify needed information (variables)
- Know when in the unit, lesson will be done
- Show a general bungee jumping video (tied to feet not neck)
- Include the grading rubric
- Give too verbose directions (to prescriptive, too much reading, can be confusing)
- Don't reveal scaffolding too early
- Lay it all out on the worksheet
4
7/7/2014 13:44:58Guess: high, low, definite wrong for # of rubberbands
Group size: 3- 6
Show how to do rubber bands etc.
Common system- how do we drop her. Why all the same?
Colored rubber band in hair good for q common reference point
What info do you think you need (they should come up with her height too
Predict first, break down the meaning of the numbers later (what does the slope mean? where do we see it in the graph?)
Ensure rubber bands are consistent
Tell them how many to test at a time
Don't give tables
Don't do the thinking for them
Don't start with the formal math language first

5
7/7/2014 13:45:03DO ask open ended questions and let students answer.
DO motivate students to ask questions using a video or something fun. Maybe it's real world, maybe it's not, but get them curious.
DO take into account what your students already know (do they need a table? Will they do that automatically?)
DO talk about constraints and assumptions.
DO let students revise their answers.
DO let students choose their own method - even when they chose an easier method, they had to think about and discuss the other methods as a class.
DO consider how to validate without dropping Barbie again (re-dropping may not be the best use of time, but may add more engagement)
DO use photos sparingly and strategically (ask if they are necessary or is a demonstration better?)
DO let kids get appropriately creative (stand on chairs, etc)
DO let kids drop Barbie many times in order to get good data. Put a lower limit, but not an upper limit.
DON'T give students all the information all at once.
DON'T let the worksheet limit how far you go.
6
7/7/2014 13:45:08Provide a graph but maybe leave off labels.
Allow students to verbalize their questions after watching a video or demonstration.
Don't give everything away before students even start.
Don't be too explicit in written instructions, too verbose.
7
7/7/2014 13:46:04Do ask the students what they can measure, and how they would like to measure it.
Do give the students options on how to find their line of best fit.
Do allow students to identify the variables.
Do have students make predictions on number of rubber bands.
Do have students sketch what they think the graph would look like.
Do get more students input on what is going to take place and more student interact.
Don't give too much away too soon (number of rubber bands, increments of measurements, how to organize or represent the material).
Don't jump right into collecting data
Don't provide the model.
8
7/7/2014 13:46:17Liked worksheets...structure and focus.
The fact that the students did it.
Encourage more student conversation.
Student should create more of the questions.
Teacher talked too much. Gave out too much information.

9
7/7/2014 13:51:13
- Show live demo or video of Barbie dropping. Ask students what questions they have after viewing. Ask them what information they would need to answer their question.
- Have materials ready for them (Barbies, rulers, graph paper, rubber bands) for them to data collect. Do let them think about how to collect data, plot data and fit a model onto the data without telling them.
- ask students questions about their model: what does it represent? How would they use it? What next?
- find a space on campus to test models - validate and then correct
- tell the students the question to answer before letting them ask
- telling the students what variables they are measuring, what the given information is, giving a table with variables already on it
- telling them the model to fit before they have collected data, including five methods for finding the equation of the line
- why start with two? Let students decide how many to start with on their own
10
7/7/2014 13:51:21
Liked the validation stuff;
Show a set-up video to identify variables and solicit guesses;
Use this activity as an introduction to line of best fit, not a culminating activity;
Different groups have different jumpers;
Extension: use ratio of jumper's height to length of jump to predict jumps for "real" people;
Remember that you can always add but never subtract;
Have conversations at the "end" of the activity to compare results and methods;
Able to go back and revise
Don't give it all away at the start;
Don't scaffold so heavily;
Don't make it just an act-it-out word problem;
11
7/7/2014 13:57:19
Hook kids on the context FIRST: Either asking someone to describe what happens in a bungee jump, demo what's happening with a barbie and ask them to describe to their neighbor, show a video of someone bungee jumping (and dipping head in water?), or a video of a few (short) barbie bounces in the stairwell and pan over to a box of rubber bands.

Do the whole questions, (THEN tell the question) predictions, too many/too few thing.

Ask "What info do you want?"
- How high is the stairwell? (Give to students)
- How long is one/two/three jumps? (We'll collect that data)

What data should we collect?
(Motivated by standardization, being able to compare data, agree on variables)
(Does it matter if the barbie's hair touches the floor? What about her head?)
Agree on table and axis labels (Do tell kids to organize their work, possibly do this after some work)

Consider using the same type of object so that everyone can compare results.

Do collect lots of data points.

Do structure data collection (have students choose roles like spotter, recorder, etc.)

Consider allowing (and VALUING) kids to use different methods (finding average bounce per rubber band and multiplying, graphing and doing an eyeballed line of best fit, or finding an equation.) Then share some resources- other groups have tried x, how does that connect to what you did, or why don't you try another method.

Pause for a narrowed range of predictions (what's the lowest and highest prediction now?)

Do the validation process of testing it out and evaluating your model!
Don't give too much structure (tell them exactly how many rubber bands, which heights to use)
Don't overload worksheets with pseudo-context (walls of text!)
Don't keep kids guessing what you want (like just suggest that they also try using Q-points to find a line of best fit and compare how they are different)
Don't make kids feel bad about being far off- instead emphasize the learning they're getting from it.
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
Loading...
 
 
 
Form Responses 1