New England Farm to Institution Policy
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StateName of Policy InitiativePolicy Lever TypeFunctionDescriptionDate Enacted
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CT
Gen. Stat. § 10-215D Regulations re nutrition standards for school breakfasts and lunches. Facilitation of purchases from local farmers.
AidStreamlines school nutritIon guidelines to support Farm to School local purchasing goals to facilitate purchases from local farmers (b) Not later than October 1, 2017, the regulations described in subsection (a) of this section shall be amended, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 54, to facilitate purchases from local farmers by local and regional boards of education, in furtherance of the state's farm to school program established in section 22-38d.2016
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CT
Gen. Stat. § Sec. 22-38a. Promotion of Connecticut-Grown farm products. Regulations.
AidEstablishes a local food certification and events to help institutions identify local products
The Commissioner of Agriculture shall establish and administer a program to promote the marketing of farm products grown and produced in Connecticut for the purpose of encouraging the development of agriculture in the state. The commissioner may, within available appropriations, provide a grant-in-aid to any person, firm, partnership or corporation engaged in the promotion and marketing of such farm products, provided the words “CONNECTICUT-GROWN” or “CT-Grown” are clearly incorporated in such promotional and marketing activities. The commissioner shall (1) provide for the design, plan and implementation of a multiyear, state-wide marketing and advertising campaign, including, but not limited to, television and radio advertisements, promoting the availability of, and advantages of purchasing, Connecticut-grown farm products, (2) establish and continuously update a web site connected with such advertising campaign that includes, but is not limited to, a comprehensive listing of Connecticut farmers' markets, pick-your-own farms, roadside and on-farm markets, farm wineries, garden centers and nurseries selling predominantly Connecticut-grown horticultural products and agri-tourism events and attractions, and (3) conduct efforts to promote interaction and business relationships between farmers and restaurants, grocery stores, institutional cafeterias and other potential institutional purchasers of Connecticut-grown farm products, including, but not limited to, (A) linking farmers and potential purchasers through a separate feature of the web site established pursuant to this section, and (B) organizing state-wide or regional events promoting Connecticut-grown farm products, where farmers and potential institutional customers are invited to participate. The commissioner shall use his best efforts to solicit cooperation and participation from the farm, corporate, retail, wholesale and grocery communities in such advertising, Internet-related and event planning efforts, including, but not limited to, soliciting private sector matching funds. The commissioner shall use all of the funds provided to the Department of Agriculture pursuant to subparagraph (C) of subdivision (5) of subsection (a) of section 4-66aa for the purposes of this section. The commissioner shall report annually to the joint standing committee of the General Assembly having cognizance of matters relating to the environment on issues with respect to efforts undertaken pursuant to the requirements of this section, including, but not limited to, the amount of private matching funds received and expended by the department. The commissioner may adopt, in accordance with chapter 54, such regulations as he deems necessary to carry out the purposes of this section.
2006
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CT
Gen. Stat. § 22-38D Farm to school program. Connecticut-Grown for Connecticut Kids Week.
Celebration / AidEstablishes a Farm to School Program and Connecticut-Grown for Connecticut Kids Week, along with outreach and training to schools in support of local purchasingThere is established, within the Department of Agriculture, a farm to school program. In consultation with the Department of Education, the program shall facilitate and promote the sale of Connecticut-grown farm products by farms to school districts, individual schools and other educational institutions under the jurisdiction of the Department of Education. Through the farm to school program, the Department of Agriculture shall (1) encourage and solicit Connecticut farmers to sell their products to such districts, schools and other educational institutions, (2) develop and regularly update a database of farmers interested in selling their products to Connecticut schools, including the types and amounts of products the farmers want to sell and the time periods during which the farmers want to sell, (3) in consultation with the Department of Education, facilitate purchases from local farmers by such interested districts, schools and other educational institutions, and (4) provide outreach and guidance to farmers concerning the value of and procedure for selling their products to such interested districts, schools and other educational institutions. (b) The Department of Education, in consultation with the Department of Agriculture, school food service directors and interested farming organizations, shall (1) establish a week-long promotional event, to be known as Connecticut-Grown for Connecticut Kids Week, in late September or early October each year, that will promote Connecticut agriculture and foods to children through school meal and classroom programs, at farms, farmers' markets and other locations in the community, (2) encourage and solicit school districts, individual schools and other educational institutions under its jurisdiction to purchase Connecticut-grown farm products, (3) provide outreach, guidance and training to districts, parent and teacher organizations, schools and school food service directors concerning the value of and procedure for purchasing and incorporating into their regular menus Connecticut-grown farm products, (4) in consultation with the Department of Agriculture, arrange for local, regional and state-wide events where potential purchasers and farmers can interact, and (5) arrange for interaction between students and farmers, including field trips to farms and in-school presentations by farmers.2006
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CTGen. Stat. § Sec. 4a-51. (Formerly Sec. 4-110). Duties of Administrative Services Commissioner re purchases.Local PreferenceAll else being equal, state agencies must prefer local dairy products, poultry, eggs, beef, pork, lamb, farm-raised fish, fruits or vegetables in bidsThe Commissioner of Administrative Services, when purchasing or contracting for the purchase of dairy products, poultry, eggs, beef, pork, lamb, farm-raised fish, fruits or vegetables pursuant to subsection (a) of this section, shall give preference to dairy products, poultry, eggs, beef, pork, lamb, farm-raised fish, fruits or vegetables grown or produced in this state, when such products, poultry, eggs, beef, pork, lamb, farm-raised fish, fruits or vegetables are comparable in cost to other dairy products, poultry, eggs, beef, pork, lamb, farm-raised fish, fruits or vegetables being considered for purchase by the commissioner that have not been grown or produced in this state.2013
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CTGen. Stat. § 10-215j. School nutrition program bids by food service management companies. Consistency with farm to school program. Preference in award of contract. Local PreferenceWhen choosing among equal bids, schools must give preference to local suppliersAny bid submitted by a food service management company in response to a request for proposals or bid solicitation by a local or regional board of education that is posted to the State Contracting Portal and that relates to such local or regional board of education's school nutrition program shall include information detailing the consistency of such bid with the state's farm to school program, established in section 22-38d and the ways in which such bid facilitates the purchase of products from local farmers by the local or regional board of education, as described in section 22-38d. In the award of any such contract, in accordance with any other statute, regulation or rule concerning such award, all other factors being equal, preference shall be given to the proposal or bid that facilitates such purchase of products from local farmers by the local or regional board of education, as described in section 22-38d.2016
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MAGen. L. Ch 2. 20 § 6C Massachusetts Food Policy CouncilAdvocate PositionEstablishes MA Food Policy Council to increase production, sales and consumption of Massachusetts-grown foods, including through increased institutional purchases of Massachusetts-grown foods.There shall be established a Massachusetts food policy council, hereinafter referred to as the council. The council shall consist of 17 members, 1 of whom shall be a member of the house of representatives; 1 of whom shall be a member of the senate; 1 of whom shall be a member of the house of representatives who shall be appointed by the minority leader of the house of representatives; 1 of whom shall be a member of the senate who shall be appointed by the minority leader of the senate; 1 of whom shall be the commissioner of agricultural resources, or the commissioner's designee; 1 of whom shall be the commissioner of public health, or the commissioner's designee; 1 of whom shall be the commissioner of elementary and secondary education, or the commissioner's designee; 1 of whom shall be the commissioner of environmental protection, or the commissioner's designee; 1 of whom shall be the commissioner of transitional assistance or the commissioner's designee; 1 of whom shall be the secretary of housing and economic development, or the secretary's designee; and 7 of whom shall be appointed by the governor, 1 of whom shall be a farmer or representative of a farm organization, 1 of whom shall represent food distribution, processing and marketing interests, 1 of whom shall represent direct-to-consumer marketing efforts, 1 of whom shall represent a local health department addressing food safety and nutrition, 1 of whom shall be an expert in food safety, 1 of whom shall be an expert in food processing and handling and 1 of whom shall represent community-based efforts addressing nutrition and public health. (b) Members of the council shall be appointed for terms of 3 years or until a successor is appointed. Members shall be eligible for reappointment. The chair of the council shall be elected by the members of the council for a term not to exceed 2 years. In the event of a vacancy, the original appointing authority shall, within 60 days of the occurrence of a vacancy, appoint a new member in accordance with subsection (a) to fulfill the remainder of the unexpired term. Members of the council shall serve without compensation. The council may request administrative support from the department. (c) The council shall have an advisory committee. The council shall appoint members to the advisory committee and the committee shall include, but not be limited to, the following members: 2 of whom shall be active farmers or who shall represent farmer associations; 1 of whom shall represent an organization engaged in farmland protection and conservation; 1 of whom shall represent an organization engaged in developing new farm businesses, urban and community supported agriculture, community gardening, immigrant and refugee farming or youth education through agriculture; 1 of whom shall represent the cooperative extension service at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst; 1 of whom shall represent food distribution, processing and marketing interests; 1 of whom shall represent a school of nutrition or public health; 1 of whom shall represent a community-based coalition or health care provider addressing obesity and chronic disease; 1 of whom shall represent citizens in need of transitional assistance; and 1 of whom shall represent an anti-hunger organization. The council may create other committees as it deems necessary to carry out the purpose of this section. The advisory committee and any other committees shall serve at the direction of the council. (d)(1) The purpose of the council shall be to develop recommendations to advance the following food system goals for the commonwealth: (A) increased production, sales and consumption of Massachusetts-grown foods; (B) the development and promotion of programs that deliver healthy Massachusetts-grown foods to Massachusetts residents, through programs such as: (i) targeted state subsidies; (ii) increased state purchasing of local products for school and summer meals and other child and adult care programs; (iii) double coupon initiatives; (iv) direct market subsidies to communities with identified needs; (v) increased institutional purchases of Massachusetts-grown foods and other programs to make access to healthy Massachusetts products affordable, and (vi) increased access to healthy Massachusetts-grown foods in communities with disproportionate burdens of obesity and chronic diseases; (C) the protection of the land and water resources required for sustained local food production; and (D) the training, retention and recruitment of farmers and providing for the continued economic viability of local food production, processing and distribution in the commonwealth. (2) Recommendations the council shall consider shall include, but shall not be limited to, methods by which the following may contribute to achieving the food system goals: (i) increased collaboration and communication between state agencies; (ii) increased collaboration and communication between state and federal agencies; (iii) innovative public-private partnerships; (iv) institutional purchasing agreements; (v) changes to state or federal laws or regulations; (vi) changes in the manner in which state and federal programs are implemented; and (7) additional federal, state, local or private investments. (3) Recommendations of the council shall include benchmarks and criteria for measuring progress towards achieving each goal. In developing its recommendations, the council shall solicit public input through public hearings or informational sessions. The council may conduct research and analysis as needed and invite additional stakeholder participation through its advisory committee or other committees to address issues identified by the council as requiring further study or particular expertise. The council shall review progress made on each of its recommendations based upon the benchmarks and criteria developed (4) The council may accept and expend funds for projects consistent with its purpose, including but not limited to, the development of a strategic food policy plan. Such funds shall be administered by the department of agricultural resources. (e) The council shall submit an annual report of its findings, conclusions, proposals, recommendations and progress towards reaching benchmarks provided in subsection (d) not later than December 31. The report shall be submitted to the governor, the president of the senate, the speaker of the house, the chairs of the joint committee on public health, the chairs of the joint committee on environment, natural resources and agriculture, the clerk of the house of representatives and the clerk of the senate.(f) The council shall meet periodically at the call of the chair, but not less than 4 times annually. All meetings shall be public. (g) The council shall keep a public record of all meetings, votes and other business.2010
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MACommonwealth Quality Seal ProgramAidEstablishes certification and technical assistanc to help institutions identify local productsCommonwealth Quality, a brand designed by the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources, serves to identify locally sourced products that are grown, harvested and processed right here in Massachusetts using practices that are safe, sustainable and don’t harm the environment. Commonwealth Quality-certified growers, producers, harvesters and processors not only meet stringent federal, state and local regulatory requirements, but also employ best management practices and production standards that ensure consumers receive the safest, most wholesome products available.2010
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MA
Gen. L. Ch. 6 § 15BBBBBB An Act Establishing Massachusetts Farm-to-School Month and Commending Farm-to-School Programs
Celebration / Advocate PositionEstablishes Farm to School month and joint farm to school task forcehe governor shall annually issue a proclamation setting apart the month of October as Massachusetts Farm-to-School Month in recognition of the vital role that agriculture plays in the culture, heritage and economy of the commonwealth. The proclamation shall commend the farm-to-school programs that support improved nutrition and academic achievement among the student population and represent potential markets for local farmers, growers and food producers in schools and shall recommend that the month be observed in an appropriate manner by the people. SECTION 2. The department of elementary and secondary education, the department of agricultural resources and the department of public health may initiate a joint taskforce, in collaboration with the Massachusetts Farm-to-School Project, LLC, to strategize regarding opportunities to expand farm-to-school programs statewide.2015
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MA
Gen. L.7 § 23B: Preference for products grown in or produced from products grown in commonwealth
Local Preference10% Price Preference for In-State ProductsSection 23B. (a) Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, and to the extent permitted by federal law, a state agency, authority or trustees or officers of a state college or university designated by such trustees when purchasing products of agriculture as defined in section 1A of chapter 128, including but not limited to, fruits, vegetables, eggs, dairy products, meats, crops, horticultural products or products processed into value added products as part of a Massachusetts farm operation, shall prefer products grown in the commonwealth or products produced using products grown in the commonwealth as well as fish, seafood, and other aquatic products. (b) To effectuate the preference for those products of agriculture grown or produced using locally-grown products, the state purchasing agent responsible for procuring the products on behalf of a state agency, authority or trustees or officers of a state college or university designated by such trustees shall, in advertising for bids, contracts or otherwise procuring products of agriculture, make reasonable efforts to facilitate the purchase of such products of agriculture grown or produced using products grown in the commonwealth. (c) The state purchasing agent responsible for procuring the products on behalf of a state agency or authority shall purchase the products of agriculture grown or produced using products grown in the commonwealth, unless the price of the goods exceeds, by more than 10 per cent, the price of products of agriculture grown or produced using products grown outside of the commonwealth.2016
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MAGen. L. Ch. 30B § 4 Submission of quotationsThresholdEstablished $35,000 local food purchasing threshold(d) A procurement officer, who follows sound business practices, may award contracts which include individual purchases of less than $35,000 to Massachusetts farm operations for the procurement of products of agriculture as defined in section 1A of chapter 128 including, but not limited to, fruits, vegetables, eggs, dairy products, meats, crops, horticultural products and products processed into value added products, that are grown or produced using products grown in the commonwealth as well as fish, seafood and other aquatic products, without seeking quotations as required under subsection (a)2006
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ME
Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 7 c 8-A sub-c 1 §214. Coordination of purchases of foodstuffs from Maine concerns
Advocate PositionTasks employee as local foods coordinator; also establishes supporting advisory committee to discuss possibilities and review proposals for expanding purchases of local foodstuffsThe commissioner shall designate an employee of the department to serve as a food purchasing coordinator to assist in the development of connections. 3. Advisory committee. The commissioner shall establish an advisory committee to discuss possibilities and review proposals for expanding purchases of local foodstuffs. The commissioner shall invite one or more representatives from each of the following agencies to serve on the advisory committee: the Department of Education; the Department of Marine Resources; the Department of Corrections; the Department of Administrative and Financial Services, Bureau of Purchases; the Department of Health and Human Services; the University of Maine System; and the Maine Community College System2005/2011
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MELunch Harvest WeekCelebrationEncourages / facilitates relationships with Maine producers to promote local food use in schools.
The Maine Harvest Lunch was resurrected in School Year 2005 as a statewide event. It was dropped in the late 90s when budget cuts eliminated 50% of the state office Child Nutrition staff.
2005
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MERev. Stat. Ann. tit. 20-A, § 6602 #15 Food service recognitionCelebrationLocal food service / servers recognition for creative and effective use of local food products.The department shall provide for the development of an annual competitive skill-oriented school food service recognition based on criteria developed by the department emphasizing creative and effective use of local food products to attract students to eat healthier meals and snacks and promoting community interest in good nutrition and other factors determined by the department.2015
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MERev. Stat. Ann. tit. 20-A, § 6602 #12 Local Produce FundIncentiveMatching grants for local food purchasing in schools ($1 match for every $3 spent, up to $1-2k) The Local Produce Fund is established within the department. The fund is authorized to receive revenue from public and private sources. The fund must be held separate and apart from all other money, funds and accounts. Any balance remaining in the fund at the end of the fiscal year must be carried forward to the next fiscal year. The fund must be used to match $1 for every $3 a school administrative unit pays for produce or minimally processed foods purchased directly from a farmer, farmers' cooperative or local food hub in the State, to a maximum state contribution of $1,000 or $2,000 if funding is received and the school administrative unit sends a food service employee to local foods training administered by the department under subsection 13. At the end of the fiscal year, the school administrative unit may provide the department with receipts documenting purchases pursuant to this subsection during that year. For purposes of this subsection, "minimally processed" means only the washing, cleaning, trimming, drying, sorting and packaging of food items or a combination of those activities. Reimbursement or partial reimbursement to school administrative units may only be made up to the amount available in the fund. Failure to reimburse does not constitute an obligation on behalf of the State to a school administrative unit. The department shall apply for federal grant funding to provide state contributions in excess of $1,000 pursuant to this subsection if applicable grant funding is available. The department may accept grant funding from hospitals and other sources to provide state contributions in excess of $1,000 pursuant to this subsection.2015
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MERev. Stat. Ann. tit. 20-A, § 6602 #13 Local foods trainingIncentive Competitive grant to support training to increase school local food procurementLocal foods training. The department shall administer a program to encourage and expand the use of local foods in school food service programs. As used in this subsection, unless the context otherwise indicates, "local food" means food produced or harvested by a Maine food producer as defined by Title 7, section 212, subsection 2, and "food hub" means any business or organization that locates and obtains food from local growers and fisheries and is able to handle the logistics of supplying and delivering local foods to schools. The program must: A. Provide competitive grants for a training program to be conducted in up to 6 regions to provide training throughout the State without cost for local school food service programs to encourage and expand the use of local foods in school food service programs. The training program must emphasize practical training for food preparers, including creative and effective cooking skills using local fresh foods and local food procurement skills. The training program must also inform participants about practical supply chain solutions, including local food hubs and cooperatives within and across each region of the State; [2015, c. 267, Pt. OOO, §2 (NEW).] B. Foster collaboration between school food service programs throughout the State; [2015, c. 267, Pt. OOO, §2 (NEW).] C. Facilitate and encourage the use of local food hubs; and [2015, c. 267, Pt. OOO, §2 (NEW).] D. Provide guidance to schools in the use of local food products and the nutritional attributes of local foods and provide strategies for encouraging maximum knowledge and acceptance of the nutritional value of locally produced food by students and communities. [2015, c. 267, Pt. OOO, §2 (NEW).] The department shall apply for federal grant funding to implement this subsection. The department may implement this subsection only if the department receives funding covering the costs of the program under this subsection.2015
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MERev. Stat. Ann. tit. 7 c. 8-A, sub-c. 3 An Act To Expand the Local Foods Economy by Promoting Local Foods ProcurementLocal PreferenceBy 2025, 20% of all food and food products procured by state institutions be local food or food products.In accordance with this section, the commissioner shall establish and promote a local foods procurement program with the goal that no later than 2025, 20% of all food and food products procured by state institutions be local food or food products... The commissioner shall include a description of the progress toward reaching the goal under this section in the biennial report submitted to the Legislature pursuant to section 2, subsection 5.2018
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MERev. Stat. Ann. tit. 7 c 8-A sub-c 1 § 211 Statement of policyLocal PreferenceEncourages local purchasing provided food is competitively priced and of adequate quality.It is the policy of the State to encourage food self-sufficiency for the State. State institutions and school districts in the State shall purchase food produced by Maine farmers or fishermen, provided that food is available in adequate quantity and meets acceptable quality standards, and is priced competitively.1983
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NH
Rev. Stat. Ann. § 425:2-A The Granite State Farm to Plate Food Policy and Principles
Local PreferenceEstablishes Granite State Farm to Plate Program to uphold importance of and encourage local food procurementIt is the policy of the state of New Hampshire through the department of agriculture, markets, and food and in conjunction with other state agencies to encourage and support local food producers, farming, and fisheries, including businesses engaged in agriculture, the raising and care of livestock, dairy, fishing, foraging, and aquaculture, agritourism, horticulture, orchard management, maple syrup production, and the associated local and regional businesses that process, purchase, distribute, and sell such food throughout the state. II. State agencies, including the department of agriculture, markets, and food, the department of business and economic affairs, the department of health and human services, the department of environmental services, the department of transportation, the department of education, the university of New Hampshire college of life sciences and agriculture, and the university of New Hampshire cooperative extension shall strive for interagency cooperation as well as cooperation with public and private entities to foster local, state, and regional food systems that adhere to the Granite State farm to plate principles below: (a) Agriculture in New Hampshire represents a vital part of both the state's rural and urban economies and the larger food systems that connect it with the state's local and regional economies and the public. (b) Consumer demand from individuals and institutions, including New Hampshire public schools, universities, child care facilities, after-school programs, restaurants, hospitals, and prisons, for locally grown and produced food is growing and deserves support from the state and state agencies. (c) Support of local food economies is vital to public health of our residents and to the viability and livability of our communities. (d) Increased access to healthy food occurs when local and regional community-based food production, processing, aggregation, distribution, marketing, and retail work together to build markets for healthy food. (e) New Hampshire citizens and communities face social and environmental health issues connected to food, hunger, malnutrition, incidences of obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and other chronic diseases. Increased access to local, healthy food is needed to address such multifaceted issues. (f) Local and regional food economies are a vital source of employment in our communities. Promoting the growth of such local food economies will enhance economic development and job growth throughout the state. (g) Economic development opportunities among New Hampshire's cities and towns are facilitated by state and local governments cooperating to remove obstacles and excessive financial burdens to farms and associated businesses, including farmers' markets, cooperatives, food hubs, fisheries, and processing centers. (h) All levels of government shall consider the findings of the Farm Viability Task Force of 2006-2007 as well as consider advocating farmland preservation efforts that would permanently protect farmland with voluntary agricultural conservation easements that place priority on protection of agricultural resources and production to ensure our state's future capacity to produce food. (i) The New Hampshire dairy industry is vital to the state's economy. It impacts state and local economies via millions of dollars in total economic output, thousands of jobs and millions more dollars in labor income. The dairy industry should be further supported through the milk producers emergency relief fund as specified in RSA 184:107, and other methods that will encourage the success of the state's dairy industry. (j) Federal governmental programs provide significant opportunities for the state to obtain federal funding that supports the development of local food systems, such as use of federal benefits at farmers' markets. (k) Recognizing that a broad array of entities and organizations are already working together to promote New Hampshire local and regional food systems and participants, including agricultural producers, processors, distributors, and consumers, the input of such groups is vital to the construction of a more diverse and productive set of New Hampshire food systems. III. To the extent possible, local governments shall consider the policy and principles of this section when adopting local law, or when enforcing existing law and regulation.2013/2017
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RIDirector of Food Strategy Advocate PositionEstablishes state director of food strategy; non-binding / at-will position now housed in the Commerce Corporation.2016
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RIGen. L. tit. § 21-36 Interagency Food and Nutrition Policy Advisory CouncilAdvocate PositionEnsures cooperation and coordination on food policy issues across Departments
The council shall examine issues regarding the identification and development of solutions to regulatory and policy barriers to developing a strong sustainable food economy and healthful nutrition practices.(b) The council shall collaborate with other task forces, committees, or organizations that are pursuing initiatives or studies similar to the purposes and duties outlined in this chapter.(c) The council shall collaborate with, serve as a resource to, and receive input from food policy councils in the state. (d) The council shall examine any other program and policy issues the council considers pertinent.
2013
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RIGen. L. tit. § 44-30-27 Farm to school income tax creditIncentiveProvides an income tax credit for purchases of produce grown in state that are used to satisfy the purchaser’s contract to provide food to schools. The tax credit is 5% of the cost of the food product grown or produced in the state.Upon presentation of written certification by a local education agency, an individual or entity domiciled in the state for the entire tax year, shall be entitled to an income tax credit for the purchase of produce grown in the state which shall be furnished or used in connection with that individual's or entity's agreement to provide food, services or other products to a local education agency. The income tax credit shall be equal to five percent (5%) of the cost of farm products grown or produced in the state. Any amount of income tax credit not deductible in the taxable year of certification may not be carried over to the following year. The credit may not be applied until all other credits available to the taxpayer for that taxable year are applied. 2007
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RIGen. L. tit. 21-4.1-8 PreferenceLocal PreferenceIn-state milk producers and distributors receive a one quarter of one percent (0.25%) preference over any out-of-state milk provider.Notwithstanding any provisions to the contrary contained in chapter 2 of title 37 or in any city or town charter or ordinance, any Rhode Island milk processor or distributor which bids on any state, city, town, or regional school district contract for the purchase of milk within this state shall be entitled to and shall be given a percentage preference of one quarter of one percent (0.25%) over any out-of-state milk provider or distributor bidding on the same contract.1992
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RIGen. L. tit. 37-2-8 Rhode Island foodstuffsLocal PreferenceGeneral preference for locally produced food all else being equal
When foodstuffs of good quality grown or produced in Rhode Island by Rhode Island farmers are available, the purchasing agent is directed to purchase those foodstuffs at the prevailing market prices when any of those foodstuffs are required by the state institutions.
1989
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RIGen. L. tit. 37-2-22 Small Purchases.ThresholdEstablishes local food procurement threshold at $5k.
Procurements, not to exceed an aggregate amount of ten thousand dollars ($10,000) for construction and five thousand dollars ($5,000) for all other purchases may be made in accordance with small purchase regulations promulgated by the chief purchasing officer. Procurement requirements shall not be artificially divided so as to constitute a small purchase under this section.
N/A
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RIRhode Island Food Strategy Local Preference / Strategy / PlanCreates a 5 year food strategy, a non-binding guide to facilitate local food procurement. Aims to support Food Solutions New England goal that 50% of the food eaten in New England will be produced here by 2060.2017
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VT6 V.S.A. § 4724 Food Systems AdministratorAdvocate PositionEstablishes a food systems administrator position in Dept. of Ag to facilitate institutional procurement of local foodshe position of Food Systems Administrator is established in the Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets for the purpose of assisting Vermont producers in increasing their access to commercial markets and institutions, including schools, registered or licensed child care providers, State and municipal governments, and hospitals. (b) The duties of the Food Systems Administrator shall include: (1) working with institutions, schools, registered or licensed child care providers, distributors, producers, commercial markets, and others to create matchmaking opportunities that increase the number of Vermont institutions that purchase foods grown or produced in Vermont; (2) coordinating funding and providing support to the farm-to-school and farm-to-institutions programs within the Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets, and coordinating with interested parties to access funding or create matchmaking opportunities across the supply chain that increase participation in those programs; (3) encouraging and facilitating State employee access and awareness of opportunities for purchasing local food, including: enrollment in a local community supported agriculture (CSA) organization, purchasing from local farm stands, and participation in a farmers' market; (4) developing a database of producers and potential purchasers and enhancing the Agency's and partners' ability to improve and support local foods coordination through the use of information technology; and (5) providing technical support to local communities with their food security efforts. (c) The Food Systems Administrator, working with the Commissioner of Buildings and General Services pursuant to rules adopted under 29 V.S.A. § 152(14), shall: (1) encourage and facilitate awareness of and opportunities to procure healthy local foods by State employees through the use of approved advertisements and solicitations on State-owned property; and (2) implement guidelines for the appropriate use of State property for employee participation in CSA organizations, including reasonable restrictions on the time, place, and manner of solicitations, advertisements, deliveries, and related activities to ensure the safety and welfare of State property and its occupants. (d) The Food Systems Administrator shall administer a local foods grant program, the purpose of which shall be to provide grants to allow Vermont producers to increase their access to commercial and institutional markets. 2011
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VT
6 V.S.A. § 4723 Professional development for food service personnel
AidProvides school personnel with training and technical assistance to facilitate local procurement.
The Secretary of Education, in consultation with the Secretary of Agriculture, Food and Markets, the Commissioner of Health, and farm-to-school organizations and partners, shall offer professional development opportunities for public school food service and child care personnel and child care resource development specialists. Training shall include information about strategies for procuring, processing, and serving locally grown foods, especially with regard to federal procurement program requirements, as well as information about nutrition, obesity prevention, coping with severe food allergies, universal recycling, and food service operations. The Secretary of Education may use a portion of the funds appropriated for this training session to pay a portion of or all expenses for attendees and to develop manuals or other materials to help in the training. (b) The Secretary of Education shall, with existing programs and organizations, provide training related to procurement of local food and technical assistance to school food service and child care personnel and use a portion of the funds appropriated for this purpose to enable the trained people to provide technical assistance at the school and school district levels. (c) Training provided under this section shall promote the policies established in the Vermont School Wellness Policy Guidelines developed by the Agencies of Agriculture, Food and Markets and of Education and the Department of Health, updated in June 2015, or the guidelines' successor.
2007
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VTFarm to School Awareness Day CelebrationEstablishes Farm to School Awareness DayN/A
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VT6 V.S.A. § 4721 Local Food Grants ProgramIncentiveUp to $15k to fund equipment and other initiatives related to local food procurement in schools(a) There is created in the Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets the Rozo McLaughlin Farm-to-School Program to execute, administer, and award local grants for the purpose of helping Vermont schools develop farm-to-school programs that will sustain relationships with local farmers and producers, enrich the educational experience of students, improve the health of Vermont children, and enhance Vermont's agricultural economy. (b) A school, a school district, a consortium of schools, a consortium of school districts, or registered or licensed child care providers may apply to the Secretary of Agriculture, Food and Markets for a grant award to: (1) fund equipment, resources, training, and materials that will help to increase use of local foods in child nutrition programs; (2) fund items, including local food products, gardening supplies, field trips to farms, gleaning on farms, and stipends to visiting farmers, that will help educators to use hands-on educational techniques to teach children about nutrition and farm-to-school connections; (3) fund professional development and technical assistance, in partnership with the Agency of Education and farm-to-school technical service providers, to help teachers, child nutrition personnel, and members of the farm-to-school community educate students about nutrition and farm-to-school connections and assist schools and licensed or registered child care providers in developing a farm-to-school program; and (4) fund technical assistance or support strategies to increase participation in federal child nutrition programs that increase the viability of sustainable meal programs. (c) The Secretaries of Agriculture, Food and Markets and of Education and the Commissioner of Health, in consultation with farmers, child nutrition staff, educators, and farm-to-school technical service providers jointly shall adopt procedures relating to the content of the grant application and the criteria for making awards. (d) The Secretary shall determine that there is significant interest in the school community before making an award and shall give priority consideration to schools, school districts, and registered or licensed child care providers that are developing farm-to-school connections and education, that indicate a willingness to make changes to their child nutrition programs to increase student access and participation, and that are making progress toward the implementation of the Vermont School Wellness Policy Guidelines developed by the Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets, the Agency of Education, and the Department of Health, updated in June 2015 or of the successor of these guidelines. (e) No award shall be greater than $15,000.00. 2007
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VT
29 V.S.A § 909 State purchase of food and agricultural products
Local PreferenceEncourages local purchasing all else being equal(a) When procuring food and agricultural products for the State, its agencies, departments, instrumentalities, and institutions, the Commissioner of Buildings and General Services shall consider the interests of the State relating to the proximity of the supplier and the costs of transportation, and relating to the economy of the State and the need to maintain and create jobs in the State. (b) When making purchases pursuant to this section, the Secretary of Administration, the Commissioner of Buildings and General Services, and any State-funded institutions shall, other considerations being equal and considering the results of any econometric analysis conducted, purchase products grown or produced in Vermont when available2011
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VT6 V.S.A. § 4719 The Rozo Mclaughlin Farm-to-school ProgramLocal Preference / AidEstablishes Farm to School Program and sets goal of 50% local or regional procurement by 2025
Purpose. It is the purpose of this chapter to establish a farm-to-school program to: (1) encourage Vermont residents in developing healthy and lifelong habits of eating nutritious local foods;(2) maximize use by Vermont schools of fresh and locally grown, produced, or processed food; (3) work with partners to establish a food, farm, and nutrition education program that educates Vermont students regarding healthy eating habits through the use of educational materials, classes, and hands-on techniques that inform students of the connections between farming and the foods that students consume; (4) increase the size and stability of direct sales markets available to farmers; and (5) increase participation of Vermont students in child nutrition programs by increasing the selection of available foods.(b) State Farm-to-School Network goal. It is the goal of the Farm-to-School Program to establish a food system that by 2025:(1) engages 75 percent of Vermont schools in an integrated food system education program that incorporates community-based learning; and (2) purchases 50 percent of food from local or regional food sources.
2007
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VT10 V.S.A. § 330 The Farm-to-Plate Investment ProgramStrategy / PlanEstablished Farm to Plate initiative, and provides supporting resourcesCreation. (1) The Sustainable Jobs Fund Program in consultation with the Vermont Sustainable Agriculture Council shall establish the Vermont Farm-to-Plate Investment Program to fulfill the goals and carry out the tasks described in this section. (2) If at least $100,000.00 in funding is not made available for the purpose of this section, the Sustainable Jobs Fund Program is encouraged but no longer required to fulfill the provisions of this section. (b) Goals. The goals of the Farm-to-Plate Investment Program are to: (1) Increase economic development in Vermont's food and farm sector. (2) Create jobs in the food and farm economy (3) Improve access to healthy local foods. (c) Tasks. (1) By June 30, 2010, the Vermont Farm-to-Plate Investment Program shall create a strategic plan for agricultural economic development, which may be periodically reviewed and updated, based upon the following: (A) Inventory Vermont's food system infrastructure by gathering existing data, studies, and analysis about the components of Vermont's food system, including: (i) The types of foods produced in Vermont, the number of producers of each type of food, the amount of each type of food produced, and the financial viability of each food-producing sector. (ii) The types of food processors in Vermont, how much food produced in Vermont is purchased by Vermont processors, and the financial viability of the food processing sector in Vermont. (iii) The current and potential markets in which Vermont food producers and processors can sell their products. (iv) The extent of existing agricultural lands that could be expanded and the resources available to expand Vermont's food production. (v) The potential for new farmers and food processors to enter the local food economy, the methods for new farmers to acquire land and other farm infrastructure, and the availability and barriers to farm and processing labor. (vi) The potential for entirely new local products and the barriers to farmers and processors entering new markets. (B) Identify gaps in the infrastructure and distribution systems and identify ways to address these gaps. (2) The Vermont Farm-to-Plate Investment Program shall seek grant funding to support farm-to-table direct marketing, including farmers' markets and community-supported agriculture operations and to support regional community food hubs. (3) As an ongoing task, the Farm-to-Plate Investment Program shall use the information gathered for the strategic plan to identify methods and the funding necessary to strengthen the links among producers, processors, and markets, including: (A) Support of the work of existing farm-to-school programs to increase the purchase of local foods by Vermont schools, with a particular emphasis on procurement of nutrient-dense animal foods. (B) Collaborating with the Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets and the Department of Buildings and General Services to increase procurement of local foods in accordance with 6 V.S.A. § 4601.(C) Collaborating with the Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets and the Sustainable Agriculture Council to increase procurement of local foods by businesses and institutions. (D) Supporting initiatives that improve direct marketing of foods from the farm to the consumer. (E) Informing agricultural lenders of the information collected under subdivision (1) of this subsection (c) in order to facilitate availability of agricultural financing. (4) The Farm-to-Plate Investment Program strategic plan shall also include recommendations regarding measurable goals that shall be tracked over the ten-year life of the Plan; methods for the ongoing collection of data necessary to track those goals; plans for updating the Plan as needed; and appropriate methods to track the ongoing economic contribution of the farm and food sector to the Vermont economy. (d) Methods. To accomplish the goals and carry out the ongoing tasks stated in this section, the Vermont Farm-to-Plate Investment Program may: (1) Create an advisory panel with representatives from the agricultural and business communities.(2) Hire or assign staff. (3) Seek and accept funds from private and public entities. (4) Utilize technical assistance, loans, grants, or other means approved by the board.2010
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