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Common NameBotanical NameLocationDate PlantedNo.Bloom StartBloom EndWhen to FertilizeSpring Care Mar-May2017 Spring Care DoneSummer Care Jun-Aug2017 Summer Care DoneFall Care Sep-Nov2016 Fall Care DoneWinter Care Dec-Feb2017 Winter Care DoneOther Care TipsTransplant & Propagation Tips
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Althea, Blueberry Smoothie aka Rose of SharonHybiscus syriacusJuneOctoberPruning done later than early spring may cause the loss of some blooms, but those that are not removed will be larger.FALSEFALSEFlowers on growth from the current year, Pruning may be done in late fall or winter after leaves drop or in early spring before buds formFALSEFALSEEasily propagated by stem cuttings. Sterile, Does not produce seed.
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Aster Wood’s PinkAster novi-belgii ‘Wood’s Pink’AugustOctoberFALSEPinch back stems several times before mid-July helps control plant height, promote bushiness, eliminate need for staking. FALSEMay be cut to ground after flowering to prevent self-seeding or if foliage has become unsightly. FALSEFALSEDivide rootball every 2-3 years to maintain vigor and flower quality in early spring after the last frost.
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Aster Wood’s PurpleAster dumosus ‘Wood’s Purple’ - AKA Symphyotrichum dumosumAugust OctoberFALSEPinch back stems several times before mid-July helps control plant height, promote bushiness, eliminate need for staking.FALSEMay be cut to ground after flowering to prevent self-seeding or if foliage has become unsightly. FALSEFALSEDivide rootball every 2-3 years to maintain vigor and flower quality in early spring after the last frost.
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Aster, Believer PurpleAster Novi-Belgii 'Believer Purple'AugustOctoberFALSEPinch back stems several times before mid-July helps control plant height, promote bushiness, eliminate need for staking. FALSEMay be cut to ground after flowering to prevent self-seeding or if foliage has become unsightly. FALSEFALSEDivide rootball every 2-3 years to maintain vigor and flower quality in early spring after the last frost.
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Astilbe, Visions ChineseAstilbe chinensis “Visions”JuneAugustFlower can be cut whenever they start to look ragged or left up for winter interest and cut back in spring.FALSENo deadheading is needed.FALSEFlower can be cut whenever they start to look ragged or left up for winter interest and cut back in spring.FALSEFALSEDivided every 4-5 years to keep plants healthy. More frequent division by be necessary if they grow quickly.
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Beech, AmericanFagus grandifoliaAprilMayFALSEFALSEFALSEFALSE
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Black-eyed Susan aka Gloriosa DaisyRudbeckia hirtaJuneSeptemberFALSEDeadhead spent flowers to encourage repeated blooms and/or to prevent any unwanted self-seeding.FALSEFALSEFALSEFreely self-seeds. Collect dried seed heads. It is a biennial or short-lived perennial, but often grown as annual. Transplant before new growth begins in spring, which allows several weeks for roots to establish before hot weather. Fall is ok, but plant may suffer damage to roots during winter month.
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Bleeding HeartDicentra “King of Hearts”May JunePromptly remove spent flowering stems to promote additional bloom.FALSEFALSEFALSEFALSETransplant in early spring before new growth emerges or after the foliage dies back in autumn. Divide rootball every three to five years.
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Bleeding HeartDicentra “Luxuriant”MaySeptemberPromptly remove spent flowering stems to promote additional bloom.FALSEFALSEFALSEFALSETransplant in early spring before new growth emerges or after the foliage dies back in autumn. Divide rootball every three to five years.
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Blue FescueFestuca glauca “Elijah Blue”JuneJulyCut back foliage in early spring to 3-4” to tidy clumps and to facilitate new growth.FALSECut back clumps if they decline in hot, humid summers.FALSEFALSEFALSEClumps tend to die out in the center and need to be divided and replanted or replaced every 2-3 years.
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Blue Oat GrassHelictotrichon sempervirensJuneIn spring, pull away old leaves that have died from clumpsFALSEFALSEFALSETrim back in late winter.FALSEPropagate by division in early autumn or spring, or by seed in spring.
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BoxwoodBuxus microphyllaAprilMayPruning should never be done prior to last spring frost date. Pruning too early often promotes tender new growth that may be damaged or killed by a late spring frost.FALSEFALSEFALSEFALSETolerant of pruning and shearing as needed. Thin plants and remove dead or damaged branches annually to improve air circulation.May be propagated by cuttings.
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Catmint, Walker’s LowNepeta faasenii “Walker’s Low”JuneSeptemberFALSEShear flower spikes after initial flowering to promote continued bloom. If plant flowers a second time, cut back spent flowers to prevent seed production. It readily self-seeds and can quickly get out of control if left unpruned.FALSEFALSEIn winter after foliage dies, cut catmint to ground.FALSEDivide after winter pruning.
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Catmint, Walker’s LowNepeta faasenii “Walker’s Low”FALSEFALSEFALSEFALSE
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Clematis, ArabellaClematis “Arabella”JuneSeptemberClematis pruning group three: Flower in late summer on growth made in that season. Prune in late winter or early spring when buds show signs of growth, typically in February. Cut back all old stems to lowest pair of healthy buds 6 in to 1 ft above soil level.FALSEFALSEFALSEFALSEBest - very early spring as soon as it starts to show any green buds. If moved after some growing, cut top back to 1 to 2 ft tall. Can be propagated by layering or semi-hardwood cuttings
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Coneflower, Magnus SuperiorEchinacea purpurea “Magnus Superior”JuneAugustFALSEPlants usually rebloom without deadheading. Prompt removal of spent flowers improves general appearance.FALSEFALSEFALSEDivide clumps when they become overcrowded, about every 4 years. Freely self-seeds if at least some of the seed heads are left in place.
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Coneflower, Rubinstern PurpleEchinacea purpurea “Rubinstern”JulyAugustFALSEPlants usually rebloom without deadheading. Prompt removal of spent flowers improves general appearance.FALSEFALSEFALSEDivide clumps when they become overcrowded, about every 4 years. Freely self-seeds if at least some of the seed heads are left in place.
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Coneflower, White SwanEchinacea purpurea “White Swan”JulyAugustFALSEPlants usually rebloom without deadheading. Prompt removal of spent flowers improves general appearance.FALSEFALSEFALSEDivide clumps when they become overcrowded, about every 4 years. Freely self-seeds if at least some of the seed heads are left in place.
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Coral Bell, aka Alum Root, Palace PurpleHeuchera micrantha “Palace Purple”JuneJulySide-dress with compost in spring, or apply a slow-release fertilizer. Do not prune back; remove dead leaves in spring.FALSEShear off old top growth after flowering in late summer to expose fresh foliage. Remove dead leaves over the growing season to keep the foliage looking vibrant. Remove old flower spikes regularly.FALSEFALSEFALSEOld clumps may need to be divided in spring every 3 years. Fall division or transplanting is not recommended as these shallow-rooted plants need a full growing season to become established before winter.
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Coral Bell, CaramelHeuchera vilosa ‘Caramel’JuneJulySide-dress with compost in spring, or apply a slow-release fertilizer.Do not prune back; remove dead leaves in spring.FALSEShear off old top growth after flowering in late summer to expose fresh foliage. Remove dead leaves over the growing season to keep the foliage looking vibrant. Remove old flower spikes regularly.FALSEFALSEFALSEOld clumps may need to be divided in spring every 3 years. Fall division or transplanting is not recommended as these shallow-rooted plants need a full growing season to become established before winter.
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Coral Bell, Carnival Coffee BeanHeuchera villosa “Carnival Coffee Bean”JuneJulySide-dress with compost in spring, or apply a slow-release fertilizer.Remove last year’s tattered leaves at the base when flower stalks begin emerging in spring.FALSECut back entire flower stalk after flowering to put the plant’s energy into growing more leaves.FALSEFALSEWinter mulching after the ground freezes hard will prevent heaving. Foliage protects the crowns from winter damage, do not pruneFALSEDivide clumps in spring every 3-4 years to keep them from dying out in the center.
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Coral Bell, ObsidianHeuchera “Obsidian”JuneJulySide-dress with compost in spring, or apply a slow-release fertilizer. Do not prune back; remove dead leaves in spring.FALSEShear off old top growth after flowering in late summer to expose fresh foliage. Remove dead leaves over the growing season to keep the foliage looking vibrant. Remove old flower spikes regularly.FALSEFALSEFALSEOld clumps may need to be divided in spring every 3 years. Fall division or transplanting is not recommended as these shallow-rooted plants need a full growing season to become established before winter.
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Crabapple, SargentinaMalus SargentiiAprilPrune May to early June, after flowering but before flower buds form for the following year.FALSEFALSEFALSEFALSEProfuse bloom, often occurs only in alternate years.
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Cranesbill, Johnson’s BlueGeranium “Johnson’s Blue”JuneAugustFALSEIf bloom interrupts in heat of summer, cut back to rejuvenate, shape and/or encourage a late summer/early fall rebloom. FALSECut back in autumn after several killing frosts.FALSEFALSESide stems may be removed or trimmed at any time to control spread. Stake plants if necessary. If grown in wet conditions, may get taller and required support. Keep plants “dead-leafed”—remove any leaves that have turned brown or yellow. Propagate by dividing in early spring or fall, taking rooted pieces from the outside of the plant clumps.
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DaylilyHemerocallis lilioasphodelusJuneAugustFALSEDeadhead spent flowers daily for neatness and remove scapes when flowers have completed bloom. FALSERemove old foliage by cutting back to the ground in the fall.FALSEFALSEDivide every 3-4 years in fall or spring. Spring is best in cold winter climates.
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DaylilyHemerocallis lilioasphodelusFALSEFALSEFALSEFALSE
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Daylily, Bama BoundHemerocallis “Bama Bound”JulyAugustFALSEDeadhead spent flowers daily for neatness and remove scapes when flowers have completed bloom. FALSERemove old foliage by cutting back to the ground in the fall.FALSEFALSEDivide every 3-4 years in fall or spring. Spring is best in cold winter climates.
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Daylily, Strawberry CandyHemerocallis ‘Strawberry Candy’JuneAugustIn early spring, apply a light application of balanced or slow-release fertilizer low in nitrogen or side-dress with compost and organic amendments when new growth appears.FALSEDeadhead spent flowers daily for neatness and remove scapes when flowers have completed bloom. FALSERemove old foliage by cutting back to the ground in the fall.FALSEFALSEDivide every 3-4 years in fall or spring. Spring is best in cold winter climates.
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Echinacea, PowwowEchinacea purpurea “Powwow Wild Berry” July AugustFALSEPlants usually rebloom without deadheading. Prompt removal of spent flowers improves general appearance.FALSEFALSEFALSEDivide clumps when they become overcrowded, about every 4 years. Freely self-seeds if at least some of the seed heads are left in place.
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Echinacea, PowwowEchinacea purpurea “Powwow Wild Berry” FALSEFALSEFALSEFALSE
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Feather Reed GrassCalamagrostis acutiflora “Karl Foerster”JulyAugustCut clumps to ground (some say 6-9 inches) in late winter or early spring just before new shoots appear.FALSEFALSEFALSEFALSETo propagate, divide a single mature clump, but be prepared for a bit of a wrestling match when trying to pry offspring from a mature plant. To yield flowers the first year, divisions should have half a dozen growing points; if divisions are small they may take two years to flower. Best time to plant is in fall, early spring usually works as well.
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Fern, Japanese SwordPolystichum retrosopaleaceumpH of 4-7, Fertilize in spring just after new growth has begun. Ferns are very sensitive to fertilizers; use a slow-release.FALSEFALSEFALSECut fronds back after a killing frost and apply a winter mulch of salt marsh hay or evergreen boughs to help prevent winter heaving.FALSEDivide when fern fronds appear to be smaller or the clump has a bare center. Some ferns form crowns while others grow as mats of fibrous roots. Dig up the whole clump and take 6” square pieces from the most vigorous growth.
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Fern, Ursula’s Red Japanese PaintedAthyrium niponicum ‘Ursula’s Red’pH of 4-7, Fertilize in spring just after new growth has begun. Ferns are very sensitive to fertilizers; use a slow-release.FALSEFALSEFALSECut fronds back after a killing frost and apply a winter mulch of salt marsh hay or evergreen boughs to help prevent winter heaving.FALSEDivide when fern fronds appear to be smaller or the clump has a bare center. Some ferns form crowns while others grow as mats of fibrous roots. Dig up the whole clump and take 6” square pieces from the most vigorous growth.
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Geum, Banana DaiquiriGeum “Banana Daquiri”JuneJuneApply a balanced fertilizer once in the spring, when new growth begins.
Trim dead leaves only.FALSERemove spent flowers to encourage additional bloom, but consider leaving some of the later flowers so that the fluffy seed heads can form. Can be pruned back hard after blooming to rejuvenate the foliage.FALSEFALSEFALSEDivide every three or four years in early spring before new growth begins or in fall.
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Grape HyacinthMuscari armeniacumMarchAprilFALSEFALSEBulbs often send up grasslike leaves in fall. This growth is normal and should not be cut or mowed off until browned by frost. FALSEFALSENaturalizes by bulb offsets and self-seeding, although it usually taks at least 4 years before a seed grown plant will flower.
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Hosta, variousHostaJulyAugustPrefer slightly acid, light application of fertilizer in early spring.Can be cut back in spring.FALSEGroom plants by removing yellow or dead leaves. Cut flower spikes off at base when blooming is over.FALSECut foliage back in the fall to eliminate cover for overwintering slugs, or cut back in spring. FALSEFALSEBest to divide in early spring before leaves unfurl, but both division and transplanting are successful throughout the season if there is thorough follow-up watering.
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Hydrangea, Bluebird LacecapHydrangea serrata “Bluebird”MayAugustBloom occurs on old wood. Little pruning is needed. Prune after flowering by cutting back flowering stems to a pair of healthy buds. Prune out weak or winter-damaged stems in early spring.FALSEFALSEMulch before first frost. May lose significant numbers of flower buds or die to the ground in harsh winters, impairing or totally destroying the bloom for the coming year.FALSEFALSETransplant established plants during the winter while plant is dormant.
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Hydrangea, Endless Summer aka Bigleaf HydrangeaHydrangea macrophylla ‘Endless Summer’JulySeptemberAdd aluminum sulfate to make flowers bluer or lime to make pinker. Fertilize once in spring with fertilizer designed to encourage blooms, such as 15-30-15.Prune out weak or winter-damaged stems in late winter/early spring. FALSEDead head spent blooms to help encourage repeat bloom. Needs little pruning. If needed, prune immediately after flowering by cutting back flowering stems to a pair of healthy buds, by end of August.FALSEMulch before first frost. May lose significant numbers of flower buds or die to the ground in harsh winters, impairing or totally destroying the bloom for the coming year.FALSEGive additional winter protection to minimize loss of flower buds or possible die-back to ground in harsh winter. A burlap wrap of stems or circle of chicken wire filled with leaves or straw to 8-12” can be effective. Unlike other cultivars, Endless Summer blooms on both old and new growth.FALSEYoung plants may be transplanted when dormant in early spring.
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Hydrangea, Pinky WinkyHydrangea paniculata “DVP Pinky”JulySeptemberFertilize in early spring by applying a slow release fertilizer specialized for trees and shrubs. Follow the label recommendations for rates of application.Bloom occurs on current season’s growth. Prune as needed in late winter to early spring. FALSEFALSEPrune off spent flowers when they turn brown.FALSEBloom occurs on current season’s growth. Prune as needed in late winter to early spring. FALSETransplant new container plants in spring; move established shrubs during fall or winter dormancy. Root prune the bush in spring before transplanting in fall or winter, using a sharp spade or half-moon edger. Before moving, remove all dead and damaged branches and reduce size by about one-third. Pruning in late summer or early fall gives the plant time to recover before moving the shrub later in fall or winter.
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Lady’s MantleAlchemilla mollisJuneJulyRemove mulch in early spring. Remove last year’s tattered leaves at the base when flower stalks begin emerging in spring.FALSECut back hard after flowers brown to produce a second flush of growth and blooms.FALSELeave plant standing in the fall. Foliage protects the crowns from winter damage. Apply a 4-inch layer of mulch on the plants in late fall to protect the roots from freezing and thawing winter temperatures.FALSEFALSESow seed in containers in spring. Divide in early spring or autumn.
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Lavender, MunsteadLavandula augustifolia ‘Munstead’JuneSeptemberDo not fertilize. If you add fertilizer it will spur it to grow a lot of leaves and make it less fragrant. Do not prune until second year in ground. Cut back to one third after new leaves appear. Prune back in early spring to avoid pruning off undeveloped flowers, about the same time you would plant spring bulbs. See http://everything-lavender.com/ FALSERemove faded flowers to promote continued bloom.FALSEPrune off any dead, limp or unsightly growth. This is not the best time to give your plant a hard pruning for those of you with cold harsh freezing winters. FALSEMake sure that there are no winter debris such as autumn leaves or plant material from nearby plants smothering your plantings. A pile of leaves will get dampened by winter precipitation and hold moisture causing disease, die back or totally kill your plant. Even though it is winter you will need to see that good air circulation is maintained. Try to avoid leaving your plants under a pile of damp snow for very long. FALSEGrow from cuttings. Tip cuttings may be taken any time of year except winter. Spring cuttings often root faster. Remove the short 3-4” side shoots by pulling towards sharply to produce a heel or a piece that has a small strip of woody skin attach. Strip leaves, dip in rooting hormone and insert in damp sand.
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Lavender, MunsteadLavandula augustifolia ‘Munstead’FALSEFALSEPrune off any dead, limp or unsightly growth. This is not the best time to give your plant a hard pruning for those of you with cold harsh freezing winters. FALSEFALSE
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LilacSyringa meyeriAprilMayPrompt removal of faded flower panicles before seed set will increase bloom in following year. Prune as needed immediately after flowering.FALSEFALSEFALSEFALSE
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Lilac, Dwarf HybridSyringa “Red Pixie”MayJuneLightly trim older bushes after flowering, immediately after the main flush of flower fade to encourage strong renewal grown where next spring’s flowers will sprout.FALSEFALSEFALSEFALSEMove bush in late winter or early spring when lilac is still dormant to minimize trauma to the plant.
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Majesty PalmRavenea rivularisFertilize with a general-purpose houseplant fertilizer. Fertilize regularly for faster growth, or just a couple of times a year for slower growth. No matter how often you fertilize, follow directions on fertilizer packaging to ensure you're giving it the correct dose. FALSERemove old fronds that have started to turn yellow.FALSEFALSEFALSE
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Matchsticks ChrysanthemumHardy Mum Chrysanthemum ‘Matchsticks’SeptemberNovemberFertilize hardy mums once per month during spring and summer using a complete water-soluble 20-20-20 NPK fertilizer. Do not fertilize hardy mum flowers after the end of summer. The halt in feeding will signal that it's time to bloom and prepare for winter, which is necessary for the healthy life cycle of the plants. Leave the foliage on the plants until late winter or early spring. Cut back the stems of the mums to 3 to 4 inches above the ground.

FALSEPinch hardy mums to remove the growing tips, once when the plant is about six inches tall and again when the shoots have grown an additional six inches. Pinch off the growing tip of each shoot with your fingers, which will promote branching and compact growth habits, and lead to more blooms in the fall. Do not pinch early blooming cultivars later than June 15, and do not pinch late blooming cultivars later than July 15. Doing so will not give enough time for the plant to recover before it's time to bloom.FALSELeave the foliage on the plants until spring. Mulch.FALSEFALSEDivide every 2 to 3 years in the spring, to maintain vigorous, healthy plants. If you choose to move the plants, do so before the first hard freeze.
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Narcissus, Ice FolliesNarcissus “Ice Follies”May MayEarly spring, just as the foliage begins to push through the soil. Use a granular slow-release fertilizer formulated especially for bulbs.FALSERemove dried up foliage after it has died down completely. FALSEFALSEMulch with evergreen boughs after the ground freezes may help plants stay dormant if warm periods occur during the winter months.FALSEMove or divide bulbs when their foliage has withered, signaling the end of active growth. Lift them with a digging fork or spade, taking care to avoid injuring the bulbs, and replant them immediately at the same depth and about three times their diameter apart.
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Narcissus, Yellow CheerfulnessNarcissus “Yellow Cheerfulness”May MayEarly spring, just as the foliage begins to push through the soil. Use a granular slow-release fertilizer formulated especially for bulbs.FALSERemove dried up foliage after it has died down completely. FALSEFALSEMulch with evergreen boughs after the ground freezes may help plants stay dormant if warm periods occur during the winter months.FALSEMove or divide bulbs when their foliage has withered, signaling the end of active growth. Lift them with a digging fork or spade, taking care to avoid injuring the bulbs, and replant them immediately at the same depth and about three times their diameter apart.
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Ornamental OnionAllium aflatunense 'Purple Sensation' May JuneRemove the spent flowers if you wish to prevent them from self-sowing.FALSEFALSEFALSEFALSEAlliums rarely need transplanting or dividing, but this can be done when the bulbs are dormant.
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Phlox, Garden ‘Laura’Phlox paniculata “Laura”JulySeptemberFALSERemove faded flower panicles to prolong bloom period and to prevent unwanted self-seeding. FALSEFALSEFALSEDivide established clump. Also root cuttings, stem cuttings in late spring or early summer. Cultivars generally do not come true from seed.
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Phlox, Nicky TallPhlox paniculata “Nicky”July AugustFALSERemove faded flower panicles to prolong bloom period and to prevent unwanted self-seeding. FALSEFALSEFALSEDivide established clump. Also root cuttings, stem cuttings in late spring or early summer. Cultivars generally do not come true from seed.
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Pincushion Flower, Butterfly BlueScabiosa columbaria “Butterfly Blue”May JulyIn early spring when plant first starts to grown, should be able to see if it need to be pruned down to basal foliage. Cut off any dead portions in early spring for appearance.FALSERemove spent flowers to encourage additional bloom. Prune down to the crown (just above ground level) if stems fail to branch out in the spring or early summer after plant reaches about one foot tall. Prune down to basal foliage (leaves that grow around the crown of the plant) if the plant has just one center leader (like a trunk) which can occur after years of growth.FALSEPrune flower stems off in late fall just above the basal foliage.FALSEFALSEDig up parent plant and separate 2-3 well-rooted stems and transplant perennial varieties in late autumn or before the last frost in early spring. Cuttings can be taken in summer for propagation.
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Pink Cloud Beauty BushKolkwitzia amabilis “Pink Cloud”MayJuneFALSEEarly-flowering shrubs are pruned after flowering. They usually flower on the previous year’s growth. Pruning immediately after flowering allows the maximum time for development of young growth to provide the following year’s flowers before the end of summer.FALSEFALSEFALSEPropagate by semi-hardwood cuttings.
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Pinks, Firewitch CheddarDianthus gratianopolitanus “Firewitch”MayJuneFALSERemove spent flowers to promote continued bloom. After flowering is completed, plants may be lightly sheared back to maximize foliage effect as a dense ground cover.FALSEFALSEFALSEDivide plants every 3-4 years as new growth begins in the spring, lifting plants and dividing them into clumps.
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Rhododendron, Olga MezittRhododendron ‘Olga Mezitt’ aka PJM group hybrid by Peter J. MezittAprilAcidify soils as needed. Clip off spent flower clusters immediately after bloom.FALSEFALSEFALSEFALSESterile, Does not produce seed.
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Rhododendron, Roseum ElegansRhododendron “Roseum Elegans”July 2005May JuneRemove spent flowers to promote growth. Any necessary pruning should be done soon after flowering, before next year's flower buds form.FALSEFALSEFALSEFALSEAll parts of this plant are poisonous.
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River BirchBetula nigraAugust 2015AprilMayAvoid pruning in spring when sap is running.FALSEUse soaker hoses and bark mulches to keep root zones cool and moist.FALSEFALSEFALSEAvoid pruning in spring when sap is running. Use soaker hoses and bark mulches to keep root zones cool and moist.
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Russian sagePerovskia atriplicifoliaJulyOctoberCut back plant almost to the ground (some say 6 inches) in late winter to early spring as soon as new growth appearsFALSEFALSEFALSEFALSEMay require staking.Transplant in spring, just as new growth is about to begin. As a woody flowering perennial, can be propagated by cuttings as well as by seed. Collect seeds from desiccating seed heads at the end of the bloom cycle. Harvest soft wood cuttings in late spring or early summer, at least 5” long.
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Sea Thrift, Ballerina LilacArmeria pseudarmeria “Ballerina Lilac”September 2015May JuneFALSETrim off spent flowers to encourage repeat blooming.FALSEFALSEFALSEEarly spring by root division.
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Shasta DaisyLeucanthemum superbumJuneOctoberFALSEDeadhead spent flowers to encourage heavier blooms.FALSECut back Shasta daises near the base of the stems after your area's first frost date. Remove all dead or dried-out foliage. Spread a 1- or 2-inch layer of mulch, such as pine branches or salt hay, over the pruned Shasta daises and the surrounding soil.
FALSEFALSEA short-lived perennial, they return for just a few years. Staggered yearly plantings ensure that plants continue to colonize.
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Stonecrop, Sedum Autumn JoyHylotelephium “Autumn Joy”SeptemberOctoberSpring pruning can help build stronger stalks for floppy sedum. Pinch off the terminal, or top, bud of each stalk with fingers when the plant is 6 to 8 inches tall. This helps the plant produce stronger side shoots, helping the plant better support the weight of fall blossoms. Trim off the top 4 inches of the plant when it is about 8 inches tall with hedging shears when you are simply trying to control the height of the plant, which can reach 3 feet tall, or you don't have the patience for pinching individual stalks. Remove clippings from the base of the plant.
Water the plant well after pinching to help it recover from pruning shock.
FALSEFALSEFALSECut the dead, dried stalks from the plant down to 3 inches tall in late winter. The stalks can be removed anytime after bloom is complete, but garden experts recommend leaving them on as long as possible to attract birds and to provide protection against any severe cold to the plant's crown.FALSETake softwood cuttings or root leaves in early summer. Divide in spring.
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Tarda TulipTulipa TardaMayMayAfter flowering fertilize with nitrogenRemove mulch when all danger of frost has passed. Allow the leaves to die back naturally, cut the leaves off when they turn completely yellow.FALSEFALSEPlant new bulbs in fall.FALSETo survive harsh winters apply a mulch (straw or newspaper) over them to prevent frost damage.FALSE
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Tickseed, Baby SunCoreopsis grandiflora “Baby Sun”JuneSeptemberFALSEPrompt deadheading of spent flower stalks encourages additional bloom and prevents any unwanted self-seeding. May be cut back hard in summer if foliage sprawls or becomes unkempt.FALSEFALSEFALSEEvery 2-3 years, dig the clumps up in the fall after the plant finished blooming or in the early spring before new growth begins.
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Tickseed, Moonbeam Threadleaf CoreopsisCoreopsis verticillata ‘Moonbeam’JuneAugustFertilize lightly once in spring with a balanced granular formula; too much fertilizer will result in spindly growth.FALSEShear in mid to late summer to promote fall growth and to remove any sprawling or unkempt foliage.FALSEDo not prune back all the way for winter, as stems left standing will protect the crowns. Will benefit from a mulch.FALSEFALSEEvery 2-3 years by division of rootball in autumn or when new grown appears in spring.
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Tickseed, Pink Threadleaf CoreopsisCoreopsis rosea “American Dream”JuneSeptemberFALSEDeadhead spent flowers to encourage heavier blooms. Smaller flowered varieties are difficult to deadhead—shear the plants once the first flush of flowers fade.FALSEFALSEFALSECoreopsis do not tend to live more than 3-5 years. Decrease in flowering is a signal it is time to divide the plants or plants new ones from seed.
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Tiger LilyLilium lancifoliumJuneAugustApply light application of balanced fertilizer or side-dress with compost when new growth appears. FALSERemove flowers as they fade to prevent seed from setting. FALSEAfter bloom, cut plants back only after leaves and stems turn yellow. After foliage has died back, cut stems off at ground level, or leave a few inches to locate.FALSEFALSELily bulbs go dormant in late fall, the best time to move or divide the clumps.
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Yarrow, Peachy SeductionAchillea millefolium “Peachy Seduction”JuneSeptemberFALSECut back the flower heads after the first flush of bloom, when the umbels begin to wilt and dry. Cut the stems back by half their length, making the cut above a leaf set. Trim the yarrow back by half after each subsequent flower flush through summer and into fall. Yarrow typically flowers twice, but the second bloom may not occur all at once so cutting back individual stems as needed keeps the plants tidy and attractive.
FALSEPrune the entire plant after it dies back naturally in late fall or early winter. Cut the plants to within 1 inch of the ground.
FALSEFALSEYarrow can be invasive. Divide regularly.
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