LI Goals: Cedarburg SAMR
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Problem SolvingStudents are resilient and determined, driven, problem solvers who can tie many skills together to solve a problem

Students are analytical thinkers who can think critically about the information they gather

Students identify questions that will help them solve the problem and have the skills and strategies needed to seek answers to these questions
Students may be asked to solve a problem that is very similar to one done in class and does not require them to solve the problem in a different context.Students are asked to solve a problem.

Questions are primarily teacher generated.

Students may need to apply information they have gathered to solve a problem, but are not asked to analyze, evaluate or create new products using information they have gathered.

Students do not have to tie together many different types of skills to solve a problem and are primarily researching on the Internet to find answers.
Questions are primarily teacher directed and about finding information.

The research process is driven around facts and lower levels of Bloom’s taxonomy.

Students are not asked to evaluate or analyze information. Students play the role of information gatherer but are not challenged to demonstrate deeper knowledge or solve a problem.
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Authentic Learning EnvironmentsStudents are able to apply learning to real world applicationsStudents are asked to solve a problem that is similar to a problem they might encounter in the real world. There is not a real connection to the community or a real authentic problem being solved (i.e. students plan an imaginary trip to a destination they are studying)Students may be asked to solve a problem, but the problem has no meaningful connection for them (i.e. story problems in a math book)The purpose of the problem a student is asked to solve is to practice skills being taught and no attempt to relate this to the real world is made.
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Knowledge CreatorsStudents are able to effectively collaborate to research, create new products, and publish to real world audiences

Students demonstrate Creativity and innovation in their work
Students publish for teachers, parents and their peers.

The research process is collaborative and requires students to consider other points of view.

The assignment encourages students to be creative and innovative.
Work is not shared beyond the classroom.

Students may work in groups.

Students are not asked to create products that demonstrate deeper knowledge or innovate something new.

The purpose of the product is to organize facts and information gathered.
The primary audience is the teacher for grading purposes.

Research is done in isolation.
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Life Long LearnersStudents are aware of their learning and are able to discuss their strengths and weaknesses

Students have knowledge making skills such as note taking, and how to sift and sort information electronically.

Students are able to prioritize their time and use tools such as a calendar to manage deadlines on projects
Teachers require students to reflect on their learning, but need to prompt them and help them articulate what their learning needs are.

Students are given access to results of formative assessments.

Teachers assist students by helping them sift and sort information by giving them graphic organizers and setting up note taking strategies designed to help students sift and sort information.

Teachers give deadlines and checklists and other tools to help students manage their time and project manage larger project based assignments.
Teachers conference with students and tell them their strengths and weaknesses.

Teachers use formative assessments to guide instruction.

Note taking and other self-organizing tasks are teacher directed.
Teachers give feedback to students on their learning in terms of grades. Students are not asked to reflect or articulate their own learning needs.

Assessments may be primarily summative in nature.

Tasks to help students organize their time are not taught or addressed.

The project may be teacher-centered or prescriptive that time or project management is not needed to complete tasks.
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