WrittenAssignmentRubric_STA-201-jul12
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Rubric for Written Assignments
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4321 or 0
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CriterionExceptionalAcceptableMarginalUnacceptableScore
4
Interpretation:
Ability to explain
information presented in mathematical forms (e.g., equations, graphs, diagrams,
tables, words)
Provides accurate explanations of information presented in mathematical forms. Makes appropriate inferences based on that information. For example, accurately explains the trend data shown in a graph and makes reasonable predictions regarding what the data suggest about future events.Provides accurate explanations of information presented in mathematical forms. For instance, accurately explains the trend data shown in a graph.Provides somewhat accurate explanations of information presented in mathematical forms, but occasionally makes minor errors related to computations or units. For instance, accurately explains trend data shown in a graph, but may miscalculate the slope of the trend line.Attempts to explain information presented in mathematical forms, but draws incorrect conclusions about what the information means. For example, attempts to explain the trend data shown in a graph, but will frequently misinterpret the nature of that trend, perhaps by confusing positive and negative trends.
5
Representation:
Ability to convert relevant information into various mathematical forms (e.g., equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words)
Skillfully converts relevant information into an insightful mathematical portrayal in a way that contributes to a further or deeper understanding.Competently converts relevant information into an appropriate and desired mathematical portrayal.Completes conversion of information but resulting mathematical portrayal is only partially appropriate or accurate.Completes conversion of information but resulting mathematical portrayal is inappropriate or inaccurate.
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CalculationCalculations attempted are essentially all successful and sufficiently comprehensive to solve the problem. Calculations are also presented elegantly (clearly, concisely, etc.)Calculations attempted are essentially all successful and sufficiently comprehensive to solve the problem.Calculations attempted are either unsuccessful or represent only a portion of the calculations required to comprehensively solve the problem. Calculations are attempted but are both unsuccessful and are not comprehensive.
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Application / Analysis:
Ability to make judgments and draw appropriate conclusions based on the quantitative
analysis of data, while recognizing the limits of this analysis
Uses the quantitative analysis of data as the basis for deep and thoughtful judgments, drawing insightful, carefully qualified conclusions from this work.Uses the quantitative analysis of data as the basis for competent judgments, drawing reasonable and appropriately qualified conclusions from this work.Uses the quantitative analysis of data as the basis for workmanlike (without inspiration or nuance, ordinary) judgments, drawing plausible conclusions from this work.Uses the quantitative analysis of data as the basis for tentative, basic judgments, although is hesitant or uncertain about drawing conclusions from this work.
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Communication: Expressing quantitative evidence in support of the argument or purpose of the work (in
terms of what evidence is used and how it is formatted, presented, and contextualized)
Uses quantitative information in connection with the argument or purpose of the work, presents it in an effective format, and explicates it with consistently high quality.Uses quantitative information in connection with the argument or purpose of the work, though data may be presented in a less than completely effective format or some parts of the explication may be uneven.Uses quantitative information, but does not effectively connect it to the argument or purpose of the work.Presents an argument for which quantitative evidence is pertinent, but does not provide adequate explicit numerical support. (May use quasi-quantitative words such as "many," "few," "increasing," "small," and the like in place of actual quantities.)
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Writing mechanicsWriting demonstrates a sophisticated clarity, conciseness, and correctnessWriting is accomplished in terms of clarity and conciseness and contains only a few errorsWriting lacks clarity or conciseness and contains numerous errorsWriting is unfocused, rambling, or contains serious errors
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Total:
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Thomas Edison State College
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Note 1: Criteria are evaluated on a 4-3-2-1-0 basis. Total rubric points are converted first to a letter grade and then to a numerical equivalent based on a 0-100 scale.
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Scale: 23-24 = A (93-100); 22 = A- (90-92); 21 = B+ (88-89); 17-20 = B (83-87); 16 = B- (80-82); 15 = C+ (78-79); 11-14 = C (73-77); 10 = C- (70-72); 5-9 = D (60-69); 0-4 = F (below 60).
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Note 2: This rubric is adopted from Quantitatvie Literacy VALUE Rubric by AAC&U (Association of American Colleges and Universities).
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Rubric for Final Paper