Ireland - List of Lists
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
Still loading...
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVW
1
© 2013 - 2014 Myrddyn Phillips. Non-commercial copying is permitted provided attribution is preserved. Re-use of the presented data in this or another format requires the permission of the blog author.
2
3
Ireland - List of Lists
4
5
Year
Author / List Compiler
TitlePublisherMinimum HeightMaximum HeightMinimum ProminenceNumber of SummitsOther CriteriaNotes
6
7
VariousScottish Mountaineering Club JournalScottish Mountaineering ClubThe List: This appeared in an article entitled 'Beinn Tarsuinn and the British 'Threes''published November 1929 in the Scottish Mountaineering Club Journal Vol. 18 No. 108, with the relevant text and list appearing on pages 336 – 343. Entitled 'List of the Mountains in the British Isles 3,000 feet or over in height' it comprises Beinn Tarsuinn, the 277th Munro, four mountains in England, 12 in Wales and seven in Ireland. This is the first known list to catalogue Irish hills using any form of criterion and directly emanates out of the Scottish Munros listing.
8
1929James A. ParkerBeinn Tarsuinn and the British 'Threes'
9
List of the Mountains in the British Isles 3,000 feet or over in height3,000 ft
Not Applicable
Not Defined7Only minimum height specifiedThe Author: James A. Parker is recorded as the 3rd person to have completed the Munros, and with his ascent of Tryfan in Wales on the 19th April 1929, became the 1st recorded person to have ascended all separate 3,000 ft mountains in British and Ireland.
10
11
12
13
1939VariousWayfarers' JournalThe Wayfarers' ClubThe List: This appeared in an article in the 130-page Wayfarers’ Journal No.6 published in 1939, with the relevant text and list appearing on pages 67 – 73. Entitled ‘The Mountains of Eire’ it consists of 51 summits arranged in section district format. An additional four Tops are mentioned within the text on page 70, these are part of the author’s MacGillicuddy’s Reeks listing and comprise Top No.1 (3,062 feet), Top No.2 (of similar height to Top No.1), Top No.3 (perhaps 100 feet higher than Top No’s. 1 and 2 and lastly Top No.4. Within the introductory text it is stated that to prepare a reliable list of hills 2,000 feet or more would need a great deal of exploration on the ground and searching on the map. Whereas hills of 2,500 feet and over are a different matter, with a list of these summits considered ‘by no means impossible’.
14
E. W. HodgeThe Mountains of Eire2, 500 ft
Not Applicable
Not Defined51Only minimum height specifiedThe Author: E. W. Hodge is recorded as the 11th person to have completed the Munros, of which he finished in 1947.
15
16
17
18
1939C. W. WallMountaineering in IrelandIrish Tourist AssociationThe List: This appeared in an 88-page booklet published in 1939, with the relevant list appearing on pages 35 and 36. Entitled 'List of Irish Mountains exceeding 2,500 feet in height' it consists of 37 mountains in Munster, nine mountains in Leinster, six mountains in Connacht and two mountains in Ulster.
19
List of Irish Mountains exceeding 2,500 feet in height2, 500 ft
Not Applicable
Not Defined54Only minimum height specifiedThe Author: Claude Wall was the President of the I.M.C. (Irish Mountaineering Club) from 1953 – 1955.
20
21
22
23
1948J. C. ColemanThe Mountains of KillarneyDundalgan Press, DundalkThe List: This regional list to the mountains of Killarney is subjective and appears in a 66-page booklet published in 1948, with the relevant list appearing on page iv. Entitled 'List of Mountain Heights' it consists of seven mountains in the 'Mangerton District', 10 mountains in 'The MacGillycuddy’s Reeks', five mountains in the 'Purple Mountain Group' and two mountains in 'The Paps'.
24
List of Mountain HeightsNot Defined
Not Applicable
Not Defined24No use of criteria specified
25
26
27
28
A List of the Mountains of Ireland Attaining an Altitude of 2,000 ft or overThe List: This was dictated by Joss Lynam and typed by his wife. Originally one master copy and three carbon copies existed, these were distributed between Loss Lynam, Cecil Ronald Pakenham Vandeleur, Claud Wall and the I.M.C. Library respectively. By this lists revised version in 1976, only Claud Wall’s copy was known to have survived, upon his death it was passed onto Joss Lynam. A copy of one of the carbon copies which was sent to C. G. Thompson on 4th December 1966 has been made available on the MountainViews website as a PDF document. The publication comprises 16 pages including two title pages (one hand written), two pages of introductory text, one page detailing the 'Summary' which gives the totals for the 'Separate Mountains' and 'Tops' included in the list, followed by nine pages for 'List No 1' 'The 2,000 ft Tops of Ireland arranged according to district', and lastly two pages detailing 'List No 2' The 2,000 ft Separate Mountains arranged in order of altitude'. Only 124 of these Separate Mountains are listed as the document seems to be missing its last page.
29
1952C. R. P. Vandeleur and Joss LynamList No. 1 The 2,000ft Tops Arranged According to DistrictPrivately produced2,000 ft
Not Applicable
50 ft257Subjectivity is used to differentiate between separate mountains and subsidiary tops
30
List No. 2 The 2,000 ft Separate Mountains Arranged in Order of Altitude2,000 ft
Not Applicable
50 ft156The Authors: The Reverand Vandeleur is recorded as being a Canon of Salisbury Cathedral who later became a member of the I.M.C. (Irish Mountaineering Council), when Joss Lynam initiated this list C. R. P. Vandeleur offered to help and proved a great source of information. Joss Lynam was born in London on 29th June 1924, with his parents being natives of Galway, he was christened James Perry O'Flaherty Lynam, and was a civil engineer by profession, living in Rhaeadr Gwy in Mid Wales and working on the construction of the Claerwen Reservoir in 1952; the year of publication of this list. He would become an accomplished guide book author and an influential figure in regard to Irish hill listing and a well respected figure in the world of hillwalking and mountaineering.
31
32
33
34
A Selection of some 900 British and Irish Mountain Tops
35
Two Lists of Independent Irish Mountains List A3,000 ft
Not Applicable
Not defined7Only minimum height specified
36
3,000 ft
Not Applicable
100 ft contour ring4Only criteria specified in preceding columns apply
37
1954
William McKnight Docharty
Privately published2,500 ft2,999 ft100 ft contour ring13Only criteria specified in preceding columns applyThe List: These appeared in a privately published book in December 1954, with the relevant text appearing between pages 70 – 79 and consist of Independent Mountains and their Subsidiary Tops. Entitled 'Two Lists of Independent Mountains'. List A comprises seven Independent 3,000 ft Mountains, four Subsidiary Tops of 3,000 ft Mountains and 13 Tops between 2,500 ft – 2,999 ft within 3,000 ft mountain groups. Whilst List B comprises 22 Independent 2,500 ft – 2,999 ft Mountains with 500 ft prominence, 16 Tops of these Independent Mountains between 2,500 ft – 2,999 ft, four Tops of these Independent Mountains under 2,500 ft, 21 Independent Mountains under 2,500 ft and lastly 11 Tops of these Independent Mountains under 2,500 ft. Within the book are also extensive listings to mountains in Scotland, Wales and England. The Index to the Irish mountains appears on pages 114 – 116.
38
2,500 ft2,999 ft500 ft22Only criteria specified in preceding columns applyThe Author: With an ascent of Aonach Beag above Glen Nevis on the 31st May 1948 William McKnight Docharty became the 14th recorded person to complete the Munros. Later the same day with the ascent of Stob Coire Bhealaich he became only the 8th known person to complete the Munro Tops. His Furth completion in 1949 was only the second recorded, as was his Corbett completion of the 20th May 1960 atop Meall an Fhudair.
39
Two Lists of Independent Irish Mountains List B2,500ft2,999 ft100 ft contour ring16Only criteria specified in preceding columns apply
40
Not Defined2,499 ft100 ft contour ring4Only criteria specified in preceding columns apply
41
Not Defined2,499 ftNot defined21Only maximum height specified
42
Not Defined2,499 ft100 ft contour ring11Only criteria specified in preceding columns apply
43
44
45
46
Table giving all the 3000-Ft. Mountains of England, Wales and Ireland
47
3,000 ft
Not Applicable
150 ft2Not Applicable
48
3,000 ft3,149 ft150 ft3Minimum distance to nearest 3,000 ft summit of one quarter of a mile
49
1959D. C. MaxwellTable 1 - Arranged According to CountyPrivately published3,150 ft
Not Applicable
50 ft1Minimum distance to nearest 3,000 ft summit of one quarter of a mileThe List: This appeared in an eight-page pamphlet privately published in 1959. Consisting of one list with the peaks being detailed in two formats, by country and by height. Entitled 'Table 1 – Arranged According to Country' the relevant list appears on pages 4 and 5, whilst 'Table ll – Arranged According to Height' appears on page 6. They consist of five separate mountains and six subsidiary tops; the latter are also referred to as summits. The criteria used are based upon the relationship of height, prominence and distance between qualifying peaks. Also listed are four separate mountains and three subsidiary tops in England and eight separate mountains and six subsidiary tops in Wales.
50
3,000 ft
Not Applicable
500 ft4Minimum distance to nearest 3,000 ft summit of one mileThe Author: D. C. Maxwell was a member of the Grampian Club, Dundee and the son of Eric Maxwell, who was the first person to compile a listing of Munroists.
51
3,000 ft3, 499 ft500 ft0Not defined
52
3,000 ft
Not Applicable
50 ft1Minimum distance to nearest 3,000 ft summit of two miles
53
Table II - Arranged According to Height3,000 ftAs specified aboveAs specified above11As specified above
54
55
56
57
The Supplement to A Selection of some 900 British and Irish Mountain Tops and A Selection of 1,000 Tops under 2,500 Feet
58
3,000 ft
Not Applicable
Not Defined8Only minimum height specified
59
3,000 ft
Not Applicable
Not Defined5Only minimum height specified
60
Lists of Irish Mountains and 'Tops' – List A2,500 ft2,999 ftNot Defined13Only criteria specified in preceding columns apply
61
1962
William McKnight Docharty
Privately published2,000 ft2,499 ft500 ft59Only criteria specified in preceding columns applyThe Lists: These appeared in a privately published book in December 1962, with the relevant text appearing between pages 76 – 79 and 150 – 164 and consist of independent mountains and their subsidiary tops. Comprising three lists with List B being a summary of Docharty’s 1954 listed totals. List A comprises eight independent 3,000 ft mountains, five subsidiary Tops of 3,000 ft mountains and 13 Tops between 2,500 ft – 2,999 ft within 3,000 ft mountain groups. Whilst List C comprises 59 independent 2,000 ft – 2,499 ft mountains with 500 ft prominence and 11 independent 2,000 ft – 2,499 ft mountains with less than 500 ft prominence but where individuality suggests recognition, 45 Tops of these independent mountains between 2,000 ft – 2,499 ft, eight Tops of these independent mountains under 2,000 ft, 17 independent mountains under 2,000 ft and lastly three Tops of these independent mountains under 2,000 ft. Within the book are also extensive listings to mountains in Scotland, Wales and England. The Index to the Irish mountains appears on pages 199 – 202.
62
2,000 ft2,499 ftArbitrary11Only criteria specified in preceding columns applyThe Author: With this 1962 publication William McKnight Docharty became the first person to attempt a systematic listing to the 2,000 ft mountains of Ireland, Wales and England. Over subsequent years only a select few list compilers have followed suit. With the inclusion of his Scottish 2,000 ft tour de force listing he paved the way for the mountain category we now know as The Grahams.
63
2,000 ft2,499 ftNot Defined45Only criteria specified in preceding columns apply
64
Lists of Irish Mountains and 'Tops' – List CNot Defined1,999 ftNot Defined8Only maximum height specified
65
Not Defined1,999 ftNot Defined17Only maximum height specified
66
Not Defined1,999 ftNot Defined3Only maximum height specified
67
68
69
70
VariousScottish Mountaineering Club Journal
71
3,000 ft
Not Applicable
Not Defined5Only minimum height specified
72
1968
William McKnight Docharty
Looking Back Over Them All
Scottish Mountaineering Club3,000 ft
Not Applicable
Not Defined5Only minimum height specifiedThe List: This regional list to the MacGillycuddy’s Reeks appeared in an article published in 1968 in the S.M.C. Journal Vol. 29 No. 159, with the relevant text appearing between pages 29 – 34 (hill listing on page 32). Entitled 'Ordnance Survey of Ireland ??? Sheet No. 20 – (V)' it lists five Separate Mountains, five Subsidiary Tops and three Tiny Tops, the latter of 'immature nameless features'. On page 30 of the same article is a Table to 'The British and Irish Mountain Tops over 3000ft. in height' which compares overall numbers of Separate Mountains and Tops from Munro’s Tables, D. C. Maxwell’s Tables and Docharty’s own lists for Scotland, Ireland, Wales and England.
73
3,000 ft
Not Applicable
Not Defined3Only minimum height specified
74
75
76
77
Circa 1975Joe GloverUnknownPrivately producedUnknownUnknownUnknownUnknownUnknownThe List: Within the introductory notes (page 85) to the Valdeleur and Lynam Revised Edition (published 1976, see below), reference is made to Joe Glover, who gave up work on his own partially completed hill list in favour of helping with Joss Lynam’s 2,000 ft list. Unfortunately little else is known about Joe Glover’s compilation. Joss Lynam remembers it being more selective when compared to his 1976 listing and enquiries with Dennis Golden, the custodian of Joe Glover’s archived library at The North-west Mountaineering Club, has only turned up old mountaineering books and diaries. It seems this historically important document is now lost.
78
The Author: Joe Glover was a member of The North-west Mountaineering Club. He was shot dead by the I.R.A. on the 23rd November 1976 in a seeming case of mistaken identity. He was aged 60. His ashes were scattered on Errigal.
79
80
81
82
C. W. WallMountaineering in Ireland
83
1976C. R. P. Vandeleur and Joss LynamA List of the Mountains of Ireland Attaining an Altitude of 2000ft or over List No. 1Federation of Mountaineering Clubs of Ireland2,000 ft
Not Applicable
50 ft257Subjectivity is used to differentiate between separate mountains and subsidiary topsThe Lists: These appeared in a F.M.C.I. Guide published in 1976 (preface dated January 1976), with the relevant text appearing between pages 85 – 111. List No. 1 (pages 90 – 107) comprises 156 Separate Mountains and 101 Subsidiary Tops arranged according to districts. Whilst List No. 2 (pages 108 – 111) comprises 156 Separate Mountains arranged in order of altitude. Entitled 'A List of the Mountains of Ireland Attaining an Altitude of 2000ft or over', edited by the late C. R. P. Vandeleur and Joss Lynam, it is Joss Lynam’s revised edition of their 1952 list and is considered by many as the first modern day Irish hill list.
84
A List of the Mountains of Ireland Attaining an Altitude of 2000ft or over List No. 22,000 ft
Not Applicable
50 ft156
85
86
87
88
VariousScottish Mountaineering Club Journal
89
1977H. M. BrownFurth of ScotlandScottish Mountaineering Club3,000 ft
Not Applicable
Not Defined8Only minimum height specifiedThe List: This appeared in an article published in 1977 in the S.M.C. Journal Vol. 31 No. 168, with the relevant text appearing between pages 189 – 191 (hill listing on pages 190 and 191) and consists of eight 'Munros' and five Tops. The 'Munros' are in the category usually referred to as 'Separate Mountains'. Also listed are eight 'Munros' and six Tops in Wales and four 'Munros' and three Tops in England.
90
3,000 ft
Not Applicable
Not Defined5Only minimum height specifiedThe Author: Hamish Brown is recorded as the 62nd Munroist and with seven rounds is one of only a few multi round Munro completers. His Tops completion in 1965 was the 24th recorded, whilst with five Furths to his credit he is the leading person in the list of British Isles 3,000 ft multi round completions of Separate Mountains. With an ascent of Baosbheinn on the 13th October 1976 he became the 7th recorded person to have completed the Corbetts. He achieved the first self-propelled continuous traverse of the Munros, taking 112 days from 4th April – 24th July 1974 and covering 1,639 miles (2,638 km) with 449,000 ft (137,000 m) of ascent. He is the author of numerous books including 'Hamish’ Mountain Walk', a document to the first continuous traverse of the Munros.
91
92
93
94
Guide to Eire's 3000-foot Mountains The Irish Munros
95
1980H. MulhollandThe 3000 – foot PeaksMulholland Wirral3,000 ft
Not Applicable
300 ft6Only criteria specified in preceding columns applyThe List: This appeared in an 84-page booklet published in 1980 (hill listing on pages 13 and 14). Entitled 'The 3000 – foot Peaks' it consists of six Peaks and five Tops. With descriptions of routes to each listed summit, this booklet was the first guidebook to Irish mountains to use set criteria.
96
3,000 ft
Not Applicable
50 ft5Maximum prominence of 299ftThe Author: Harry Mulholland self published various books including his guides to the 3000 - foot mountains of Ireland, Wales and Lakeland as well as the appropriately entitled ‘Guide to Self-Publishing – an A-Z of Getting Yourself into Print’.
97
98
99
100
The High Mountains of Britain and Ireland
Loading...
 
 
 
Sheet1