Teacher Success Plan.xlsx
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Elements of Effective Practice teacher 1teacher 2teacher 3teacher 4teacher 5teacher 6
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1=In Progress, 2=Competent, 3=AdvancedBaselineFall RatingWinter RatingSpring RatingBaselineFall RatingWinter RatingSpring RatingBaselineFall RatingWinter RatingSpring RatingBaselineFall RatingWinter RatingSpring RatingBaselineFall RatingWinter RatingSpring RatingBaselineFall RatingWinter RatingSpring Rating
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Lesson/Unit Preparation Identifies a higher-order focusing question that guides the unit and its lessons
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Clearly defines content objective for the unit/lesson
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Clearly defines language objectives
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Clearly defines strategy-use objectives
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Several activities and tasks are planned at each level of Bloom’s Taxonomy
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Adapts content to all levels of student proficiency (e.g. multiple texts, visual and auditory resources)
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Tightly links the unit’s/lesson’s focusing question & objectives with formative & summative assessments
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Creates the final summative assessment(s) before writing lesson plans
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Creates rubrics for Assessments as well as classroom practices (such as group work and discussion)
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Plans nightly homework to reinforce targeted objectives
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Building BackgroundNew concepts are explicitly linked to students’ prior knowledge about the topic, their previous experience, or analogous concepts
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Critical background information is introduced
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Key vocabulary in the texts is previewed and explicitly taught
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Begins class with a do now and mini-lesson that helps students access prior knowledge/ experience and/or presents critical new information/vocabulary
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Provides students with models of high quality projects and assignments
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Ensuring UnderstandingUses several different media to teach concepts (e.g. visual, auditory, written, hand-on creation, body language/gestures, and translation into students’ first language)

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Academic language/terms/concepts are appropriately adapted and modified to meet students’ academic comprehension capabilities
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Instruction relies on a number of consistent rituals and routines that are familiar to students, increasing their independence
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Academic speech is appropriate for students’ academic language proficiency (e.g. monitoring the rate of speech, enunciation, complexity of vocabulary/idiom use, and sentence structure and length
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Provides sufficient wait time for all students to process verbal information
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Provides opportunities for students to clarify key concepts (in first language if needed)
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Checks on student understanding throughout the lesson (through conferences, walk arounds, dip-sticking, full group sharing)
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Anticipates confusion around difficult concepts and prepares multiple access points for the material
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Learner Centered Strategies Key learning strategies are explicitly taught in-depth in full class and small groups, based on student need
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Students are provided with the opportunity to practice and apply the learning strategies over a long period of time
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Students are provided with a broad range of explicit methods for applying the learning strategies to master new concepts
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Students use their own judgment to make choices about the learning strategy to employ for various academic tasks
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Students construct interpretations of text in a variety of ways (e.g. in readers’ response notebooks, Post-its, pairs, discussion)
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Metacognitive ThinkingStudents think and talk concretely about their learning process: how they learn, weakness/strengths in their learning process, etc.
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Students have a good awareness of their working schema
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Students organize their own plan for expanding their schema related to academic concepts
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Students monitor their learning and apply fix-it strategies when they become confused
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Students have the opportunity to make mid-course corrections to their approach to an academic task, if need be
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Builds students’ confidence and willingness to engage in an exploration of their knowledge and thoughts
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Students set their own goals to improve their learning skills
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Higher-Order Thinking Skills“Blooms” the unit’s content objective and standards
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Explicitly teaches Bloom’s Taxonomy
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Consistently uses scaffolding techniques to support student success with higher-order thinking
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Poses questions that are often higher-order (e.g. analytic and interpretive, rather than literal)
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Students have frequent opportunities to analyze, evaluate and create
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Students pose and explore their own higher-order questions
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Students can identify the level of thinking required by various academic tasks
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Students have the stamina to undertake higher-order thinking tasks
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Opportunities for Interaction 50-60% of each day, students have the opportunity to interact with one another in the completion of academic tasks (small groups, pairs, full class discussion, and reciprocal teaching)
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Student groupings are flexible and determined by changing student needs
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Teacher/student interaction is frequent, but often 1:1
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Rituals and routines for interaction are well-established and used by students
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Furniture arrangement is flexible: it supports individual and collaborative work, more than teacher-centered work
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Investigate New LearningDevotes 60% of class time to…
Asking students to use their learning in new ways
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Providing opportunities for students to explore their own, higher-order questions
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Provides students with choice regarding ways to practice and apply new learning
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Makes manipulatives and hands-on materials available to students
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Changes the momentum, level or kind of instruction based on learners’ needs, styles or interests
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earning resources are available to students, and their use is supported by routines and rituals (e.g. computers, paper, atlases, work folders, missed assignments, dictionaries, reference books)
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Student work is prominently displayed, accessible as a learning resource
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High quality examples of finished projects and tasks are available as learning resources
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Synthesize New LearningDevotes 20% of class time to …
Reviewing key concepts and vocabulary at the end of each lesson
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Assessing the development of higher- and lower-order thinking skills
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Assessing student capacity to explore the unit’s focusing question
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Provides opportunities for students to demonstrate learning in a range of formats: presentation, discussion, research paper, journals, essays, art work, interview, etc.
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Uses a “Ticket-to-Leave” to assess progress in using strategies, metacognitive skills, and higher-order thinking skills
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Provides regular feedback to students on their output
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Confers with each student at least once a week to assess progress
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Focuses conferences on both HOW students are learning and WHAT they are learning
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Maintains a system for tracking progress revealed during weekly conferences
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Modifies planned lessons based on needs identified during conferences
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Reflect on Lessons and UnitsSets 1 or 2 SMART goals for instructional improvement
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Takes stock of progress towards meeting goals after completing lessons/units
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Makes mid-course corrections as needed and/or suggested by others
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Solicits feedback from coaches, peers and supervisors
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Documents progress towards meeting improvement goals (e.g.videotape, student evaluations, intervisition letters, supervisor evaluations, personal reflections)
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Reads/views relevant research/resources to support achievement of goals
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