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PHY 2030 Standards
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Version 2.0Fall 2013
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ChapterNameStandard
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LApparatusI can use a lab apparatus with appropriate technique to make measurements accurately and precisely.
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LReportI can write a lab report in LaTeX in a style consistent with a journal article that describes the experiment, measurements, and conclusions.
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LjournalI can review a journal article and write a summary of the article that describes the experimental setup, analysis, and conclusions.
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R1RelI can state the Principle of Relativity and can apply it to non-relativistic motion
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R2SRI can provide evidence for Special Relativity and can apply SR to relativistic motion
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R3, R4, R5TimeI can measure or calculate position, coordinate time, proper time, and spacetime interval, and I know what quantities are invariant.
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R6LTI can calculate (and compare) spacetime coordinates of an event for observers in different inertial frames.
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R7LCI can calculate (and compare) length measurements for observers in different inertial frames.
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R8VI can calculate (and compare) velocity measurements for observers in different inertial frames.
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R8CausalityI can determine whether two events are causally related.
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R9, R104MomI can calculate mass, momentum, energy, and 4-momentum for a particle, and I know which quantities are invariant and which quantities are conserved.
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R10ConsI can apply conservation of 4-momentum to a system.
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Q1WSI can describe the modes of a standing wave (whether transverse or longitudinal) whether it is fixed at both ends or free and fixed at each end.
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Q2WII can use path difference to predict the interference of two sources of waves at a location.
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Q3, Q4WPI can provide evidence for wave-particle duality and can apply a particle model or a wave model to a quanton, depending on the experiment.
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Q5MQI can use the mathematics needed to describe the state of a quanton, including complex algebra, the inner product of two complex vectors, probability, and normalization.
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Q5, Q6QrulesI can recite and apply the "rules of the game" of quantum mechanics.
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Q7, Q8QenergyI can derive energy eigenvalues for various systems and can relate energy eigenvalues to a spectrum of photons emitted or absorbed.
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Q9QHI can describe the set of quantum numbers for a hydrogen atom and can connect these quantum numbers to various representations of the atom, including spectroscopic notation, an energy diagram, and a plot of the real part of the square of the associated energy eigenfunctions.
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Q9QatomI can describe how multi-electron atoms are similar to and different from the hydrogen atom and the implications on energy eigenvalues and allowed transitions.
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Q10QpsiI can write a VPython program to calculate Psi numerically for a given value of E and graph Psi(x). I can use this program to find the energy eigenvalues of a system.
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Evidences
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ChapterNameStandardProblems
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R1RelI can state the Principle of Relativity and can apply it to non-relativistic motion
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R1I can design a test for whether a reference frame is inertial or not and can identify inertial reference frames.S3, Video Analysis
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R1I can state the Principle of Relativity.
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R1I can derive the Galilean transformation equations for position and velocity and can use them to make predictions of what an observer in a particular inertial reference frame would measure.B1, B3, B4, S4, S5, S6, S7, S8
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R1I can describe how clocks are synchronized in Newtonian Relativity and what measurements observers in inertial reference frames will agree on.S11
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R2SRI can provide evidence for Special Relativity and can apply SR to relativistic motion
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R2I can explain the "problem with electromagnetic waves" and the experiment(s) that showed the non-existence of the ether.
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R2I can describe how clocks are synchronized in Special Relativity.S1
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R2I can convert between SI units and SR units.B1, B3
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R2I can sketch and interpret worldlines on a spacetime diagram.B4, B5, B7, S3, S4, S6, S11
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R3, R4, R5TimeI can measure or calculate position, coordinate time, proper time, and spacetime interval, and I know what quantities are invariant.
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R3I can define coordinate time, proper time, and spacetime interval and can describe how each quantity is measured. I can use a geometric analogy with spacial coordinates to describe each quantity, thus comparing plane geometry and spacetime geometry.B3, B4, B5, S3, S4, S6
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R3I can explain why events that are simultaneous in one inertial frame are not simultaneous in another frame.B1, B2, S1
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R4Use the metric equation to calculate spacetime interval.B1, B2, B3, B4, S1, S4, S6
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R4I can explain the Twin Paradox using a spacetime diagram and a calculation of spacetime interval for each twin.
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R4I can calculate the number of muons remaining after x number of half-lives, and I can explain, using the metric equation, why fewer muons decay that is predicted by classical physics.S2
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R5I can calculate the proper time along a curved worldline traversed by an inertial clock moving at constant speed.B1, B3, B4, B7, S1
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R5I can derive and use the bionomial approximation.B5, S4, S6, S9
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R5I can describe and give examples to explain the relationship between coordinate time, spacetime interval, and proper time, as shown in Figures R5.1 and R5.2.S3, S4, S7 (note a typo in the question), S9
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R6LTI can calculate (and compare) spacetime coordinates of an event for observers in different inertial frames.
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R6I can draw a two-observer diagram, with correctly sloped t' and x' axes and correctly calibrated scales, and can plot and read the spacetime coordinates of events.B1, B7
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R6I can use a two-observer diagram to transform coordinates of an event from one frame to another frame and can use the two-observer diagram to solve problems and make predictions.B2-B3, B5, S2, S3,S5, S7
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R6I can use the Lorentz Transformation Equations (and Inverse Lorentz Transformation Equations)B4, B6, B8
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R7LCI can calculate (and compare) length measurements for observers in different inertial frames.
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R7I can state an operational definition for the length of an object.
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R7I can use a two-observer diagram to determine the length of an object as measured in an Other frame.B5, B6
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R7I can calculate the Lorentz contraction of an objectB1, B4, B7, S1, S2, S4, S5, S6
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R8VI can calculate (and compare) velocity measurements for observers in different inertial frames.
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R8I can use the Einstein velocity transformation equations to calculate the velocity of an object measured by an observer in an Other frame (or alternatively, the Home frame).B4, B5, S12
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R8CausalityI can determine whether two events are causally related.
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R8I can determine whether the interval between events is timelike, lightlike, or spacelike and can describe how each interval is measured.B2
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R8I can determine whether two events are causally related.B1, B2, S6
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R8I understand The Cosmic Speed Limit and that it results from Causality being consistent with the Principle of RelativityS1, S3, S4
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R9, R104MomI can calculate mass, momentum, energy, and 4-momentum for a particle, and I know which quantities are invariant and which quantities are conserved.
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R9I can show that the classical definition of momentum as p=mv is inconsistent with the Principle of Relativity and Conservation of MomentumS8-S9 (both)
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R9I know the definition of mass as the magnitude of the 4-momentum of an object, and I know that it is the same for observers in different inertial reference frames (i.e. it is invariant).B9, S6
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R9I can write the total energy of a particle in terms of its rest energy and kinetic energy, in both SR units and SI units.S5
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R9I can use the equations in Figure R9.5, and I know where each equation comes from.B4, B7
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R9I can use Einstein transformation equations to transform the 4-momentum of an object in one inertial frame to the 4-momentum of the object measured in another inertial frame.B9, S6
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R10I can sketch and interpret an energy-momentum diagram.B1
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R10ConsI can apply conservation of 4-momentum to a system.
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R10I can apply conservation of 4-momentum to a system, including a system with photons. I know that photons have no mass but do have energy and momentum (E=p).B3, B6, B7, S1, S8
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R10I know that the mass of a system is generally different than the sum of the masses of its parts; I can explain why this is the case using conservation of energy and E=m+K; and I can give an example showing this to be true.
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R10I can use a momentum-energy diagram to show conservation of 4-momentum for a system.S2, S4
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Q1WSI can describe the modes of a standing wave (whether transverse or longitudinal) whether it is fixed at both ends or free and fixed at each end.
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Q1I can derive equations Q1.12a and Q1.12b.
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Q1I can state the superposition principle and can add waves graphically and algebraically.B1
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Q1I can describe the shape of a reflected wave at an interface between two media or at a boundary with a fixed or free end.Figure Q1.5, Figure Q1.7
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Q1I can derive equation Q1.9 and can use it to describe the motion of various pieces of the medium for a standing wave.S7 and a derivation of Q1.9
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Q1I can identify the boundary conditions and can calculate the frequency of the normal modes of a standing wave.B3, B4, B5, B7, B8, S2,
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Q2WII can use path difference to predict the interference of two sources of waves at a location.
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Q2I can calculate the path difference at a given location from two sources and can predict whether it will result in total constructive interference or total destructive interference or something in between.B1, S1, S2, S3
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Q2I can calculate the locations of bright fringes in a double-slit experiment, and I can describe how fringe spacing depends on wavelength and slit spacing.B4, B5
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Q2I can calculate the locations of dark fringes in a single-slit experiment.B12, B13
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Q2I can use the Rayleigh Criterion to describe whether two point sources can be resolved.S8, S9
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Q2I can use a single-slit interference apparatus to determine the wavelength of a light source, including uncertainty.lab report
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Q3, Q4WPI can provide evidence for wave-particle duality and can apply a particle model or a wave model to a quanton, depending on the experiment.
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Q3I can describe the photoelectric effect experiment and can use the photon model for light to explain the results, explain and interpret a graph of maximum kinetic energy vs. frequency, and make predictions.B4, S1, S2, S4, S7
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Q3I can use a photoelectric effect apparatus to conduct an experiment to measure Planck's constant and the work function of the metal.lab report
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Q3I can calculate the energy of a photon and relate energy to frequency (or wavelength) of light.B1, B2
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Q3I can relate the number of photons per second incident on a surface and intensity of light for a given power of a light source. I also understand the difference between a point source of light and a beam of light in terms of how its intensity varies with distance.B6, S8
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Q4I can compute the deBroglie wavelength of a particle.B5
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Q4I can apply conservation of energy to a charged particle traveling between two charged plates to compute the particle's deBroglie wavelength.B4
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Q4I can interpret results of the double-slit experiment for particles by treating them as waves.S4
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