T75 Table Mexican Seafood
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Fishery Information
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Improvement StatusFisheryFishSource RatingSustainability IssuesImprovement ObjectivesImprovements (2 years)FIP Rating & CommentAdditional Improvement Needs/Comments% of Sector
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Sustainable (MSC-C or FS scores above 8)Small Pelagics Fishery in Sonora, Gulf of CaliforniaModerate Risk–There is limited domestic management of this stock in the purse seine fishery, through licensing and reporting requirements.
–Quotas have not been implemented and the harvest control rule needs further improvements to be applied
As part of the certification process, the fishery is collaborating closely with environmental NGOs to improve monitoring and address issues around bycatch and interactions with rare, threatened and endangered species.certified since July 2011NANA0.02% of the Reduction Fisheries Sector
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Sustainable (MSC-C or FS scores above 8)Southern Gulf of California thread herringModerate Risk–There are no reliable abundance estimates for Pacific thread herring.
–Fishing effort is considered too high for the sardine fishery in Gulf of California.
–Harvest control rules and TAC have not been explicitly defined yet.
Conditions of the certification include improvements in the harvest strategy, harvest control rule, stock assessment, bycatch and ecosystem interactions, and fishery management system.certified since October 2016NANA0.4% of the Reduction Fisheries Sector
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Sustainable (MSC-C or FS scores above 8)Northeastern Tropical Pacific Purse Seine, skipjack and yellowfin tunaModerate Risk–There are no MSY based reference points used for skipjack tuna in the EPO.
–There are time/area closures in place for the purse seine fleet but these measures are not sufficient to manage the fish aggregating device (FAD) fishery.
–Purse seine fisheries can interact with ETP species.
Conditions of the certification include seven years’ respite from fishing Pacific Bluefin tuna; a greater level of transparency in public reporting and review of management; improved training; greater protection for species of shark, rays, and bluefin tuna; and significant financial investment in dolphin population surveys.certified since September 2017NANA3.1% of the Shelf-Stable Tuna Sector
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Improving (Fair Trade certified)Sinaloa blue shrimp (Fair Trade USA)Moderate Risk–There is not a full assessment of the blue shrimp in Pacific waters, thus the real stock condition is unknown.
–The shrimp fishery management plan is not finalized or published.
–IUU fishing activities exist in the artisanal sector.
–Promoting a system for the continuous assessment of the shrimp populations targeted by the fishery
–Implementing a system for the continuous monitoring and assessment of the fishery environmental impacts
–Achieving the supply chain’s full compliance with fishery regulations
30 June 2018 —
FIP reported on the maintenance of the VMS coverage and plans to expand coverage to ensure traceability of shrimp caught by the fishing community. Additionally, the FIP launched the development of an awareness campaign to increase fishery compliance with regulations.
1 June 2017 —
The bycatch monitoring program finished and the report was delivered. Results show the fishery environmental performance continues to be as registered in 2012 and 2014.
BFIP should demonstrate activity on stock assessment improvement objective.0.003% of the large shrimp sector
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Improving (IFFO RS)Thread Herring [Opishonema medirastre, O. liberatate & O. bulleri], Eastern Central Pacific (IFFO-RS)NA–By-catch data is largely not collected; the observer programme should be reinstated and mitigation strategies developed and implemented.
–A number of other areas only attain a level of "medium compliance" according to the IFFO-RS standard.
–Implement TAC or HRC
–Implement regular, formal review of management plan every 3-5 years
IFFO RS approved since April 2016NASee the Reduction Fisheries SR.1.2% of the Reduction Fisheries Sector
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Improving (FIP A-C)Mexican Grouper (CeDePesca), red and black grouperHigh Risk–Catch limits are not defined.
–The stock is “in deterioration” with biomass below limit reference point.
–Fishing mortality reference points are not defined.
–The minimum landing size is not adequate according to biological characteristics of the species, and 40% of artisanal fleet landings were below minimum landing size in 2012.
–Data on discards is not available.
–Fleet size and effort limits have been enacted but are not being enforced.
–To have an adequate Management Plan adopted based on the best scientific information available by February 2020.
–To have a consistent recovery strategy adopted for the Mexican grouper stocks, including measures aimed at reducing fishing effort and setting catch quotas by February 2020.
–To help improve the fishing registry and the traceability of fishery production by February 2020.
–To help define an adequate Research Plan that includes data collection on target and non-target species, and on the impact of the fishery on other ecosystem components by February 2020.
–To help establish participatory mechanisms that allow fishery stakeholders to participate in both data collection activities and the assessment of the Management Plan's performance by February 2020.
–To achieve an MSC certifiable status and enter into an MSC full-assessment process in March 2020.
–In February 2018 the FIp begin working with fishermen to implement a traceability program to enable compliance with the US Seafood import Monitoring Program.
–In January 2018 a species catalog was created to improve species identification by fishers. In addition, the database of fishery-collected harvest information continues to be updated and has been made available to researchers.
–The “Committee for the Sustainable Management of the Grouper Fishery” was officially created by CONAPESCA in December 2017. Additionally, several activities took place to raise awareness in the community. Cartoons have been used in the program “Fish For The Future” that involves educational workshops with students, and also in awareness events with fishers.
AThe FIP needs to focus more effort on pressing the government to improve the stock assessment and implement the management plan.1.2% of the Snapper Grouper Sector
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Improving (FIP A-C)Mexican North Pacific barred sand bass (Pronatura)NA–While a basic stock assessment is available, it could be far more robust, such as inclusion of discard information.
–There is no defined harvest strategy or control rule, and the draft fishery management plan has not been adopted.
–Limited information is available on the impacts of this fishery on habitats and the ecosystem.
–Develop a harvest strategy and control rule, an efficient information and monitoring system, and periodic assessment of stock status by December 2022.
–Publish and implement the fishery management plan by December 2019.
–Promote capacity building through the establishment of a consultative committee for the Barred Sand Bass fishery by December 2020
–Strengthen good fish processing practices within the productive chain, seeking market tools and incentives such as certification of vessels for good practices, fair trade business model, buyers committed to sustainable fishing by December 2023
FIP activities were underway during 2018, including analysis of the catch of secondary species, catch data collection and storage, identification of tools to control fishing pressure, and reviews of gear selectivity.CThe FIP must quickly achieve an improvement in fishing practice or policy to demonstrate its ability affect change.0.18% of the Snapper Grouper Sector
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Improving (FIP A-C)Mexico Gulf of California Giant (jumbo flying) squid (COBI)High Risk–There is low public access to current existing information from institutions in charge of investigation and management of the fishery. Thus, publicly available information on the stock is out of date.
–Biomass and fishing mortality estimates have not been estimated from stock assessment models in recent years, even if updates were contemplated in the management plan.
–Improve the giant squid fishery in the Gulf of California through a sustainable fishery management plan involving four states: Baja California, Baja California Sur, Sinaloa and Sonora.
–Seek support and collaboration opportunities with different stakeholders and for instances that can provide an improvement to the fishery.
–Keep generating biological and technical information about the giant squid fishery, through collaboration between stakeholders.
–To be evaluated again by the Monterey Bay Aquarium (MBA) Seafood Watch and to be rated as "Green/Best Choice", improving fishing and social activity.
–National Fisheries Charter updated and published in June 2018.
–Other activities undertaken in 2018 include communication with government, fishing monitoring workshops, and identification of potential actors that could participate in a biological and technological subcommitte on the squid resource
BSee Global Squid SR0.017% of the Global Squid Sector
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Improving (FIP A-C)Gulf of California Swimming Crab (DIMEX) cuata and warrior/brown swimcrabHigh Risk–The status of the crab species has so far been jointly assessed (instead of assessed separately for each species).
–The extent of non-compliance with regulations is not available.
–Have a system in place for the continuous assessment of the crab populations targeted by the fishery.
–Have a system in place for the continuous monitoring and assessment of the fishery environmental impacts.
–Achieve full compliance of the swimming crab supply chain with fishery regulations.
1 April 2018 —
Based upon producers initiative, a "crabmeter" was produced and distributed among the 2500 producers supplying the FIP participants in order to help them to verify minimum legal sizes of the landings
BThe FIP should primarily focus efforts on improving the stock assessment, which may require improved understanding of the stock structure and improved catch data collection.1.4% of the swimming crab sector
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Improving (FIP A-C)Mexico Western Baja California Sur swimming crab (ALMAR), warrior/brown swimming crabNA–The status of the crab species has so far been jointly assessed (instead of assessed separately for each species).
–The extent of non-compliance with regulations is not available.
–To establish a system that allows a continuous monitoring and assessment of the fishery stock status and environmental impacts.
–Evaluating and fishery environmental impacts
–Put in place a system that improves compliance with the swimming crab supply chain with fishery regulations.
NANAThe FIP must quickly achieve an improvement in fishing practice or policy to demonstrate its ability affect change.0.2% of the swimming crab sector
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Improving (FIP A-C)Campeche blue crab (Ocean Technology)NA–There is no recent stock assessment.
–The current management strategy lacks harvest control rules (HCRs) to control fishing effort.
–Monitoring program to confirm the level of impact on other species.
–Improve the knowledge about the current status of the stocks
–Build a management strategy with clear rules and objectives
–Provided a comprehensive report of the impact of the fishery in the ecosystem
NANAThe FIP must quickly achieve an improvement in fishing practice or policy to demonstrate its ability affect change.0.4% of the swimming crab sector
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Improving (FIP A-C)Mexican Pacific shrimp - bottom trawl (Yellowleg, Whiteleg, Blue Shrimp)Moderate to High Risk–There are not full or up-to-date stock assessments in many zones.
––A management plan has been developed but is still to be approved and implemented.
–Illegal fishing was historically an issue in this fishery, and recently illegal fishing has been detected inside the area of protection for the vaquita porpoise.
–High levels of bycatch, including of ETP species have been reported (e.g., pacific seahorse Hippocampus ingens and totoaba Totoaba macdonaldi).
–Initiating continuous assessments of all shrimp stocks targeted by the fishery.
–Improving transparency in monitoring, research, and decision-making processes for fishery management.
–Evaluating means to reduce the fishery environmental impacts.
–Maintaining the fishery full compliance with the regulatory framework while improving transparency and accountability.
30 March 2018 —
FIP participants discussed with the fisheries authority the need for robust, updated and transparent stocks assessments. INAPESCA made the commitment to conduct new stocks assessments before the start of 2018 season.
31 August 2017 —
The FIP reported evidence of increasing transparency in decision-making process in the publication of the rules for 2017.
BThe FIP must start making more rapid progress on improvement objectives, especially for stock assessments and verfication of compliance with the regulatory framework.0.3% of the Large Shrimp Sector
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Improving (FIP A-C)Mexico Baja California Sur yellowleg and blue shrimp – bottom trawl/cast netHigh Risk–A recent stock assessment of the stock is not available therefore there is no up-to-date information on biomass or fishing mortality.
–A management plan has been developed but is still to be approved and implemented.
–There is no information on the degree of compliance of this fishery.
–There is no information on the impact of this fishery on bycatch species, habitats and ecosystems.
–Develop and promote a system for the continuous assessment of the shrimp populations targeted by the fishery.
–Maintain the fishery's environmental impacts at documented levels.
–Achieve the supply chain’s full compliance with fishery regulations.
1 October 2017 —
The FIP launched an awareness campaign on the regulatory framework.
25 August 2017 —
The FIP requested publication of latest stocks assessments.
1 July 2017 —
The FIP reported the completion of the bycatch research project data analysis - concluding that shrimp:bycatch ratio is 1:1. Eight species have high abundance in by catch, none reported at risk by IUCN.
Inactive due to lack of reportingThis FIP should update their public report immediately to regain active status.0.01% of the Large Shrimp Sector
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Improving (FIP A-C)Mexico Gulf of California small scale blue shrimp - drift/cast netsModerate to High Risk–A recent stock assessment of the stock is not available therefore there is no up-to-date information on biomass or fishing mortality.
–A management plan has been developed but is still to be approved and implemented.
–Some illegal fishing activities are taking place in the artisanal sector, including violations to restricted areas and use of illegal fishing gear.
–There is little information to assess the amount of bycatch of main and ETP species in this fishery, although it is suposed to be low.
–Impact of the fishing gear used in this fishery on bottom habitats and the whole ecosystem is supossed to be low but no specific studfies have been conducted.
–By the end of 2021, there is a system in place for the continuous assessment of the shrimp populations targeted by the fishery.
–By the end of 2021, the fishery's environmental impacts are evaluated and mitigation strategies are identified.
–By the end of 2021, the supply chain is in full compliance with fishery regulations while increasing its accountability.
NANAThe FIP must quickly achieve an improvement in fishing practice or policy to demonstrate its ability affect change.0.1% of the Large Shrimp Sector
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Fishery Target of SRCommon octopus (Gulf of Mexico)High Risk–No catch quotas are in place. Scientific assessment focuses on the Mexican four-eyed octopus, with little information collected for the common octopus, including abundance assessments.
–There is no management strategy in place.
–Catch data are unavailable after 2013.
–Enforcement and data collection has historically been weak.
–Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing has historically been a problem for the octopus fishery.
–Traditional biological points are not available and a full stock assessment hasn't been conducted.
–The blue crab primarily used as bait is fully exploited, suggesting the octopus fishery could be putting the sustainability of that species at risk.
–FIP catalyzation efforts underway by Global Octopus SRNANASee the Global Octopus SR4.4% of octopus sector
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Fishery Target of SRFour-eyed octopus (Gulf of Mexico)High Risk–Enforcement and data collection has historically been weak.
–Current management uses spatial abundance reference points rather than a harvest control rule based on biomass and fishing mortality.
–Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing has historically been a problem with catches above the limits, illegal fishing during the fishing season with forbidden gears and during the biological closure. The artesanal fleet frequently catches undersized individuals.
–Traditional biological points are not available and a full stock assessment hasn't been conducted.
–The blue crab primarily used as bait is fully exploited, suggesting the octopus fishery could be putting the sustainability of that species at risk.
–FIP catalyzation efforts underway by Global Octopus SRNANASee the Global Octopus SR3.7% of octopus sector
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Fishery Target of SRSnappers, Gulf of MexicoHigh Risk–No abundance estimates are available or reference points. No specific scientific recommendations are known to exist.
–There is no management plan and no catch limits are defined.
–The status of the stock is unknown.
–There are signs of non-compliance in protected areas.
–Interaction of the fishery with protected species is unknown.
–A prospective FIP has been reported by COBI, a Mexican NGO: https://fisheryprogress.org/fip-profile/mexico-red-snapper-longline. The SR will review plans for this FIP and support if possible.NANAA national FIP needed to push for basic improvements in stock assessment and fishery management for the multi-species snapper fishery in the Gulf of Mexico.1.2% of Snapper Grouper Sector
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Fishery Target of SRSnappers, PacificNA–Stock assessments and management recommendations exist for Lutjanus peru only. Information needed for other primary species. –A multi-species fishery management plan is needed for snapper and grouper in the Pacific region.–FIP scoping is underway by Ecologists Without Borders for yellowtail, snapper, and grouper small-boat fisheries operating in the Santa Rosalía region (Gulf of California). This FIP would represent only a small portion of the coastwide landings; a great deal more improvement work is needed.NANAA national FIP is needed to push for basic improvements in stock assessment an fishery management for snapper and grouper throughout the Pacific region.2.1% of snapper grouper sector
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Fishery Target of SRGroupers, PacificNA–Stock assessments and management recommendations exist for Paralabrax nebulifier only. Information needed for other primary species. –A multi-species fishery management plan is needed for snapper and grouper in the Pacific region.–FIP scoping is underway by Ecologists Without Borders for yellowtail, snapper, and grouper small-boat fisheries operating in the Santa Rosalía region (Gulf of California). This FIP would represent only a small portion of the coastwide landings; a great deal more improvement work is needed.NANAA national FIP is needed to push for basic improvements in stock assessment an fishery management for snapper and grouper throughout the Pacific region.1% of snapper grouper sector
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