ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZAAABACADAEAFAGAHAIAJAKALAMAN
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TimestampEmail AddressName and SurnameInstitution
Country where you are based
Conducting research OR Offering to collaborate?
Study title
Where is this study being conducted?
Please list countries in which study is being conducted (separated by commas) or enter "Global" if study is open to global participation.
What is the status of this study / research project?
In what languages is the study being conducted? (separated by commas)
How are you planning ahead for data sharing & re-use (FAIR data)? (check all that apply)
Study principal investigator
Study principal investigator contact details
Study contact person
Study contact person contact details
Brief research summary (include research questions/hypotheses and methodology)
Study design (check all that apply)
Target population(s) for this study (check all that apply)
If "vulnerable population", please describe here
Target age group(s) for this study (check all that apply)
Anticipated sample size
(Anticipated or actual) study start date
(Anticipated or actual) study end date
Study instruments / measures
What is being assessed? (check all that apply)
For each assessment topic checked above, please list measures / instruments.
If intervention study, provide brief description of intervention
Are you seeking collaborators?
Are you seeking additional resources?
If you are seeking collaborators or other resources, please explain briefly here.
Please explain how you can be of assistance / how you would like to collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
Are you interested in providing any of the following? (check all that apply)
Explain any boxes checked above
2
4/20/2020 4:45:18j.k.daniels@rug.nlJudith DanielsUniversity of GroningenThe Netherlands
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Posttraumatic adjustment in nurses
Multiple countries (specify later)
Austria, The Netherlands, (potentially Germany), (potentially Iran)
Planning study
German, Dutch, (potentially Farsi)
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Collaborating with others to use common measures, Collaborating with others to utilize common variable names and coding
Judith K. Danielsj.k.daniels@rug.nlJudith K. Danielsj.k.daniels@rug.nl
Nurses are at the frontline of the current pandemic. They often have to handle emotionally impactful situations and at times make difficult decisions. We will assess the impact this has on their mental health and how the adjust following the peak of the crisis. To this end, nurses will be surveyed three times within 6 months using an online questionnaire.
Observational, Longitudinal
Healthcare workers
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
5/20/202012/20/2020
Demographics, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes
Validated instruments assessing positive affect, depression, anxiety, PTSD symptom severity, dissociation, and meaning making. In addition, non-validated items assessing subjective physical health, work environment, and exposure to Covid-19 cases.
YesMaybe
We would like to implement this study as a multicentre study across several countries. We expect the local peaks of the epidemic to arise at different time points. In order to not overwhelm health care workers the assessment will start after the local peak, i.e. at different time points in the participanting centres.
3
4/20/2020 7:42:26dgrasso@uchc.eduDamion Grasso
University of Connecticut School of Medicine
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Epidemic-Pandemic Impacts Inventory (EPII): Initial Survey Evaluation
One countryUnited States
Currently enrolling participants
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Collaborating with others to use common measures
Damion Grassodgrasso@uchc.eduDamion Grassodgrasso@uchc.edu
To administer the Epidemic-Pandemic Impacts Inventory (EPII) and measures of perceived stress, mental health, and social support to a convenience sample of individuals residing in the Northeast Region of the U.S. (CT, RI, NY, NJ, MA, ME, NH, PA, VT) and recruited via social media and online communications. Target sample size is 1,000. Aim 1. To identify personal and social impacts of the coronavirus disease pandemic across various sociodemographic characteristics in a broad sample of individuals residing in the Northeast region of the United States. Aim 2. To examine the psychometric structure of items on the EPII across sociodemographic characteristics using variable- and person-centered analytic methods. Aim 3. To examine concurrent validity of the EPII in relation to measures of perceived stress and mental health difficulties, and to explore moderation by past trauma exposure, resilience, and social support.
Cross-sectionalGeneral population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
10004/13/20206/1/2020
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior health history, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
Background demographics
Epidemic-Pandemic Impacts Inventory (EPII; bi.tly/EPII2020)
Perceived Stress Scale
Patient Health Questionnaire 9
Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7
Primary Care PTSD Screen
Brief Resilience Scale
Functional Social Support Questionnaire
Brief Lifetime Traumatic Events from Structured Trauma-Related Experiences & Symptoms Screener
Not applicableMaybeYes
Additional populations to administer the EPII (also have Spanish version)
4
4/20/2020 7:52:17dgrasso@uchc.eduDamion Grasso
University of Connecticut School of Medicine
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Examining the Impact of the Coronavirus Pandemic in a Low-Income, Trauma-Exposed Cohort of Women with a High Rate of Posttraumatic Stress During Pregnancy
One countryUnited States
Currently enrolling participants
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Collaborating with others to use common measures, Collaborating with others to utilize common variable names and coding
Damion Grassodgrasso@uchc.eduDamion Grassodgrasso@uchc.edu
To administer the Epidemic-Pandemic Impacts Inventory (EPII) and measures of perceived stress, mental health, and social support to a cohort of women recruited during pregnancy, now with children ages 9 months to 5 years. Aim 1. To examine associations between pandemic-related impacts and perceived stress and mental health difficulties in a high-risk sample of women with young children. Aim 2. To examine associations between pandemic-related impacts, perceived parenting competence, and child functioning.
Longitudinal
Pregnancy Cohort (now with young children)
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age
1004/13/20207/1/2020
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior health history, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies, Biological or physiological variables
1. Demographic Questions
2. Structured Trauma-Related Experiences & Symptoms Screener (STRESS; www.traumascreens.com)
3. Epidemic-Pandemic Impacts Inventory (EPII; bit.ly/EPII2020)
4. Perceived Stress Scale
5. Prenatal Distress Questionnaire (baseline only)
6. Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scales (DASS-21)
7. Disruptions in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS; baseline only)
8. Multidimensional Social Support Scale
9. Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (baseline only)
10. Revised Conflict Tactics Scales (baseline only)
11. Life Events Scale (baseline only)
12. BITSEA (follow-up only)
13. DNA samples mother and newborn (baseline collected)
14. Birth outcomes (baseline collected)
Not applicableMaybeMaybe
Considering a study and funding mechanisms to recruit new sample of pregnant women from prenatal clinic where listed research was conducted.
5
4/20/2020 13:47:30
adamsn@email.chop.edu
Nancy Kassam-Adams
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Acute stress reactions in healthcare staff
Global (e.g. an online survey where participants may come from anywhere in the world)
Global
Currently enrolling participants
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request
Nancy Kassam-Adams
adamsn@email.chop.edu
Optional online self-assessment of acute stress reactions related to COVID-19 is embedded in toolkit for healthcare staff. Collecting only de-identified data: (1) whether currently working directly in a healthcare setting, (2) 19 acute stress reactions, (3) overall rating of impact on functioning
Observational, Cross-sectional
Healthcare workers
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
4/10/2020
Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other
Exposure - Single yes/no question: Are you currently working directly in healthcare setting? Acute stress reactions: 19 items ASDS adapted for COVID-19
Overall impact: Single item rated 1-5
NoNo
6
4/20/2020 14:54:11sseedat@sun.ac.zaSoraya Seedat Stellenbosch UniversitySouth Africa
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Collaborative Outcomes study on Health and Functioning during Infection Times (COH-FIT)
Multiple countries (specify later)
Approximately 35 countries participating
Planning study
Chinese, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Farse, Finnish, French, German, Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Thai, Turkish
Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive, Collaborating with others to use common measures, Collaborating with others to utilize common variable names and coding
Prof Marco Solmi, University of Padua and Prof. Christoph Correll, Hofstra/Northwell (overall PI), SA PI- Soraya Seedta
Soraya Seedat: sseedat@sun.ac.za
Georgina Spies ggiocos@sun.ac.za
Objective of this study is to assess the impact of COVID-19 pandemic and related quarantine measures on the physical and mental health of the general population as well as on health care workers. Three waves- baseline, 6 months, 12 months
LongitudinalGeneral population
School-age children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
300004/27/20203/31/2021
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior health history, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
Depression (PHQ-9)

Anxiety (GAD-7)

PTSD (PCL)

Obsessions/compulsions (Y-BOCS)

Suicidality (C-SSRS)
MaybeNo
Countries not currently included could possibly come on board.
7
4/21/2020 8:39:56
Alex.DeYoung@health.qld.gov.au
Dr Alexandra De Young
Children's Health Queensland; University of Queensland
Australia
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
COVID-19 Unmasked: Prospective longitudinal study to determine the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health and wellbeing of infants and preschool aged children and their families
Global (e.g. an online survey where participants may come from anywhere in the world)
GlobalPlanning studyEnglish
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Collaborating with others to use common measures, Collaborating with others to utilize common variable names and coding
Dr Alexandra De Young
Alex.DeYoung@health.qld.gov.au
Dr Alexandra De Young
Alex.DeYoung@health.qld.gov.au
The project team will partner with researchers from [Pending] to advance urgent research into understanding the mental health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on young children (1-6 years) and their families. The project will (1) determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the emotional and behavioural wellbeing of infants and preschoolers (i.e. anxiety, depression, disruptive behaviour, sleep disturbance, traumatic stress, resilience); (2) determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on parent’s mental health (i.e. depression, anxiety and stress, trauma); and (3) identify the risk and protective factors (i.e. cognitive processes in preschoolers and parents, parenting support behaviours and parenting style, exposure to psychosocial stressors) for child mental health outcomes.
LongitudinalGeneral population
Infants / young children (0-5)
5/1/20207/1/2020
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Coping strategies
Demographics & Background History Questionnaire; COVID-19 Pandemic Experiences Questionnaire; PTSD Scale for Young Children; PROMIS Early childhood; Depression Anxiety Stress Scale - 21; Risk and Protective Factors; Parent as a Social Context Questionnaire.
YesMaybe
We would like to be able to collaborate with as many researchers from other countries to be able to disseminate this survey as widely as possible to help get a better understanding of what the short and longer-term mental health impacts will be for young children and their families. This study is currently unfunded.
8
4/21/2020 12:55:31
m.olff@amsterdamumc.nl
Miranda OlffAmsterdam UMCNetherlands
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Screening for responses to COVID19-related psychotrauma
Global (e.g. an online survey where participants may come from anywhere in the world)
GlobalPlanning study
English, French, Armenian, Chinese, Croatian, Dutch, Italian, Japanese, Norwegian, Russian, Spanish, German, Greek, Indonesian, Georgian, Portuguese, Turkish, Afrikaans
De-identified / anonymous data will be openly available
Miranda Olff
m.olff@amsterdamumc.nl
Miranda Olff
m.olff@amsterdamumc.nl
The Global Psychotrauma Screen will be used see: https://www.global-psychotrauma.net/gps
Cross-sectional, Epidemiological
General population, Healthcare workers
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
8005/1/202011/1/2020
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
GPSYesNo
Seeking collaborators to target specific populations (eg health care professionals, uniformed services, administrative personnel
9
4/21/2020 17:12:11
Ateka.Contractor@unt.edu
Ateka Contractor
University of North Texas
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Examination of Stressful Life Experiences in Medical Professionals
Global (e.g. an online survey where participants may come from anywhere in the world)
Global
Currently enrolling participants
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request
Ateka Contractor and Fallon Keegan
ateka.contractor@unt.edu
Ateka Contractor
ateka.contractor@unt.edu
Cross-sectionalHealthcare workers
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
200
Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes
MaybeNo
10
4/21/2020 18:51:18betty.lai@bc.eduBetty LaiBoston CollegeUnited States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Colleges and the COVID-19 Crisis: Evaluating Psychological Impacts and the Formation of Meaning and Purpose
One countryUnited States
Currently enrolling participants
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be openly available, De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive, Collaborating with others to use common measures, Collaborating with others to utilize common variable names and coding
Betty Laibetty.lai@bc.eduBetty Laibetty.lai@bc.edu
Responding to the COVID-19 disaster, U.S. colleges have rapidly cancelled in-person classes, displacing students and causing psychological, financial, and social distress. Ensuring that college students are able to complete their degrees when faced with disasters has enormous economic and public health benefits. Students who complete their degrees earn more, are healthier, and happier. Supporting educational continuity for students is critical for substantially reducing risks and losses post-disaster. Yet, we have limited evidence to guide disaster recovery efforts for college students. Filling this evidence gap, the project will assess college student and faculty/advisor experiences during the COVID-19 disaster. This is a mixed methods study with baseline and six month follow-up assessments planned.
LongitudinalStudents
Adults 18 - 34 years of age
3503/27/20203/31/2023
Demographics, Prior health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
MaybeMaybe
11
4/21/2020 19:31:29
t.dune@westernsydney.edu.au
Dr Tinashe Dune
Western Sydney University
Australia
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Minority and marginalised tertiary student health and wellbeing: The impact and aftermath of COVID-19
Global (e.g. an online survey where participants may come from anywhere in the world)
Australia, Canada, USA, UK
Planning studyEnglish
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive, Collaborating with others to use common measures, Collaborating with others to utilize common variable names and coding
Dr Tinashe Dune
t.dune@westernsydney.edu.au
Dr Tinashe Dune
t.dune@westernsydney.edu.au
This study explores the impact of COVID-19 on the health and wellbeing of tertiary education students. It compares the experiences of domestic and international students as well as explores the experiences of students across countries - Canada, USA, UK, Australia and New Zealand. The project focuses on the experiences of minority students including those with disability, LGBTIQ-identifying, culturally and linguistically diverse, of indigenous heritage or religious minority groups. Marginalised students including those of low socioeconomic status and first in family to attend university will be asked to participate. The responses from minority and marginalised students will be compared with those from mainstream backgrounds to better understand the experiences and stresses experienced by students across a range of variables. The findings will inform the development of support resources for students during and after COVID-19 as the health and wellbeing impacts across a range of social determinants will be long lasting.
Cross-sectional, Interventional
Students, Vulnerable population (e.g. refugees, unaccompanied minors, incarcerated, elderly, minorities) - specify later
youth of minority and marginalised backgrounds
Adults 18 - 34 years of age
25007/1/20207/31/2021
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior health history, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
TBC
Development of a peer to peer student support system - like penpals.
YesYes
International collaborators and assessment/measurement ideas.
12
4/23/2020 10:54:52ajsmith@utah.eduAndrew SmithUniversity of UtahUnited States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
RAISe: Resilience and Adaptation in Stress
One countryUnited States
Currently enrolling participants
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Collaborating with others to use common measures, Collaborating with others to utilize common variable names and coding
Andrew Smith & Charles Benight
ajsmith@utah.edu | cbenight@uccs.edu
Andrew Smith ajsmith@utah.edu
Study Goals: (1) to provide a public service to participating organizations by offering real-time assessment of mental health, coping, and burnout as part of our mission to contribute to the public good. (2) To collaborate with global community investigators to publish data for dissemination to the academic, medical, and policy communities. Outcomes of interest include depression, anxiety, and PTSD severity and caseness measured using normalized scales. As is consistent with Goal 1, this study and associated materials are designed to be shared with and adapted by collaborators who are interested in joining this effort to provide a public good in their region. As is consistent with Goal 2, such sharing and collaboration contributes to the larger scientific mission.

This study began deployment on April 1, 2020 via remote surveys, which will be repeated across four assessment periods. The first three assessment periods occur 1x per month for three months. The fourth assessment period will occur one year following the time 3 assessment. There are two versions of the data collection tool, including a version that utilizes full measures (i.e., PCL-5; PHQ-9, and GAD-7; 12.5 minute completion time) and a version that utilizes screening measures (PC-PTSD, PHQ-2, GAD-2; 8 minute completion time). Resilience and coping factors being measured include social support, loneliness, sleep, exercise, coping self-efficacy, burnout, community resilience, and moral injury resulting from ethical and moral dilemmas.

Note that we have developed the survey tool and content in a 'de-centralized' manner-- as a flexible (i.e., customizable to region) to the needs of interested collaborators. We welcome contact to communicate about how others can utilize this these tools to provide a public good in their region and come back together after data collection to collaborate.
Cross-sectional, Longitudinal, Epidemiological
Healthcare workers, Firefighters, Paramedics/EMTs, Law Enforcement Officers
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
40004/1/20205/31/2021
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies, Other
PCL-5, PC-PTSD, PHQ-2, PHQ-9, GAD-2, GAD-7; Community Resilience; Moral Injury; Social Support; Subjective Isolation (loneliness using ULS-4); Burnout; Coping Self Efficacy for burnout; coping self-efficacy for managing COVID-19 response.
MaybeMaybe
We would be potentially interested in collaborating and combining data with other investigators from other countries measuring similar constructs. This study is also designed to be shared and disseminated by collaborators interested in deploying this in their own regions, and we would be interested in assisting others in that collaborative process.
13
4/24/2020 4:41:21m.patane@vu.nlMartina PatanèVrije Universiteitthe Netherlands
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
COMET- COVID-19 Mental Health Survey “Mental health effects of the COVID-19 outbreak – a longitudinal international comparison”
Global (e.g. an online survey where participants may come from anywhere in the world)
GlobalPlanning study
Dutch, English, German, Italian, French, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish, Mandarin, or Bahasa Indonesia
Other
Martina Patanè and Marit Sijibrandij
m.patane@vu.nl
We will perform a longitudinal cross-sectional online survey across fourteen countries affected by the COVID-19 virus outbreak. It will not be possible to draw a random population sample. Instead we will perform an internet survey and aim for a large sample size. We will examine mental health symptoms at four waves across the same participants: Wave 1 (as soon as possible), Wave 2 (3 months), Wave 3 (6months), Wave 4 (9 months). We will examine predictors for the development of these symptoms (demographic variables, level of exposure to COVID-19 outbreak, pre-existing mental health problems, social isolation, contamination sensitivity, cultural values and coping strategies).
LongitudinalGeneral population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
4/27/20206/1/2021
Demographics, Prior mental health history, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies, Other
NoNo
14
4/22/2020 8:06:54
i.d.primasari@amsterdamumc.nl
Indira Primasari
Amsterdam UMC & Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Indonesia
Netherlands, Indonesia
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Mental Health in the Time of Uncertainty: A Study of Psychological Impacts of COVID-19 Pandemic in Indonesian Undergraduate Students
One countryIndonesia
Currently enrolling participants
Indonesian (Bahasa Indonesia)
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive
Indira Primasari
Center of Psychological Trauma, Amsterdam UMC, The Netherlands - Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia (Email: i.d.primasari@amsterdamumc/indiraprimasari@ui.ac.id)
Indira Primasari
Center of Psychological Trauma, Amsterdam UMC, The Netherlands - Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia (Email: i.d.primasari@amsterdamumc/indiraprimasari@ui.ac.id)
There is a critical necessity to conduct an assessment of psychological impacts among Indonesian undergraduate students, due to the COVID-19 outbreak in Indonesia. The outbreak puts the students in the risk of physical and mental health problems since the epidemic has been continuous spreading and the Indonesian government released some strict measures, including physical isolation, university closures, restriction in some regions in Indonesia, and prohibition to the exodus ( returning to the hometown) to celebrate Ramadan. There have been reports of the impacts of the pandemic on the students, however, there is no publication or study reported the detailed results of the impacts nowadays. Therefore, this study aims to assess the mental health conditions of Indonesian undergraduate student samples who are exposed to COVID-19 Pandemic.
A cross-sectional university-based online survey will be conducted in 10 cities. Using convenience sampling, a minimum of 900 undergraduate students), aged ≥ 18 and comprehend in the Indonesian language (Bahasa Indonesia) will be recruited in certain private/public universities. Respondents who express their interest to participate in the study will be contacted by the investigator and ask to fill a secured and GCP compliant online questionnaire, provided by Castor EDC. For follow-up purposes, the respondent will be offered to participate in a follow-up study and asked to fill out the questionnaire within 2 weeks after the initial survey completion. Respondents will be assessed using the Resilience Evaluation Scale (RES), the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC 25), Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (Brief-COPE), PTSD Checklist for DSM 5 (PCL-5) , Life Event Checklist for DSM 5 (LEC-5), the World Health Organization Quality of Life WHOQOL-BREF (1 item), the Clinical-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5 CAPS-5 (2 items), the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the International Trauma Questionnaire (ITQ), the Global Psychotrauma Screen (GPS), the Current Stressor Questionnaire, and the COVID-19 Questionnaire.
This study will provide digital individual respondent consent. Ethical clearance has been obtained from the Health Research Ethics Committee, National Institute of Health Research and Development (HREC-NIHRD, Ministry of Health, Republic of Indonesia (REF: LB.02.01/2/KE/042/2020).
Cross-sectionalStudents
Adults ≥ 18 years of age
9003/13/20206/13/2020
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
WHOQOL, RES, LEC-5, PCL-5, CAPS-5, PHQ-9, GPS, ITQ, Current Stressor Questionnaire, COVID-19 Questionnaire, BRIEF-COPE
-NoMaybe
15
4/22/2020 21:25:38horcutt@niu.eduHolly Orcutt
Northern Illinois University
USA
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Coping with the COVID-19 Outbreak
One countryUSA
Currently enrolling participants
English
Collaborating with others to use common measures
Holly Orcutthorcutt@niu.eduHolly Orcutthorcutt@niu.edu
Design includes baseline survey launched one week after Illinois shelter-in-place order and then weekly follow-ups til the end of the semester (up to 6 timepoints). Focus is on evaluating the effects of COVID-19 and shelter-in-place on coping efforts, substance use, behavioral health (e.g., sleep), psychological and physical distress and impairment.
LongitudinalStudents
Adults 18 - 34 years of age
753/27/20205/4/2020
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior health history, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ)
Life Events Checklist (LEC)
Negative Life Events for Students (NLESS)
COVID-19 specific questions (includes open entry) (overlap with Dr. Amour and Dr. Lai) Insomnia Severity Index
Self-Assessment of Sleep Survey (plus PSQI bad dreams item)
Substance Use: Alcohol Q/F
Substance Use: NIDA drug questions
Physical Exercise: Two questions
Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support
Brief Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire (BEAQ)
Difficulties in Emotion Regulation – 16 item short form (DERS-16)
Perceived Ability to Cope with Trauma (PACT)
Self-Compassion Scale (SCS) short form
Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU) short form
Brief COPE
Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)
Depression Anxiety Stress – 21 (DASS-21) depression and anxiety scales only
Posttraumatic Stress Checklist (PCL-5) – participants indicate trauma (i.e., not CV19 specific)
Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 (GAD-7)
Vancouver Obsessional Compulsive Inventory (VOCI) Contamination subscale
NIH Toolbox Fear Short Form
Subset of items from the WHO Disability Assessment (WHODAS 2.0)
Resource Loss
It's a very focused group right now but could be expanded to larger population or extend the timepoints with more resources.
16
4/26/2020 17:15:14
tgreene@univ.haifa.ac.il
Talya GreeneUniversity of HaifaIsrael
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
ESM study of mental health during COVID (Follow up study)
One countryIsraelPlanning studyHebrewOther
Talya Greene and Marc Gelkopf
tgreene@univ.haifa.ac.il
Talya Greene
tgreene@univ.haifa.ac.il
Intensive longitudinal assessment of emotions, psychiatric symptoms, and COVID-related stressors in participants with and without serious mental illness
Longitudinal, A follow up wave of a longitudinal experience sampling method study
General population, Clinical population (mental health concern)
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
2005/1/202010/1/2020
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes
THQ, COVID - new questionnaire. PCL-5, GAD7, PHQ9
NoNo
17
4/27/2020 11:33:33jford@uchc.edukJulian Ford
University of Connecticut
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Traumatic Stress and Adversity Faced by COVID-19 Frontline Healthcare Workers
Global (e.g. an online survey where participants may come from anywhere in the world)
GlobalPlanning study
English, Dutch, Spanish, Italian, Japanese, Chinese
De-identified / anonymous data will be openly available
Julian Fordjford@uchc.edumiranda olff
m.olff@amsterdamumc.nl
Healthcare professionals and workers are exposed to many potentially traumatic threats and losses when caring for COVID-19 patients. Social and news media provide a channel for the general public to communicate with and about COVID-19 healthcare providers and for healthcare providers to communicate with each other and with their communities. Text mining procedures with large news and social media databases internationally will be used to perform qualitative and machine learning analyses to identify and quantify major themes of the stressors and protective factors experienced by COVID-19 healthcare providers and correlate these with regional and national data on COVID-19 incidence and deaths, health system capacities and responses, and socioeconomic and ethnocultural factors. The aim is to refine the traumatic stress field’s knowledge of and interventions for the unique traumatic and related socioeconomic and ethnocultural stressors and protective factors facing COVID-19 healthcare providers.
ObservationalHealthcare workers
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
5/15/2020
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior health history, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
Text mining of social media postings
YesYes
Researchers with expertise in text mining of social media
18
4/28/2020 12:22:29
munmund@gatech.edu
Munmun De Choudhury
Georgia Institute of Technology
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
ocial Media Algorithms and Interventions to Tackle the Psychological Impact of the COVID-19 Crisis
One countryUnited StatesOtherEnglish
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Collaborating with others to use common measures, Other
Munmun De Choudhury
munmund@gatech.edu
Munmun De Choudhury
munmund@gatech.edu
Observational, Interventional, Longitudinal, Experimental
General population
Adolescents (13-17), Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
10000005/1/20204/30/2021
Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
YesYes
19
4/29/2020 6:34:44
supergnu@hotmail.com
Andreas LieberothAarhus UniversityDenmark
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
COVIDiSTRESS global survey
Global (e.g. an online survey where participants may come from anywhere in the world)
Global
Currently enrolling participants
A [Africaans], [Albanian], [Arabic] B [Bangla], [Belgian Dutch], [Bahasa Indonesian], [Bosnian], [Brazilian Portugese] C [Chinese (Simplified)], [Chinese (Traditional)], [Croatian], [Czech] D [Danish], [Dutch], E [English], [Español - México], [Español - Argentina], [Español - Cuba], [Español - España], [Español - Colombia] F [Filipino], [Finnish], [French] G [German], [Green] H [Hindi], [Hungarian], I [IsiXHOSA], [IsiZulu], [Italian] J [Japanese] K [Korean] L [Lithuanian] P [Polish], [Polish], [Portugese] R [Russian] S [Serbian] U [Urdu] V [Vietnamese]
De-identified / anonymous data will be openly available, Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive, Collaborating with others to use common measures
Andreas Lieberothandreas@edu.au.dkAndreas Lieberothandreas@edu.au.dk
The COVIDiSTRESS global survey is an international collaborative undertaking for data gathering on human experiences, behavior and attitudes during the COVID-19 pandemic. In particular, the survey focuses on psychological stress, compliance with behavioral guidelines to slow the spread of Coronavirus, and trust in governmental institutions and their preventive measures, but multiple further items and scales are included for descriptive statistics, further analysis and comparative mapping between participating countries.

To gather comparable data swiftly from across the globe, when the Coronavirus started making a critical impact on societies and individuals, the collaboration and survey was constructed as an urgent "quick and dirty" process. Individual collaborators and groups in the COVIDiSTRESS network (see below) conducted translations to each language.
Cross-sectional, Longitudinal, Experimental
General population, Vulnerable population (e.g. refugees, unaccompanied minors, incarcerated, elderly, minorities) - specify later
Immigrants/expats (not sole focus, but part of demographic data)
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
2000003/30/20205/30/2020
Demographics, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies, Other
YesMaybe
The COVIDiSTRESS global survey is currently translated into 45+ languages, and distributed in a large number of countries. Researchers who are interested in adding a back-translation to their language and/or make a significant effort to collect data in their country are welcomed to join our existing community
20
4/29/2020 7:35:40rsumner@glos.ac.ukRachel Sumner
University of Gloucestershire
United Kingdom
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
CV19 Heroes
Multiple countries (specify later)
United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland
Currently enrolling participants
English
Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive
Dr Rachel Sumner & Dr Elaine Kinsella
rsumner@glos.ac.uk, elaine.kinsella@ul.ie
Dr Rachel Sumner, Dr Elaine Kinsella
rsumner@glos.ac.uk, elaine.kinsella@ul.ie
Keeping economies and societies afloat during crisis is a delicate balance between urging care and responsibility, and deterring panic. We are currently facing an unprecedented public health crisis, where human behaviour plays a critical role not only in the spread of disease, but also in response to the crisis. The current CV-19 crisis will necessitate extraordinary human resilience in order to preserve and prolong life and social order. It has been long thought that emergency service workers are a particular “type” of person (Mirhaghi, Mirhaghi, Oshio, & Sarabian, 2016; Wagner, Martin, & McFee, 2009), which draws them to that profession; however during the CV-19 crisis, similar risks are being faced by a range of professionals. Not only are emergency service workers (heroes every day) putting their lives at risk, but also other frontline staff members that work in supply chain (everyday heroes) face the same challenges. At present, we do not understand the short-term or long-term impact of working during the CV-19 crisis on frontline workers, or indeed the protective factors that may sustain these vital workers in the coming weeks and months ahead. To address this gap, we will examine both contextual and individual difference factors that are associated with wellbeing and burnout in frontline workers during the CV-19 crisis. By comparing workers from the United Kingdom and Ireland, we will assess the impact of markedly different CV-19 strategies on frontline workers. By tracking the respondents over time, we will also assess whether pandemic related factors (i.e. morbidity and mortality rate) impacts the hours these individuals work, their wellbeing, and their determination to continue in the face of adversity. Using an online survey (plus optional follow-up surveys and interviews), we will track those in frontline positions over time as the crisis develops to understand more about these heroes, and what we can do to support them to support us.
Research Questions:
• How do individual factors (e.g., resilient coping style, altruism) relate to levels of wellbeing and burnout in front-line workers during the COVID-19 crisis?
• How do contextual factors (e.g., socio-political response, mortality) impact on wellbeing and burnout in frontline workers during the COVID-19 crisis?
• What factors may protect (e.g., meaning in life, social support) frontline workers from long-term negative consequences (e.g., burnout, PTSD, poor health) resulting from CV-19 working conditions over time?
Observational, Cross-sectional, Longitudinal
Healthcare workers, Frontline workers
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age
10003/31/20203/31/2021
Demographics, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
GAD-7, BRS, AASRS, BRCS, MLQ, BBI, PTSD8
NoNo
21
4/29/2020 12:37:03dsaxbe@usc.eduDarby Saxbe
University of Southern California
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Coronavirus, Health, Isolation & Resilience in Pregnancy (CHIRP)
Global (e.g. an online survey where participants may come from anywhere in the world)
global
Currently enrolling participants
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request
Darby Saxbedsaxbe@usc.edu
We are surveying currently-pregnant women and their partners to examine stress, social support, anxiety, depression, and coping during the pandemic, as well as pandemic-related disruptions to prenatal care and birth planning. We plan to follow up with participants after the birth.
Observational, Cross-sectional, Longitudinal
expectant parents
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age
8003/27/20203/27/2022
Demographics, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies, Biological or physiological variables
BDI-II depression scale, Perceived Stress Scale, State Anxiety Inventory, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory, Pregnancy Specific Anxiety Measure, Pregnancy Anxiety Scale, MOS Social Support Scale, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, medical birth records
MaybeMaybe
Our current sample skews white and highly educated so we would appreciate help recruiting a more diverse and representative sample. We are also open to international collaborators who want to translate the questionnaire battery into other languages to look at prenatal experiences in their countries.
22
4/29/2020 14:01:41
m.i.vdnheuvel@tilburguniversity.edu
Marion I. van den Heuvel
Tilburg UniversityThe Netherlands
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
COVID-19 and Perinatal Experiences (COPE) Study
Multiple countries (specify later)
The Netherlands; USA
Currently enrolling participants
English, Dutch, Spanish, Chinees (Mandarin)
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive, Collaborating with others to use common measures, Collaborating with others to utilize common variable names and coding
Moriah Thomason; Alice Graham; Marion I. van den Heuvel
Moriah.Thomason@nyulangone.org
Together with 100+ researchers all over the world, we created a questionnaire to measure objective and subjective stress related to the COVID-19 outbreak for pregnant and postpartum (<6 months) women, the COPE-questionnaire. More information and open-access resources of the international COPE study can be found at our OSF platform: https://osf.io/uqhcv/
Observational, Longitudinal, Epidemiological
Vulnerable population (e.g. refugees, unaccompanied minors, incarcerated, elderly, minorities) - specify later
Women during pregnancy and <6 months postpartum
Infants / young children (0-5), Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age
50004/4/2020
Demographics, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies, Other
Newly developed COVID-19 for postpartum questionnaire (COPE questionnaire)
MaybeMaybe
23
4/29/2020 14:04:42blperry@indiana.eduBrea PerryIndiana UniversityUS
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Person to Person Health Interview Study - COVID-19 Rapid Response Study
One countryUS, Indiana
Currently enrolling participants
EnglishOtherBrea Perryblperry@indiana.edu
Responding effectively to the COVID-19 pandemic and to future infectious disease epidemics requires an understanding of social and cultural factors that shape health behaviors, including social distancing, and therefore affect the spread of disease and its population health impact. Moreover, it is critical to determine the broader health implications, beyond COVID-19 infection outcomes, of global pandemics, by monitoring secondary health outcomes like psychological distress, mental illness, and substance abuse. By leveraging the ongoing Person to Person (P2P) Health Interview Study, the P2P COVID-19 Rapid Response Study will provide an understanding of participants’ views and behaviors related to COVID-19, contemporaneous to the epidemic. To accomplish this, we will re-contact P2P participants, who were drawn from a probability sample of Indiana residents, for additional data collection. Up to 1,600 participants will complete a telephone survey about their social distancing and other health behaviors, knowledge about the disease, perceptions of risk, attitudes toward the efficacy of institutional responses, feelings of social isolation and disruption, and mental health outcomes. These responses will be merged with data from the P2P, which contains hundreds of social, behavioral, and health indicators, including biomarkers. We will plan to conduct an additional follow-up, which will provide an unparalleled longitudinal dataset with three observations collected in the months before, during, and after this unprecedented epidemic and governmental response. This research will reveal how social, cultural, and behavioral factors contribute to the acceleration or mitigation of disease spread across rural and urban communities, and will identify secondary adverse health consequences of social psychological and public health responses to epidemics.
Longitudinal
Adult Indiana Residents
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
16004/1/2020
Demographics, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support
MaybeYes
Open to collaborators for this project. Certainly any resources would be welcome.
24
6/16/2020 9:08:47
natashastonebridge@connect.glos.ac.uk
Natasha Stonebridge
University of Gloucestershire
UK
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
What are people’s experiences of nature during the COVID-19 lockdown and can these be a protective factor to subjective wellbeing and resilience?
Global (e.g. an online survey where participants may come from anywhere in the world)
Global
Enrollment complete - still collecting data
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive, Other
Natasha Stonebridge
natashastonebridge@connect.glos.ac.uk
www.springtimeinlockdown.com
This study will present an opportunity to explore how a person’s interactions with and connection to nature could be a protective factor of wellbeing and resilience during COVID-19 lockdown; where people are experiencing higher levels of prolonged anxiety and nature may be disconnected from them.

What does nature mean to an individual? (understanding views and perspectives)
What does being in nature mean to an individual? (understanding views and perspectives)
How does an individual usually interact with nature? (understanding practices and experiences)
Has the COVID-19 lockdown impacted on people’s interaction with nature? Explain how.
Has it altered people’s perception of nature and their relationship with it? Explain why.
Could interaction(s) with nature be a protective factor in an individual’s sense of wellbeing and resilience during COVID-19 lockdown?

The study will use mixed methods to collect data via an online survey comprising both pre-assigned responses and free text; the latter will allow participants their own classification as to what they understand nature to be and what being in it means to them. The survey will also feature three short form questionnaires looking at subjective wellbeing, resilience and connectedness to nature. The survey will initially be distributed across social media platforms; therefore it will be an opportunity sample, with some snowballing as there will be a request to pass it on to contacts. In addition various organisations will be approached to allow broader dissemination with their cooperation. Participants will be anyone over 18 experiencing lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic and could be resident in any country. The researcher will also seek to carry out follow up surveys and telephone interviews with those that agree in order to ascertain progress during the COVID-19 lockdown and then when movement restrictions have been lifted.
LongitudinalGeneral population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
5005/1/20205/1/2021
Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Coping strategies
Short Form Nature Relatedness Scale (NR-6)
Brief Resilience Scale (BRS)
Short Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (SWEMWBS)
NoMaybe
Would welcome help to disseminate the study. The link is www.springtimeinlockdown.com
25
4/30/2020 11:22:44
hrsnyder@brandeis.edu
Hannah SnyderBrandeis University USA
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
What are the best predictors of stress coping and mental health in college students during the Covid-19 pandemic?
One countryUSA
Enrollment complete - still collecting data
English
Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive, Collaborating with others to use common measures
Hannah Snyder
hrsnyder@brandeis.edu
This is an 8-week intensive longitudinal study (including daily diary) examining undergraduate student covid-related stress, stress coping, and mental health
LongitudinalStudents
Adults 18 - 34 years of age
1504/3/20206/30/2020
Demographics, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
Large questionnaire set at baseline and 8 weeks, with subset every 2 weeks and a daily diary. Includes measures of stressors, stressor appraisals, stress coping, depression and anxiety symptoms, emotion regulation, social support, activities and behaviors. Contact me for details.
MaybeNo
We already have one collaboration with overlapping measures. We would welcome conversations with additional potential collaborators on conceptual replications or on a fall follow-up study.
26
4/30/2020 11:29:09
gng2109@columbia.edu
George Georgarakis, Robert Y. Shapiro
Columbia University USA
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Incidental Disgust and Information: Attitude change during the Covid-19 pandemic
One countryUSA
Initial data analyses complete
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be openly available, Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive
Robert Y. Shapiro rys3@columbia.eduGeorge Georgarakis
gng2109@columbia.edu
ExperimentalGeneral population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
25004/1/20204/3/2020Other
Focus on attitudes toward civil liberties, personal hygiene, minorities, and various policies
Participants read information about Covid-19 and/or were exposed to a disgusting audiovisual stimulus.
NoNo
27
4/30/2020 12:39:19bond@sandiego.eduBradley BondUniversity of San DiegoUnited States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
How are relationships, both real-life friendships and mediated connections to celebrities and fictional characters, being influenced by social distancing during a pandemic?
One countryUnited States
Enrollment complete - still collecting data
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request
Bradley Bondbond@sandiego.eduBradley Bondbond@sandiego.edu
This study is investigating our parasocial relationships with media characters and celebrities during shelter-in-place. As our social connections become more distant and/or more reliant on screens for connection (e.g., video conferencing, social media), does it alter the way we feel about media personae as they may fill the void in our social networks?
LongitudinalGeneral population3004/6/20206/8/2020
Demographics, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Social support
Measuring social networks, need for social interaction, extroversion/introversion, attachment style, psychological closeness with real-life friends, parasocial relationship strength with mediated characters and celebrities, amount of time spent interacting with close others, amount of time spent with media, demographics (particularly essential worker status, state of residence, political ideology)
NoMaybe
Funding is always needed to incentivize participants in a longitudinal survey study.
28
5/4/2020 4:00:41hewittr2@cardiff.ac.ukRachael HewittCardiff UniversityWales, UK
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Exploring people’s health, wellbeing and coping strategies in relation to negotiating and managing the threat of COVID-19
One countryThe UKOtherEnglishProfessor Chris Bundybundyec@cardiff.ac.ukRachael Hewitthewittr2@cardoff.ac.uk
This project involves an online survey to explores people’s health, well-being and coping strategies in negotiating and managing the threat of Covid-19, and looks to identify effective guidance based on this information. Specifically, this study aims to a) determine how, and the extent to which, Covid-19 changed the public’s ways of thinking, feeling and acting in relation to negotiating and managing the threat of Covid-19; and b) to use this information to develop guidance on effective coping strategies.
Cross-sectional, Longitudinal
General population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
4/7/202012/31/2020
Demographics, Prior health history, Prior mental health history, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
The online survey includes questions that assess people's beliefs, emotions and behaviour in relation to the threat of Covid-19
NoNo
29
4/30/2020 21:55:31radolphs@caltech.eduRalph Adolphs
California Institute of Technology
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
COVID-DYNAMIC. Characterizing the dynamics of emotional and social attitudes during the COVID-19 pandemic
One countryUnited States
Currently enrolling participants
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive
Ralph Adolphsradolphs@caltech.eduRalph Adolphsradolphs@caltech.edu
Please see: https://osf.io/sb6qx
Longitudinal, Experimental
General population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
15004/5/202012/30/2020
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior health history, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies, Other
please see https://osf.io/sb6qx
NoYes
Any funding availability would be tremendously helpful for this expensive longitudinal study.
30
5/1/2020 4:56:55raratan@gmail.comRabindra Ratan
Michigan State University
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
What is the relationship between loneliness and mental health and technology use that could potentially reduce the negative impact of isolation
Global (e.g. an online survey where participants may come from anywhere in the world)
Global
Currently enrolling participants
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive
Rabindra Ratanraratan@gmail.comMatt Kleinkleinm21@msu.edu
We ask participants about their media use habits before social distancing and recently, during it. we expect certain habits, particularly those associated with social presence, which we measure as well, to be associated with less depression and loneliness, which we also measure.
Cross-sectionalGeneral population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
300
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support
MaybeMaybe
This project grew out of an idea from a master-student and is not entirely in my field of expertise, which is media research. If someone in Psychology, particularly someone who is focused on depression or loneliness, were interested in collaborating, I would definitely be open to that.
31
5/1/2020 7:57:17
marie.briguglio@um.edu.mt
Marie BriguglioUniversity of MaltaMalta
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
WELLBEING DURING THE COVID-19 OUTBREAK EVIDENCE FROM MALTA
One countryMalta
Initial data analyses complete
English, Maltese
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request
Marie Briguglio
marie.briguglio@um.edu.mt
Marie Briguglio
marie.briguglio@um.edu.mt
We specify a mathematical model of wellbeing where life satisfaction and happiness are stipulated to respond to lifestyle, demographics and personality as well as exposure to Covid-19. We collect data from Malta during the third week of the outbreak (n=1,821). We test differences in means, and estimate a model of wellbeing using Ordinary Least Squares and Fixed Effects with a view to identifying effects. Our null hypothesis (H0) is that there was no difference in wellbeing or its predictors following the outbreak of Covid-19. We test this against our alternative hypotheses: H1: Mean wellbeing declined during the Covid-19 outbreak; H2: Exposure to the impact of Covid-19 is linked with stronger effects on wellbeing; H3: The Covid-19 outbreak changed the wellbeing equation itself, impacting both the direction and magnitude of the coefficients that predict wellbeing.
Cross-sectionalGeneral population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
20003/21/20205/7/2020
Demographics, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Other
Self-Assessed Happiness, Life Satisfaction (0-10); Personality (5 item); Lifestyle
MaybeMaybe
32
5/1/2020 14:13:58
kharahr@athabascau.ca
Kharah RossAthabasca UniversityCanada
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
COVID-19, Social Connections and Mental Health
One countryCanada
Currently enrolling participants
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request
Kharah Ross
kharahr@athabascau.ca
Kharah Ross
kharahr@athabascau.ca
The purpose of the study is to examine the impact of social distancing policies on social connections and mental health, focusing on a Canadian sample. Participants will complete an initial online survey querying social connections (social integration, social support, social conflict, and loneliness) and mental health (anxiety and depressive symptoms). Shorter follow-up assessments querying mental health (anxiety and depressive symptoms) and changes in social connection will occur every two weeks for six months (total of 12 assessments). The 3-month and 6-months surveys will re-assess social connection variables, in order to track long-term changes in social connections as a result of COVID-19 pandemic social distancing policies.
Observational, Longitudinal
General population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
4/29/2020
Demographics, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Social support
YesYes
Contacts at other institutions and funding opportunities to expand the study
33
5/2/2020 11:25:30fkach@email.comFrank Kachanoff
University of North Carolina
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Measuring Two Distinct Psychological Threats of COVID-19 and their Unique Impacts on Wellbeing and Adherence to Public Health Behaviors
One countryUnited States
Initial data analyses complete
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be openly available
Frank Kachanofffkach@email.unc.eduFrank Kachanofffkach@email.unc.edu
COVID-19 threatens lives, livelihoods, and civic institutions. Although public health initiatives (i.e., social distancing) help manage its impact, these initiatives can further sever our connections to people and institutions that affirm our identities. Three studies (N=1,195) validated a brief 10-item COVID-19 threat scale that assesses 1) realistic threats to physical or financial safety, and 2) symbolic threats to one’s sociocultural identity. Studies reveal that both realistic and symbolic threat predict higher anxiety and lower wellbeing, and demonstrate convergent validity with other measures of threat sensitivity. Importantly, the two kinds of threat diverge in their relationship to public health behaviors (e.g., social distancing): Realistic threat predicted greater self-reported compliance, whereas symbolic threat predicted less self-reported compliance to these social-disconnection initiatives. Symbolic threat also predicted using creative ways to affirm identity even in isolation. Our findings highlight how social psychological theory can be leveraged to understand and predict people’s behavior in pandemics.
Cross-sectional, Longitudinal
General population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
11953/19/20203/28/2020
Demographics, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Other
Anxiety, Impact of Event (impact avoidance, impact intrusion) , life satisfaction, positive and negative affect, symbolic and realistic threat of COVID-19; other individual differences like the need for cognitive closure, belief in a dangerous world, big 5 personality, and universal values. I also assess adherence to public health behaviors.
n/aMaybeMaybe
I am always open to discuss my research and opportunities for collaboration with others. Please note that I am based more in social psychology than clinical psychology, but I am very interested in the impact of social/group contexts on mental health and well-being!
34
5/3/2020 15:17:16
kleinmatthew0@gmail.com
Matthew S Klein
Michigan State University
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Attitudes, Technology Use, and COVID-19
Global (e.g. an online survey where participants may come from anywhere in the world)
United States
Enrollment complete - still collecting data
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request
Matthew S Klein
kleinmatthew0@gmail.com
Matthew S Klein
kleinmatthew0@gmail.com
ObservationalGeneral population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age
3007/1/2020
Demographics, Prior mental health history, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Social support, Other
Loneliness- UCLA Loneliness Survey
Technology Use
Technology Use based on tie strength
Social Presence
MaybeYes
Funding for participant pools/opportunities for participant pools. Open to Sharing data when available.
35
5/4/2020 13:22:40
michael.briguglio@um.edu.mt
Michael BRIGUGLIOUniversity of MaltaMalta
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Agency vs Structure during the Covid-19 pandemic
One countryMalta
Data collection complete - analyzing data
English
Collaborating with others to utilize common variable names and coding
Michael Briguglio
michael.briguglio@um.edu.mt
michael.briguglio@um.edu.mt
This study looks into what people consider to be the most important factor to help them feel better amid the Coronvirus context. Over 1,500 respondents were asked to write this through an open-ended question as part of a survey undertaken in the first weeks of the pandemic in Malta. The study will assess the factors which respondents are relying on to cope with the Covid-19 anxieties, categorising responses as those which involve an expression of agency as opposed to passive responses reliant on social situations, social structure and other external factors. The study will explore whether there is a link between respondent’s approch to coping and key demographics .
SurveyGeneral population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
15004/1/20207/1/2020Coping strategiesSurveyNoMaybe
36
5/5/2020 4:07:39peraka@ugr.esPandelis PerakakisUniversity of GranadaSpain
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
CoVidAffect: Real-time monitoring of mood variations following the COVID-19 outbreak
Multiple countries (specify later)
Spain, Colombia
Currently enrolling participants
Spanish
De-identified / anonymous data will be openly available, Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive
Pandelis Perakakisperaka@ugr.es
CoVidAffect is a citizen participatory project that started from the University of Granada (Spain) to monitor the emotional impact of the COVID-19 crisis. We use online forms and a mobile app to help citizens regularly record their mood and build a real-time map showing how this extraordinary emergency and its management affect all of us.
All data are publicly available for visualisation and download through the project website (https://covidaffect.info).
The project started measuring the emotional impact in the Spanish territory but we currently seek collaborations to expand internationally.
Mood is registered via two Visual Analogue Scales, one for valence and another for arousal. Answers are submitted up to six times per day via an online form or with the help of a mobile app that can be used to automatize notifications and data entry.
ObservationalGeneral population
Adolescents (13-17), Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
3/28/2020
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes
YesNo
Dissemination and international expansion
37
5/7/2020 18:59:06
redbird@northwestern.edu
Beth Redbird
Northwestern University
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Social and Cultural Impact of COVID-19
One countryUnited States
Enrollment complete - still collecting data
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be openly available, Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive, Collaborating with others to use common measures
Beth Redbird
redbird@northwestern.edu
Beth Redbird
redbird@northwestern.edu
Nationally representative, longitudinal, panel survey of the social, cultural, behavior, and attitudinal consequences of COVID-19. Data can be explored at https://CoronaData.us
Longitudinal
General population, Vulnerable population (e.g. refugees, unaccompanied minors, incarcerated, elderly, minorities) - specify later
Over age 55
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
80003/13/20207/1/2020
Demographics, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Other
MaybeYes
We are always open to collaborators. Currently, we can fund 3 panel waves. One launched in March, one in May, and one is anticipated in late June. However, the pandemic is likely to go on longer than originally anticipated. We are looking to fund a fourth wave.
38
5/11/2020 11:36:25pfraz@umn.eduPatricia FrazierUniversity of MinnesotaUnited States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Assessing Effectiveness of Web-based COVID-19 Stress Management Interventions
One countryUnited States
Initial data analyses complete
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request
Patricia Frazierpfraz@umn.eduPatricia Frazierpfraz@umn.edu
We developed a web-based stress management intervention in 2011, and have published eight studies documenting its efficacy among more than 2,000 students. The intervention results in small to moderate reductions in stress, depression, and anxiety on average relative to comparison groups. We recently completed a randomized trial with 386 Psychology students to assess whether our intervention is effective for reducing stress and improving student mental health in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The intervention (Control What You Can) involves watching brief psychoeducational videos and completing exercises online. The exercises involve focusing on what you can control, which is very relevant in the current context. To create the COVID-specific intervention, we collected and coded data from ~250 students regarding their current stressors and coping strategies. Participants were randomly assigned to our stress management intervention or to a group that received reminders to follow recommendations on the CDC website with regard to COVID-related stress management (e.g., exercise regularly). The mean within-group effect sizes for the Control What You Can and CDC conditions were d = .42 and d = .28, respectively, across six measures of boredom, stress, anxiety, and depression.

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InterventionalStudents
Adults 18 - 34 years of age
3864/13/20205/4/2020
Demographics, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Coping strategies
Basic demographics; Mental health measures: DASS-21, Perceived Stress Scale, Multidimensional State Boredom Scale; COVID-related stress scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; Coping related measures: R-COPE, Present control subscale of the Perceived Control Over Stressors Scale, nonreactivity subscale of the FFMQ
The intervention involves watching brief psychoeducational videos and completing five brief exercises online. The exercises involve distinguishing between controllable and uncontrollable aspects of stressors, learning to focus on the things you can control, and using mindfulness skills to let go of uncontrollable aspects of stressors.
MaybeMaybe
I would be interested in potentially collaborating with other investigators who want to replicate our findings. Re resources, right now the program is in Canvas. We could use programming help to move it to a different platform.
39
5/14/2020 9:50:46
candace.raio@nyulangone.org
Candace RaioNYU Langone HealthUSA
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Our COVID Story (Assessing the Impact of COVID-19 on Health Behaviors and Mental Wellness)
One countryUSA
Currently enrolling participants
english
De-identified / anonymous data will be openly available, De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request
Paul Glimcher, PhD
Paul.Glimcher@nyulangone.org
Candace Raio, PhD
candace.raio@nyulangone.org
Our Covid Story is a longitudinal study examining the impact of pandemic stress on health behaviors. Two cohorts of participants, from New York City and the broader United States, use a mobile app to complete approximately 5-10 minutes of self-report instruments and cognitive tasks daily for 6-18 months. This project is designed to assess social, psychological, economic, and infection-specific stressors, and their effects, through the duration of the pandemic.
ObservationalGeneral population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
100004/15/202012/30/2021
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior health history, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies, Biological or physiological variables, Other
upon request no interventionMaybeMaybe
40
5/15/2020 12:35:55sarah.lowe@yale.eduSarah Lowe
Yale School of Public Health
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Healthcare Workers' COVID-19 Experiences and Wellbeing
One countryUnited States
Currently enrolling participants
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request
Sarah Lowesarah.lowe@yale.eduSarah Lowesarah.lowe@yale.edu
The study is investigating work-related experiences (e.g., direct contact with COVID-19 patients, availability of PPE) and mental health outcomes (e.g., depression, PTSD, anxiety), and potential moderating factors (e.g., workplace support). Data are being collected at three time points (approximately: May 2020; November 2020; May 2021).
Observational, Serial cross-sectional
Healthcare workers
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
10005/5/20205/31/2021
Demographics, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
PHQ-9; GAD-7; PC-PTSD-5; AUDIT; Brief Cope (selected subscales)
N/AMaybeNo
Would be happy to collaborate with others interested in data analysis
41
5/20/2020 6:25:10
elif.duman@boun.edu.tr
Elif Aysimi DumanBogazici UniversityTurkey
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Bogazici Mother-Baby Relationship Project
One countryTurkey
Enrollment complete - still collecting data
Turkish
Collaborating with others to use common measures, Collaborating with others to utilize common variable names and coding
Elif Aysimi Duman
elif.duman@boun.edu.tr
Elif Aysimi Duman
elif.duman@boun.edu.tr
Birth cohort from Istanbul, Turkey (Duman, Atesyakar & Ecevitoglu, 2020), with the following time points: 2nd and 3rd trimester during pregnancy, 1-4-6 months after birth. Investigates mainly effects of different early and prenatal stressors on maternal physiology and health, and on offspring development and health. COVID-related measures are integrated to investigate the impact of the pandemic on individuals, their daily routines and coping strategies.
LongitudinalPregnant women
Pregnant women > 18 years of age
15011/1/20186/1/2021
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior health history, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies, Biological or physiological variables
PSS, CESD, MSPSS, STAI state and trait, BDI-II, LEC, ERQ, UCLA loneliness, PSQI, CTQ, GQ-6, EPDS, PSI, CD-RISC, MEQ
MaybeMaybe
Open to collaborations with similar cohorts/outcomes across different countries.
42
5/22/2020 7:46:12s1602969@glos.ac.ukSamuel Warne
University of Gloucestershire
England
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Active Lockdown: Exploring the effect of Government enforced lockdown on physical activity habits and the corresponding relationship with wellbeing
One countryUnited Kingdom
Enrollment complete - still collecting data
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request
Samuel Warnes1602969@glos.ac.ukSamuel Warnes1602969@glos.ac.uk
An online survey has been launched, utilising the Past Week Modifiable Activity Questionnaire and Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale, in a bid to explore the effects of the government-enforced lockdown on physical activity habits and mental wellbeing.

Research Questions:
1. Are individual’s levels of physical activity being affected during lockdown compared to how they were beforehand?
2. Does isolating with other individuals have an effect on physical activity habits of those in lockdown?
3. Is there a positive relationship between physical activity levels and an individual’s wellbeing during the 2020 Coronavirus lockdown?
4. Does isolating with other individuals have an effect on wellbeing during the 2020 Coronavirus lockdown?
5. How does the end of lockdown impact individual’s physical activity habits?
Observational
General population, Students
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
1995/22/20206/26/2020
Demographics, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Other
Current Mental Health - Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale

Other (Physical Activity habits) - Past-Week Modifiable Activity Questionnaire
NoNo
43
5/22/2020 17:57:53dtamir@princeton.eduDiana TamirPrinceton UniversityUnited States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Social thought and social well-being during social isolation
Global (e.g. an online survey where participants may come from anywhere in the world)
Currently enrolling participants
English, German, French, Chinese, Japanese, Arabic
De-identified / anonymous data will be openly available
Diana Tamirdtamir@princeton.eduJudith Mildner
jmildner@princeton.edu
Cross-sectional, Longitudinal
General population, Students, Healthcare workers, Clinical population (mental health concern), Clinical population (physical health concern)
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
3/16/20203/16/2021
Demographics, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Other
YesYes
We currently have English, French, Chinese, Japanese, and German versions of this survey. We would love collaborators to help us distribute the survey in additional languages.
44
6/9/2020 12:03:58
jennifer.mccabe@wwu.edu
Jennifer McCabe
Western Washington University
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Prenatal Maternal Stress during COVID-19
One countryUnited StatesPlanning studyEnglish, Spanish
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Collaborating with others to use common measures
Jennifer McCabe
jennifer.mccabe@wwu.edu
Jennifer McCabe
jennifer.mccabe@wwu.edu
Prospective longitudinal study of prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) during COVID-19 and effects on offspring development. Collect data maternal data during pregnancy and postpartum. Collect offspring data during postpartum. Examine objective stress and subjective distress.
Longitudinalpregnant women
pregnant women 18 years and older
3007/27/20205/31/2021Demographics, Other
Other: still designing the study
MaybeMaybe
45
6/9/2020 12:18:29nora.charles@usm.eduNora Charles
The University of Southern Mississippi
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Are levels of psychological symptoms and alcohol use higher during the pandemic than in the previous semester?
One countryUnited States
Initial data analyses complete
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request
Nora Charles, PhDnora.charles@usm.eduNora Charles, PhDnora.charles@usm.edu
Data on mental health symptoms, perceived stress, and alcohol use was collected online from 148 college students at a medium-sized university in the southeastern U.S. during the U.S. COVID-19 shutdown in Spring 2020. Results are compared to those of 240 students from the previous semester. Measures include the DSM-5 Level 1 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure for Adults, the AUDIT alcohol use measure, and the Perceived Stress Scale. Additionally, some lab-developed COVID-19 questions were asked during spring data collection and responses are compared to symptoms.

Our goal is to understand how the pandemic has affected college students' well-being by comparing in-pandemic to pre-pandemic measures. We expect to see higher levels of internalizing symptoms, stress, and alcohol use during the pandemic. Additionally, we will explore whether there are differences in well-being between White and African American students.
Cross-sectionalStudents
Adults 18 - 34 years of age
4004/1/20205/8/2020
Demographics, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
Lab-developed demographic and COVID questions
Perceived Stress Scale
AUDIT- Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test
DSM-5 Level 1 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure- Adult
PANAS- Positive and Negative Affect Schedule
Lab-developed information about diet and health behaviors
Brief COPE
MaybeMaybe
We've completed a wave of data collection but would consider collaborating if approached!
46
6/9/2020 14:37:12
laura.carstensen@stanford.edu
Laura L. CarstensenStanford UniversityUnited States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Age Advantages in Emotional Experience Persist Even Under Threat From the COVID-19 Pandemic
One countryUnited States
Initial data analyses complete
English
Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive
Laura L. Carstensen
laura.carstensen@stanford.edu
Laura L. Carstensen
laura.carstensen@stanford.edu
The COVID-19 pandemic is creating unprecedented, sustained, and unavoidable stress for the entire population, with older people facing particularly heightened risk. The current study was conducted in April 2020, when the pandemic had begun to spread exponentially in the United States. We evaluated the emotional well-being of Americans to address important theoretical questions about age differences in emotional experience in times of crisis. We surveyed a representative sample of 945 Americans aged 18-76 and assessed the frequency and intensity of a range of positive and negative emotions. We also assessed perceived risk of contagion and complications from the virus, as well as personality, health, and demographic characteristics.
Cross-sectional
General population, Vulnerable population (e.g. refugees, unaccompanied minors, incarcerated, elderly, minorities) - specify later
older adults
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
9454/23/2020
Demographics, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes
NoNo
47
6/9/2020 20:37:11
Margaret.kerr@wisc.edu
Margaret.kerr@wisc.edu
University of Wisconsin-Madison
United States of America
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Parenting in a Pandemic Study
One country
United States of America
Initial data analyses complete
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Collaborating with others to use common measures
Margaret Kerr
Margaret.kerr@wisc.edu
Kerrie Fanningkafanning@wisc.edu
Approximately 1000 participants were recruited through electronic snowball sampling methods (e.g., emailing listservs) and completed a 30-minute survey through Qualtrics with closed-ended and open-ended questions exploring parenting experiences, behaviors, and emotions. Participants were asked to report on their feelings about being a parent, and about their relationship with their children and other family members during COVID-19. They were also asked questions about how COVID-19 has impacted their lives, including job changes, governmental aid, child care arrangements, mental health, and
parenting behaviors. The primary goal of the study is to explore how the COVID-19 pandemic has influenced parents' emotions, stress, and parenting behaviors.
Cross-sectional
General population, Parents with children under 12
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age
10044/29/20205/1/2020
Demographics, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
PHQ-9; GAD-7; Other COVID-19 specific measures
MaybeYes
Looking for opportunities to work together to get the data shared or disseminated. Also the possibility of recruiting another sample that is more diverse.
48
6/15/2020 2:23:04
Sonja.March@usq.edu.au
Sonja March
University of Southern Queensland
Australia
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
COVID-19 UNMASKED: Supporting Children and Adolescents
One countryAustralia
Currently enrolling participants
EnglishOtherProfessor Sonja March
Sonja.March@usq.edu.au
Professor Sonja March
Sonja.March@usq.edu.au
The aims of this research:
1. To track children and young people's mental health (via parent report) throughout the COVID19 crisis and in the year following resolution.
2. To identify supportive care needs during and after the crisis (to inform service delivery and programs).
3. To understand use of and acceptability by young people and families of newly implemented services (e.g. telehealth and digital services).
4. To identify what parental responses and actions protect children and young people from deteriorating mental health (over time, and at particular stress points).
5. To understand how the above varies according to child and family characteristics.

The research uses a longitudinal design with online questionnaires being delivered at 4 time points over 12 months (baseline, 3-months, 6-months and 12-months).
Observational, Longitudinal
Parents of children 6-17
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age
5005/15/20207/15/2021
Demographics, Prior health history, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies, Other
SDQ-P, RCADS-P-25, DASS-21, Daliy behaviours
NoNo
49
7/2/2020 20:33:01jmhenrici@gmail.com
Jane Henrici and Karine Lepillez
George Washington University
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Food, Family, and Farm Security: Gendered Issues in Dealing with Disasters and Climate Change in Rural Maryland
One countryUnited States
Currently enrolling participants
EnglishOtherJane Henricijmhenrici@gmail.comJane Henrici, PhDjmhenrici@gmail.com
Qualitative open-ended interviews, coded and analyzed with grounded feminist theory: Farm work and farm businesses worldwide are often particularly vulnerable to sudden-onset disasters such as droughts and floods; in contrast during the COVID-19 pandemic and policy responses to it, many farms—including those owned or run by women and women of color in the United States—are staying operational even as other enterprises, particularly those owned by women, close. This project explores ways in which farm owners and farmers of diverse genders and racial and ethnic backgrounds are dealing with and adapting to regional COVID-19 quarantine and food security issues. The interviews are being conducted remotely with farmers across the state of Maryland, and with representatives of organizations that work to support farmers currently experiencing both their ongoing responses to the sudden-onset disaster of the pandemic and quarantine and to the slower-onset disaster of climate change and its related environmental hazards. This analysis is intended to inform discussion and future disaster and climate action carried out by farmers, women small- and medium-size business owners, as well as governmental, private sector, and non-profit stakeholders.
Observational
Vulnerable population (e.g. refugees, unaccompanied minors, incarcerated, elderly, minorities) - specify later
Owners of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds of small- and medium- size farm businesses and farm workers across the US state of Maryland
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
455/15/20207/31/2020
Social support, Coping strategies
Self-identifiedNo
We plan to seek funds to conduct a follow-up, longitudinal project
50
7/12/2020 11:50:05levygigilab@gmail.comEinat Levy-GigiBar Ilan UniversityIsrael
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Psychological effects of the corona virus and the role of emotional and cognitive flexibility
Multiple countries (specify later)
Israel, Germany, United States, Australia
Enrollment complete - still collecting data
English, German, Hebrew
Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive
Einat Levy-Gigilevygigie@gmail.comAlla Hemihemi.alla@gmail.comLongitudinalGeneral population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
60004/12/20206/1/2021
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
51
7/12/2020 12:00:33
nidhi78_m@yahoo.co.in
Nidhi Maheshwari
Freelance Govt. Projects
India
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Nudging Health Behaviours through media advertising
Global (e.g. an online survey where participants may come from anywhere in the world)
Globally settled Indians
Data collection complete - analyzing data
English and Hindi
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request
Dr. Nidhi M
nidhi78_m@yahoo.co.in
Dr. Nidhi M
Understanding Health Beliefs in predicting preventive behaviours and checking on the perceived effectiveness of advertisements (nudges) for behavioural change intention.
InterventionalGeneral population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age
400
Current health / health outcomes, Other
Published Online Adverts
MaybeMaybe
52
7/13/2020 15:15:33
kharahr@athabascau.ca
Kharah RossAthabasca UniversityCanada
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
COVID-19, social connections and mental health
One countryCanada
Enrollment complete - still collecting data
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request
Kharah Ross
kharahr@athabascau.ca
Observational, Cross-sectional, Longitudinal
General population, Students
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
4004/30/2020
Demographics, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support
YesYes
Qualitative researchers to help code/analyze open-ended questions
53
7/25/2020 4:53:15
whitney.ringen@gmail.com
Whitney Ringen
Alice Salomon Hochsule
Germany
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Social Distancing for the Socially Distant: The effects of COVID-19 on adult non-national residents living in Berlin during the pandemic
One countryGermany (Berlin)
Currently enrolling participants
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Collaborating with others to use common measures, Collaborating with others to utilize common variable names and coding
Whitney Ringen
whitney.ringen@gmail.com
Whitney Ringen
whitney.ringen@gmail.com
Non-national residents are often treated as outsiders in their communities, either actively or covertly. Despite initiatives and programs that try to encourage "integration," many individuals still face obstacles even during the best of times. How has COVID-19 affected those individuals? Using Grounded Theory to investigate their experiences, personal-network research to understand their access to resources and intending to use GPS to evaluate the psychological effects of their experiences.
Observational, Cross-sectional
General population, Students, Vulnerable population (e.g. refugees, unaccompanied minors, incarcerated, elderly, minorities) - specify later
Non-national residents
Adults 18 - 34 years of age
3/1/201912/30/2020
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Social support, Coping strategies, Other
Semi-structured interviews, online surveys, field observations, GPS
YesMaybe
I am seeking anyone that can help with distributing the online survey to the appropriate populations.
54
8/17/2020 8:16:58info@covidsoclab.orgAleksander AristovnikUniversity of LjubljanaSlovenia
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Impact of the Covid-19 Pandemic on Life of Higher Education Students
Global (e.g. an online survey where participants may come from anywhere in the world)
Global
Data collection complete - analyzing data
English
Collaborating with others to use common measures, Collaborating with others to utilize common variable names and coding
Aleksander Aristovnik
aleksander.aristovnik@fu.uni-lj.si
Dejan Ravšeljinfo@covidsoclab.org
The goal of this study is to highlight the main results of a global survey on impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the life of higher education students that was carried out by an international consortium of universities, other higher education institutions, and students’ associations. The questionnaire is based on and extends the European Students’ Union Survey [2020] and targeted higher education students with respect to what student life looked like during the pandemic, including teaching and learning, their social contacts, habits/routines as well as how they were coping with the situation emotionally and financially, and what they were expecting by way of support measures from various institutions, e.g. universities, the government, banks etc. (see Aristovnik et al. 2020). The purpose of the study was to shed light on the ways the COVID-19 crisis has impacted student life and to design a set of recommendations for policymakers and higher education institutions concerning how students can be supported during the crisis created by the COVID-19 pandemic.
In order to understand the ways the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted a range of aspects of student lives, the following research questions are addressed:
R1: How have students around the world been satisfied with and how have they perceived different aspects of student life during the COVID-19 pandemic?
R2: Are there any socio-demographic and geographic differences in:
• … students’ satisfaction with and perception of selected elements of academic work and academic life due to the transition from onsite to online lectures? (R2.1)
• … students’ perception of the COVID-19 pandemic’s consequences for their social and emotional life, personal circumstances and habits? (R2.2)
• … students’ satisfaction with the role of selected institutions and their measures during the COVID-19 pandemic? (R2.3)
R3: How do selected socio-demographic, geographic and other factors determine the students’ satisfaction with the role of their university during the COVID-19 pandemic?
Observational, Cross-sectional
Students
Adults 18 - 34 years of age
305/5/20206/15/2020
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Social support
http://www.covidsoclab.org/global-student-survey/survey-results/
MaybeMaybe
55
8/30/2020 6:55:18
s.butter@sheffield.ac.uk
Sarah ButterUniversity of SheffieldUK
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
A longitudinal mixed-methods population study of the UK during the COVID-19 pandemic
Multiple countries (specify later)
UK, Ireland, Spain, Italy, United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia
Data collection complete - analyzing data
English, Spanish, Italian, Arabic
Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive
Professor Richard Bentall
r.bentall@sheffield.ac.uk
Dr Sarah Butter
s.butter@sheffield.ac.uk
The main aim of the study is to monitor and assess the long-term impact of the COVID-19 crisis on psychological, social, and economic outcomes within and across a number of countries. Data were collected on a nationally representative sample of adults via an online panel survey, covering a broad range of sociodemographic, mental health, psychological, social, political and COVID-19 related (e.g. health behaviours) information. At present, the three waves of data collection have been conducted in the UK, which serves as the ‘parent’ arm of the study. Four additional waves of data collection have been funded.
LongitudinalGeneral population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
20003/23/202012/31/2021
Demographics, Prior health history, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Social support
Background and demographic information, prior physical health condition, mental health treatment history, COVID-19 self-infection, COVID-19 family infection, ITQ, GAD-7, PHQ-9, PHQ-15 (somatic symtpoms), Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Revised, Persecution and Deservedness Scale (paranoia), UCLA loneliness scale, Brief Resilience Scale, Death Anxiety Inventory, Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale, Locus of Control Scale, modified Medical Outcome Social Support Survey, additional psychological and mental health measures, economic measures, family functioning measures, living conditions, political beliefs and attitudes, knowledge and beliefs about COVID, health behaviours.
Maybe
56
9/15/2020 11:00:39h.lomax@hud.ac.ukHelenLomaxUK
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Corona Chronicles - Children researching their everyday lives, education & relationships during the coronavirus pandemic (CHEER)
One countryUK (England)
Enrollment complete - still collecting data
English
Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive
Professor Helen Lomaxh.lomax@hud.ac.ukHelen Lomaxh.lomax@hud.ac.uk
This research explores the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the everyday lives, education and relationships of primary school children aged 9-11 in the UK (UK school years 5 to 6). The research is informed by participatory action research and children as researchers, whereby methods are inclusive, collaborative and value all voices. The research supports children to visually ‘chronicle’ their experiences using creative media of their choosing (photographs, drawings, narrative and film). These chronicles, together with image elicitation focus-groups with children (n=30) and teachers (n=10), a parent survey and children’s wellbeing self-assessment will generate new understandings of the material, familial and personal resources available to support children’s resilience and flourishing. The inclusion of children experiencing material and other forms of disadvantage will enable the research to answer pressing questions about the particular risks to these children’s education and wellbeing. Outputs, including an illustrated guide to children’s wellbeing co-produced with children will enable the research to contribute directly to educational and societal recovery and be of value for responding to future pandemics/crises. To find out how the team are researching remotely with children see our two-minute video https://huddersfield.app.box.com/file/690714388254

PAR (Participatory Action Research): Creative, participatory methods
Vulnerable population (e.g. refugees, unaccompanied minors, incarcerated, elderly, minorities) - specify later
Children aged 9-11 including children experiencing material and other forms of disadvantage
School-age children (6-12), Teachers
307/1/20204/30/2021
Social support, Coping strategies, Other
Children will:
- visually chronicle their material, familial and personal resources that support their wellbeing;
- complete a wellbeing self-assessment x 2
YesYes
The study is currently funded to work with five schools in England (researching with children, teachers and parents). We are seeking to extend the study to explore children's resilience over time during and post pandemic with international partners.
57
9/17/2020 0:42:35
jeanliu@yale-nus.edu.sg
Jean CJ LiuYale-NUS CollegeSingapore
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
COVID-19 News Exposure as a Modifiable Risk Factor of Psychological Symptoms: Can an Official WhatsApp Channel Help?
One countrySingapore OtherEnglish
Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive
Jean CJ Liu
jeanliu@yale-nus.edu.sg
Jean CJ Liu
jeanliu@yale-nus.edu.sg
This cross-sectional study was conducted with 1145 adults in Singapore which aims to (1) assess well-being during the pandemic; (2) replicate
prior findings linking exposure to COVID-19 news with psychological distress; and (3) examine whether subscription to an official WhatsApp channel can mitigate this risk. As the primary outcome measure, participants completed the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). As predictor variables, participants also answered questions pertaining to: (1) their exposure to COVID-19 news; (2) their use of the Singapore government’s WhatsApp channel; and (3) their demographics.
Cross-sectionalGeneral population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age
11453/7/20204/21/2020
Demographics, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Coping strategies
Demographics - gender, ethnicity, religion, country of birth, country of citizenship, marital status, education, house type, household size

Psychological outcomes - DASS-21

Coping strategies - participants indicated: (1) whether they had used the government’s WhatsApp channel to receive COVID-19 news (yes / no); (2) how likely they were to share or forward messages from the channel (using 4-point scales anchored with “will definitely not forward on” to “will definitely forward on”); and (3) how likely they were to trust a message from this source (using 4-point scales anchored with “do not trust at all” to “trust completely”)
NoNo
58
9/17/2020 4:58:48
jeanliu@yale-nus.edu.sg
Jean CJ LiuYale-NUS CollegeSingapore
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Understanding the mental health of migrant workers during the COVID-19 outbreak
One countrySingapore
Currently enrolling participants
English, Chinese, Bengali, Tamil
Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive
Jean CJ Liu
jeanliu@yale-nus.edu.sg
Jean CJ Liu
jeanliu@yale-nus.edu.sg
This study aims to understand the mental health of migrant workers diagnosed with COVID-19 or quarantined in dormitories during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Worldwide, there are an estimated 164 million migrant workers. Although studies have documented how workers have an increased risk of adverse health outcomes, little is known about their vulnerability during a health crisis. In the current COVID-19 outbreak, nearly 30,000 migrant workers have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 in Singapore. This represents 9 in 10 of the local cases, and 25 dormitories have been gazetted to contain the spread of the virus. Correspondingly, these measures have placed a spotlight on the well-being of migrant workers.

In this research protocol, the investigators propose to administer a survey to understand the mental health of migrant workers: (1) diagnosed with COVID-19 (housed in NUS or Expo), and (2) quarantined in dormitories. This will allow the investigators to capture the base rate of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in the population, and will also help to identify risk factors of psychological distress within this population.

Cross-sectional, Epidemiological
Vulnerable population (e.g. refugees, unaccompanied minors, incarcerated, elderly, minorities) - specify later
Migrant workers who have been quarantined during the COVID-19 pandemic in Singapore
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
10006/1/202010/31/2020
Demographics, Prior health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes
Demographics: Country of citizenship, Religion, Education, Marital Status, Household, Years worked in Singapore, Type of work, Financial status (amount of money earned before and after the COVID-19 outbreak, loans owed in Singapore)

Prior health history: Have you been diagnosed with COVID-19?

Type/degree of COVID-19 exposure: Have you been diagnosed with COVID-19? Do you know anyone who has been diagnosed with COVID-19? (someone in room/floor/block)

Current mental health/psychological outcomes: DASS-21
NoNo
59
9/22/2020 4:42:29bruno.arpino@unifi.itBruno ArpinoUniversity of FirenzeItaly
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Intergenerational relationships and mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic
Multiple countries (specify later)
France, Italy, Spain
Initial data analyses complete
English, French, Italian, Spanish
Bruno Arpinobruno.arpino@unifi.itBruno Arpinobruno.arpino@unifi.it
The restrictions to movements, events and relations imposed in different countries due to the COVID-19 pandemic have limited the possibility to meet and socialise with other people. This may have contributed to a deterioration in people’s mental health on top of other negative consequences of the pandemic. The goal of the study is twofold. First, we aim at examining to what extent intergenerational physical and non-physical contacts have changed during the pandemic. Second, we aim at testing whether people that managed to maintain social contacts even if at a distance have better coped with the stress created by the pandemic.



DATA

The data have been collected through an on-line survey by the survey company Lucid on a total sample of 9,186 individuals in Italy, Spain and France (about 3,000 respondents per country) in April 2020. We used quota sampling targeting the population aged 18+. Based on data from national statistical offices, we have set quotas proportional to the prevalence in the country of each category of the following variables: gender, age, region, education and income.

We collected data on:

Intergenerational (and other type) of relationships (physical and non-physical; means of communication; frequency, etc.)

Living arrangements

Mental health

Consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic (e.g., income loss, death of relative/friend due to COVID-19, worsened partner relationships, time spent with family)

Intentions for the future 3 years (e.g., fertility, living parental home, marriage, divorce, retirement)

For more details: https://sites.google.com/unifi.it/intergen-covid
Observational, Cross-sectional
General population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
90564/14/20204/24/2020
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior health history, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support
Maybe
60
10/16/2020 19:06:54SCHIFF@UCALGARY.CA
Jeannette Waegemakers Schiff
University of CalgaryCanada
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
Traumatic Stress and Mental Health Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Front-Line Workers in Homeless Services
One countryCannada
Currently enrolling participants
English
De-identified / anonymous data will be available upon request, Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive, Collaborating with others to use common measures
Jeannette Waegemakers Schiff
schiff@ucalgary.caStephanie Campbell
scampbe2@lakeheadu.ca
Summary of Research Proposal: Until the COVID-19 pandemic, scant attention had been paid to the mental health and well-being of front-line workers in homeless and domestic violence services. Prior research reported high levels of traumatic stress and high rates of employee stress leave. These responses were exacerbated by lack of training, inadequate preparation for responses in a pandemic and a perceived lack of physical and psychological safety that may potentiate further traumatic stress responses. As the pandemic emerged front-line workers, along with health care staff, were deemed “essential” and thus unable to work from home, which would have minimized their exposure to transmission. Resultantly, most have been exposed to frontline work with minimal availability, especially in the early weeks, of protective equipment. In previous work, we surveyed of front-line workers in homeless services, and results at all locations showed consistently high rates of traumatic stress indicating a diagnosis of PTSD. Given the sudden and potentially traumatic impact of COVID- 19, the overall goal of this research is to document the extent to which the COVID-19 crisis has impacted mental health and work-related disability among front-line workers and to ascertain if Trauma Informed care has had a mitigating effect. A second aim is to document the efficacy of a novel data collection strategy aimed at capturing the majority of staff experiences as select samples seriously under-report prevalence of traumatic stress. A final aim is to document rates of disability (stress) leave for staff through Worker’s Compensation Board (WBC) claims. The proposed research is supported by the availability of a unique baseline data set from surveys of work-related stress in homelessness services organizations and a large network of organizations committed to participating in this project. The surveys provide the only known profile of the mental health stressors encountered by front-line workers prior to COVID-19 and this provides a singular opportunity to compare workplace mental health and stressors both before and after the onset of the COVID crisis and examine mitigating factors. We will access WCB pre and post COVID-19 data on stress leave claims and costs in the identified organizations and determine the extent to which any changes in staff well-being also correlated with changes in stress leave disabilities. Together this data will present important information on staff traumatic stress, the impact of the COVID-19 virus, resultant disabilities, and possible mitigating factors resulting from organizational changes and the efficacy of a novel data collection approach. This is especially critical as health authorities predict a second and possible third wave of infections that would seriously deplete an already highly stressed group of essential workers.
The study will, include a quantitative component: a survey of all staff in participating organizations in seven Canadian cities (Calgary, Edmonton, Thunder Bay, Toronto, Moncton, Fredericton and Saint John (New Brunswick). The survey will include the PROQoL, PCL-C, and LEC as well as questions on organizational culture and COVID related organizational responses. A qualitative component consists of semi-structured interviews with organization management and leadership about COVID related adaptations.
Cross-sectional, Epidemiological
Frontline workers in homelessness services
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
90010/26/20203/16/2021
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Coping strategies, Other
PROQoL; LEC, PCL-C, organizational culture scale; Indigenous identity profile
MaybeMaybe
This study is funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the New Brunswick Institute of Health Research. Expansion to other sites is possible but would require additional funding.
61
11/9/2020 12:48:28dgarfin@uci.eduDana Rose Garfin
University of California, Irvine
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
RAPID: Uncertain Risk and Stressful Future: A National Study of the COVID-2019 Outbreak in the U.S.
One countryUnited States
Enrollment complete - still collecting data
English
Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive
Roxane Cohen Silver, E. Alison Holman, Dana Rose Garfin
rsilver@uci.eduRoxane Cohen Silver
In December 2019, scientists identified a novel Coronavirus (COVID-2019) that was associated with an outbreak of pneumonia in Wuhan, China and that was suspected of being zoonotic in origin. On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a pandemic, and on March 13, 2020, U.S. President Donald Trump declared a national emergency. Because individuals can transmit the illness prior to exhibiting symptoms (i.e., an ‘invisible threat’), and in the absence of a vaccine for protection, the severity of this crisis and the timing of containment in the United States is unknown. In the context of this uncertainty and ambiguity about the immediate future, the research team studies emotional (fear, worry, distress), cognitive (perceived risk), and behavioral (media use, health protective behaviors) responses to the COVID-19 outbreak and how these early responses shape outcomes over time. The scholars examine how widespread media coverage of the COVID-19 outbreak is associated with acute stress responses to the threat, its success (or failure) in affording people the information needed to understand the threat, and how cognitive and affective processes shape risk assessments, behavioral responses, and mental health outcomes. This project is unique in studying the effects of risk perceptions, health protective behaviors, and acute stress on adjustment as an ambiguous global health threat unfolds.

The research is a longitudinal study of 5,000 people from the AmeriSpeak panel, a probability-based nationally representative sample of U.S. households on whom, baseline, mental and physical health data have been collected prior to the start of the COVID-19 threat in the U.S. Two surveys administered over the next year examine respondents’ risk perceptions, fear, media use, health protective behaviors, and distress surrounding the outbreak. The sample is drawn using sample stratification to assure sample representativeness with respect to age, gender, race/ethnicity, and Census Region. For Wave 1, the drawn sample is randomly assigned to one of three nationally representative replicates (i.e., cohorts) that have non-overlapping data collection periods of 2 calendar weeks, for a total of a 6-week fielding period. Each cohort thus represents a representative sample whose interviews are generalizable to point-in-time survey estimates for the 2-week period to which the cohort is mapped. A second survey is fielded on the Wave 1 sample within the next year, as the crisis unfolds (or abates).

Overall, this study assesses risk perceptions, media use, acute stress, social norms, self- and response-efficacy, and protective behaviors at the start of an ambiguous and deadly domestic threat on a large representative sample with existing pre-threat mental and physical health data. This provides a unique opportunity to examine national responses to an ongoing public health crisis as it unfolds, producing research with both theoretical and practical importance. The team has five specific aims: 1) Estimate COVID-19-related media exposure, COVID-19 risk perceptions, trust in institutions managing (and communicating about) COVID-19, and behavioral and emotional responses to perceived COVID-19 threat; 2) Investigate how type (e.g., television, Twitter, online news), amount (e.g., total hours), and content (e.g., imagery) of COVID-19-related media coverage are associated with risk perceptions, and behavioral and emotional responses (e.g., acute stress, somatization, depression); 3) Examine how ambiguity of the COVID-19 threat and inconsistencies in official communications about this threat are associated with perceived risk, as well as emotional and behavioral responses; 4) Investigate whether prior exposure to individual (e.g., childhood violence) and collective (e.g., 9/11) stress are associated with COVID-19-related risk perceptions and behavioral and emotional responses to the COVID-19 threat; and 5) Contrast key theories of health behavior in an epidemiological sample responding to a current and evolving threat. We expect that information collected in this research will advance future conceptual work on coping with highly stressful events by furthering our understanding of the extent to which traditional and non-traditional media coverage of the Coronavirus outbreak may be affecting individuals’ risk perceptions and acute stress responses to it, providing information to facilitate early identification of individuals at risk for subsequent difficulties following potential public health crises, and explicitly integrating the stress and coping literature with the literature on risk analysis and perception.

This award reflects NSF’s statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation’s intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.
LongitudinalGeneral population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
65143/18/2020
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior health history, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
MaybeMaybe
62
11/9/2020 12:51:03dgarfin@uci.eduDana Rose Garfin
University of California, Irvine
United States
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
RAPID: Compounding Crises: Facing Hurricane Season in the Era of COVID-19
One countryUnited States
Enrollment complete - still collecting data
English
Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive
Gabrielle Wong Parodi, Dana Rose Garfin
dgarfin@uci.eduDana Rose Garfin dgarfinm@uci.edu
This Rapid Response Research (RAPID) grant provides funding to assess participants’ crisis exposure, their threat perceptions, their self- and response-efficacy, their emotional responses and their engagement in health protective behaviors as relevant to COVID-19 and to hurricanes. As the 2020 hurricane season commences, millions of Americans residing in the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts will face the likely possibility of dual crises – COVID-19 and hurricane exposure – with competing mitigation strategies. Experts project that there will be four hurricanes that will develop into major hurricanes (Categories 3, 4, or 5) in the Atlantic during the 2020 hurricane season (June 1st – November 30th). Concurrently, many in the Atlantic and Gulf Coast states are seeing alarming increases in confirmed case of COVID-19. The confluence of crises in communities at risk for hurricane exposure may create an untenable and tragic situation where millions of people may be suddenly asked to flee from an approaching major hurricane to shelters, potentially imperiling themselves and others to COVID-19. Hurricane-force winds further compound the risk given the high potential for Coronavirus to spread via respiratory droplets, potentially creating super-spreading environments and fueling fears about going to shelters. Repeated exposure to such crises can tax individuals’ emotional states, leading to difficulties in functioning and decision making over time. The important theoretical and practical question is: How do people make proactive decisions regarding the threat of a hurricane in the time of the COVID-19 pandemic?

The research team conducts a prospective, longitudinal, epidemiological study of residents (n=1,683) from Texas and Florida, for whom the team has data on their exposure, behavior, and response to previous hurricanes. Participants are members of Ipsos’s KnowledgePanel, and complete two surveys: one at the beginning of the 2020 hurricane season and at the height of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and the second after the threat of a major land-falling Category 3, 4, or 5 hurricane. The researchers assess participants’ crisis exposure, their threat perceptions, their self- and response-efficacy, their emotional responses and their engagement in health protective behaviors as relevant to COVID-19 and to hurricanes. Moreover, the team uses publicly available datasets to create geocoded variables that link participant location to objective indicators of disaster exposure to both COVID-19 (e.g., deaths per 10,000, daily cases) and the physical parameters of hurricanes (e.g., inundation flooding, wind speed, air temperature). This project examines individual’s response to repeated exposure to hurricanes in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, using pre-COVID, prospectively collected data, objective markers of exposure, and a longitudinal design. The findings are useful to policymakers, service providers, educators, and members of the media to communicate messages and design interventions.
LongitudinalGeneral population
Adults 18 - 34 years of age, Adults 35 - 60 years of age, Adults > 60 years old
184675/14/2020
Demographics, Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Prior health history, Prior mental health history, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
MaybeMaybe
63
12/30/2020 12:49:48
mariateresa.fenoglio@unito.it
Maria Teresa Fenoglio
Psicologimoer i Popoli Torino. Turin University
Italy
Conducting (or planning) COVID-19 related mental health research
An intervention risearch among a group of Emergency Health professionals
One countryGlobal
Data collection complete - analyzing data
Italian
Data will be deposited in an accessible data repository / archive
Maria Tetesa Fenoglio
Mariateresa.fenoglio@unito.it
Trough in Depht interviews of a group of Health professionals in the Emergency system, Researchers, themselves involved in psychosocial support of both professionals and patients, are collecting qualitative data regarding difficulties and resources met in the Covid19 Emergency while helping the system to learn from experiences.
InterventionalHealthcare workersAdults of all ages209/1/20201/30/2020
Prior stress / trauma / adversity, Type / degree of COVID-19 exposure, Traumatic stress reactions related to COVID-19, Other current mental health / psychological outcomes, Current health / health outcomes, Social support, Coping strategies
Qualitative in depht interviews
The group of researchers involves Health professionals in recostructing the story of their personal and institutional experience in covid19 Emergency. The aim of the study is to emeliorate the quality of interpersonal relationship among colleagues, gaining awareness about instituitional dynamics and reinforcing personal and collettive resilience.
NoMaybe
Confronting with otthers
64
4/21/2020 20:16:16
t.dune@westernsydney.edu.au
Tinashe Dune
western sydney university
Australia
Offering to assist or collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
Research in Australia, qualitative research, research with minority and marginalised populations.
Collaborate to conduct an existing study in my area / country, Help to spread the word about open study recruitment, Assist with data analyses / interpretation, Collaborate to provide specific relevant expertise (content or methods)
qualitative research, q methodology, minortity and marginalised groups
65
4/22/2020 16:50:00
anushka.patel@ucsf.edu
Anushka PatelUCSFUSA
Offering to assist or collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
Translate measures / study materials into additional language(s), Collaborate to jointly plan a new study, Collaborate to conduct an existing study in my area / country, Assist with data analyses / interpretation, Collaborate to provide specific relevant expertise (content or methods)
I am fluent in Hindi and English and can assist in any translation and cultural validation of assessment or treatment materials. I am also very interested in collaborating to ask research questions, analyze data, and publish findings to create awareness related to the uptick in domestic violence as a result of mandated sheltering-in-place globally. I am particularly interested in this topic for under-served populations and would love to help in any way possible for studying and/or treating its psychological sequelae.
66
4/22/2020 16:53:37emily@cogdiv.comEmily Santiago
Center for Cognitive Diversity
US
Offering to assist or collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
We provide proactive mental health supports for peer groups of educators and healthcare professionals impacted by the pandemic using the research based model of Reflective Supervision. Participants have shared that it reduces burnout and the impact of trauma exposure. Some previous research shows it can reduce staff turnover by 12%. We would like to collaborate to prove this is a technique that can address collective trauma caused by covid-19. We also have an ecological assessment tool that measures stress response and resilience that we are piloting called 'Dynamic Empowerment.'
Collaborate to jointly plan a new study, Collaborate to provide specific relevant expertise (content or methods)
I am a Licensed Educational Psychologist and I deliver and develop interventions that may be of interest to researchers. Our organization has been focused on proactive mental health/pre-traumatic interventions to prevent burnout and treat Secondary Traumatic Stress.
67
4/23/2020 22:12:46
s.garrido@westernsydney.edu.au
Sandra Garrido
Western Sydney University
Australia
Offering to assist or collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
We have a smartphone app which can be used to collect data about how people are using music to cope with covid-19
Collaborate to jointly plan a new study, Collaborate to conduct an existing study in my area / country, Help to spread the word about open study recruitment, Collaborate to provide specific relevant expertise (content or methods)
68
4/24/2020 8:53:50
knaumova@fzf.ukim.edu.mk
Katerina Naumova
Ss. Cyril and Methodius University - Skopje
Republic of North Macedonia
Offering to assist or collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
Collaborate to conduct an existing study in my area / country
69
4/25/2020 16:13:23
nikhilnayyar8587@gmail.com
Nikhil Nayyar
Ambedkar University Delhi
India
Offering to assist or collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
As a researcher and student i can prove to be a valuable collaborator to research in Mental Health. As COVID-19 i can help collect data representative from India, which could help global projects in ensuring a wider sample.
Collaborate to jointly plan a new study, Collaborate to conduct an existing study in my area / country, Help to spread the word about open study recruitment, Collaborate to provide specific relevant expertise (content or methods)
70
4/27/2020 11:26:21
cdenckla@hsph.harvard.edu
Christy A. Denckla
Harvard University, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
United States
Offering to assist or collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
At the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, we have deployed a public mental health initiative “REACH for Mental Health” based on the “Do The Five” WHO concept and informed by trauma-based theory and evidence-based disaster mental health. Further information about the global project can be found at https://www.global-psychotrauma.net/covid-19-projects. We outline an example of the concept below, and seek to engage with collaborators on study design and implementation, analysis, grant writing, or evaluation.

An example of a REACH initiative is described in more detail below (see Denckla, Gelaye, Orlinsky & Koenen (in press; EJPT) for more details. First, to “Recognize the Problem”, we noticed that rising levels of uncertainty and stress called for dissemination of basic evidence-based psychoeducational information on mental health and wellness. Second, we sought to “Expand the Social Safety Net” by offering public mental health forums to the both the institutional community and the public. These forums included a combination of psychoeducation, evidence based coping strategies, and “question and answer” sessions via Zoom. At the time of this writing we have offered three weekly forums, the most recent one attended by over 800 participants. All slides, recordings, and associated resources are available via the Harvard T.H. Chan website and YouTube. In the spirit of open science, the public has permission to take any of the resources created and adapt them for their own use. Third we sought to “Assist Those Most At Risk” by delivering resources targeted to vulnerable groups such as those with preexisting mental health conditions (for example through the National Alliance for Mental Illness [NAMI]) and a session focused on mental health disparities. This includes insuring our forums include a global perspective, such as a panel from mental health professionals on the front lines in Sub-Saharan Africa. Fourth, we sought to “Cultivate Resilience” through our mental health forums by bringing evidence-based skills for managing stress and enhancing resilience, including teaching skills such as mindfulness, diaphragmatic breathing, and progressive muscle relaxation. Fifth, we sought to adhere to the foundation of “Have Empathy” by integrating a message of self-compassion, tolerance and encouraging practices of altruism into our forums and public education materials.
Collaborate to jointly plan a new study, Collaborate to conduct an existing study in my area / country, Help to spread the word about open study recruitment, Assist with data analyses / interpretation, Collaborate to provide specific relevant expertise (content or methods)
We look to seek to engage with collaborators on study design and implementation related to the REACH initiative, analysis, grant writing, or evaluation.
71
4/28/2020 11:11:49
ab.digiorgio@operapadrepio.it
Annabella Di Giorgio
IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza
Italia
Offering to assist or collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
I work as liaison psychiatrist in a General Hospital (IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza, https://www.operapadrepio.it/en/hospital.html) with nearly 900 inbeds that recently has been converted in Covid Hospital. I could be instrumental in data collection and analysis.
I have long experience in psychiatric research and in international collaboration.
Collaborate to conduct an existing study in my area / country, Assist with data analyses / interpretation
To collaborate to an ongoing study would be more easy at this time than planning a new study giving my current clinical duties. I have been involved in scientific research in the last 15 years and I could be of assistance in data analyses and interpretation.
72
5/2/2020 21:32:26
a.denejkina@westernsydney.edu.au
Anna Denejkina
Western Sydney University
Australia
Offering to assist or collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
My research focus is traumatic stress, and trauma transmission. I am also interested in the impact of traumatic stress on families, particularly children of parents experiencing PTS.
Translate measures / study materials into additional language(s), Collaborate to jointly plan a new study, Collaborate to conduct an existing study in my area / country, Assist with data analyses / interpretation, Collaborate to provide specific relevant expertise (content or methods)
I have a PhD in intergenerational trauma transmission. I am interested in collaborating on a new or existing study. I am a mixed-methods researcher, and in addition to English, am fluent in Russian.
73
5/16/2020 0:38:3324neliti@gmail.comMelok Roro KinanthiYARSI UniversityIndonesia
Offering to assist or collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
Translate measures / study materials into additional language(s), Collaborate to conduct an existing study in my area / country
74
6/8/2020 14:01:00
olga.bogolyubova@um.edu.mt
Olga BogolyubovaUniversity of MaltaMalta
Offering to assist or collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
I'm open to various forms of collaboration. Possible contributions are described below
Translate measures / study materials into additional language(s), Collaborate to jointly plan a new study, Collaborate to conduct an existing study in my area / country, Help to spread the word about open study recruitment, Collaborate to provide specific relevant expertise (content or methods)
Translate measures: Russian
Plan a new study: I'm particularly interested in a) studies on the effects of social isolation and the impact of pandemic on interpersonal relationships; b) studies that include linguistic variables in the assessment of COVID-19 mental health effects; 3) studies looking at pandemic-related communication/expression of distress on social media
Conduct existing study: can conduct participant recruitment in Malta and Russia
Help spread the word: Russia, Malta, and, to some degree, in the U.S.
Collaborate to provide specific expertise: social media-based studies and/or quantitative text analysis
75
8/19/2020 9:55:34
hadjicharalambous.x@unic.ac.cy
Xenia Anastassiou-Hadjicharalambous
University of NicosiaCYPRUS and GREECE
Offering to assist or collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
collect data, write up papers, translate and validate measures in Greek
Translate measures / study materials into additional language(s), Collaborate to jointly plan a new study, Collaborate to conduct an existing study in my area / country, Help to spread the word about open study recruitment, Assist with data analyses / interpretation, Collaborate to provide specific relevant expertise (content or methods)
76
11/17/2020 4:55:20
paolo@robertidisarsina.org
Paolo Roberti di Sarsina
Fondazione per la Salutogenesi ONLUS
Italy
Offering to assist or collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
Fondazione per la Salutogenesi ONLUS (Foundation/Charity for Salutogenesis ONLUS being the Italian acronym for charity) is the only Italian foundation devoted to the paradigm of Salutogenesi https//salutogenesi.org
Collaborate to jointly plan a new study, Collaborate to conduct an existing study in my area / country, Help to spread the word about open study recruitment
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12/12/2020 9:20:30
kritika.rastogi@christuniversity.in
Dr Kritika Rastogi
CHRIST (DEEMED TO BE UNIVERSITY) DELHI NCR
India
Offering to assist or collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
My observation regarding pandemic is that the external environment right now is the same for all of us. Still different countries of the word are adopting various buffer systems to stabilize their economy, and to bring harmony at large. During pandemic a cross cultural validation study could be planned to understand the character strength of the people which are enabling them to fight in this situation. The role of culture could be investigated by using evidence-based research practices. Intervention based study for maintaining emotional stability could also be part of this research.
Translate measures / study materials into additional language(s), Collaborate to jointly plan a new study, Collaborate to conduct an existing study in my area / country, Collaborate to provide specific relevant expertise (content or methods)
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12/12/2020 9:20:37
akancha.srivastava@christuniversity.in
Dr. Akancha Srivastava
CHRIST(Deemed to be university) Delhi NCR
India
Offering to assist or collaborate in COVID-19 related mental health research
My observation regarding pandemic is that the external environment right now is the same for all of us. Still different countries of the word are adopting various buffer systems to stabilize their economy, and to bring harmony at large. During pandemic a cross cultural validation study could be planned to understand the character strength of the people which are enabling them to fight in this situation. The role of culture could be investigated by using evidence-based research practices. Intervention based study for maintaining emotional stability could also be part of this research.



We as researchers could collaborate and understand the cultural dynamics of different countries. We would be an aid for getting data from India and validating it. We could work in developing collaborative research papers. As researchers we have multidisciplinary specialization which would enable us to have successful collaboration.
Translate measures / study materials into additional language(s), Collaborate to jointly plan a new study, Collaborate to conduct an existing study in my area / country, Collaborate to provide specific relevant expertise (content or methods)
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