Troop 95 - Annual Camp Plans
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Troop 95 Camping Program
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This program is designed to meet our goal of 6 camp-outs per year and to allow all scout members to complete the required tasks for rank advancement and earn the Eagle-required Camping and Cooking Merit Badges over a 4-year period. Activities are grouped by themes. It is possible to complete more tasks to make-up for camping events missed by the scout.
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*Note: Second Class 2e:
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Scouts will use the Duty Roster to ensure that each scout completes this activity over 3 campouts.
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Winter Camp and Summer Camps are not included in the 4-year program.
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Year 1Year 2
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Campout #ActivityDateActivityDate
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Camping Basics
Tenderfoot 1a. Present yourself to your leader prepared for an overnight camping trip. Show the personal and camping gear you will use. Show the right way to pack and carry it.Camping 5d. List the outdoor essentials necessary for any campout, and explain why each item is needed.
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Tenderfoot 1b. Spend at least one night on a patrol or troop campout. Sleep in a tent you have helped pitch.
Tenderfoot 1c. Tell how you practiced the Outdoor Code on a campout or outing.
Camping 5e. Present yourself to your Scoutmaster with your pack for inspection. Be correctly clothed and equipped for an overnight campout.
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Tenderfoot 2a. On the campout, assist in preparing one of the meals. Tell why it is important for each patrol member to share in meal preparation and cleanup.Camping 4b. Help a Scout patrol or a Webelos Scout unit in your area prepare for an actual campout, including creating the duty roster, menu planning, equipment needs, general planning, and setting up camp.
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Tenderfoot 2b. While on a campout, demonstrate the appropriate method of safely cleaning items used to prepare, serve, and eat a meal.Cooking 5b. Create a shopping list for your meals showing the amount of food needed to prepare and serve each meal, and the cost for each meal.
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Tenderfoot 2c. Explain the importance of eating together as a patrol.Cooking 5c. Share and discuss your meal plan and shopping list with your counselor.
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Tenderfoot 5a. Explain the importance of the buddy system as it relates to your personal safety on outings and in your neighborhood. Use the buddy system while on a troop or patrol outing.
Cooking 1c. Describe how meat, fish, chicken, eggs, dairy products, and fresh vegetables should be stored, transported, and properly prepared for cooking. Explain how to prevent cross-contamination.
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Tenderfoot 5b. Explain what to do if you become lost on a hike or campout.
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Tenderfoot 5c. Explain the rules of safe hiking, both on the highway and cross-country, during the day and at night.
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Fireman Chit and Whittlin Chit
Second Class 1b. Explain the principles of Leave No Trace, and tell how you practiced them while on a campout or outing. This outing must be different from the one used for Tenderfoot requirement 1c.First Class 5a. Identify or show evidence of at least 10 kinds of native plants found in your local area or campsite location. You may show evidence by fallen leaves or fallen fruit that you find in the field, or as part of a collection you have made, or by photographs you have taken.
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Second Class 1c. On one of these campouts, select a location for your patrol site and recommend it to your patrol leader, senior patrol leader, or troop guide. Explain what factors you should consider when choosing a patrol site and where to pitch a tent.
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Second Class 2b. Use the tools listed in Tenderfoot requirement 3d to prepare tinder, kindling, and fuel wood for a cooking fire.
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Second Class 2c. At an approved outdoor location and time, use the tinder, kindling, and fuel wood from Second Class requirement 2b to demonstrate how to build a fire. Unless prohibited by local fire restrictions, light the fire. After allowing the flames to burn safely for at least two minutes, safely extinguish the flames with minimal impact to the fire site.
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Cooking 1
Second Class 2e. On one campout, plan and cook one hot breakfast or lunch, selecting foods from MyPlate or the current USDA nutrition model. Explain the importance of good nutrition. Demonstrate how to transport, store, and prepare the foods you selected.First Class 5b. Identify two ways to obtain a weather forecast for an upcoming activity. Explain why weather forecasts are important when planning for an event.
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Second Class 2a. Explain when it is appropriate to use a fire for cooking or other purposes and when it would not be appropriate to do so.First Class 5c. Describe at least three natural indicators of impending hazardous weather, the potential dangerous events that might result from such weather conditions, and the appropriate actions to take.
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Second Class 2d. Explain when it is appropriate to use a lightweight stove and when it is appropriate to use a propane stove. Set up a lightweight stove or propane stove. Unless prohibited by local fire restrictions, light the stove. Describe the safety procedures for using these types of stoves.First Class 5d. Describe extreme weather conditions you might encounter in the outdoors in your local geographic area. Discuss how you would determine ahead of time the potential risk of these types of weather dangers, alternative planning considerations to avoid such risks, and how you would prepare for and respond to those weather conditions.
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First Class 1a. Since joining Boy Scouts, participate in 10 separate troop/patrol activities, at least six of which must be held outdoors. Of the outdoor activities, at least three must include overnight camping. These activities do not include troop or patrol meetings. On campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect, such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee.
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Map & Compass
Second Class 3a. Demonstrate how a compass works and how to orient a map. Use a map to point out and tell the meaning of five map symbols.First Class 4a. Using a map and compass, complete an orienteering course that covers at least one mile and requires measuring the height and/or width of designated items (tree, tower, canyon, ditch, etc.)
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Second Class 3b. Using a compass and a map together, take a five-mile hike (or 10 miles by bike) approved by your adult leader and your parent or guardian.First Class 4b. Demonstrate how to use a handheld GPS unit, GPS app on a smartphone or other electronic navigation system. Use a GPS to find your current location, a destination of your choice, and the route you will take to get there. Follow that route to arrive at your destination.
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Second Class 3c. Describe some hazards or injuries that you might encounter on your hike and what you can do to help prevent themCooking 1a. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in cooking activities and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards.
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Second Class 3d. Demonstrate how to find directions during the day and at night without using a compass or an electronic device.
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Second Class 4. Identify or show evidence of at least ten kinds of wild animals (such as birds, mammals, reptiles, fish, mollusks) found in your local area or camping location. You may show evidence by tracks, signs, or photographs you have taken.
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Invite the Webelos to this camp-out as part of our annual Webelos Recruitment plan
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Cooking 2
Second Class 2e. On one campout, plan and cook one hot breakfast or lunch, selecting foods from MyPlate or the current USDA nutrition model. Explain the importance of good nutrition. Demonstrate how to transport, store, and prepare the foods you selected.First Class 2a. Help plan a menu for one of the above campouts that includes at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner and that requires cooking at least two of the meals. Tell how the menu includes the foods from MyPlate or the current USDA nutrition model and how it meets nutritional needs for the planned activity or campout.
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First Class 2c. Show which pans, utensils, and other gear will be needed to cook and serve these meals.First Class 2b. Using the menu planned in First Class requirement 2a, make a list showing a budget and food amounts needed to feed three or more boys. Secure the ingredients.
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Plan and carryl-out activities with the Webelos, Including activities involving cooking treats!First Class 2d. Demonstrate the procedures to follow in the safe handling and storage of fresh meats, dairy products, eggs, vegetables, and other perishable food products. Show how to properly dispose of camp garbage, cans, plastic containers, and other rubbish.
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First Class 2e. On one campout, serve as cook. Supervise your assistant(s) in using a stove or building a cooking fire. Prepare the breakfast, lunch, and dinner planned in First Class requirement 2a. Supervise the cleanup.
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Attend a Council event
Second Class 1a. Since joining Boy Scouts, participate in five separate troop/patrol activities, at least three of which must be held outdoors. Of the outdoor activities, at least two must include overnight camping. These activities do not include troop or patrol meetings. On campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect, such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee.Camping 9a. Camp a total of at least 20 nights at designated Scouting activities or events.* One long-term camping experience of up to six consecutive nights may be applied toward this requirement. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched, you need not pitch your own tent.
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Annual Backpacking/Canoeing/Hiking/etc Camp Trip
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First Class 3a. Discuss when you should and should not use lashings.First Class 3c. Demonstrate tying the square, shear, and diagonal lashings by joining two or more poles or staves together.
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First Class 1b. Explain each of the principles of Tread Lightly! and tell how you practiced them while on a campout or outing. This outing must be different from the one used for Tenderfoot requirement 1c and Second Class requirement 1b.First Class 3d. Use lashings to make a useful camp gadget or structure.
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First Class 3b. Demonstrate tying the timber hitch and clove hitch.First Class 3d. Use lashings to make a useful camp gadget or structure.
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Year 3Year 4
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Campout #ActivityDateActivityDate
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1 - Camping BasicsCamping 7a. For a patrol campout: Make a checklist of personal and patrol gear that will be needed.Camping 7b. For a patrol campout. Pack your own gear and your share of the patrol equipment and food for proper carrying. Show that your pack is right for quickly getting what is needed first, and that it has been assembled properly for comfort, weight, balance, size, and neatness.
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Camping 6c. Describe the factors to be considered in deciding where to pitch your tent.Camping 6b. Discuss the importance of camp sanitation and tell why water treatment is essential. Then demonstrate two ways to treat water.
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Camping 8a. Explain the safety procedures for: 1. Using a propane or butane/propane stove, 2. Using a liquid fuel stove, 3. Proper storage of extra fuelCamping 5a. Prepare a list of clothing you would need for overnight campouts in both warm and cold weather. Explain the term "layering."
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Camping 8b. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of lightweight cooking stoves.Camping 5b. Discuss footwear for different kinds of weather and how the right footwear is important for protecting your feet.
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Cooking 3c. Describe for your counselor how to manage your time when preparing a meal so components for each course are ready to serve at the correct time.Camping 5c. Explain the proper care and storage of camping equipment (clothing, footwear, bedding).
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Camping 6a. Describe the features of four types of tents, when and where they could be used, and how to care for tents. Working with another Scout, pitch a tent.
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Fireman Chit and Whittlin Chit
Camping 4a. Make a duty roster showing how your patrol is organized for an actual overnight campout. List assignments for each member.Cooking 3a. Discuss EACH of the following cooking methods. For each one, describe the equipment needed, how temperature control is maintained, and name at least one food that can be cooked using that method: baking, boiling, broiling, pan frying, simmering, steaming, microwaving, grilling, foil cooking, and use of a Dutch oven.
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Cooking 1
Camping 8d. Cook at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner for your patrol from the meals you have planned for requirement 8c. At least one of those meals must be a trail meal requiring the use of a lightweight stove.Camping 1b. Discuss with your counselor why it is important to be aware of weather conditions before and during your camping activities. Tell how you can prepare should the weather turn bad during your campouts.
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Cooking 1b. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while preparing meals and eating, including burns and scalds, cuts, choking, and allergic reactions.Camping 8c. Prepare a camp menu. Explain how the menu would differ from a menu for a backpacking or float trip. Give recipes and make a food list for your patrol. Plan two breakfasts, three lunches, and two suppers. Discuss how to protect your food against bad weather, animals, and contamination.
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Cooking 6b. Create a shopping list for your meals, showing the amount of food needed to prepare and serve each meal, and the cost for each meal.
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Cooking 5a. Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, plan five meals for your patrol (or a similar size group of up to eight youth, including you) for a camping trip. Your menus should include enough food for each person, keeping in mind any special needs (such as food allergies) and how you keep your foods safe and free from cross-contamination. These five meals must include at least one breakfast, one lunch, one dinner, AND at least one snack OR one dessert. List the equipment and utensils needed to prepare and serve these meals.
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To finish the cooking and camping merit badges, scouters will need to do the following activities at home:
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Cooking 4. Cooking at home. Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, plan menus for three full days of meals (three breakfasts, three lunches, and three dinners) plus one dessert. Your menus should include enough to feed yourself and at least one adult, keeping in mind any special needs (such as food allergies) and how you kept your foods safe and free from cross-contamination. List the equipment and utensils needed to prepare and serve these meals.Cooking 4c. Using at least five of the 10 cooking methods from requirement 3, prepare and serve yourself and at least one adult (parent, family member, guardian, or other responsible adult) one breakfast, one lunch, one dinner, and one dessert from the meals you planned. *
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Cooking 4a. Create a shopping list for your meals showing the amount of food needed to prepare and serve each meal, and the cost for each meal.Cooking 4d. Time your cooking to have each meal ready to serve at the proper time. Have an adult verify the preparation of the meal to your counselor.
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Cooking 4b. Share and discuss your meal plan and shopping list with your counselor.Cooking 4e. After each meal, ask a person you served to evaluate the meal on presentation and taste, then evaluate your own meal. Discuss what you learned with your counselor, including any adjustments that could have improved or enhanced your meals. Tell how better planning and preparation help ensure a successful meal.
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Cooking 2
Cooking 5d. In the outdoors, using your menu plans for this requirement, cook two of the five meals you planned using either a lightweight stove or a low-impact fire. Use a different cooking method from requirement 3 for each meal. You must also cook a third meal using either a Dutch oven OR a foil pack OR kabobs. Serve all of these meals to your patrol or a group of youth. **Cooking 5f. After each meal, have those you served evaluate the meal on presentation and taste, and then evaluate your own meal. Discuss what you learned with your counselor, including any adjustments that could have improved or enhanced your meals. Tell how planning and preparation help ensure successful outdoor cooking.
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Cooking 5e. In the outdoors, prepare a dessert OR a snack and serve it to your patrol or a group of youth.**Cooking 5g. Explain to your counselor how you cleaned the equipment, utensils, and the cooking site thoroughly after each meal. Explain how you properly disposed of dishwater and of all garbage.
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5Attend a Council event
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Annual Backpacking/Canoeing/Hiking/etc Camp Trip
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Cooking 5h. Discuss how you followed the Outdoor Code and no-trace principles when preparing your meals.Camping 6d. Tell the difference between internal- and external-frame packs. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each.
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Cooking 6a. Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, plan a menu for trail hiking or backpacking that includes one breakfast, one lunch, one dinner, and one snack. These meals must not require refrigeration and are to be consumed by three to five people (including you). Be sure to keep in mind any special needs (such as food allergies) and how you will keep your foods safe and free from cross-contamination. List the equipment and utensils needed to prepare and serve these meals.Camping 6e. Discuss the types of sleeping bags and what kind would be suitable for different conditions. Explain the proper care of your sleeping bag and how to keep it dry. Make a comfortable ground bed.
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Camping 9b. On any of the camping experiences, you must do TWO of the following, only with proper preparation and under qualified supervision: 1. Hike up a mountain where, at some point, you are at least 1,000 feet higher in elevation from where you started, 2. Backpack, snowshoe, or cross-country ski for at least 4 miles, 3. Take a bike trip of at least 15 miles or at least four hours, 4. Take a nonmotorized trip on the water of at least four hours or 5 miles, 5. Plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience, 6. Rappel down a rappel route of 30 feet or more, c. Perform a conservation project approved by the landowner or land managing agency. This can be done alone or with others.Camping 9b. On any of the camping experiences, you must do TWO of the following, only with proper preparation and under qualified supervision: 1. Hike up a mountain where, at some point, you are at least 1,000 feet higher in elevation from where you started, 2. Backpack, snowshoe, or cross-country ski for at least 4 miles, 3. Take a bike trip of at least 15 miles or at least four hours, 4. Take a nonmotorized trip on the water of at least four hours or 5 miles, 5. Plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience, 6. Rappel down a rappel route of 30 feet or more, c. Perform a conservation project approved by the landowner or land managing agency. This can be done alone or with others.
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