GOV YAG SY 2017-2018
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHI
1
SIT 1
Theme:
2017-2018
Conflict and CompromiseDriving Question:How are conflicts opportunities?
2
Unit ThemeDriving QuestionMN State Standard Benchmark(s)Government Standard(s)Essential QuestionsVocabularyShort Description of Content and Skills CoveredFormative AssessmentsSummative Assessment
3
POWER
(Civic Skills)
What power do you have (and how do you use it)?9.1.1.1.1 Demonstrate skills that enable people to monitor and influence state, local and national affairs.
9.1.2.3.2 Identify the sources of governmental authority; explain popular sovereignty (consent of the governed) as the source of legitimate governmental authority in a representative democracy or republic.
9.1.2.3.3 Define and provide examples of foundational ideas of American government which are embedded in founding era documents: natural rights philosophy, social contract, civic virtue, popular sovereignty, constitutionalism, representative democracy, political factions, federalism and individual rights.
9.1.3.4.5 Explain the responsibilities and duties for all individuals (citizens and non-citizens) in a republic.
9.1.4.6.5 Describe the systems of enumerated and implied powers, separation of powers, and checks and balances.
Democratic government depends on informed and engaged citizens who exhibit civic skills and values, practice civic discourse, vote and participate in elections, apply inquiry and analysis skills and take action to solve problems and shape public policy.What is power?
What is government?
Why do we consent to be governed?
What responsibilities do people have to others?
How is power used?
power
government
authority
influence
sovereignty
politics
constitution
representation
privilage
leader
Students increase their awareness about governments, their levels and their powers, while reflecting on why people agree to be governed.Little Rock High School
Book: Warriors Don't Cry
Eyes on the Prize: Episode
Students identify a local problem in which they are invested, e.g. religious profiling, watershed contamination, open lunch, etc. They describe the problem: who the stakeholders are, what powers they have, what responsibilities they have, and how power is used (or is not used) to contribute, perpetuate, resolve (?) the problem. Students identify and critique local government's role in the problem. Students conduct two interviews: of people with more power and people with less power. Students reflect on their investment in the problem (how much perceived power there is) and suggest an ideal solution based on all stakeholders' perspectives. Further, they propose action steps they will take to assume a greater role in the problem. Their work is documented in a student-chosen medium, e.g. blog, slideshow, poster, etc, which they present to a panel.
4
DemocracyHow is fairness achieved through goverment?9.1.2.3.1 Analyze how constitutionalism preserves fundamental societal values, protects individual freedoms and rights, promotes the general welfare, and responds to changing circumstances and beliefs by defining and limiting the powers of government.

9.1.2.3.2 Identify the sources of governmental authority; explain popular sovereignty (consent of the governed) as the source of legitimate governmental authority in a representative democracy or republic.

9.1.2.3.3 Define and provide examples of foundational ideas of American government which are embedded in founding era documents: natural rights philosophy, social contract, civic virtue, popular sovereignty, constitutionalism, representative democracy, political factions, federalism and individual rights. For example: Documents—Mayflower Compact, English Bill of Rights, the Virginia Declaration of Rights, the Declaration of Independence, Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, the Constitution, selected Federalist Papers (such as 10, 39, 51, 78), the Bill of Rights.

9.1.2.3.4 Analyze how the following tools of civic engagement are used to influence the American political system: civil disobedience, initiative, referendum and recall.

9.1.2.3.5 Analyze the tensions between the government’s dual role of protecting individual rights and promoting the general welfare, the struggle between majority rule and minority rights, and the conflict between diversity and unity.
The United States is based on democratic values and principles that include liberty, individual rights, justice, equality, the rule of law, limited government, common good, popular sovereignty, majority rule and minority rights.What is fairness?
How do people establish consensus?
How do people resolve conflict between individual and popular sovereignty?
How does democracy protect and contradict freedom?
Fairness
Equality
Equity
de Tocqueville
5
Rights and Responsibilities How do people use power to change rights and responsibilities in the United States?9.1.3.4.1 Analyze the meaning and importance of rights in the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights and subsequent amendments; compare and contrast these with rights in the Minnesota Constitution.

9.1.3.4.2 Explain the scope and limits of rights protected by the First and Second Amendments and changes created by legislative action and court interpretation.

9.1.3.4.3 Explain the scope and limits of rights of the accused under the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments and changes created by legislative action and court interpretation.

9.1.3.4.4 Explain the current and historical interpretations of the principles of due process and equal protection of the law; analyze the protections provided by the 14th Amendment

9.1.3.4.5 Explain the responsibilities and duties for all individuals (citizens and non-citizens) in a republic. For example: Paying taxes, obeying the law, responding to government requests such as subpoenas, informed participation in voting and public decision-making, developing and defending positions on public policy issues, monitoring, influencing decision-making.

9.1.3.5.1 Define the legal meaning of citizenship in the United States, describe the process and requirements for citizenship, and explain the duties of citizenship including service in court proceedings (jury duty) and selective service registration (males).

9.1.3.5.2 Describe the process of naturalization; explain the role of the federal government in establishing immigration policies.
Individuals in a republic have rights, duties and responsibilities.
Citizenship and its rights and duties are established by law.
What are our rights/responsibilities and how do they differ?
What happens when rights are infringed upon?
Why do we have today's rights/responsibilities?
How are rights and responsibilties connected?
How can power change through exclusion/inclusion?

Constitutional AmendmentsPre-assessment: MN Civics Test Questions (11 questions)
Mid-Unit: Comparing MN and US Constitution -- can they apply the skills they've used reading the US Constitution to read (independently) the MN Constitution?
Students choose an example of how power has changed through a specific right/responsibility, and they create a picture book to teach someone else about that right/responsibility.
6
Processes9.1.4.6.1 Explain federalism and the provisions of the United States Constitution which delegate to the federal government the powers necessary to fulfill the purposes for which it was established; distinguish between those powers and the powers retained by the people and the states. For example: Necessary and Proper Clause (“elastic clause”), Commerce Clause, Ninth and 10th Amendments.

9.1.4.6.2 Explain the purposes, organization, functions and processes of the legislative branch as enumerated in Article I of the United States Constitution.

9.1.4.6.3 Explain the purposes, organization, functions and processes of the executive branch as enumerated in Article II of the United States Constitution.

9.1.4.6.4 Explain the purposes, organization, functions and processes of the judicial branch as enumerated in Article III of the United States Constitution.

9.1.4.6.5 Describe the systems of enumerated and implied powers, separation of powers, and checks and balances.

9.1.4.6.6 Evaluate the importance of an independent judiciary, judicial review and the rule of law.

9.1.4.6.7 Explain the powers and operations of the state of Minnesota government as defined in its Constitution and its relationship with the federal government.

9.1.4.6.8 Explain the powers and operations of local (county, city, school board, and township) government in Minnesota.

9.1.4.6.9 Compare and contrast the budgets of the United States and Minnesota governments describing the major sources of revenue and categories of spending for each. For example: Sources of revenue—sales, income and property taxes, fees. Categories of spending—leases (mineral, water, oil, lumber), defense, public safety, education, entitlements, transportation, welfare.

9.1.4.7.1 Describe the purposes, types, and sources of laws and rules. For example: Types of laws—civil, criminal and juvenile. Sources of laws and rules—case, statutory, administrative, and executive.

9.1.4.8.1 Evaluate the impact of political parties on elections and public policy formation.

9.1.4.8.2 Evaluate the role of interest groups, corporations, think tanks, the media and public opinion on the political process and public policy formation.

9.1.4.9.1 Analyze how the United States political system is shaped by elections and the election process, including the caucus system and procedures involved in voting.
The United States government has specific functions that are determined by the way that power is delegated and controlled among various bodies: the three levels (federal, state, local) and the three branches (legislative, executive, judicial) of government.
The primary purposes of rules and laws within the United States constitutional government are to protect individual rights, promote the general welfare and provide order.
Public policy is shaped by governmental and nongovernmental institutions and political processes.
Free and fair elections are key elements of the United States political system.
7
Relationships9.1.5.10.1 Explain how tribal sovereignty establishes a unique relationship between American Indian Nations and the United States government.

9.1.5.10.2 Evaluate the effectiveness of diplomacy and other foreign policy tools used by the United States government and other nations in historical or contemporary times.

9.1.5.10.3 Explain why governments interact in world affairs; describe how the United States government develops and carries out United States foreign policy, including treaty-making.

9.1.5.11.1 Describe how individuals, businesses, labor and other groups influence United States foreign policy.

9.1.5.11.2 Explain the role of international law in world affairs; evaluate the impact of the participation of nation states in international organizations. For example: International organizations— United Nations, Arab League, World Trade Organization, African Union, European Union, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Organization of American States.

9.1.5.12.1 Compare the philosophies, structures and operations of different types of governments in other countries with those in the United States. For example: Different types of governments—monarchies, theocracies, dictatorships, representative governments.
The United States establishes and maintains relationships and interacts with indigenous nations and other sovereign nations, and plays a key role in world affairs.
International political and economic institutions influence world affairs and United States foreign policy.
Governments are based on different political philosophies and purposes; governments establish and maintain relationships with varied types of other governments.
8
Freedom: Conflict and CompromiseStudent project where students evaluate the effectiveness of dipomacy.
Loading...
 
 
 
YAG
Civic Skills
Democracy
Rights and Responsibilities
Processes
Relationships
Final Project