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Fuel for the work required.
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IMPORTANT: Before using this tool, make a copy for yourself by clicking "File" --> "Make a copy". Please do not request editing rights. Also, please do not download to Excel as I cannot guarantee that all the formulae will transfer correctly and function properly.
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Once you have made you own copy of the sheet, you can edit the
yellowcells.
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The best starting point is probably to begin with a day when you can have confidence in the estimate of your carbohydrate availability.
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For example, either after a couple of days off training while eating lots of carbohydrates (= high carbohydrate availability)
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or after a long-duration glycogen-depleting run with no breakfast before the run and no carbohydrate supplementation during the run (= low carbohydrate availability).
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First, estimate your PRE-exercise glycogen level:
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Carbohydrate availability =
Normal
Normal / High / Low,
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Where,
High means you have consumed a high carb diet with >6 g/kg/day for the last 3 days or longer, or >7g/kg/day for the last 2 days;
Low means you are on a low-carbohydrate diet (less than 50 g/day) OR are glycogen depleted.
Normal means neither High or Low apply to you.
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Approximate VO2max =
70mL/kg/min.
To ''estimate'' your VO2max, use this tool -->
https://runsmartproject.com/calculator/
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Muscle glycogen level =
598
mmol/kg dry weight of muscle.
Calculations derived from the work of Jose Areta and Will Hopkins →
Areta and Hopkins. Sports Med. 2018; 48(9):2091-2102.
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Next, estimate your POST-exercise glycogen level:
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Pre-exercise glycogen level =
598
mmol/kg dry weight of muscle NOTE: this might be the value you've calculated above or the post exercise level calculated below.
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Sex =Male
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Approximate VO2max =
70mL/kg/min.
To estimate your VO2max, use this tool -->
https://runsmartproject.com/calculator/
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Exercise duration =
90minutes
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Average exercise intensity =
70%of VO2max
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Where,
40% to 60% of VO2max is "Easy" effort, below your aerobic "economy" threshold (~RPE 2 to 4 or HR zones 1 to 2);
60% to 80% of VO2max is "Moderate" effort, below your anaerobic/lactate "fatigue" threshold (e.g. tempo or marathon pace runs, ~RPE 4 to 6 or HR zone 3);
80% to 90% of VO2max is "Threshold", working comfortably hard, around your anaerobic/lactate "fatigue" threshold (e.g. Half-marathon or 10km pace, ~RPE 6 to 8 or HR zone 4).
90% to 100% of VO2max is "Hard" work where you are working above your fatigue threshold (e.g. ~5km pace or ~3 km pace, RPE 8 to 9 or HR zone 4 to 5).
Anything greater than 100% VO2max is "Very Hard" work (e.g. 1-mile pace or faster, RPE 9 to 10 or HR zone 4 to 5).
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Carbohydrate ingestion during exercise?
YesYes or no?
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Glycogen used =
230
mmol/kg dry weight of muscle.
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Post-exercise glycogen =
368
mmol/kg dry weight of muscle.
Calculations derived from the work of Jose Areta and Will Hopkins →
Areta and Hopkins. Sports Med. 2018; 48(9):2091-2102.
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😟 You finished your session with too much muscle glycogen left to elicit maximal adaptations.
But remember that glycogen depletion should not be your goal for every session.
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Interpretation derived from the work of Sam Impey and James Morton →
Impey et al. Sports Med. 2018; 48:1031–1048.
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Then, estimate the amount of carbohydrate you need to eat to replenish your muscle glycogen for your next session.
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Current glycogen level =
368
mmol/kg dry weight of muscle.
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Target glycogen level =
598
mmol/kg dry weight of muscle (= level to reach before next session).
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Body weight =
65kg
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You need to eat
498
grams of carbohydrate between now and the start of your next session.
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(Based on the estimate that 1 g of carbohydrate per kg body mass will lead to ~30 mmol/kgDW of muscle glycogen resynthesis.)
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