Design for America
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Your NameWhere did you observe?Who did you talk to?What were your findings?Source
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K.C. FoxInternetNo oneUniversity of Portland stops selling bottled water on campus. Students must bring their own water bottles and use from a multitude of drinking water sources on campushttp://blog.oregonlive.com/pdxgreen/2010/02/university_of_portland_makes_a.html
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Trent University starts using biodegradable takeout containers and packaging that can be composted with food. No separation needed. Resident dining halls use reusable cutlery and glasswarehttp://www.campusdish.com/en-US/CA/Trent/Sustainability/
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Karan KumarInternetNo oneUniversity of Chicago has started phasing out some styrofoam by switching to a product called ecotainer™ made by International Paper. ecotainer™ packaging is a revolutionary new product line that provides a more environmentally sensitive alternative to traditional foodservice disposables. Made from renewable resources, sustainable wood fiber and corn, ecotainer™ packaging reduces your environmental impact while providing all the functionality of traditional packaging.http://sustainability.uchicago.edu/medical/food_services.shtml
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(Low priority) UC Santa Cruz Dining partners with the UCSC Farm to offer students fresh, campus-grown veggies!http://housing.ucsc.edu/dining/farm.html
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Some things that UCSC has done towards sustainability in their dining halls and restaurants. The "tray-less" dining system is interesting.http://housing.ucsc.edu/dining/sustainability.html
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www.reuseit.com is a great site for looking up potentially simple solutions the issue we've identified.http://www.reuseit.com/learn-more/top-facts/disposable-lunches
http://www.reuseit.com/learn-more/buying-guides/5-steps-to-a-waste-free-lunch
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Keith KatanoAckermanNo oneI looked at what some of the restaurants used to put their food in for customers. For Tsunami, they use a plastic bowl for soups and noodles and small plastic boxes for sushi and rolls. They will give you a plastic cap for the bowl if you're not eating there. They have plastic spoons and forks and disposable wood chopsticks. For Sbarros, they use a paper(not pure paper) plate for pizzas when the customer is eating there, and a box of similar material for takeout. For other stuff like spaghetti and salad, they use a plastic bowl and give you a plastic cap if you're not eating there. Breadsticks are wrapped in aluminum foil. They have plastic forks and knives and bags too for takeout. For Panda Express, they use Styrofoam containers. For Wetzel's Pretzels, they use a paper(with a thin coating of something) to wrap around your food and their bags are made of similar material too. There is a water dispenser in front of Sbarros with plastic cups.My eyes and past experience buying food there.
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Vikash PatelAckermanNo oneMost of my findings were similar to those of Keith above. To add, Carls Jr. serves food in paper which is coated with something, or in stiff paper boxes. They put all the food together in a brown paper bag. They serve their milkshakes in clear plastic cups. Bruin Buzz serves iced beverages in clear plastic cups. Their coffee is served in normal coffee cups. They do have a system in place in which you can bring your own mug and have the coffee at a discounted price since you are reducing waste by using a re-usable coffee cup. They also serve food such as bagels in the same paper with some kind of coating, and this is placed in similar bag. Curbside also wraps their sandwiches in a similar paper/plastic combo. They also serve fruit and yogurt in clear plastic cups. Jamba Juice serves their smoothies in styrofoam cups.
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As for what students are disposing, most of the trash consists of the food containers/wrappers listed above. Water bottles are another source of trash. Napkins and the plastic untensils also seem to comprise a large amount of waste.
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On Tuesday, I had emailed a couple different managers/head of Ackerman whose emails I found online. I am still waiting for a reply.
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Michael WangProfessor's OfficeProfessor GillespieGillespie is in the Geography department and seems big on sustainability. First thing that popped up in his head: "the chopsticks have to go." They are wasted and come from cheap, unsustainable wood from e.g. china/canada. Recycled, sustainable, personal chopsticks are possible fixes. This should apply to the other (Keith's post) disposable utensils as well. He also mentioned there are large amounts of styrofoam beach litter. He strongly recommended my "next step" to see the UCLA Sustainability Coordinator Nurit Katz, so I've already e-mailed her to set up a time to meet. Gillespie also recommended (which seemed to ring a bell with the DfA approach) to NOT start general, but start on a very focused project e.g. chopsticks, build a model, and then apply it more broadly. He called this a "Proof of Concept" approach. Aside from all that, I did some rough searching on single-use items food-related and one simple idea was to use sporks instead of spoons and forks.T.W. Gillespie; http://www.geog.ucla.edu/people/faculty.php?lid=2737&display_one=1&modify=1
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InternetN/ASeattle is "requiring" its restaurants to switch from single-use packaging to compostable/recyclable packaging. How? By providing restaurants with "an accepted list of compostable items." Good idea, but how exactly its enforced, not sure.http://earth911.com/news/2010/07/06/seattle-bans-single-use-restaurant-packaging-from-landfills/
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InternetN/AAlternative to styrofoam...although I'm not sure how the business aspect works. (what's the point of the $8.50? for the supplier?)http://www.neighborhoodnotes.com/news/2011/01/go_box_portland_food_carts_singleuse_container_waste_inspires_sustainable_solution/
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Sanjeev DattaOnline Survey/Facebook StudentsI didn't get a large amount of feedback for the survey (about 10 responses), but 1/2 of the people go to Ackerman 1 time a day. Also, 1/2 of the people try to recycle frequently and the other half recycle often. Finally, 7/10 people want to start using single-use items, but most of the responses weren't too helpful. A few people mentioned making sporks more commonplace in the dining halls, and one suggested that we bring our own utensils to the dining halls. http://www.surveymonkey.com/MySurvey_Responses.aspx?sm=gD%2f8oAchrp1yeg9SCeTWmKbvnIqPL4dw7SUk1XRwPpU%3d
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EricInternet / TVC / Personal observationN/AIn Taiwan, "Twisted Bottle" is trendy recently. Used for packaging bottle water, Twisted Bottle, compared with tradition plastic bottle, reduces its plastic material contained (about 40% reduced); meanwhile, by "twisting" the bottle, the volume of the used bottle can be significantly reduced, decreasing the volume of waste and increasing the space for recycling (+70%).http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGMIpLf4NaI
http://iseverywhere.pixnet.net/blog/post/5042499
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JacobInternetN/AA cool, innovative design framework to renewable, multi-use product development called "Cradle-to-Cradle." Could be a great approach for design of a multi-use item (e.g. eating utensils, drinking cup/bottle) in Ackerman.http://www.mbdc.com/detail.aspx?linkid=1&sublink=6http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cradle_to_Cradle_Design
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