Runs w/Power Template
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ColumnMetricDefinitionDefinition ReferenceLink
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DEfficiency Index (EI)Efficiency Index compares speed per watt. Speed is calculated in meters per minute. Increases in value show improved efficiency.Jim Vance'sbook
"Running with Power"
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EEfficiency Factor (EF)Efficiency Factor is the difference between normalized power and average heart rate for the workout or selected workout segment. Increases in value shows improved efficiency.Training Peaks articlehttp://help.trainingpeaks.com/hc/en-us/articles/204072154-Advanced-Analysis-Metrics
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FRunning Effectiveness (RE)It is calculated as the ratio of speed (in m/s) to power (in W/kg, or (Nm/s)/kg), resulting in the units of kg/N. It can be viewed as the inverse of the effective horizontal retarding force that a runner must overcome to achieve a particular speed. For most experienced runners, running effectiveness is typically close to 1 kg/N. Running effectiveness may be lower in novice or fatigued runners since they do not travel as fast for a given power output or must generate more power to achieve the same speed. Running effectiveness may also decline slightly at higher running speeds, when running above critical pace for example.Andy Coggan's Training Peaks articlehttp://home.trainingpeaks.com/blog/article/wko4-new-metrics-for-running-with-power
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HPower (w/kg)Running power relative to body mass, as measured using a running power meter. Note that because of energy recycling via the series-elastic elements of the musculoskeletal system, sustained running power is often significantly higher than cycling power, even for the same individual. On the other hand, due to the way the data is smoothed or damped, power at very short durations is generally lower.Andy Coggan's Training Peaks articlehttp://home.trainingpeaks.com/blog/article/wko4-new-metrics-for-running-with-power
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IDuty Time (%)As indicated above, shorter ground contact times may be associated with better running economy. However, ground contact time varies somewhat based on running speed, making it more difficult to interpret. Duty factor, on the other hand, is the percentage of the total time between steps or strides that the foot is on the ground. As such, it somewhat less dependent on actual running speed. Values for duty factor can vary from 50 to 90 percent, but are typically in the 60 to 80 percent range.Andy Coggan's Training Peaks articlehttp://home.trainingpeaks.com/blog/article/wko4-new-metrics-for-running-with-power
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JFlight Time (%)This is the time during which both feet are off the ground. All else being equal, a greater flight time might be associated with better running economy, since at a given step or stride frequency, flight time and ground contact time are inverse to each other.Andy Coggan's Training Peaks articlehttp://home.trainingpeaks.com/blog/article/wko4-new-metrics-for-running-with-power
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LIntensity Factor (IF)Intensity Factor (IF) for every workout or time range analyzed. IF is simply the ratio of the normalized power as described above to your threshold power. For example, if your normalized power for a long training ride done early in the year is 210 W and your threshold power at the time is 280 W, then the IF for that workout would be 0.75. However, if you did that same exact ride later in the year after your threshold power had risen to 300 W, then the IF would be lower, i.e., 0.70. IF therefore provides a valid and convenient way of comparing the relative intensity of a training session or race either within or between riders, taking into account changes or differences in threshold power.Training Peaks article:http://home.trainingpeaks.com/blog/article/normalized-power,-intensity-factor-training-stress
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MStride RateAlso termed stride rate or, outside of the scientific literature, cadence. This is the number of steps or strides taken per minute. Contrary to common lore, a step rate or stride rate of 180 (or greater) steps/min is not necessarily ideal. Rather, the optimum varies between individuals, based on their running speed, leg length, leg stiffness (Kleg – see below), etc.Andy Coggan's Training Peaks articlehttp://home.trainingpeaks.com/blog/article/wko4-new-metrics-for-running-with-power
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PNormalized Power (NP)Normalized Power is an estimate of the power that you could have maintained for the same physiological "cost" if your power had been perfectly constant, such as on an ergometer, instead of variable power output. NP is used to calculate TSS.Training Peaks article:http://help.trainingpeaks.com/hc/en-us/articles/204072154-Advanced-Analysis-Metrics
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QForm PowerForm Power is essentially your “running in place” power. It is another metric that is now available in Stryd’s PowerCenter. Decreases in your Form Power over time, when running at similar training speeds, is a good indication that you have improved your running economy. Highly trained and economical runners may already have near optimal running form but can monitor how Form Power changes with fatigue.Stryd articlehttps://www.google.com/amp/blog.stryd.com/2016/11/04/run-faster-with-stryd-part-two-2/amp/?client=safari
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RGround Contact Time (ms)Also called stance time, this measurement reflects how long the foot is contact with the ground, starting from the initial “crash” phase as the runner touches down and ending with toe-off. Values are typically in the 150 to 350 ms range, although this varies somewhat based on running speed, etc. Ground contact time is of potential interest because studies in the literature suggest that shorter ground contact times may be associated with a lower metabolic cost to run at the same speed.Andy Coggan's Training Peaks articlehttp://home.trainingpeaks.com/blog/article/wko4-new-metrics-for-running-with-power
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SVertical Oscillation (cm)Vertical oscillation is how much your center-of-mass bounces or travels up-and-down while running. Values are generally in the 8 to 14 cm range, although again it varies depending on a number of factors, including running speed. Running faster generally entails “flying higher” since they are achieved in part by increasing stride length, which requires a higher apogee during the flight phase. At a given running speed, excessive vertical oscillation generally results in poor running economy as excess energy is expended performing work against gravity. On the other hand, overly constraining vertical oscillation at a given running speed may also impair running economy as this can limit energy recycling.Andy Coggan's Training Peaks articlehttp://home.trainingpeaks.com/blog/article/wko4-new-metrics-for-running-with-power
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TLeg Spring Stiffness (LSS)Think of your leg as a spring upon which your body “bounces." The stiffer the spring, the less energy you must produce to propel yourself forward with each step. This new metric measures the stiffness of the muscles and tendons in your leg. Increases in LSS can indicate economy improvement over time.Stryd articlehttps://www.google.com/amp/blog.stryd.com/2016/11/04/run-faster-with-stryd-part-two-2/amp/?client=safari
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