Gender Schedule
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ChairPanel title & presentation titleAuthorAffiliation
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April 12 12:00 PMRegistration in REND CContinues throughout the day.
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April 12 1:00 PMMovements
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Room: REND ABetsy BrunerFascinating Womanhood documentary filmErin Barney Boise State University
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The Gender Experience of Consensual Non-MonogamyMelissa CortesAlumnus, Idaho State University
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You, Too: Pervasiveness and Normativity at Odds in the #MeToo MovementTera Joy ColeIdaho State University
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#Metoo: Not my movementBrooke Danielle DamicoBoise State University
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April 12 1:00 PMEducation & Community
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Room: REND BRulon WoodThe Social Construction of LGBT Youth in Mormon Communities: One Way to Understand Suicide and IdeationDaniel SnyderPost-Grad, Private Practice Therapist
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Survey of Heteronormative Attitudes and Tolerance Toward Gender Nonconformity in Mountain West Undergraduate StudentsSteven G. Duncan Brigham Young University
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Speaking Loudly and Proudly: Feminist Teachers Sharing Our StoriesJessica L. WillisEastern Washington University
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Psychological Distress and Access to Community Resources among Incarcerated Women Post-ReleaseMichael MaresIdaho State University
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April 12 2:30 PMGender Spectrums
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Room: REND AMaygen Cassity"'But What Happened To You?' Navigating College & Hookup Culture among People Who Identify As Asexual"Christina KopperBoise State University
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Queer TopographyJune Tay SandersWashington State University
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Moving with Trauma, Tension and Difference: On the Universality of Transgender IdentityDavy LeJones NguyenGonzaga
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SpectrumRemington R GrunewaldIdaho State University
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Transitioning He & She to third Gender TermsRaiven Masina LeFayIdaho State University
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April 12 2:30 PMPerforming, Resisting, and Critiquing Masculinity
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Room: REND BZac GershbergResisting Change: Sexism and Fear in Marshall McLuhan’s Formative TheoryMadison ShumwayIdaho State University
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Negotiating Gender in the Whitewater Rafting IndustryMaria Blevins, Kylee Park, Karlee PrestonUtah Valley University
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Branwell Brontë: The Burden of Masculinity on AuthorshipElise Barker Idaho State University
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The Lead Parent: An Autoethnographic Gender Analysis of Paternity LeaveRyan CheekWeber State University
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April 12 4:00 PMGendered Performance as Moral Act: Presentations of Problematic Gender Portrayals
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Room: REND ATara YoungPANEL: In Dwight Conquergood’s (1985) piece Performance as Moral Act, he explains how performance can act as a “necessary and indissoluble link between art and life…open[ing] a dialogue with the world.” As we reflect on representations of gender and sexuality in society, it becomes apparent that some portrayals are not truly reflective of the lived experiences of those identities. In order to start a dialogue to further discuss this phenomenon, this panel employs performance as way to connect with the audience. The goal of this panel is to, as Conquergood states, stir “moral and ethical questions…to the surface” and open a space to interrogate problematic depictions of sexuality and gender.

Through performance, the speakers on this panel explore a variety of gender representations that are controversial and, in some cases, harmful to those impacted. Whether feeding into societal gender stereotypes, or challenging stigmatized identification, the following presentations tell the stories of problematic gender portrayals within our culture.
Dr. Christina L. Ivey
Janice Witherspoon
Andrew Castro
Hailie Johnson-Waskow
Samantha Haskell
Boise State University
Boise State University
Boise State University
Boise State University
Boise State University
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April 12 4:00 PMNavigating Gender in Pop Culture
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Room: REND BElise BarkerVideo Game Harassment and What Companies Can Do.Daniel Mark SheldenIdaho State University
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Examining Judith Butler Work on the Performance of Gender to Include Performance of Pain as Shown in Mary Lambert's Music and PerformanceNicholas TarbetIdaho State University
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Failing Debate: Navigating Neoliberalism from Under the SeaSquid MonteithEmporia State University
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The Oppositional Gaze and Exhibit BRulon WoodBoise State University
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Julia BroderickBoise State University
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April 12, 5:30 PMDinner/Reception
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Buffet in REND CEat in Rendezvous Atrium
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April 12, 6:30 PM
6:30 pm Keynote – Rae Lynn Schwartz-Dupree
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Room: REND 203– Curious About George
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April 13 8:00 AMRegistration in the hallway outside REND CContinues throughout the day.
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April 13 9:00 AMPop Culture Gender Portrayals: Objectification, Representation, and Performance
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Room: REND AAmanda ZinkThe Refined Redneck and the (Overly) Gentile Lady: Notperforming as Performance StrategyDr. Christina L. IveyBoise State University
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Forever Country: Using Deconstruction Theory to Analyze Mixed Messages of Sexual ObjectificationAnthony RogersBoise State University
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Fear the Conquering Viking: Symbolic Representation and Signification in the Modern Presentation of Viking SocietyRaven R LouwBoise State University
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Rhetorical Criticism: Carl's Jr.Elisa JohnsonIdaho State University
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April 13 9:00 AMGender & Politics
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Room: REND BShane GleasonFrom poetry to politics: Questioning the rhyme and reason behind Title IX rollbacksAmy ArellanoBoise State University
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The Impact of the Arab Spring on Female Parliamentary RepresentationChrista WhiteIdaho State University
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The Performance of Gender and Lower Court Influence on U.S. Supreme Court Opinion ContentShane A. Gleason & Krystoff KissoonIdaho State University
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"Contagious Feminism: Attorney Gender and Judicial Decision Making at the U.S. Courts of Appeals"Christine Marie BaileyIdaho State University
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April 13 10:45 AMDance performance -"No Manifesto"...Challenging expectations regarding Gender and Dance
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Room: REND ALauralee ZimmerlyIn 1965, Yvonne Rainer, a pioneer in post modern dance, wrote the “No Manifesto” as a means of demystifying dance as a form of spectacle and entertainment and rebelling against the notion that narrative, emotion, and drama were inherent to dance as an art form. She challenged the common assumptions regarding what dancers should look like, what they do and where they do it. While the manifesto is widely accepted as a profound statement regarding socio-cultural context and dance performance, it is also a comment on gender roles. Although gender is not directly addressed, there are implicit messages regarding the representation and/or reinforcement of traditional gender roles in dance. For this performance, I consider the manifesto and its relationship to current social, political, and cultural issues in our country. How are these statements relevant today? What expectations and assumptions do audiences have today regarding gender and sexuality in dance?Kathleen DiehlIdaho State University
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4/13/2018 11:30:00
Pick up lunch in REND C and watch debate in REND A&B
Christensen
11:30 am Dine & debate. (Box lunches;
exhibition Debate) Topic: The United States
Should Reintroduce and Ratify the Equal Rights
Amendment
Nick Grunig Conner Coutts Jack Bradley Squid Montieth
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April 13 1:30-4:30
Room: REND 106
RichardsonGreen Dot training
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