Research meeting KSOC MU
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZAAABAC
1
TimeSpeakerAffiliationType/FormatTitle AbstractNotes
2
26.9.20181:30
3
3:15
4
3.10.20181:30Asma AbbasLiberal Arts College Bard College at Simon's RockFulbright Masaryk Distinguished ChairUnwilling Ends: Provocations to Politics and Method in an Age of Austerity, Terror, and FascismWhat, if any, is the imperative of ongoing histories of injustice and oppression for our methods in the humanities and social sciences? Who is our work as teachers, scholars, and students, accountable to, if we suppose, for a moment, that frameworks of utility, salvation, and philanthropy are not the only, or even the most compelling, ones available for appraisals of our purpose and practice? Are there other ways of approaching the politics of our method beyond the content of what and who we study and teach? The presentation’s questions draw on visions and practices of scholarship and pedagogy and their mutuality rooted in decolonial, historical, feminist, postcolonial, and materialist understandings of our shared global conditions. As a historian of form and method to recall the "forms of life" to which philosophers have drawn attention to, I hope to introduce some questions that orient my work as a political theorist and educator, that can lead to an open discussion about how histories our impact our methods of inquiry and our self-conceptions as thinkers and teachers, and what we each might bring to an agenda for the social sciences and the humanities in this historical moment.
5
3:15
6
7.3.20181:30Joachim Singelmann
U of Texas at Saint Antonio
Guest lectureThe Occupational Mobility of Mexican Migrants in the United StatesIn this paper we analyze the pre-to-post migration occupational mobility of Mexican migrants to the U.S. using occupation and migration histories from the Mexican Migration Project. We compare the first occupation in the U.S. to the last occupation in Mexico, and the occupation in the last year spent in the U.S. to the occupation in the first year, by sex, using multinomial logistic regression models. The multivariate analyses account for individual, migration, and context characteristics. Our findings show a rigid occupational structure for migrants and low opportunities for mobility after migration. Most men experience lateral mobility upon arriving to the U.S., and are unlikely to change occupations afterwards. Most women enter lower status occupations or exit the labor force upon arrival, especially if highly educated or skilled. Undocumented men and university-educated women are more likely to experience downward mobility. These patterns remain even after accounting for migrant networks.
7
3:15DPT meeting
8
14.3.20181:30Asier Amezaga Etxebarria University of the Basque CountryGuest lectureAssembling artworks, public and mediation in an exhibition. The case of Peace Treaty in the European Capital of Culture of San Sebastian 2016.The presentation focuses on the complex articulation of agents required by the exhibition-making and how this articulation influences the meaning-making. For that purpose, the interweaving of apparently conflictive interests in the implementation of the Peace Treaty exhibition in a European Capital of Culture (ECoC) is this work’s starting point. The research unfolds Actor-Network Theory to track how different actors were enlisted in the planning, production and reception stages of the exhibition. It is based on a fieldwork made for an evaluation tasked by the ECoC2016 and consisting on participant observations in the exhibition halls and interviews to key informants.
The exhibition tackles the representation of peace in 1516-2016 period, considering the peace as result of treaty, as a way to manage the violence. To be carried out, the exhibition has to face conflicts such as the tension between the festivalisation frame of a ECoC and contemporary art-based proposal, the political use of culture and claims for its autonomy, and its logistical and institutional complexity.
Firstly, the exhibition was planned by means of a constant dialogue of different inscriptions (calendar and chronogram) moving from one point to another and translating involved agents interests. Secondly, it requires bringing objects from lender museums to the exhibition rooms and, accordingly, a network should ensure the continuity of the conservation conditions and reference to the original place. Thirdly, it requires bringing public, who are mainly recruited through the presence of some original artworks and the signifier of peace, opposing their initial interests to the curators proposal.
While the actor-network keeps plotted, the exhibition works and is perceived as unity. However, as far as some actors’ interests are not translated, controversy between different views on the exhibition arises. The controversy become apparent in regards to the exhibition’s mediation: there is a dialectical and spatial fight to control the gap between the public and the exhibition, reflecting different mediation cultures. Peace Treaty could be understood, in its very isomorphism, as a result of a peace treaty between the involved actors where the conflict, far from being solved, is managed in a certain way.
9
3:15
10
21.3.20181:30Nurseit NiyazbekovGuest lecture
11
3:15/// reservation ///FSSCCM seminar
12
28.3.20181:30Csaba SzalóFSS
Book presentation
Cultural sociology of rememberingThe increased importance of memory studies, especially the current emphasis given to cultural trauma and iconicity in cultural sociology, encouraged me to propose that cultural interpretation must be supplemented with phenomenological descriptions. This is partly because the theoretical model developed by Jeffrey C. Alexander to understand the formation of cultural trauma revealed that it is no longer possible to adequately interpret our relationship to the past using the concepts relying on cognitive models of remembering. Instead, the social force and performative power of icons contends that our relationship to the past is more akin to indirect forms of expression. As a result, phenomenological aesthetics takes on increased importance for the interpretive strategy of cultural sociology.
13
3:15
14
4.4.20181:30Porada katedry
15
3:15Reading week
16
11.4.20181:30
17
3:15
18
18.4.20181:30Křest nihy Berger: Posvátný baldachýn
19
3:15Merete LieWelfare Technologies and Robotic CareWelfare technologies have become a major area of priority for the public sector, led by the promise that such technologies can solve some of the challenges brought on by an aging population. Our research aims to identify care needs among an aging population that can be alleviated by robotics technology, and how to develop and implement culturally and contextually sensitive robotic services in the health and care sector. The implementation of welfare technologies is at an initial stage in Norway today. Robotic welfare services are implemented in many other countries, with Japan in the front. The objective is to build on existing research and development in the field, still recognizing the necessity of local expertise and cultural adaptation. This is explored by an interdisciplinary investigation of the development of robotic welfare services and the domestication of them in a Norwegian context.
20
25.4.20181:30Zuzana Búriková Sekerákováprezentace knihyPanie k deťom a na upratovanie
21
3:15CCM seminarFSS
22
2.5.20181:30Porada Katedry
23
3:15Barbora Spalová a kol.prezentace knihy
24
9.5.20181:30Erasmus host from Porto Helena Vilaça
25
3:15dpt. discussion
26
16.5.20181:30Tomáš DosedelFSSPhD presentation
27
3:15Martin LakomýFSSPhD presentation
28
CCM seminar
29
23.5.2018TWIN towns
30
31
27.6.Erika Dyck
32
33
34
Filip Vostal <vostal@flu.cas.cz>
Podzim 2018
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
Loading...
 
 
 
Spring 2018
FALL 2018
 
 
Main menu