SSA 2020 Unofficial Program Suggestions and Connections
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This spreadsheet is provided as an informal tool to connect individuals who are seeking ideas and/or collaboration on session proposals for SSA's 2020 Annual Meeting in Denton, TX. Read the full Call for Program Proposals: https://2020.southwestarchivists.org/conference-program/
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Name: Session ProposerContact InformationTopic PresentationldeaName(s) of interested parties and contact information
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Gerrianne Schaad and Benna Vaughngschaad@flsouthern.edu or Benna_Vaughan@baylor.eduvisionary college presidents or administratorsAre you the college archivist? would you like to speak about an administrator with a vision or a leadership idea? We will also include a records component. 60 or 90 minutes if we get enough people
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Heather Fergusonheather.ferguson@sanantonio.govZine CollectionsA 60 minute panel discussion on the topic of managing and preserving zine collections in Library & Archival CollectionsJennifer Hecker jenniferraehecker@gmail.com; Katie Rojas katie.rojas@utsa.edu
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Chad Garrettgarrett.chad@gmail.comUser experience research and design in archives organizationsArchivists are passionate about helping patrons find what they need/want (while protecting the materials, of course); however, are they aware of or do they employ the proven practices of user experience research and design in the course of designing projects, systems, and spaces with which their users interact? A 60-minute panel discussion could explore current practices and debate the practicality of integrating such practices in an archives setting.Joseph Lueck jlueck@uh.edu
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Jenna Cooper
jenna.cooper@austintexas.gov
Neurodiversity in ArchivesAre you neurodivergent and/or passionate about promoting equity and inclusiveness for neurodivergent people? SAA recently created a working group to address neurodiversity in the archival profession, users and donors, and collections that document neurodivergent people. While the SAA working group is in the process of creating documentation that will "make archives and the archival profession more welcoming for neurodivergent people," I think it's critical that we continue these conversations on the regional level to collate regionally-specific resources and perhaps addendums to the SAA working group's documentation. A panel discussion or working group would be the best formats for this proposal.
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Meagan MayMeagan.May@unt.eduExploring Innovative Student Engagement with ArchivesI am hoping to find others who would be interested in a panel discussion or lightening talk that revolves around innovative ways students have engaged with archival material and collections. This could be through collaborative projects, instruction sessions, events, etc. I intend to discuss a recent collaborative project that involved looking at the archives through a fine art lens to create sketchbooks and proposed art pieces based off materials and themes within the collections they viewed. I would like to have others join me for this panel, and feel free to reach out directly if you have any questions. We can also look into tweaking the presentation topic as more people join.Amanda Dietz (afa07a@acu.edu)- various cohorts of students working on a 10+ year project to process university presidential papers; using field notes from service learning in archives as a primary source
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Jennifer Hecker, et aljenniferraehecker@gmail.comHow We Leveraged Our CrowdPanel or lightning talks about ways you have leveraged your "crowd". Your crowd could be a classroom of undergrads, a community organization, an unaffiliated bunch of architecture buffs, whatever. Maybe you leveraged them with a crowdfunding campaign to raise money to conserve a historic object or collection, maybe you leveraged them to help you transcribe a collection of letters, maybe you leveraged them by helping them throw a fundraiser for your org, maybe you leveraged them with a Wikipedia-a-thon, oral history campaign, or scan day, whatever. I'm aiming for a multifaceted look at how different orgs use different methods to leverage different kinds of "crowds".
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Leon Millerlmiller@tulane.eduPrimary Sources are OverratedAt a session at SAA it was argued that archivists have given primary sources an importance they do not always deserve; that the focus on primary sources has twisted archivists’ relationship with researchers; and that the obsession with primary sources has hindered our ability to define an American archival tradition. I’d like to follow-up on that at SSA with perhaps a more case-study approach, with panelists discussing how they use the concept of primary sources in outreach and instruction without allowing it to define archival practice. Any takers?
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Katie Rojaskatie.rojas@utsa.eduDeaccessioning & DispositionCalling all reappraisers! I'd like to put together a group of presenters (60 or 90 min depending) to share how we make and document deaccession decisions, as well as how we grapple with the challenge of disposition (particularly in tricky situations like no living donor/heirs and no deed).Dylan McDonald dylanmcd@nmsu.edu; Zack Stein zackstein@louisiana.edu
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Andrew Hintonandrew.hinton@ttu.eduDigital Preservation / Personal ArchivingI would like to present on a research project that I did over the summer of 2019 where I interviewed military veterans about their personal archiving practices for records pertaining to their military experiences, i.e. what records they kept from their service and what they were doing with them. I focused particularly on born-digital records to look at how many veterans were storing these ephemeral records in ways that would ensure that they could be accessible and renderable if and when they ever make it to the archives. Would anyone else like to collaborate on a panel looking at issues with born-digital collections or digital preservation more broadly?
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Samantha Schafersschafer@nationalcowboymuseum.orgCanva for ArchivesThis would be a skills training session for using Canva, a free online graphic design program. Using Canva and a little creativity, archivists can make their own mailers, handouts, and social media posts (among other items) that use images from their collections. I'm looking for someone to co-present or contribute examples on how they've used Canva. Personally, I've made postcards that can be used as handouts at conferences, that feature interesting images from our collections on the front and contact information on the back.
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Jessamyn Swan (Community Engagement Archivist, Georgia College)jessamyn.swan@gcsu.eduCase Studies in Oral History (Tentative Title)--Panel DiscussionOral history initiatives are currently back in vogue as institutions try to diversify their holdings such that they are more reflective of their actual community of stakeholders. This form of documentation first became popular in the latter half of the twentieth century—around the same time that Howard Zinn issued his famous call for archivists to become “activist-archivists.” To avoid reinventing the wheel in our own outreach activities, now, as we creep towards 2020, I think it’s important to examine what has been done in the past, analyzing what worked and what didn’t, and discuss our observations and ideas for how to adapt and improve upon past methods in our current, postmodern, post-custodial era of practice, where the archivist and the records-creator now both "co-create" records (Verne Harris). I am therefore proposing a panel composed of speakers who are interested in writing case studies about the oral histories already housed in their archives, with an eye towards what we can adapt for our own unique time, as well as what mistakes we should avoid repeating. I think a constructive overall emphasis for our panel discussion could be on how to design projects that both diversify our holdings and promote active collabroation and relationship-building with the communities we are seeking to collect from. Examples of things that could be discussed include (but are certainly not limited to) the following: community engagement; overall initiative design; interviewing techniques; marketing techniques to reach participants; licensing issues; post-collecting activities to further increase community engagement (such as the adaption of oral histories into radio dramas, stage plays, and other creative endeavors).
I, myself, would like to present my work on the Arizona Historical Society’s oral history program between 1970 to 1990. My tentative title is “Things I’d Better Not Tell Strangers” and it analyzes interview techniques and discusses the varying degrees of “presence” of various interviewers in the interview itself as well as afterwards, during the processing stage, in order to arrive at conclusions of how much interviewer “presence” is required in order to obtain the best oral history interviews.
Norie Guthrie - slg4@rice.edu
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Scott Zieglersziegler1@lsu.eduDigital Libraries, Archives and EmpathyThere is a lot of great literature currently appearing around archives and empathy (see, for example, the upcoming JCLIS issue devoted to Radical Empathy in Archival Practice: https://journals.litwinbooks.com/index.php/jclis/announcement/view/7). I would like to present on the how these ideas manifest in digital libraries and other digital spaces that showcase reformatted archival material. What role does empathy play when considering digitization selection? What role might empathy play when considering access restrictions, assessment, use and reuse? I work with the Louisiana Digital Library (https://louisianadigitallibrary.org/), and would love to have a panel with other people who work directly with digital collections, especially multi-institutional digital projects. All of this is early thinking, though, happy to chat about options/slightly different directions.
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