Voter Profiles
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
|
 
Still loading...
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRS
1
SlugVoter NameVoter BioImpactTotal AmericansRestriction Typejoin_col
2
blocking voter registrationJoseJose is a Latino student at a Florida high school. He just turned 18 and isn't registered to vote yet.For many years, Jose's US government teacher has been helping her students register to vote. But Florida passed onerous new restrictions on voter registration efforts. Rather than <a href="http://www2.tbo.com/news/politics/2011/nov/01/1/teacher-says-no-way-to-comply-with-floridas-voting-ar-299783/">risk paying a $1,000 fine</a> for turning in her students’ registration forms late, Jose's teacher has decided to abandon voter registration this year. The restrictions disproportionately target African American and Latino voters, as well as first-time voters like Jose, who are more likely to register through drives than whites.202,000voter registrationvoter_registration
3
eliminating early/absentee votingLawrenceLawrence is a 48-year-old African American North Carolina resident. For many years, he has voted on the Sunday before the election, after he and his family attend their church's "Souls to the Polls" voting drive.In 2008, about a third of American voters took advantage of the convenience of early and absentee voting. But several states have proposed rolling back their early voting periods. <a href="http://www2.nbc17.com/news/wake-county/2012/mar/24/naacps-southeast-reps-meet-nc-voting-rights-ar-2083626/">North Carolina</a>, along with Florida and Ohio, have proposed eliminating early voting on the Sunday before election day. African Americans, Latinos, and first-time voters disproportionately use early Sunday voting.1-2 millionearly/absentee votingearly_absentee_voting
4
denying voter IDRuthRuth is a 95-year-old resident of Chattanooga, Tennessee. She grew up under Jim Crow and has voted in every general election for the past 50 years.She <a href="http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/2011/oct/05/marriage-certificate-required-bureaucrat-tells/">was denied</a> a state-issued photo ID, <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/03/us/new-state-laws-are-limiting-access-for-voters.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all">now required</a> for voters under Tennessee’s strict new voter ID law. She presented a birth certificate along with a rent receipt, a copy of her lease, and her voter registration card, but since her birth certificate listed her maiden name, she was told that to prove her identity she needed her marriage certificate—which she did not have with her.<br/>In Tennessee, university student IDs don’t count as an acceptable voter ID either—but concealed handgun licenses do.3.2 millionvoter IDvoter_id
5
disenfranchising felonsAliceIn the late 1990s, Alice finished a three-year prison sentence for a nonviolent felony drug crime in Iowa and found work as a nurse at a Des Moines hospital. Iowa barred convicted felons from voting at the time, keeping her out of the ballot box until 2005, when Democratic Gov. Tom Vilsack reversed the restrictions with an executive order.Republican Iowa Gov. <a href="http://felonvoting.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=286#iowa">Terry Branstad reinstated</a> the previous ban in 2011, once again denying all convicted felons the right to vote. 5.3 millionrestoring voting rights, convicted felonsconvicted_felons
6
requiring proof of citizenshipMaryOriginally from El Salvador, Mary moved to Virginia with her family six years ago. She was granted US citizenship last year, before leaving for Kansas to attend college. She just filled out voter registration forms for her first presidential election.But a new law requiring voters to provide documentation of their citizenship made Mary think twice about registering; she didn't have her naturalization certificate or other papers verifying her citizenship handy. At least <a href="http://www.brennancenter.org/content/resource/2012_summary_of_voting_law_changes/">17 states</a> in all have introduced proof-of-citizenship voting restrictions; these laws have passed in Alabama, Kansas, and Tennessee.13 millionproof of citizenshipproof_citizenship
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
Loading...
 
 
 
profiles
restrictions by state
map index
sources