Y3 Curriculum Overview
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St Christopher's Junior School
Year 3 Curriculum Overview: Term 1
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What we will do at SchoolWhat you can do at home
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NUMERACY
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Numeracy - Please click link to access the St Christopher’s Maths Calculation Policy:goo.gl/Hi1fp6
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Please click link to access the IXL website for your child’s year group:https://uk.ixl.com
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Number
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Place at least 2 and 3-digit numbers on a line.
Create a numberline and digit cards to insert.
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Order and compare at least 3-digit numbers.

Discuss 3 digit numbers and identify the digit within the number
that determines where it appears when ordered or compared to another
number.
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Understand place value in at least 3-digit numbers.
Discuss the value of each digit in a 3 digit number.
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Understand and use place value with money.
Play with GBP notes and coins creating different amounts and ensure the
children refer to the amounts correctly.
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Use = to represent equality.e.g. 7+7 = 8+6 or 7+7 = 12 + 1 +1 and then 4+8 =?+6.
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Add 1 digit to 2-digit numbers.e.g 34+3, 44+3 and discuss any patterns that emerge.
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Subtract 1-digit from 2-digit numbers.e.g 34-3, 44-3 and discuss any patterns that emerge.
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Add several small numbers using number facts.
e.g 4 + ? + 7 = 15 or 24 = 8 + 9 +? Also encourage children to notice
number bonds.
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Mental addition of pairs of at least 2-digit numbers by partitioning.
See the Maths Calculation Policy.
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Mental subtraction of pairs of at least 2-digit numbers by
counting up.
See the Maths Calculation Policy.
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Find change from at least £1.e.g. £1 - 45p or £1 - 63p.
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Understand and use place value and partitioning to add
and subtract.
e.g. 300 + 58, 350 + 8, 308 + 50 & 456 – 56, 456 – 406 and 456 – 450.
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Use place value in money to add and subtract.
e.g. £2.35: £2 + 30p + 5p, £2.05 + 30p etc..£2.35 – 30p = £2.05, £2.35 – 5p
= £2.30 etc...
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Add/subtract 1, 10 and 100 to/from any 3-digit number.
e.g. 247+100; 247+10 & 247+1 and then ? + 100 = 547 etc.
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Mentally double at least 2-digit numbers.
e.g. double 27 as double 20 and double 7; 40+14=54. Discuss near
doubles e.g. double 39 best viewed as double 40 is 80 and subtract 2.
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Mentally halve at least small even numbers.e.g. half of 48 as half 40 and half 8; 20+4=24.
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Understand that multiplication is commutative.

e.g. 5x7 = 7x5 & 35 ÷ 5 = 7, 35 ÷ 7 = 5 and then ? x 6 = 42 and also ? ÷ 7 = 6.
Emphasise how known facts can assist with unknown facts e.g. 72 ÷ 8 = ?
but I know that 8 x 9 = 72 so 72 ÷ 8 = 9.
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Recognise multiples of 2,5 and 10.Count in sequences of 2, 5 and 10.
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Use place value to add and subtract 1s, 10s, 100s to/from at
least 2 and 3-digit numbers.
e.g. 256+10; 256+20; 256+30; 256+100; 256+200; 256 +300 etc..
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Mental addition and subtraction using near multiples of 10 from 3-digit numbers.See the Maths Calculation Policy.
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Know pairs of multiples of 5 totalling 100.Play I Say - You Say e.g. I say 35 you say 65.
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Know pairs of 2-digit numbers totalling 100Play I Say - You Say e.g. I say 49 you say 51.
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Know multiplication facts for the at least 3 and 4 times tables up to the 12th multiple, derive corresponding division facts. e.g. ? x 4 = 20 so 20 ÷ 4 = ? Play times tables games e.g. snap, pairs etc..
and sing times tables songs.
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Divide by at least 2, 3, 4, 5 and 10, including giving
remainders.
e.g. 22 ÷ 5, 22 ÷4, 22 ÷ 2, 22 ÷ 3 and 22 ÷ 10. Use counters e.g. 22 ÷ 5 = 5 piles of 4 counters (20) with 2 counters left over.
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Understand concept of a fraction of a shape and quantity.
Divide a cake into 8 slices. Identify 3/8 of the cake.
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Find fractions of a quantity: ½, ⅓, ¼, ¾, ⅔ including ½ of an odd number. e.g. ½ of 30 counters; ⅓ of 45 pencils; ¼ of 36 toy cars etc..
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Measurement
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Tell the time to five minutes using analogue, digital and
Roman numeral clocks.
Regularly ask your child what the time is on an analogue watch / clock.
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Understand and use am and pm times appropriately.
Explain how am and pm represent two 12 hour periods of a complete day.
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Statistics
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Collect data and display using bar graphs and pictograms.

Look at graphs and pictograms from real life on the news, magazines and
newspapers. Have a go at collecting some data and displaying it as
either a bar graph or picotgram.
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Geometry
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Describe, name and sort 2D shapes.
Go on a 2D shape hunt around your house. Name the shape and associated properties.
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Describe, name and sort 3D shapes, learn and use correct
vocabulary.
Go on a 3D shape hunt around your house. Name the shape and associated properties.
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LITERACY
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Reading
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Word ReadingMake reading fun
Have fun singing along to karaoke songs or playing board games together.
Read to your child every day. You can use your first language.
Have a pile of reading materials available – library books (non-fiction and fiction), kids’ cookery books, simple timetables, newspapers and magazines, catalogues and any other reading that supports your child’s current interest.
Encourage your child to retell favourite stories or parts of stories in their own words. Play card games (you can make the cards yourself) and board games together.
Here are some tips -
When they are reading, your child will be working at solving unfamiliar words by themself. If they need help you could ask them to work their way across the word looking for things they know that might help. At this level, reading involves bringing everything they know together to solve problems and build understanding. If they can’t work it out – tell them and carry on with reading.
If you or your child starts to feel stressed by what they’re reading, take a break and read the rest of the story aloud yourself – keep it fun.
Make it real
Reading makes more sense if your child can relate it to their own life. Help them to make connections between what they are reading and their own lives and experiences.
Look for opportunities for your child to read wherever you are – signs, advertising billboards, junk mail, recipes.
Show your child that reading is fun and important to you by letting them see you reading magazines, books, newspapers.
Find out together
Visit the school library and help your child to choose books about topics that interest them.
Talk with older people in your family about interesting stories and people from your child’s past that you could find out more about together.
Ask your child questions (and support them to find the answers) to widen their reading experiences. For example, "What’s the quickest biscuit recipe?", "What time is the next bus to town?"
Help your child with any words that they don’t understand – look them up together in the dictionary if you need to.
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Apply knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes to read aloud and to understand the meaning of unfamiliar words.
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Read further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between spelling and sound.
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Attempt pronunciation of unfamiliar words drawing on prior knowledge of similar looking words.
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Comprehension
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Read a range of fiction, poetry, plays, and non-fiction texts.
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Prepare poems to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action.
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Read aloud and independently, taking turns and listening to others.
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Explain how non-fiction books are structured in different ways and can use them effectively.
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Explain some of the different types of fiction books.
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Ask relevant questions to get a better understanding of a text.
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Predict what might happen based on details I have.
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Draw inferences such as inferring a characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions.
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Use a dictionary to check the meaning of unfamiliar words.
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Identify the main point of a text.
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Explain how structure and presentation contribute to the meaning of texts.
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Use non-fiction texts to retrieve information.
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Prepare poems to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action.
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Writing
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Revise what the following are: Noun/ Verb/ Adjective/ Adverb.Writing for fun
Talk about interesting words with your child, especially ones that are fun to say, like "hippopotamus". Short and simple games could involve finding how many little words can be found using the letters in the word ‘elephant’.
Work together on the small word games found in the children’s section (or word section) of the newspaper.
Make up a story or think of a legend or traditional tale and act it out with costumes and music, write down the names of the characters.
Make up a play with your child. You could help your child to write the play down. Use puppets they design and make themselves to give a performance to the family.
Here's a tip - keep writing fun and use any excuse to encourage your child to write about anything, any time.
Writing for a reason
Writing for a real purpose can help your child want to write.For example, writing invitations, typing emails or writing and posting small notes.
Personalising notes by cutting, decorating, sticking or stamping are great skills for coordinating fingers and being creative. Postcards are a good size for a sentence or two and they are cheap to post, too.
Encourage your child to write what they need to pack for a holiday, dictate your shopping list to them, or get them to write a list of jobs that need doing.
Here's a tip - talk about what your child writes. Be interested. If you don’t understand what your child’s picture or story is about, ask them to explain.
Supporting your child's writing
Talk to your child about what you are writing – let them see you making lists, writing emails, filling in forms.
Keep envelopes, banking slips, forms you don’t need so that your child can do their own ‘grown up’ writing.
Display your child’s writing where others can admire and read it.
Play with words. Find and discuss interesting new words – this can help increase the words your child uses when they write – look words up in the dictionary or on the Internet or talk about the origins of words.
Here's a tip - be a great role model. Show your child that you write for all sorts of reasons. Let them see you enjoying writing.
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Know the term ‘suffix’.
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Know the term ‘word family’.
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Revise what tense is.
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Revise different types of sentences eg statement/command/exclamation/question.
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Use the terms ‘consonant’ and vowel’ confidently and accurately.
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Use the forms ‘a’ or ‘an’ according to whether the next word begins with a consonant or vowel.
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Revise what a noun phrase is.
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Recognise the present perfect form of verbs in contrast to the past tense (He has gone out to play vs He went out to play).
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Create settings, character and plot.
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Know what a conjunction is – and how it can express time, place and cause.
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Use conjunctions.
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Use and punctuating direct speech (use the term ‘direct speech’.
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Write from memory simple sentences, dictated by the teacher, that include words and punctuation taught so far.
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Recognise and use apostrophes for contraction.
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Recognise what a subordinate clause is.
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Use a subordinate clause.
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In non-narrative material, use simple organisational devices [for example, headings and sub-headings].
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Introduce to paragraphs as a way to group related material.
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Use headings and sub-headings to aid presentation.
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Identify and use specific features relevant for a text type.
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Use commas in a list and with fronted adverbials.
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Know what a preposition is.
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SCIENCE
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Rocks
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Compare and group together different kinds of rocks on the
basis of their appearance and simple physical properties.
Explore different kinds of rocks and soils, including those in the local environment.
Observing rocks, including those used in buildings and gravestones, and explore how and why they might have changed over time.
Explore different soils and identify similarities and differences between them.
Investigate what happens when rocks are rubbed together or what changes occur when they are in water.
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Describe in simple terms how fossils are formed when
things that have lived are trapped within rock.
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Recognise that soils are made from rocks and organic matter.
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Plants
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Identify and describe the functions of different parts of
flowering plants: roots, stem/trunk, leaves and flowers.
Look at the relationship between structure and function: the idea
that every part has a job to do.
Explore questions that focus on the role of the roots and stem in
nutrition and support, leaves for nutrition and flowers for reproduction.
Talk about what can affect plant growth.
Talk about how seeds are dispersed.
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Explore the requirements of plants for life and growth
(air, light, water, nutrients from soil, and room to grow) and
how they vary from plant to plant.
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Investigate the way in which water is transported within plants.
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Explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering
plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed
dispersal.
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ICT
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To be able to log on, save work, open folders, make folders, copy and paste from the internet independently.
To develop research skills when using internet search engines.
Explore layouts of comics and discuss what makes a good comic.
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To use Publisher independently to change colour, font size, font style, insert and manipulate images, add frames.
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To have an understanding of how digital technology may be used in comics or graphic novels.
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To develop skills in working with images on a computer.
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To improve proficiency in combining text and images to make a digital comic using Comic Life.
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