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Book TitleAuthorIllustratorDescriptionOur ThoughtsRace/Ethnicity FeaturedGender FeaturedAgesFamily StructureReviewed by Canerow
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Feast for 10Cathryn FalwellCathryn FalwellA counting book that features an African-American family shopping for food, preparing dinner, and sitting down to eat. Lively read-aloud text paired with bright collage illustrations.Black1-3
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Ten, Nine, Eight Board BookMolly BangMolly BangBedtime! A happy game to lure the most persistent sleep evader. A warm and reassuring countdown to the land of dreams.BlackGirl1-3
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Peekaboo MorningRachel IsadoraRachel IsadoraA toddler plays a game of peekaboo, and you're invited to play too. First there's Mommy to find, with Daddy not far behind. Then Puppy comes peeking around the corner, and a favorite toy train brings the toddler to Grandma and Grandpa. Isadora's brilliant, joyful pastel illustrations capture the familiar and cozy people, toys and animals that will delight babies.BlackBoy1-3
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Lola At the LibraryAnna McQuinnRosalind BeardshawLola has a big smile on her face. Why? Because it's Tuesday--and on Tuesdays, Lola and her mommy go to the library. Join Lola in this cozy celebration of books and the people who love them.BlackGirl2-5
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Full, Full, Full of LoveTrish CookePaul HowardFor the youngest member of an exuberant extended family, Sunday dinner at Grannie’s can be full indeed - full of hugs and kisses, full of tasty dishes, full to the brim with happy faces, and full, full, full of love. With a special focus on the bond between little Jay Jay and his grannie, Trish Cooke introduces us to a gregarious family we are sure to want more, more, more of.BlackBoy2-5
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Joshua By The SeaAngela JohnsonRhonda MitchellJoshua enjoys a day at the shore with his familyBlackBoy1-3
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Some of the Days of Everett AndersonLucille CliftonEvaline NessThis rhyming book exposes the likes, dislikes, and adventures of young Everett Anderson as he goes through a typical week.BlackBoy3-6
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Everett Anderson's YearLucille CliftonAnn GrifalconiSeven-year -old Everett Anderson shares his reflections of each month of the year in 12 verses.BlackBoy3-6
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FamilyIsabell MonkJanice Lee PorterHope's new and unusual dessert blends well with the traditional dishes prepared by her cousins and Aunt Poogee at their annual summer get-together.Black/MixedGirl5-7
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Aki and the FoxAkiko HayashiAkiko HayashiAki and her toy fox Kon make an adventurous journy to Grandma's House so that she can mend Kon's arm.Asian (Japanese)Girl4-7
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Homemade Lovebell hooksShane W. EvansHer Mama calls her Girlpie-a sweet treat, homemade with love. And when Girlpie makes a mistake, the lover of her mother and father lets her pick up the pieces and make everything right again. Shane W. Evan's resplendent artwork teems with "homemade love," one of the tender nicknames award-winning author bell hooks gives her young heroine.BlackGirl3-7
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Happy To Be Nappybell hooksChris Raschkabell hooks and Chris Raschka join together to create an exuberant, rhythmic, read-aloud celebration about the joy and beauty of "nappy" hair.BlackGirl3-7
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My Pop Pop and MeIrene SmallsCathy Ann JohnsonA young boy who loves to sniff the lemon whiff and to clink the dishes in the sink helps his Pop Pop bake a cake.BlackBoy4-7
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Mama Panya's Pancakes: A Village Tale from KenyaMary Chamberlin, Rich ChamberlinJulia CairnsOn market day, Mama Panya's son Adika invites everyone he sees to a pancake dinner. How will Mama Panya ever feed them all? This clever and heartwarming story about Kenyan village life teaches the importance of sharing, even when you have little to give.BlackBoy4-7
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The Hello, Goodbye WindowNorton JusterChris RaschkaThis is a love song devoted to that special relationship between grandparents and grandchild. The kitchen window at Nanna and Poppy's house is, for one little girl, a magic gateway. Everything important happens near it, through it, or beyond it. Told in her voice, her story is both a voyage of discovery and a celebration of the commonplace wonders that define childhood, expressed as a joyful fusion of text with evocative and exuberant illustrations.The world for this little girl will soon grow larger and more complex, but never more enchanting or deeply felt.Black/MixedGirl4-8
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The Village that VanishedAnn GrifalconiKadir NelsonYoung Abikanile and all of the villagers of Yao feel safe hidden deep within the African jungle. But word has come that the slavers are on their way! Abikanile looks to her mother and her grandmother for strength and guidance. These two brave women come up with a plan to fool the slavers and protect their tribe. But as the villagers retreat into the forest, Abikanile finds that she too has the courage to help her people stay safe and free.BlackGirl5-8
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Visiting LangstonWillie PerdomoBryan CollierIt's a special day when a little girl and her father go to visit the house where the great poet Langston Hughes lived-especially when the little girl is a poet herself! This rhythmic tale is a wonderful introduction to the work and world of Langston Hughes, who was a central figure of the Harlem Renaissance and an American cultural hero.BlackGirl4-8
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Into Mother's ArmsSharon JenningsRuth OhiA child describes the circle of her day, allowing us a glimpse into the loving and accepting bond that exists between a mother and child. Starting with breakfast together and followed by grocery shopping and a visit to the park, this lovely picture book shows a trusting relationship between a mother and her daughter. Told simply and with humor, Into My Mother's Arms will feel immediately familiar to children and adults alike. Sharon Jennings' text and Ruth Ohi's artwork offer a loving tribute to mothers and their daughters that is perfect for Mother's Day.Asiangirl3-6
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I Love Saturdays y DomingosAlma Flor AdaElivia SavadierSaturdays and Sundays are very special days for the child in this story. On Saturdays, she visits Grandma and Grandpa, who come from a European-American background, and on Sundays -- los domingos -- she visits Abuelito y Abuelita, who are Mexican-American. While the two sets of grandparents are different in many ways, they also have a great deal in common -- in particular, their love for their granddaughter. While we follow our narrator to the circus and the pier, share stories from her grandparents' pasts, and celebrate her birthday, the depth and joy of both cultures are conveyed in Spanish and English. This affirmation of both heritages will speak to all children who want to know more about their own families and ethnic backgrounds.Latino (Mexican-American)girl4-8
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Big JabeJerdine NolenKadir NelsonWhen a young slave named Addy goes fishing one spring day, she doesn't catch any fish. Instead, she finds a little boy in a basket floating in the river. Jabe is no ordinary boy: in a few short months, he grows to be a big, strong man with the strength of fifty. He can pick an entire field of cotton by himself in just one night and day. Why, he even has the power to turn a tired old workhorse into a young filly ready to race! When slaves begin to miraculously disappear from the Plenty Plantation, Addy knows in her heart that Jabe is the reason why.Black
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My Princess BoyCheryl KilodavisSuzanne DeSimoneMy Princess Boy is a nonfiction picture book about acceptance. With words and illustrations even the youngest of children can understand, My Princess Boy tells the tale of 4-year-old boy who happily expresses his authentic self by happily dressing up in dresses, and enjoying traditional girl things such as jewelry and anything pink or sparkly. The book is from a mom's point of view, sharing both good and bad observations and experiences with friends and family, at school and in shopping stores.boy
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AbuelaArthur DorrosWhile riding on a bus with her grandmother, a little girl imagines that they are carried up into the sky and fly over the sights of New York City. Two editions: English w/ Spanish phrases or in SpanishLatinogirl
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Earth MotherEllen JacksonLeo and Diane DillonEarth Mother awakes with the dawn. As she walks the land, swims the seas, and climbs the mountains, nurturing all of creation, she comes across
Man, Frog, and Mosquito. They each give her thanks for nature’s bounty,
yet can’t help but give her advice about making their lives better. Everybody’s got an opinion, it seems, and Earth Mother is amused when it becomes clear that the circle of life is not without a healthy dose of cosmic humor.
Black
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Shota and the Star QuiltMargaret Bateson HillFrancesca PelizzoliShota is a young Lakota girl who lives in a contemporary American city. When the block that her family and friends live on is threatened by development, they use long-standing Lakota traditions to find a solution that saves their homes. In working together, they create a beautiful quilt that resolves more than just their problem. This story weaves together traditional folktale values with modern concerns for the urban environment and green issues. In addition to the beautiful folk-style native art illustrations, the complete text of the story is presented in Lakota as well as English.Native American (Lakota)girl
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Bintou's BraidsSylvianne DioufShane EvansBintou wants braids. Long, pretty braids, woven with gold coins and seashells, just like her older sister and the other women in her family. But she is too young for braids. Instead, all she has are four little tufts of hair; all she ever gets are cornrows. However, when Bintou saves the lives of her two young cousins and is offered a reward of her choosing, Bintou discovers that true beauty comes in many different forms. Rich, earthy illustrations and a heartwarming story capture the spirit of a West African village in this wise tale about a girl who learns she's perfect just the way she is.Black (Senegal)girl
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The Streets Are FreeKurusaMonika DoppertThis book is based on the true story of the children of the barrio of San Jose de la Urbina in Caracas, Venezuela. Although the mayor promises the children a playground, they realize that they must build it themselves. And they do just that.Latino (Venezuela)
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Freedom On the MenuCarole Boston WeatherfordJerome Lagarrigue When four courageous black teens sat down at a lunch counter in the segregated South of 1960, the reverberations were felt both far beyond and close to home. This insightful story offers a child's-eye view of this seminal event in the American Civil Rights Movement. Connie is used to the signs and customs that have let her drink only from certain water fountains and which bar her from local pools and some stores, but still . . . she'd love to sit at the lunch counter, just like she's seen other girls do.
Showing how an ordinary family becomes involved in the great and personal cause of their times, it's a tale that invites everyone to celebrate our country's everyday heroes, of all ages.
Black
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Grandma's RecordsEric VelasquezEric VelasquezEvery summer, Eric goes to live with his grandmother in El Barrio (Spanish Harlem) while his parents work. Through the long hot days, Grandma fills her apartment with the blaring horns and conga drums of Bomba y Plena, salsa, and merengue-the music she grew up with in Puerto Rico-sharing her memories and passions with Eric.

But Eric sees Grandma in a new light when she gets them tickets to hear their favorite band in concert. The music sounds so different than it does at home on their scratchy records. And then the lead singer serenades Grandma right in front of the whole audience!
Latino/Black (Puertorican)boy
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The Butter ManElizabeth Letts and Ali AlalouJulie Klear EssakalliAs young Nora waits impatiently for her mother to come home from work and for her father to serve the long-simmering couscous that smells so delicious, her father tells her about his childhood in Morocco. During a famine, when Nora's grandfather had to travel far to find work and bring food for the family, her father learned the valuable life lessons of patience, perseverance, and hope.Moroccan (Berbers)
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Toussaint L'ouverture The Fight for Haiti's FreedomWalter Dean Myers Jacob LawrenceToussaint L'Ouverture was a freed slave who became general of a Haitian slave army that rose up against the French in 1791, liberating the country. These captivating illustrations by Jacob Lawrence, paired with text by Newbery Honor author Walter Dean Myers, open the doors to Haiti's early history.Black (Haitian)
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The PaperboyDav PilkeyA boy and his dog savour the silence of the early morning as they deliver papers.Blackboy
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Mama Bird, Baby BirdsAngela JohnsonRhonda MitchellJoshua and his sister watch a mother bird feeding its babies.Black
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Joy!Joyce Carol ThomasPamela JohnsonThroughout the year, a grandmother expresses her unconditional love for her grandson. The lyrical text is paired with reassuring and warm illustrations to make this a must-have on every child's bookshelf.Black
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Olu's DreamShane W. WilliamsIt's time for Olu to lie down in bed, for the little one to sleep, his dad just said. Though Olu would rather play and race, Not end the fun, or slow the pace. But as soon as Olu shuts those eyes, catch this—imagination flies!Biracial (Black/Asian)boy
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Little Rock NineMarshall PoeEllen LindnerThere are moments in every country's history when decisions are made and actions are taken that will change the course of that country's future. Turning Points historical graphic novels bring these moments in American history to life.

Sixteen-year-old William McNally and fifteen-year-old Thomas Johnson both live in Little Rock, Arkansas, in the summer of 1957. They both love baseball and teasing their little sisters. There's just one big difference -- William is white, and Thomas, the son of William's family's maid, is black. After the Supreme Court rules in favor of desegregating public schools, Little Rock Central High School prepares to enroll its first nine African-American students, and William and Thomas are caught in the center of a storm.
(Black)
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Bringing the Rain to Kapiti PlainVerna AardemaBeatriz VidalThe story of how Ki-pat ingeniously brings rain to the arid Kapiti Plain.Black (Kenya)
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Henry's Freedom BoxEllen LevineKadir NelsonA stirring, dramatic story of a slave who mails himself to freedom by a Jane Addams Peace Award-winning author and a Coretta Scott King Award-winning artist.

Henry Brown doesn't know how old he is. Nobody keeps records of slaves' birthdays. All the time he dreams about freedom, but that dream seems farther away than ever when he is torn from his family and put to work in a warehouse. Henry grows up and marries, but he is again devastated when his family is sold at the slave market. Then one day, as he lifts a crate at the warehouse, he knows exactly what he must do: He will mail himself to the North. After an arduous journey in the crate, Henry finally has a birthday -- his first day of freedom.
Black
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He's Got the Whole World in His HandsKadir NelsonKadir NelsonWhat began as a spiritual has developed into one of America’s best-known songs, and now for the first time it appears as a picture book, masterfully created by award-winning artist Kadir Nelson.Through sublime landscapes and warm images of a boy and his family, Kadir has created a dazzling, intimate interpretation, one that rejoices in the connectedness of people and nature.
Inspired by the song’s simple message, Kadir sought to capture the joy of living in and engaging with the world. Most importantly, he wished to portray the world as a child might see it—vast and beautiful.
Black
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We are the Ship: The Story of Negro League BaseballKadir NelsonKadir NelsonUsing an "Everyman" player as his narrator, Kadir Nelson tells the story of Negro League baseball from its beginnings in the 1920s through the decline after Jackie Robinson crossed over to the majors in 1947. Illustrations from oil paintings by the author.Black
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Thunder RoseJerdine NolenKadir NelsonThunder Rose vows to grow up to be more than just big and strong, thank you very kindly--and boy, does she ever! But when a whirling storm on a riotous rampage threatens, has Rose finally met her match?Blackgirl
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Ellington Was Not a StreetNtozake ShangeKadir NelsonIn a reflective tribute to the African-American community of old, noted poet Ntozake Shange recalls her childhood home and the close-knit group of innovators that often gathered there. These men of vision, brought to life in the majestic paintings of artist Kadir Nelson, lived at a time when the color of their skin dictated where they could live, what schools they could attend, and even where they could sit on a bus or in a movie theater.
Yet in the face of this tremendous adversity, these dedicated souls and others like them not only demonstrated the importance of Black culture in America, but also helped issue in a movement that "changed the world." Their lives and their works inspire us to this day, and serve as a guide to how we approach the challenges of tomorrow.
Black
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One Crazy SummerRita Williams-GarciaIn this Newbery Honor novel, New York Times bestselling author Rita Williams-Garcia tells the story of three sisters who travel to Oakland, California, in 1968 to meet the mother who abandoned them.

Eleven-year-old Delphine is like a mother to her two younger sisters, Vonetta and Fern. She's had to be, ever since their mother, Cecile, left them seven years ago for a radical new life in California. When they arrive from Brooklyn to spend the summer with her, Cecile is nothing like they imagined. While the girls hope to go to Disneyland and meet Tinker Bell, their mother sends them to a day camp run by the Black Panthers. Unexpectedly, Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern learn much about their family, their country, and themselves during one truly crazy summer.
Blackgirl
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P. S. Be EleventRita Williams-GarciaIn this sequel to One Crazy Summer, the Gaither sisters return to Brooklyn and find that changes large and small have come to their home.

After spending the summer in Oakland with their mother and the Black Panthers, Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern arrive home with a newfound streak of independence, and the sisters aren't the only ones who have changed. Now Pa has a girlfriend. Uncle Darnell returns from Vietnam a different man. But Big Ma still expects Delphine to keep her sisters in line. That's much harder now that Vonetta and Fern refuse to be bossed around. Besides her sisters, Delphine's got plenty of other things to worry about-like starting sixth grade, being the tallest girl in her class, and dreading the upcoming school dance (her first). The one person she confides in is her mother, Cecile. Through letters, Delphine pours her heart out and receives some constant advice: to be eleven while she can.
Blackgirl
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The Mighty Miss MaloneChristopher Paul Curtis“We are a family on a journey to a place called wonderful” is the motto of Deza Malone’s family.

Deza is the smartest girl in her class in Gary, Indiana, singled out by teachers for a special path in life. But the Great Depression hit Gary hard, and there are no jobs for black men. When her beloved father leaves to find work, Deza, Mother, and her older brother Jimmie go in search of him, and end up in a Hooverville outside Flint, Michigan. Jimmie’s beautiful voice inspires him to leave the camp to be a performer, while Deza and Mother find a new home, and cling to the hope that they will find Father.

The twists and turns of their story reveal the devastation of the Depression and prove that Deza truly is the Mighty Miss Malone.
Black
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Not Norman: A Goldfish StoryKelly BennettNoah Z. JonesNorman the goldfish isn’t what this little boy had in mind. He wanted a different kind of pet — one that could run and catch, or chase string and climb trees, a soft furry pet to sleep on his bed at night. Definitely not Norman. But when he tries to trade Norman for a "good pet," things don’t go as he planned. Could it be that Norman is a better pet than he thought? With wry humor and lighthearted affection, author Kelly Bennett and illustrator Noah Z. Jones tell an unexpected — and positively fishy — tale about finding the good in something you didn’t know you wanted.Blackboy
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Brown Girl DreamingJacqueline Woodsonn/aJacqueline Woodson, one of today's finest writers, tells the moving story of her childhood in mesmerizing verse.

Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child’s soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson’s eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become.
Blackgirl
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Promise of ShadowsJustina Irelandn/aZephyr Mourning has never been very good at being a Harpy. She’d rather watch reality TV than learn forty-seven ways to kill a man, and she pretty much sucks at wielding magic. Zephyr was ready for a future pretending to be a normal human instead of a half-god assassin. But all that changes when her sister is murdered—and she uses a forbidden dark power to save herself from the same fate.

Zephyr is on the run from a punishment worse than death when an unexpected reunion with a childhood friend (a surprisingly HOT friend) changes everything. Because it seems like Zephyr might just be the Nyx, a dark goddess made flesh that is prophesied to change the power balance. For hundreds of years the half-gods have lived in fear, and Zephyr is supposed to change that.

But how is she supposed to save everyone when she can’t even save herself?
Black (not human)girl
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Bud, Not BuddyChristopher Paul CurtisIt's 1936, in Flint, Michigan. Times may be hard, and ten-year-old Bud may be a motherless boy on the run, but Bud's got a few things going for him:

1. He has his own suitcase filled with his own important, secret things.

2. He's the author of Bud Caldwell's Rules and Things for Having a Funner Life and Making a Better Liar Out of Yourself.

3. His momma never told him who his father was, but she left a clue: flyers of Herman E. Calloway and his famous band, the Dusky Devastators of the Depression!!!!!!

Bud's got an idea that those flyers will lead him to his father. Once he decides to hit the road and find this mystery man, nothing can stop him--not hunger, not fear, not vampires, not even Herman E. Calloway himself.

Bud, Not Buddy is full of laugh-out-loud humor and wonderful characters, hitting the high notes of jazz and sounding the deeper tones of the Great Depression. Once again Christopher Paul Curtis, author of the award-winning novel The Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963, takes readers on a heartwarming and unforgettable journey.
Blackboy
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My Hands Sing the Blues: Romare Bearden's Childhood Journeyeanne Walker HarveyElizabeth ZunonA train journey in Romare Bearden’s childhood, inspired by one of his collage paintingsBlack
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GalimotoKaren Lynn WilliamsCatherine StockKondi is determined to make a galimoto -- a toy vehicle made of wires. His brother laughs at the idea, but all day Kondi goes about gathering up the wire he needs. By nightfall, his wonderful galimoto is ready for the village children to play with in the light of the moon.Black (Malawi)boy
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Harlem Stomp! A Cultural History of the Harlem RenaissanceLaban Carrick HillChristopher MyersHarlem Stomp! brings the Harlem Renaissance alive for young adults! Meticulously researched and lavishly illustrated, the book is a veritable time capsule packed with poetry, prose, photographs, full-color paintings, and reproductions of historical documents. With a forward from Nikki Giovanni.Black
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Seven Spools of Thread: A Kwanzaa StoryAngela Shelf MedearisDaniel MinterIn an African village live seven brothers who make family life miserable with their constant fighting. When their father dies, he leaves an unusual will: by sundown, the brothers must make gold out of seven spools of thread. If they fail, they will be turned out as beggars.Black (Ghana)
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Seven Candles for KwanzaaAndrea Davis PinkneyBrian PinkneyWith a rich, informative text and stunning four-color illustrations, this book will help young children to begin their own Kwanzaa celebration.Black
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Pecan Pie BabyJacqueline WoodsonSophie BlackallAll anyone wants to talk about with Mama is the new “ding-dang baby” that’s on the way, and Gia is getting sick of it! If her new sibling is already such a big deal, what’s going to happen to Gia’s nice, cozy life with Mama once the baby is born?
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I Had a Favorite DressBoni AshbumJulia DenosOpen up a fresh and stylish story about growing up and keeping hold of your favorite memories. As the year passes, the narrator’s favorite dress goes through a series of creative changes, from dress to shirt to tank top to scarf and so on, until all that’s left of it is a good memory. Assisted by her patient and crafty mama, the narrator finds that when disaster strikes her favorite things, she doesn’t need to make mountains out of molehills—she “makes molehills out of mountains” instead! Structured around the days of the week, the story is also illustrated to show the passing of the seasons, a perfect complement to the themes of growing older and keeping hold (and letting go) of special mementos.
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Rain!Linda AshmanChristian RobinsonOne rainy day in the city, an eager little boy exclaims, “Rain!” Across town a grumpy man grumbles, “Rain.” In this endearing picture book, a rainy-day cityscape comes to life in vibrant, cut-paper-style artwork. The boy in his green frog hat splashes in puddles—“Hoppy, hoppy, hoppy!”—while the old man curses the “dang puddles.” Can the boy’s natural exuberance (and perhaps a cookie) cheer up the grouchy gentleman and turn the day around?
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Underground: Finding the LIght To FreedomShane W. EvansShane W. EvansA family silently crawls along the ground. They run barefoot through unlit woods, sleep beneath bushes, take shelter in a kind stranger’s home. Where are they heading? They are heading for freedom by way of the Underground Railroad.
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The Market BowlJim AverbeckJim AverbeckYoyo has listened to Mama Cécile’s song about how to make ndolé (bitterleaf stew) her entire life—long enough to know how to make it herself, now that she is finally old enough. But slicing the bitterleaf, grinding the pumpkin, measuring out the shrimp—it just takes too long. Yoyo is confident that her variation on the stew will be good enough.
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Chandra's Magic Light: A Story in NepalTheresa HeineJudith GueyfierChandra and her sister Deena see a demonstration of a "magic light," a solar-powered lantern, at a market near their home in Nepal and are determined to buy one, knowing it will help their little brother's cough to stop using kerosene lamps. Includes facts about Nepal.
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My Brother CharlieHolly Robinson Peete, Ryan Elizabeth PeeteShane W. EvansA heartwarming story about a boy who happens to be autistic, based on Holly's son, who has autism.

"Charlie has autism. His brain works in a special way. It's harder for him to make friends. Or show his true feelings. Or stay safe." But as his big sister tells us, for everything that Charlie can't do well, there are plenty more things that he's good at. He knows the names of all the American presidents. He knows stuff about airplanes. And he can even play the piano better than anyone he knows.

Actress and national autism spokesperson Holly Robinson Peete collaborates with her daughter on this book based on Holly's 10-year-old son, who has autism.
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Green Is a Chile Pepper: A Book of ColorsRoseanne GreenfieldJohn ParraA little girl discovers all the bright colors in her Latino-American neighborhood.
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Hot, Hot Roti for Dada-JiF. ZiaKen MinAnnel's grandparents have come to stay, all the way from India. Aneel loves the sweet smell of his grandmother's incense and his grandfather, Dada-Ji, tells the world's best stories. This title features recipes which have useful pictures and easy-to-follow instructions.
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Maggie's ChopsticksAlan WooIsabelle MalenfantPoor Maggie struggles to master her chopsticks — it seems nearly everyone around the dinner table has something to say about the "right" way to hold them! But when Father reminds her not to worry about everyone else, Maggie finally gets a grip on an important lesson.
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The Granddaughter NecklaceSharon Dennis WyethBagram IbatoullineA mother shares with her daughter stories of the generations of women in their family as each individual has passed along the tales and a glittering necklace to her own daughter. Includes notes on the author's exploration of her ancestry.
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A Place Where Hurricanes HappenRenée WatsonShadra StricklandNatural and man-made disasters are becoming more commonplace in children's lives, and this touching free-verse picture book provides a straightforward account of Hurricane Katrina. In alternating voices, four friends describe their lives before, during, and after the storm and how, even though the world can change in a heartbeat, people define the character of their community and offer one another comfort and hope even in the darkest hours.
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Goldy Luck and the Three PandasNatasha YimGrace ZongIn this Chinese American retelling of "Goldilocks and the Three Bears," a careless Goldy Luck wreaks havoc on the home of a family of panda bears. She eats up the littlest panda’s rice porridge, breaks his rocking chair, and rumples all the blankets on his futon. When Goldy takes responsibility for her actions, she makes a new friend (and a whole plate of turnip cakes!) just in time for Chinese New Year.
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AbiyoyoPete SeegerMichael HaysPete Seeger's storysong "Abiyoyo" has delighted generations of parents and children. The tale of how a father with his magic wand and a boy with his music triumph over the giant Abiyoyo is based on a South African lullaby and folk story.
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Angelina's IslandJeanette WinterEvery day I tell Mama,
I want to go home.
Every day she tells me,
We are home, Angelina.
New York is home now.

Angelina's heart aches for Jamaica, and no matter how much Mama talks of having a better life in New York, Angelina still dreams about mangos, johnnycake, rainbow-colored birds, and the warmth of the sand under her feet. Then one day Mama sees something in the paper about Carnival in Brooklyn, New York, and she thinks she may have found a way to soothe Angelina's homesickness.

With vibrant colors that seem to dance right off the page, Jeanette Winter pays homage to Jamaica and the traditions of the West Indian people.
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Stitchin' and Pullin': A Gee's Bend QuiltPatricia C. McKissackCozbi A. CabreraMOTHER AND DAUGHTER, grandmother and granddaughter, aunt and niece, friend and friend. For a hundred years, generations of women from Gee’s Bend have quilted together, sharing stories, trading recipes, singing hymns—all the while stitchin’ and pullin’ thread through cloth. Every day Baby Girl listens, watches, and waits, until she’s called to sit at the quilting frame. Piece by piece, she puzzles her quilt together—telling not just her story, but the story of her family, the story of Gee’s Bend, and the story of her ancestors’ struggle for freedom
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I Like MyselfKaren BeaumontDavid CatrowHigh on energy and imagination, this ode to self-esteem encourages kids to appreciate everything about themselves--inside and out. Messy hair? Beaver breath? So what! Here's a little girl who knows what really matters.
At once silly and serious, Karen Beaumont's joyous rhyming text and David Catrow's wild illustrations unite in a book that is sassy, soulful--and straight from the heart.
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Art From Her Heart: Folk Artist Clementine HunterKathy WhiteheadShane W. EvansCan you imagine being an artist who isn't allowed into your own show? That's what happened to folk artist Clementine Hunter. Her paintings went from hanging on her clothesline to hanging in museums, yet because of the color of her skin, a friend had to sneak her in when the gallery was closed.With lyrical writing and striking illustrations, this picture book biography introduces kids to a self-taught artist whose paintings captured scenes of backbreaking work and joyous celebrations of southern farm life. They preserve a part of American history we rarely see and prove that art can help keep the spirit alive.
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Caribbean DreamRachel IsadoraWhere does sea meet sky?
Where does sound meet color?
Where does song meet soul?

Here is a place where children run, splash, and sing, on an island in the West Indies, in a world that is nothing short of magical. Rachel Isadora's glowing watercolors and lyrical, evocative text celebrate the things that make the Caribbean a very special home.
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The Little Painter of Sabana GrandePatricia Maloney MarkunRobert CasillaWhen Fernando's teacher tells him how to make his own paints, he knows how he'll spend his vacation. He'll make wonderful pictures with beautiful colors. But when the paints are stirred and brushes ready, Fernando has a terrible thought--he has no paper. Then he gets an idea that brightens his entire village of Sabana Grande.
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The DotPeter H. ReynoldsPeter H. ReynoldsHer teacher smiled. "Just make a mark and see where it takes you."

Art class is over, but Vashti is sitting glued to her chair in front of a blank piece of paper. The words of her teacher are a gentle invitation to express herself. But Vashti can’t draw - she’s no artist. To prove her point, Vashti jabs at a blank sheet of paper to make an unremarkable and angry mark. "There!" she says.

That one little dot marks the beginning of Vashti’s journey of surprise and self-discovery. That special moment is the core of Peter H. Reynolds’s delicate fable about the creative spirit in all of us.
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IshPeter H. ReynoldsPeter H. ReynoldsRamon loved to draw. Anytime. Anything. Anywhere.

Drawing is what Ramon does. It¹s what makes him happy. But in one split second, all that changes. A single reckless remark by Ramon's older brother, Leon, turns Ramon's carefree sketches into joyless struggles. Luckily for Ramon, though, his little sister, Marisol, sees the world differently. She opens his eyes to something a lot more valuable than getting things just "right." Combining the spareness of fable with the potency of parable, Peter Reynolds shines a bright beam of light on the need to kindle and tend our creative flames with care.
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Cherries and Cherry PitsVera B. WilliamsNo one can tell a story quite like Bidemmi. When she starts to draw, her imagination takes off. Enter her world, look at her pictures, and watch her stories grow and grow—just like the forest of cherry trees she imagines right on her own block.
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Poonam's PetsAndrew Davies, Diana DaviesPaul DowlingPoonam proves that even the smallest, shyest child can have important things to say.
79
Daisy Comes HomeJan BrettJan BrettMei Mei has the six happiest hens in China. She gives them treats and fresh hay baths, and when she calls to them-gu gu gu gu gu!-they all run to her as fast as they can. But one of the hens, Daisy, is not always so happy. The other hens pick on Daisy and push her off the perch every night, knowing that she is too small to stand up to them. Then one day Daisy accidentally drifts out onto the river in a basket and must quickly learn how to survive. When Daisy finds her way home, this plucky little hen is no longer afraid.
80
Soul Looks Back in WonderVarious, Tom Feelings, ed.Tom FeelingsIn this compelling collection of words and pictures, the voices of thirteen major poets, including Maya Angelou, Langston Hughes, and Walter Dean Myers, rise in response to the dazzling vistas and emotionally vivid portraits of award-winning artist Tom Feelings. A unique and moving collaboration that celebrates the sustaining spirit of African creativity.
81
Elena's SerenadeCampbell GeeslinAna JuanWho ever heard of a girl glassblower?
In Mexico, where the sun is called el sol and the moon is called la luna, a little girl called Elena wants to blow into a long pipe...and make bottles appear, like magic.
But girls can't be glassblowers. Or can they?
Join Elena on her fantastic journey to Monterrey -- home of the great glassblowers! -- in an enchanting story filled with magic realism.
82
Jazz on a Saturday NightLeo Dillon, Diane DillonLeo Dillon, Diane DillonIf you have ever been lucky enough to hear great jazz, then you will understand the pure magic of this book. Leo and Diane Dillon use bright colors and musical patterns that make music skip off the page in this toe-tapping homage to many jazz greats. From Miles Davis and Charlie Parker to Ella Fitzgerald, here is a dream team sure to knock your socks off. Learn about this popular music form and read a biography of each player pictured-and then hear each instrument play on a specially produced CD. What's the featured song? "Jazz on a Saturday Night," written and recorded to accompany this book.
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The East-West House: Noguchi's Childhood in JapanChristy HaleThe biography of the early years of biracial sculptor/designer/landscape architect Isamu Noguchi, focusing on his childhood in Japan and the building of an _east-west_ house that fostered his artistic inclinations and later gave shape to his lifelong creative approach.
84
The Chicken-Chasin​g Queen of Lamar CountyJanice N. HarringtonShelley JacksonMeet one smart chicken chaser. She can catch any chicken on her grandmother's farm except one - the elusive Miss Hen. In a hilarious battle of wits, the spirited narrator regales readers with her campaign to catch Miss Hen, but this chicken is fast as a mosquito buzzing and quick as a fleabite. Our chicken chaser has her mind set on winning, until she discovers that sometimes it's just as satisfying not to catch chickens as it is to catch them.
A fresh voice full of sass and inventive, bold collage illustrations full of surprises create a childlike escapade brimming with funny high jinks that leads the reader on a merry, memorable chase.
85
Africa Is Not A CountryMargy Burns KnightDemonstrates the diversity of the African continent by describing daily life in some of its fifty-three nations.
86
Oye, Celia!Katie SciurbaEdel RodriguezA little girl carries her favorite record with her to an impromptu neighborhood dance party and calls out for her favorite singer. “Oye, Celia!” she shouts. And as she dances she tells Celia what she hears in her singing—loss, passion, sadness, happiness, history, and more.

Oye, Celia! is a beautiful, rhythmic tribute to the Queen of Salsa—Celia Cruz. The personal telling, in a blend of English and Spanish, and the marvelously expressive illustrations will make this book irresistible to Celia’s many fans and even to those who aren’t familiar with her music.
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She Loved Baseball: The Effa Manley StoryAudrey VernickDon TateEffa always loved baseball. As a young woman, she would go to Yankee Stadium just to see Babe Ruth’s mighty swing. But she never dreamed she would someday own a baseball team. Or be the first—and only—woman ever inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

From her childhood in Philadelphia to her groundbreaking role as business manager and owner of the Newark Eagles, Effa Manley always fought for what was right. And she always swung for the fences.
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The House Baba Built: An Artist's Childhood in ChinaEd YoungLibby KoponenIn Ed Young's childhood home in Shanghai, all was not as it seemed: a rocking chair became a horse; a roof became a roller rink; an empty swimming pool became a place for riding scooters and bikes. The house his father built transformed as needed into a place to play hide-and-seek, to eat bamboo shoots, and to be safe.

For outside the home's walls, China was at war. Soon the house held not only Ed and his four siblings but also friends, relatives, and even strangers who became family. The war grew closer, and Ed watched as planes flew overhead and frends joined the Chinese air force. But through it all, Ed's childhood remained full of joy and imagination.

This powerful, poignant, and exquisitely illustrated memoir is the story of one of our most beloved children's illustrators and the house his baba built.
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Nelson MandelaKadir NelsonKadir NelsonOne day when Nelson Mandela was nine years old, his father died and he was sent from his village to a school far away from home, to another part of South Africa. In Johannesburg, Mandela saw fellow Africans who were poor and powerless. He decided then that he would work to protect them. When the government began to keep people apart based on the color of their skin, Mandela spoke out against the law and vowed to fight hard in order to make his country a place that belonged to all South Africans.

Kadir Nelson tells the story of Mandela, a global icon, in poignant verse and glorious illustrations. It is the story of a young boy's determination to change South Africa and of the struggles of a man who eventually became the president of his country by believing in equality for people of all colors. Readers will be inspired by Mandela's triumph and his lifelong quest to create a more just world.
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The Story Of Ruby BridgesRobert ColesGeorge FordPlease, God, try to forgive those people. Because even if they say those bad things, They don't know what they're doing."

This is the true story of an extraordinary 6-year-old who helped shape history when she became the first African-American sent to first grade in an all white school. This moving book captures the courage of a little girl standing alone in the face of racism.
91
Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.Doreen RappaportBryan CollierThis picture-book biography is an excellent and accessible introduction for young readers to learn about one of the world's most influential leaders, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Doreen Rappaport weaves the immortal words of Dr. King into a captivating narrative to tell the story of his life. With stunning art by acclaimed illustrator Bryan Collier, Martin's Big Words is an unforgettable portrait of a man whose dream changed America-and the world-forever.
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RosaNikki GiovanniBryan CollierShe had not sought this moment but she was ready for it. When the policeman bent down to ask “Auntie, are you going to move?” all the strength of all the people through all those many years joined in her. She said, “No.”

A picture book account of Rosa Park's historic choice.
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The People Could Fly: American Black FolktalesVirginia HamiltonLeo Dillon, Diane DillonA collection of 24 stories that kept the African culture alive during slavery.
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Esperanza RisingPam Muñoz Ryann/aEsperanza thought she'd always live with her family on their ranch in Mexico--she'd always have fancy dresses, a beautiful home, and servants. But a sudden tragedy forces Esperanza and Mama to flee to California during the Great Depression, and to settle in a camp for Mexican farm workers. Esperanza isn't ready for the hard labor, financial struggles, or lack of acceptance she now faces. When their new life is threatened, Esperanza must find a way to rise above her difficult circumstances--Mama's life, and her own, depend on it.
95
Drum, Chavi, Drum!/Toca, Chavi, toca!Mayra Lazara DoleTonelTun-TUN-dun-TUN! Even though nobody in her Cuban-American neighborhood thinks girls should play the drums, Chavi knows she was born to drum. And the whole world is her instrument: she drums on paint cans, sofa arms, even on her mother’s cheeks. Her favorites, however, are the tumbadoras, the conga drums that liven the Caribbean music she and her neighbors love. So, when she’s not picked to play on the school float for the festival on Miami’s Calle Ocho, she decides to do something about it!
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Gathering the Sun: An Alphabet In Spanish And EnglishAlma Flor AdaSimón SilvaIn simple words and sun-drenched paintings, Alma Flor Ada and Simón Silva take us into the fields and orchards, and into the lives of the people who work them. Simple poems in Spanish and English, one for each letter of the Spanish alphabet, describe the wonder of the vegetable and fruit farms. Together, the poems and the rich illustrations celebrate the glory of nature and the hearts of all who dedicate their lives to working the land.
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Elijah of BuxtonChristopher Paul Curtisn/aNewbery Medalist and CSK Award winner Christopher Paul Curtis's debut middle-grade/young-YA novel for Scholastic features his trademark humor, compelling storytelling, and unique narrative voice.

Eleven-year-old Elijah is the first child born into freedom in Buxton, Canada, a settlement of runaway slaves just over the border from Detroit. He's best known for having made a memorable impression on Frederick Douglass, but that changes when a former slave steals money from Elijah’s friend, who has been saving to buy his family out of captivity in the South. Elijah embarks on a dangerous journey to America in pursuit of the thief and discovers firsthand the unimaginable horrors of the life his parents fled--a life from which he’ll always be free, if he can find the courage to get back home.
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Raising DragonsJerdine NolenElise PrimaveraAfter all, dragons just happen to be perfect friend material.
Jerdine Nolen and Elise Primavera team up for the unforgettable story of a young girl and her best friend . . . a dragon.
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Rent Party JazzWilliam MillerCharlotte Riley-WebbWhen Sonny Comeaux's mother is laid off from work, he wants to quit school and earn their rent money. She refuses, but Sonny finds a solution. With help from a jazz musician, he throws a "rent party", where music raises the needed money. With colorful images, Rent Party Jazz tells of family, friendship, and the bonds that unite people.
100
The BraceletYoshiko UchidaJoanna YardleyEmi is sent with her family to an internment camp, and the bracelet from her best friend is the only reminder of their friendship.
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