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DraftJan 3rd VersionShorter CommentsLonger CommentsCommittee Comments
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111111111111111111111Many thanks to all of you for your work on this document, which seems to reflect many of the changes occurring in both academic librarianship and across higher education. I was encouraged and excited by this new approach to what used to be a standards document. Overall, I am in full support of this new approach, so most of my feedback is at a fairly granular level. Please know that the thoughts/suggestions below are intended to assist with improving the document, and are in no way meant as criticism. Overall: I love this approach, structure, and the ideas the document communicates. Strongly in favor of this draft and the direction the task force took. I am reading this Roles and Strengths document with two things in mind: 1) how it can help define and articulate what one does as an Information Literacy Coordinator, and, 2) how it can help an institution hire and mentor new teaching librarians being hired within the next few yeras. Will this document still be a Standard? Or, will it become a Guideline? Or, a Framework? This might seem like semantics but ACRL defines these differently and feedback is in part contingent on the kind of document it will be.Overall, I think it makes sense for ACRL to work on this revision in light of the adoption of the IL Framework and rescinding of the Standards. However, just as librarians complained that the Framework does not offer discrete, measurable goals in the way that the Standards did, I predict that ACRL will see the same pushback in the wake of this revision.

One compromise could be to keep the Standards for Proficiencies for Instruction Librarians and Coordinators as part of the “constellation” of documents, alongside Roles and Strengths of Teaching Librarians in Higher Education. The Standards for Proficiencies provides those concrete skills that some libraries likely depend on for their hiring, evaluation, and assessment processes. While I can see how some may view them as restrictive, that need not be the case. Pairing them with the more holistic Roles and Strengths is one strategy that might give libraries options about how they interpret the documents and customize them to best meet their own institutional needs.

That said, it concerns me slightly that ACRL seems to be on a trend of asking institutions to create their own goals, objectives, and standards. For instance, lines 121-127 seem to task libraries with articulating the skills that candidates for librarian positions will need to fill their role(s). It seems to me that the Standards for Proficiencies already does this. So what, exactly, is the Roles and Strengths document adding? What is it taking away?

Our current information landscape is one of proliferation and confusion. In this “post-truth” era, it seems unwise for ACRL to move further into the land of theory and conceptualization, without grounding this holistic, theoretical view with concrete examples articulating the skills that librarians (and learners) should be able to use.
Regarding the Roles and Strengths document, the roles are reasonable enough, although there is a lot of overlap between them, as acknowledged in lines 105-106. I disagree with the change in language from “instruction librarian” to “teaching librarian” for two primary reasons (and just to be clear – I don’t object to changing the title from “instruction librarian” to something else, but I disagree with changing it specifically to “teaching librarian”:

a. The term “teaching librarian” is very similar to the term “teacher librarian” which is used for K-12 education. Because the terms are so similar, “teaching librarian” will be strongly associated with “teacher librarian”, and we perform very different tasks, so we should have very different titles. This new term will also most certainly be confusing to people outside of higher education / librarianship.

b. By calling us “teaching librarians” a.k.a. “teachers”, our status in higher education automatically diminishes. Instructors in higher education are called “professors”, not “teachers”. To me, “teacher”/”teaching librarian” places us at a disadvantage to our peers. We should be promoting our titles, not demoting them. I realize that this point is very arguable, but this is just my opinion.

2. I also disagree with the change in terminology from “skills” to “strengths”. To me, a skill is a work-related responsibility that can be developed and continually improved upon. A “strength” is an innate personality characteristic that has already reached its maximum potential with no further development necessary. As librarians, one of our roles is “lifelong learner”. We should always be focused on improving ourselves, not settling for what we already have. When I think of “strengths”, I also think of “weaknesses”. If I were to speak with a faculty member about how I can assist them in the classroom, they want to hear about my skills, not my strengths (which implies strengths in my character, not my job duties). They also may wonder what my weaknesses are that I am not telling them about. I can’t imagine myself saying to a faculty member “We should collaborate on your assignment together because I have strengths that can help you.” No, I would definitely say (and prefer them to hear) “skills” instead of “strengths”. Also, speaking with faculty about my “strengths” could be taken as a conceited statement. Being conceited is not the impression I would like to leave them with. Looking over the draft, the “strengths” read to me like a list of skills, not strengths. For example, under the role of Instructional Designer, the first strength listed is “Analyzes the instructional environment, and targets instruction delivery towards appropriate audiences.” Analysis is a skill that is always evolving for the individual, not a strength that reaches a plateau of achievement. One issue I have with the phrase “teaching librarian” is that contractually at some universities & colleges librarians are non-teaching faculty. Being faculty, we must meet the same criteria for reappointment, tenure, & promotion as the teaching faculty. There are quite a few issues of parity for teaching & non-teaching faculty.


Also, there is a nationwide push for librarians to become embedded in various credited courses without any consideration of change in our non-teaching status & the parity issues. Talk about workload issues. Please remember that if teaching faculty teach during the summer and/or winter sessions-- they get paid above their annual salary.
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Roles and Strengths of Teaching Librarians in Higher Education
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Authored by the Standards and Proficiencies for Instruction Librarians and Coordinators Revision Task Force
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Members
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· Dawn Amsberry, Penn State, Member
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· Candice Benjes-Small, Radford University, member
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· Sara Harrington, Ohio University, Co-chair
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· Sara Miller, Michigan State University, Member and IS executive Board Liaison
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· Courtney Mlinar, Austin Community College, Member
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· Carroll Wetzel Wilkinson, West Virginia University, Co-chair
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1. Charge and History
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In 2014, the Standards for Proficiencies for Instruction Librarians and Coordinators Revision Task Force was charged "to update and revise the Standards for Proficiencies for Instruction Librarians and Coordinators document in accordance with the recommendations published in the report of the Standards for Proficiencies for Instruction Librarians and Coordinator Review Task Force."; The Review Task Force recommended that the new document adopt a contextual, holistic approach and wider vision which encompasses the roles and responsibilities of the instruction librarian within the academy, bridge the broader context and potential practical applications, and simplify the document. This new Roles and Strengths of Teaching Librarians in Higher Education document represents that revision. Major changes in the revision include language changes such as the shift from proficiencies to roles and from "instruction librarian" to "teaching librarian," a structural change from a list to a conceptual model, and an altered focus in the document from skills to strengths needed to thrive in each of the roles. This document uses the term "teaching librarian", which is defined as a librarian who teaches in various contexts and for whom different position descriptions (needs wordsmithing). The term "teaching librarian,"by which we mean a librarian who teaches, which could include librarians who have teaching or instruction as part of their full time responsibility or teach in any context, is used because the term is deemed broader and more participatory than"instruction," indicative of the importance of teaching and the broader educational goals held by librarians.In 2014, the Standards for Proficiencies for Instruction Librarians and Coordinators Revision Task Force was charged “to update and revise the Standards for Proficiencies for Instruction Librarians and Coordinators document in accordance with the recommendations published in the report of the Standards for Proficiencies for Instruction Librarians and Coordinator Review Task Force.” The Review Task Force recommended that the new document adopt a contextual, holistic approach and wider vision which encompasses the roles and responsibilities of the instruction librarian within the academy, bridge the broader context and potential practical applications, and simplify the document. This new Roles and Strengths of Teaching Librarians in Higher Education document represents that revision. Major changes in the revision include language changes such as the shift from proficiencies to roles and from “instruction librarian” to “teaching librarian,” a structural change from a list to a conceptual model, and an altered focus in the document from skills to strengths needed to thrive in each of the roles. This document uses the phrase “teaching librarian,” which is defined as a librarian who teaches in various contexts, and for whom teaching may be all or part of their professional responsibilities. This phrase is used because it is deemed broader and more participatory than “instruction,” which is indicative of the importance of teaching and the broader educational goals held by librarians.The phrase "more participatory" doesn't explain in what way "teaching" might be "more participatory" than "instruction," which left me wondering how exactly the committee viewed this idea and what was meant here...line 28 I had the same issue with the rest of that sentence, particularly the "importance of teaching and the broader educational goals held by librarians." Both of these phrases seemed rather vague to me, and while I understand the desire to have this document remain applicable to multiple contexts, the lack of specificity here seems to make this sentence less convincing. I don't know what the Task Force had in mind here, but maybe this whole sentence could be clearer in some way.Structural change from a list to a conceptual model [CM- I thought we changed this word from circular to conceptual]
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2. Approach
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The shift in focus in 2015 from the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education to the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (Framework) model prompted the Task Force to closely examine not only the proficiencies themselves but their structure and purpose. In the spirit of the Framework, the task force intended to present a more holistic perspective of the range of work done by teaching librarians rather than a list of skills needed to do a specific job.The shift in focus in 2015 from the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education to the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (Framework) model prompted the Task Force to closely examine not only the proficiencies themselves but their structure and purpose. In the spirit of the Framework, the task force intended to present a more holistic perspective of the range of work done by teaching librarians rather than a list of skills needed to do a specific job.he Task Force also wanted to provide a basic framework from which teaching librarian roles can continually expand within a variety of contexts. In short, this document was designed to act as a bridge between concept and practice. line 40- The first paragraph mentions a shift from skills to strengths, and yet the word "skills" is used here. Could this be "strengths" or "abilities" instead of skills? The change is subtle, yet if the intention is to reflect a move away from the "skills" focus, consistency might help with that. I love that you contextualize this revision within the shift from the IL Standards to the Framework for IL--so very relevant and helpful to do so.
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Teaching librarians have increasingly explored innovative and creative roles within their institutions, and the document is intended to reflect the myriad of activities, projects, and responsibilities that teaching librarians from a wide variety of institutions may find themselves taking on at different points in their work life and throughout their careers, as well as the characteristics and skills needed to flourish within these roles.Teaching librarians have increasingly explored innovative and creative roles within their institutions, and the document is intended to reflect the myriad activities, projects, and responsibilities that teaching librarians from a wide variety of institutions may find themselves taking on at different points in their work life and throughout their careers, as well as the characteristics and strengths needed to flourish within these roles. Tline 37“reflect” might need to be replaced with another word that acknowledges the variety of things librarians do. Suggestions: “take into account”; “consider”; “address” In line 37, the "of" after "myriad" should be removed ("the myriad activities, projects...") LOVE the use of the word "flourish" in line 40. line 40 “skills” needs to be replaced with something else considering that the new draft is trying to move away from skills.
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The Task Force also wanted to provide a basic framework from which teaching librarian roles can continually expand within a variety of contexts. In short, this document was designed to act as a bridge between the conceptual and operational.Task Force also wanted to provide a basic framework from which teaching librarian roles can continually expand within a variety of contexts. In short, this document was designed to act as a bridge between concept and practice.line 43- The term "operational" seems problematic here, at least for me. That term seems to suggest routine functions of the library, which may call to mind collection development, budgeting, opening and closing the library. If that is what is intended, then the term is fine here. My hunch, however, is that the focus here is meant to be what happens in the classroom or in other teaching situations. That focus does not seem to be reflected in the term "operational." line 43 “operational” has no previous mention. It introduces an odd dichotomy that sounds like a term used in business talk
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3. Context
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The changing higher education environment, in which discrete skill sets rapidly evolve, necessitates a broad set of concepts to describe the dynamic roles undertaken by teaching librarians. In keeping with the Framework, which provides "a cluster of interconnected core concepts…rather than any prescriptive enumeration of skills" the new Roles and Strengths document aims to construct broad and often overlapping categories within which teaching librarians operate, and identifies strengths needed to carry out the daily work within those roles.The changing higher education environment, in which discrete skill sets rapidly evolve, necessitates a broad set of concepts to describe the dynamic roles undertaken by teaching librarians. In keeping with the Framework, which provides “a cluster of interconnected core concepts…rather than any prescriptive enumeration of skills” the new Roles and Strengths document aims to construct broad and often overlapping categories within which teaching librarians operate, and identifies strengths needed to carry out the daily work within those roles.
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The following statement from the ACRL Board of Directors addresses the context of the challenges ahead for teaching librarians:
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At the 2016 ALA Midwinter Meeting in Boston, the ACRL Board of Directors took action to formally adopt the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. The Board also affirmed its intent to make a decision on the status of the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education at the 2016 ALA Annual Conference, according to the timeline established at the 2015 ALA Midwinter Meeting.The block quote in lines 54-63 is so incredibly helpful to highlight and bring to the fore, however, it is not directly cited in the draft. If this material will be in the final Roles and Strengths document (and I think the final document would benefit from its inclusion) I suggest you provide the direct citation of when and where the ACRL Board of Directors published this quote. EDIT: I just skimmed the bibliography section and see the direct citation is in fact included there, so that is good! So perhaps my suggestion here is instead to employ footnotes in the final version of this document, so direct quotes can be tied directly to their sources for the reader? This would be in addition to and supplementing the inclusion of a complete bibliography at the end of the document, as you have now.
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The roles of the teaching librarian in 2016 and beyond cannot be fully understood without engagement with the concepts, knowledge practices, and dispositions outlined in the Framework, which sets out "foundational ideas about the information ecosystem" in which librarians work and students learn. The teaching librarian's meta-role for students is coach, guide, and mentor as they navigate through this complex information ecosystem at different stages of their personal and cognitive development. Throughout all the roles presented in the new Roles and Strengths document, we see potential for improved student learning through application of the rich ideas and context of the Framework.The roles of the teaching librarian cannot be fully understood without engagement with the concepts, knowledge practices, and dispositions outlined in the Framework, which sets out “foundational ideas about the information ecosystem” in which librarians work and students learn. The teaching librarian works with students as coach, guide, and mentor as students navigate through this complex information ecosystem at different stages of their personal and cognitive development. Throughout all the roles presented in the new Roles and Strengths document, we see potential for improved student learning through application of the rich ideas and context of the Framework.line 67-68: The "meta-role" (and what exactly does that mean?) is described as being three things. Does that mean there is more than one meta-role? Or are there multiple facets of this role? Or does this mean something else? line 67 “meta-role” is unnecessary jargon
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The Roles and Strengths document will be launched while the changes brought about by the Framework are still in development and the status of the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education will be settled. Teaching librarians in the varied and diverse higher education environments will still need to integrate these changes to work with their library’s programs and constituencies.On lines 73-74, you indicate that the Information Literacy Competency Standards are still in the process of being settled -- it seems that, after ALA 2016, they are in fact settled. Just a small change to make when the document is complete.
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4. How the Document was Created
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disciplinary and curricular integration knowledge promoting consistency with the larger institution
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knowledge about online module creation and appropriate tools
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a range of teaching skills including a variety of formats and methods
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knowledge of outcomes, assessment, and scholarly communication
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The members of the Task Force began by collecting U.S. job postings for academic instruction or information literacy librarians from a six-month period. Postings were analyzed for emerging trends as well as examined quantitatively through the Voyant text analysis program. The Task Force also consulted recent literature related to job ads and academic standards, particularly Gold & Grotti's 2013 article, "Do Job Advertisements Reflect ACRL's Standards for Proficiencies for Instruction Librarians and Coordinators?: A Content Analysis." In a summary of their findings, the authors suggested "...that professional standards can provide additional guidance regarding specific competencies that go above and beyond the language of job ads." Identified trends from the literature and analysis of job postings included:The members of the Task Force began by collecting U.S. job postings for academic instruction or information literacy librarians from a six-month period. Postings were analyzed for emerging trends as well as examined quantitatively through word frequency using the Voyant text analysis program. The Task Force also consulted recent literature related to job ads and academic standards, particularly Gold & Grotti’s 2013 article, “Do Job Advertisements Reflect ACRL’s Standards for Proficiencies for Instruction Librarians and Coordinators?: A Content Analysis.” In a summary of their findings, the authors suggested “...that professional standards can provide additional guidance regarding specific competencies that go above and beyond the language of job ads.” Identified trends from the literature and analysis of job postings included: • disciplinary and curricular integration knowledge promoting consistency with the larger institution
• knowledge about online module creation and appropriate tools
• a range of teaching skills including a variety of formats and methods
• knowledge of outcomes, assessment, and scholarly communication

I would like more information about how I would like more information about how you quantitatively analyzed job postings (as referenced in line 82) -- did you count word frequency?
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collaboration with teaching facultycollaboration with teaching faculty
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ability to work with other librarians as teaching and learning trainers in concert with an increasing need for liaison librarians to teachability to work with other librarians as teaching and learning trainers in concert with an increasing need for liaison librarians to teach
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and an understanding of signature disciplinary pedagogies.an understanding of signature disciplinary pedagogies.
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Through discussions of these findings as well as the diverse experiences and institutional contexts among the members of the Task Force, the seven roles which form the framework of this document were developed: advocate, coordinator, instructional designer, lifelong learner, leader, teacher, and teaching partner.Through discussions of these findings as well as the diverse experiences and institutional contexts among the members of the Task Force, the seven roles which form the framework of this document were developed: advocate, coordinator, instructional designer, lifelong learner, leader, teacher, and teaching partner.
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This graphic illustrates the roles and indicates their interconnected and flexible nature. Librarians would not necessarily have all roles in their work. [see graphic in Word doc]
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5. Purpose of the Roles
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The purpose of the roles is to provide anchor points for which to conceptualize and describe the broad nature and variety of the work that teaching librarians undertake as well as the related characteristics which support librarians' thriving within those roles.These seven roles, which can and do overlap, are intended to help librarians to situate our individual work experiences within the broader work of academic libraries and within academic communities, as well as suggest creative new areas for expansion. The roles also are intended to assist in naming and situating some of the more abstract and unique situations in which librarians find themselves. In this way, the document is purposefully broad and encompassing. Just as the IL Framework is not intended to require librarians to touch upon every frame in every instructional situation, we did not intend that every teaching librarian would or should be working in every role described in the document. We anticipate that many librarians may find themselves identifying more strongly with certain roles over others based upon their positions, institutional contexts, and other factors.The purpose of the roles is to conceptualize and describe the broad nature and variety of the work that teaching librarians undertake as well as the related characteristics which enable librarians to thrive within those roles. These seven roles, which can and do overlap, are intended to help librarians situate our individual work experiences within the broader work of academic libraries and within academic communities, as well as suggest creative new areas for expansion. The roles also are intended to assist in naming and situating some of the more abstract and unique situations in which librarians find themselves. In this way, the document is purposefully broad and encompassing. Just as the IL Framework is not intended to require librarians to touch upon every frame in every instructional situation, we did not intend that every teaching librarian would or should be working in every role described in the document. We anticipate that many librarians may find themselves identifying more strongly with certain roles over others based upon their positions, institutional contexts, and other factors. line 105- "librarians' thriving within those roles" was confusing and felt forced. - line 106- Maybe consider changing "to help librarians to situate our individual work experiences" to "to help librarians situate their individual work experiences"
line 103 reword sentence to say: “The purpose of the roles is to conceptualize and describe the broad nature …” and line 105- “support librarians’ thriving within those roles” is an odd use of the possessive. Reword to something like: “… characteristics which support the success of librarians within those roles.” and line 106- “… to help librarians to situate our individual work experiences …” should read “… to help librarians situate their individual work experiences …”
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6. Intended Use
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This document is intended to help both clarify roles which may be assumed by a proficient teaching librarian as well as inspire new roles.This document is intended to help both clarify roles which may be assumed by a proficient teaching librarian and inspire new roles.line 119- Change "as well as" to "and"
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For hiring institutions, the roles can aid in thinking more specifically about what the institution envisions for teaching librarians in accordance with their mission, vision, and strategic objectives. While interviewing for new positions, the hiring committee is frequently asked to describe teaching librarian responsibilities. These questions are often answered as "teach information literacy sessions" or "coordinate instruction," but these answers do not define duties as well as roles. These descriptions can be clarified through identifying certain characteristics that are needed to thrive in specific roles.For hiring institutions, the roles can aid in thinking more specifically about what the institution envisions for teaching librarians in accordance with their mission, vision, and strategic objectives. While interviewing for new positions, the hiring committee is frequently asked to describe teaching librarian responsibilities. These questions are often answered as "teach information literacy sessions" or "coordinate instruction," but these answers do not define duties as well as roles. These descriptions can be clarified through identifying certain characteristics that are needed to thrive in specific roles.
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For individual librarians, units, or supervisors, the document can help with assisting teaching librarians with goal setting for projects, ideas, or professional development, and articulating how creative or unique work can reflect institutional priorities. The document can help librarians to clarify the major role or roles associated with their specific position in order to lend focus to their work and more clearly define their work to others. The roles can also serve as a template for thinking about possibilities for new or unique positions or as a means for re-envisioning and revitalizing educational responsibilities and roles.For individual librarians, units, or supervisors, the document can help with assisting teaching librarians with goal setting for projects, ideas, or professional development, and articulating how creative or unique work can reflect institutional priorities. The document can help librarians to clarify the major role or roles associated with their specific position in order to lend focus to their work and more clearly define their work to others. The roles can also serve as a template for thinking about possibilities for new or unique positions or as a means for re-envisioning and revitalizing educational responsibilities and roles.
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For future librarians, administrators, and instructors in LIS programs, the document provides a nuanced portrait of the range of possibilities and expectations for practicing teaching librarians.For future librarians, administrators, and instructors in LIS programs, the document provides a nuanced portrait of the range of possibilities and expectations for practicing teaching librarians.
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Finally, this document is both based in actual experience and aspirational in nature. It is not intended to be a comprehensive checklist of skills to be attained by every graduating LIS student, or to be fulfilled by a job applicant. It is neither realistic nor intended for any teaching librarian to fully embody all the roles or strengths in their current or desired position. Its intent is to help academic teaching librarians to identify and clarify areas of focus for professional development as well as identify new possibilities for collaboration, expansion, or creative projects.Finally, this document is both based in actual experience and aspirational in nature. It is not intended to be a comprehensive checklist of skills to be attained by every graduating LIS student, or to be fulfilled by a job applicant. It is neither realistic nor intended for any teaching librarian to fully embody all the roles or strengths in their current or desired position. Its intent is to help academic teaching librarians to identify and clarify areas of focus for professional development as well as identify new possibilities for collaboration, expansion, or creative projects.
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ROLESIt appears that the seven different roles are organized alphabetically (with the exception of "leader" and "lifelong learner"), but I would have liked them in a different structure. While I know not everyone's responsibilities build and develop in the same way, it seems like putting the teaching/teaching partner responsibilities at the beginning, and then segueing into instructional designer, leader, coordinator, advocate, and lifelong learner reflects the path that many teaching librarians take. Alternately, could you give us a visual to show us how you see the interchange of these seven roles? Obviously, each piece relates to and informs the six other components, but perhaps a diagram of how the committee sees these roles would be helpful (especially if they are listed in no ranked/sequential order). In the sections about the teaching librarian's role as "leader" and "lifelong learner," I think you very effectively frame these roles through the lens of teaching librarians -- however, in other sections, I feel like this connection could be made clearer. For instance, in the sections about "advocate," "coordinator," and "instructional designer," could you just reframe the first sentence of each paragraph to situate the teaching librarian in this context? In particular, the "instructional designer" section is somewhat unclear to me -- the second paragraph (especially lines 206-208) imply that the instructional designer in this case may not be a librarian, because they are working with librarians. I don't think this is what you mean... but I may be wrong. Emphasizing the link -- with a simple addition in line 198, such as "In teaching librarians' responsibilities as instructional designers, they create educational experiences through..." -- would clarify this point. Overall: Love all seven of these roles. I admit that on first glance I was worried to see COLLABORATOR missing, but upon reading I see this role is taken up under TEACHING PARTNER. I have some comments on this which I will share below.
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ADVOCATE
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Advocacy may involve persuasion, activism, encouragement, and support in many forms. A teaching librarian will need to be able to contextually situate information literacy and communicate its value across a range of audiences in the college/university community. Advocacy is required when working with library leaders and the college or university administration to promote and advance the Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education and the structure of the instruction program in the overall library organization.Advocacy by the teaching librarian may involve persuasion, activism, encouragement, and support in many forms. A teaching librarian will need to be able to contextually situate information literacy and communicate its value across a range of audiences in the college/university community. Advocacy is required when working with library leaders and the college or university administration to promote and advance information literacy, student learning, and the information literacy program within the overall library organization. line 155- While I certainly support the use of the Framework, I do not believe that is is part of my responsibility as a "teaching librarian" to "promote and advance" the Framework. Rather, my work involves promoting and advancing information literacy initiatives, and ultimately, advancing student learning.- and line 156- Change "instruction" program to "information literacy" program (as in line 173) : line 155- remove focus on Framework because the focus should be the instructional program. Reword to “… to promote and advance the structure of the instruction program…” and line 156- rephrase “instruction program” to “Information Literacy Program”
Page 4 (PDF version) under ROLES states that advocacy involves promoting and advancing the Framework. I believe this is counterproductive to good advocacy in that this means we are pushing the Framework document on other institutional stakeholders. Much better to promote and advance the “concepts from the Framework…”
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Strengths:
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Advocates for professional development opportunities and other forms of career advancement for teaching librarians.Advocates for professional development opportunities and other forms of career advancement for teaching librarians.
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Communicates the value of information literacy to campus library colleagues.Communicates the value of information literacy to campus library colleagues.
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Advocates for the library's role in student learning and development across the curriculum.Advocates for the library’s role in student learning and development across the curriculum.
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Partners with faculty to encourage information literacy within courses and within the curriculum.Partners with faculty to encourage information literacy within courses and within the curriculum.
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Engages with representatives of campus programs and initiatives to integrate information literacy into co-curricular activities.Engages with representatives of campus programs and initiatives to integrate information literacy into co-curricular activities.Regarding a strength for the Advocacy role (line 165-166) “Engages with representatives of campus programs and initiatives to integrate information literacy into co-curricular activities” – what might that look like?
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Promotes and advances information literacy standards to library leaders and campus administrators.Promotes and advances information literacy to library leaders and campus administrators.line 167- Given that not all institutions may have established information literacy "standards," the use of that word here is disorienting. A word like "initiatives" (as in line 187) might account for a wider variety of contexts. line 167- remove mention of standards; instead rephrase from “information literacy standards” to “information literacy initiatives” to match line 187 : In line 167, I suggest replacing the word "standards" with "learning goals" -- given the context in which this new document was developed, and the recent rescission of the IL Standards document, I believe including mention of this genre ("standards" here could lead to confusion. Plus, information literacy learning goals encompass more potential genres and sources of both inspiration and authority for this work than do information literacy standards (for instance, "learning goals" could include disciplinary guidelines, frameworks, curricular documents, and other document genres taken up in related fields and professions). Also, in the strength “Promotes and advances information literacy standards to library leaders and campus administrators” (line 167-168), does “standards” refer to some homegrown set of standards specific to that particular institution, or some other set of standards?
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Advocates for information literacy in relationship to student success in the context of institutional learning goals or learning outcomes.Advocates for information literacy in relationship to student success in the context of institutional learning goals or learning outcomes.
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COORDINATORCOORDINATOR:
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A coordinator leads, develops, and maintains a library and/or institution’s information literacy program. This role requires highly effective organizational and communication skills in managing multiple simultaneous projects, events, resources, assessment, statistical reporting and coordinating with administrators as well as academic departments.A coordinator leads, develops, and maintains a library and/or institution’s information literacy program. This role requires highly effective organizational and communication skills in managing multiple simultaneous projects, events, resources, assessment, statistical reporting and coordinating with administrators as well as academic departments.
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The coordinator must have diplomatic people skills and confidently navigate the politics of instruction - understanding the climate, culture and expectations of the stakeholders involved in the institution's information literacy objectives.The coordinator must have diplomatic people skills and confidently navigate the politics of instruction, understanding the climate, culture and expectations of the stakeholders involved in the institution’s information literacy goals.line 177- I’m not sure what you mean by “politics of instruction”? Do you mean the “academic politics surrounding instruction”? In line 179, I make a similar suggestion to the one above, to replace the word "objectives" again with "goals", for the same reasons described above.
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Strengths:
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Collaborates effectively and diplomatically, contributing to developing a welcoming culture of excellence in teaching, learning and student success.Collaborates effectively and diplomatically, contributing to developing a welcoming culture of inclusive excellence in teaching, learning and student success.The use of the word "welcoming" in line 181 animates my imagination so much--I love this! But it also brings to mind another term that is not explicit anywhere in this document, and it occurs to me that it perhaps should be: hospitality. That is, one strength of the teaching librarian is to cultivate an ethos of hospitality: as a teacher the teaching librarian cultivates this for learners, as a collaborator/teaching partner the teaching librarian cultivates this for fellow collaborators/disciplinary teaching partners, and as a coordinator and leader the teaching librarian cultivates this for other teaching librarians. I'd love to see this idea woven into the roles it makes sense to include it in--it doesn't have to use the word "hospitality" every time, but having hospitality mentioned at least once I think would strengthen the document greatly. Note as well that this not the same as the subserviant connotation "service" has developed over the years in librarian circles--let me know if you'd like me to comment on this further to distinguish what I mean from "service" as we traditionally construe it.
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Encourages, leads and empowers other teaching librarians in their professional development and workload management.Encourages, leads and empowers other teaching librarians in their professional development and workload management.
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Uses social intelligence and political savvy with highly developed, inclusive communication skills to navigate complex and sensitive situations.Uses emotional intelligence and political acumen with highly developed, inclusive communication skills to navigate complex and sensitive situations. line 177- Third Strength is a little confusing. Assimilate into 1st or 6th Strength I am not sure I understand the motivation to include language about “social intelligence and political savvy” in the strength on lines 185-186. I worry that featuring this sends a message that librarians have to connive to promote and defend IL, which undermines the credibility of information literacy as the “set of integrated abilities” it is defined as in the Framework.
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Collaborates in the development of campus-wide information literacy initiatives and goals and facilitates change while generating trust, support, and commitment from administration and faculty partners.Collaborates in the development of campus-wide information literacy initiatives and goals and facilitates change while generating trust, support, and commitment from administration and faculty partners.In the Coordinator section, one of the strengths seems overcomplicated. Lines 187-189 read “Collaborates in the development of campus-wide information literacy initiatives and goals and facilitates change while generating trust, support, and commitment from administration and faculty partners.” Could this be expressed in a more straightforward way? It seems to me to say, “Collaborates with administration and faculty to develop and support campus-wide IL initiatives and goals.”
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Creates and cultivates an environment of assessment and value for the information literacy program.Creates and cultivates an environment of assessment and value for the information literacy program.
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Maintains a consistent and effective information literacy program by leading amidst changes in administration, resources, and funding.Maintains a consistent and effective information literacy program by leading amidst changes in administration, resources, and funding. Also in that same section [Coordinator], lines 192-193 discuss maintaining the IL program, but miss an opportunity to include language about being open to innovation. I also think that there is a missed opportunity to mention knowledge of the curriculum here, an important point from the Standards for Proficiency that did not make it into this document.
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Assumes responsibility for assessment results, project management, and best practices for instruction programs.Assumes responsibility for assessment results, project management, and best practices for instruction programs.
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INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGNERINSTRUCTIONAL DESIGNER:
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The teaching librarian as instructional designer creates educational experiences through designing instructional materials, and developing learning outcomes, assessment tools and learning objects across diverse learning environments. Learning environments can include face-to-face, hybrid, and online classrooms. The instructional designer makes pedagogical choices appropriate to the educational environment, taking into consideration audience, culture, and accessibility dimensions.The instructional designer creates educational experiences through designing instructional materials, and developing learning outcomes, assessment tools and learning objects. Diverse learning environments can include face-to-face, hybrid, and online classrooms. The instructional designer makes pedagogical choices appropriate to the educational environment, taking into consideration audience, culture, and accessibility dimensions. line 198-202- The ideas in this brief paragraph do not seem clearly connected to one another, and thus readers may struggle to figure out how each of these ideas relate to one another. The sentence about diversity seems stuck in the middle, as though it were cut and pasted from another section. Each of these statements might be stronger if the ideas could be connected in some manner. lines 198-202- Ideas not are not connected. It seems like a list- first sentence could be reworded to say “…through the design of instructional materials and the development of learning outcomes…” and Second sentence (“diverse learning …”) could be incorporated into first sentence. “… tools and learning objectives to be used in diverse learning environment…” and line 202- the word “audience” is too passive; it makes it sound like the learners aren’t actively participating
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The instructional designer draws upon a solid understanding of learning theory, pedagogical practices such as backwards design, outcomes alignment and assessment methodology, as well as technical skill in creating digital instructional materialsThe instructional designer draws upon a solid understanding of learning theory, pedagogical practices such as backward course design, outcomes alignment and assessment methodology, as well as technical skill in creating digital instructional materials. line 205- “technical skill” should be plural -In line 204, I suggest the word "course" be removed so the phrase refers to "backwards design" instead of "backwards course design" -- my rationale here is that many librarians aren't applying instructional design principles to whole courses, but rather to individual classroom lessons, because not all of us teach credit bearing courses. Including the word "course" here runs the risk of alienating those of us who don't have the rich opportunity to develop whole courses, but still seek to develop ourselves as instructional designers.
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Communication and the ability to work collaboratively are also essential to this role. Instructional designers may work closely with both librarians and teaching faculty to design learning experiences that integrate information literacy and enhance instruction.Communication and the ability to work collaboratively are also essential to this role. Instructional designers may work closely with both librarians and teaching faculty to design learning experiences that integrate information literacy and enhance instruction.
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Strengths:
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Analyzes the instructional environment, and targets instruction deliveryAnalyzes the instructional environment, and targets instruction delivery towards appropriate audiences.
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towards appropriate audiences.
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Identifies learning needs of students, and creatively addresses identified needs across multiple contexts drawing on a repertoire of tools, methods, and theories.Identifies learning needs of students, and creatively addresses identified needs across multiple contexts drawing on a repertoire of tools, methods, and theories.
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Defines goals and outcomes for learning experiences.Defines goals and outcomes for learning experiences.
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Creates innovative and appealing lessons with supporting instructional materials aligned with and supporting learning outcomes.Creates innovative and appealing lessons with supporting instructional materials aligned with and supporting learning outcomes.
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Assesses the success and impact of learning experiences and makes appropriate adjustments to improve student engagement and learning.Assesses the success and impact of learning experiences and makes appropriate adjustments to improve student engagement and learning.
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Stays current with trends and innovations in learning and instructional technologies.Stays current with trends and innovations in learning and instructional technologies.
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LIFELONG LEARNERLIFELONG LEARNER:In the section on lifelong learning, I feel it would be valuable to make some mention of "job-embedded" or "work-situated" professional learning -- I think this kind of lifelong learning is what many teaching librarians participate in most often. This might fit in the point on lines 230-231 about participating in discussions around teaching. An overall comment on this role is that it feels a little underdeveloped in comparison to the others, though the strengths listed feel comprehensive for what this role is describing. In the description of the role, I notice the absence of the language of "developing oneself" and the idea of "continuous development and growth in learning and understanding" related to teaching and learning, pedagogy, and information literacy itself. The inclusion of the idea of "development" will provide a spot in this document for librarians to point to as evidence of the importance of professional development (which could help with funding and resources). While "professional development" is mentioned elsewhere in the document, its absence (by name) here under the lifelong learner role is conspicuous. And since you do have the room to develop this role a bit further (since it is considerably shorter than all the rest), I thought this might be a beneficial direction to develop it in.
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The teaching librarian as lifelong learner is curious, open, and flexible, seeking out new opportunities for continuous learning. Throughout their professional career, librarians maintain enthusiasm for teaching through reflective practice and exploration of new approaches to instruction. Lifelong learners are self-motivated in their pursuit of new knowledge, ideas, and experiences.The teaching librarian as lifelong learner is curious, open, and flexible, seeking out new opportunities for continuous learning. Throughout the professional career the librarian maintains enthusiasm for teaching through reflective practice and exploration of new approaches to instruction. Lifelong learners are self-motivated in their pursuit of new knowledge, ideas, and experiences. line 223- Consider changing "Throughout the professional career the librarians maintains enthusiasm" to "Throughout their professional career librarians maintain enthusiasm" line 223- Sentence should be rephrased to say “Throughout their professional career, librarians maintain enthusiasm…” In line 223, just a minor grammatical suggestion that the phrase "Throughout the professional career the librarian…" feels awkward. Might you employ the singular they/their here and make it "Throughout their professional career the librarian…"? Just a suggestion. :)
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Strengths:
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Pursues professional opportunities to improve and refresh teaching skills.
· Pursues professional opportunities to improve and refresh teaching skills.
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Maintains currency in both the areas of pedagogy and information literacy across disciplinesMaintains currency in both pedagogy and information literacy across disciplines. line 229- Should librarians only focus on literature specific to "library" instruction, or should they read literature across disciplines? Instruction literature from other disciplines can be equally (or even more) informative than the literature within our discipline.
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Actively participates in discussions on teaching and learning with colleagues online and in other forums.Actively participates in discussions on teaching and learning with colleagues online and in other forums.
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Demonstrates openness to implementing new ideas and new pedagogical practices and to exploring new instructional technologies.Demonstrates openness to implementing new ideas and new pedagogical practices and to exploring new instructional technologies.
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Participates in local, regional, or national professional associations.
Participates in local, regional, or national professional associations.
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