E-Consultation on SDG 10: "Reduce inequality within and among countries", to be reviewed at the HLPF 2019 under the auspices of ECOSOC (Responses)
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Inputs Received for E-Consultation on SDG 10: "Reduce inequality within and among countries", to be reviewed at the HLPF 2019 under the auspices of ECOSOC
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This file compiles inputs from MGoS on SDG 10, which will be under in-depth review at the HLPF 2019. Outcomes may contain advice, opinions and statements of various information providers. The United Nations does not represent or endorse the accuracy or reliability of any advice, opinion, statement or other information provided through this e-consultation. Our office reserves the right to delete any content/input that is not aligned with the United Nations Charter and/or the principles and purposes of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
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2. Name of Organization5. If you represent a major group or other stakeholder constituency, please indicate which one?6. Based on the evidence, and keeping the regional/local context in mind, what are the most effective ways to accelerate progress towards SDG 10? 7. Based on the evidence, and keeping the regional/local context in mind, where are the biggest shortfalls/gaps towards making progress towards SDG 10?8. How can one best leverage the interlinkages between SDG 10 and the rest of the 2030 Agenda?9. Can you share examples of effective models of multi-stakeholder engagement for the implementation of SDG 10?10. Please, add here any additional comment related to SDG 10.
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Maison des Organisations de la Société Civile (MOSC)Ngazidja
Non-Governmental Organizations
les moyens les plus efficaces sont: maintient de la paix, réduire le chaumage en développant des infrastructures pour la création des emploies.
les principaux manques et lacunes: esprit de création, esprit entrepreneuriat, présence de la corruption, éducation de qualité et adapter par rapport au contexte du pays. justice équitable, protéger les investissement juridiquement.
développement des infrastructures sanitaires, arriver dans un auto-suffisance alimentaire,
libre échange des produits commerciaux, échange des connaissances entre les pays développés, émergents et envoie de développement
l’égalité peut se trouver une fois, il y aura une equilibre d'emploi entre les pays.
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Amis des Étrangers au Togo: ADET
Non-Governmental Organizations
Le capitalisme a finalement créé un grand fossé entré les pays et entre les hommes. Pour renverser la tendance il faut que les pays riches développement plus de coopération avec les pays extrêmement pauvres, à revenue intermédiaire que les autres en respectant la dignité humaine et éviter la recolonisation. Les aider à se développer tout en développant des mécanisme de lutte contre la corruption pour l'État et un conseil de lutte contre la corruption pour la société civile et qui sera un guide et un contrôleur des actions de la société civile.
La volonté politique des pays riches et la volonté des pays pauvres à respecter la nouvelle donne
Quand les moyens financiers, les moyens technologies, les connaissances sont déployés dans les pays moins nantis avec une politique claire de redistribution, on assiste à une réduction de la pauvreté, de la faim et une promotion de la paix, de l'éducation, de la santé de tous. Amélioration du bien- être de tous: énergie pour tous, de l'eau pour tous, promotion du genre, promotion de la production et de la consommation, de l'écosystème, de l'océan.
Transparency international doit saisir les barons pour exemple.
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PARLIAMENTARY FORUM ON CLIMATE CHANGE-UGANDA (PFCC-U)
Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Local Authorities, Farmer, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
Most families and youths still have strong respect for religious leadership. we need to build the capacity in equality management using the religious structures.
Most rural parents have lost morale in educating children due to unemployment already evident within the graduate fraternity. This has created early marriages which negatively affects girls most. They are impregnated early with associated health problems, they cant competitively look for employment, their exposure levels are put on halt and their respective economic empowerment becomes difficult.
This question is not clear though.
Mobilisation mechanisms for stakeholder engagement needs to cater for local perspectives otherwise the use of political mechanisms demotivates the most affected from taking part.
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Caritas Ghana
Faith Based Organizations
1. Governments must balance their focus on Economic growth with distribution of national income.
2. Using the national budget process (appropriation) to target poorer social segments and geographical areas
3. Monitoring national implementation of the SDG principle of "Ensure no one is left behind"
4. Ensure that national social protection policies are available and working
1. Failure of national budget to prioritize poorer social and geographic segments
2. Weak implementation of national social protection policies
3. Weak data on poverty trends
1. Inclusive follow up and review processes
2. National monitoring of the implementation of the SDG principle of "Ensure no one is left behind"
1. Ghana has diverse social protection policies
2. Ghana has a provision in the national Constitution called "Directive Principles of State Policy" which seeks to guarantee equitable development and accountability for same.
Nil
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Chairman of Elmoustkbal organization for Media Studies
Non-Governmental Organizations, Media
Media censorship and press monitoring on the uneven standards of social justice as well as pressure on governments to achieve economic development and the protection of poor groups and social protection in addition to promoting investment and provide the requirements of social security for the lowest income.
Some governments do not care about less-income citizens and increase poverty in the world. Some laws do not guarantee the rights of lower-income groups.
Reducing poverty rates is the first way to achieve good education and provide quality health care, which will increase awareness and achieve the other goals of sustainable development.
Increasing the poverty rates in Egypt caused by social and political problems affecting citizens.
My CV:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/cg1294bvrireph5/Amro%20Selim%20CV.doc?dl=0
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FIACAT
Non-Governmental Organizations
States must commit to make the defense of vulnerable groups a priority. In this regard, civil society organisations play a key role in ensuring, through their reporting and advocacy, awareness on those issues. Creating a database with all cases of discrimination is a good first step to assess what are the issues at stake and measures should be taken.
Through their work, FIACAT and its grass root members have noticed that discrimination issues are very present in detention and in the application of the death penalty. In fact, it has been noted that many of the people detaineed come from underprivileged backgrounds. In addition, it has been recognized that the death penalty is discriminatory and mainly affects poor and/or discriminated against classes because of their ethnicity or "race", religious beliefs or sexual orientation and its use is inextricably linked to poverty. Social and economic inequalities affect access to justice for those sentenced to death for several reasons: the accused in such a situation of inequality often lacks the resources (social, economic, cultural but also power) to defend himself or herself and will most often be marginalized because of his or her social status.
Vulnerable groups are often the biggest victims of the lack of implementation of the other SDGs (for example: in education, in the justice system etc.)
Since 2014, FIACAT has been implementing a project on abusive pre trial detention. (APD).The APD project contributes to the implementation of ODD 10 by ensuring that the rules surrounding abusive pre-trial detention are strictly applied and respected for all without distinction of their financial means. In order to do so, FIACAT and its grass root members work in close collaboration with State representatives, prison staff and judicial staff as well as with other civil society representatives.
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UNSAS
Workers & Trade Unions
to reduce inequalities within the country it is necessary to develop the rural world, ensure the care of disadvantaged groups through social protection measures for example
les lacunes les plus importantes se trouvent au niveau des mesures de protection sociales qui ne sont pas étendues à tous surtout aux travailleurs de l'informel
Achieving SDG 10 contributes a lot to eradicating poverty and sustainable development
reducing inequalities between countries requires cooperation between countries and development aid
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ONG WIÑOY LEPAY KIMÜN
Women, Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, desarrollo de los pueblos indígenas en: educación, salud y cultura
mas y mejor educación.
agua, educación, salud, alimentación, vivienda, otros.
nacionalizar las aguas en chile, creando cursos de capacitación para adultos, mejorando la alimentación la salud se mejoraría sola. otros
cambiando la política de indap en vez de trabajar los quimicos rescatar las semillas nativas que aun quedan, fomentando su cultivo. la salud poder hacerla llegar a toda la población, creando cursos de capacitación para rescatar la soberanía alimentaria y fomentarla.
rescatar semillas nativas no trangenicas, no privatizar aguas, mas educación.
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Sukaar welfare organization
Women, Children & Youth, Farmer, Education & Academic Entities, Private Philanthropic Organizations
Yes YesYesYesYes
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AEST
Science & Technological Community
Implement ways of creating opportunities through smart intelligent trade such that they is distribution of essential resources at all levels in a way that have no harm or intellectual scientific enforcements.
Lack of knowledge in science and technology thus hindering development in humans.
Infrastructural development
The Dangote project in Nigeria which thus has reduced inequalities of many people who were employed and given decent salaries such that they can earn a standard of living through the implementation of the project.
Capital injection is required for full implementation of SDG 10 in all societies
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Gatef organization
Non-Governmental Organizations, Volunteer Groups
i will tell you at the attend
i have good ideas not nowat attendnot now
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Gamio
Persons with Disabilities
Ensure people with disabilities access to social protection, training, counseling, financial assistance, public housing and retirement programs
That the majority of people with disabilities continue to live in extreme poverty
Training for the most vulnerable
States should focus on education, training, fiscal, wage and social protection for vulnerable groups
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New Humanity
Non-Governmental Organizations
To Reduce inequality within and among countries, promote networks of collaboration by stakeholders at local, regional, and national levels within countries. Build bi-lateral relationships between countries at these levels.
Rapid and multiple changes during the last decade, has let to social depression and narrow mindedness, escalating conflicts and inequalities and has seriously undermined social cohesion at the local and regional levels.
Members of multi-stakeholder networks of people with a commitment of conscience, thought, and action on a personal and collective level will rank and address all the issues covered by the SDGs.
See final document of 2019 conference on co-governance. https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/8527c2_0d888da8011c4c97b240515e8b23e114.pdf
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Union of Education Norway
Union for teachers

To use the position we and other unions enjoy as social partners whereby we have a defined role in negotiations, discussions and decision-making fora. (We also believe that it is essential to involve and consult organisations representing differente professions)
In Norway it is a big shortfall that a national plan on how to reach the SDG is not elaborated. The work done to acheive the SDGs are in many instances ʺoutsideʺ the ordinary cooperation and organized work life.
As a union for teachers we see the other goals in light of education, and how we can contribute as a union. We believe it is important for an organisation to identify or see the goal of particular interest in light of the other goals.
Cooperation through social dialogue is discussed, but not implemented
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Make Mothers Matter
Women, Children & Youth, Mothers


2. Provide accessible, affordable and high-quality public services and infrastructures, in particular in the most disadvantaged and remote areas, with the explicit objective of addressing women’s “time poverty”. Water, electricity, energy, ICTs5, transportation, proximity childcare and healthcare are needed to significantly reduce the time spent on unpaid domestic and care work, and thus free up time for remunerated activities.
MMM fully agrees that the “time-money-agency conundrum” must be addressed as the main structural obstacle to further progress on gender equality.

1/Central to this conundrum is the issue of unpaid family care work that is the unequal distribution between men and women of the unpaid domestic and care work, which is essential to reproducing and sustaining families, and which in fact supports the whole economy and society as a whole.

2/Globally women still do 2½ times more unpaid care and domestic work than men. It isalso well established that when paid and unpaid work is combined, on average women work longer hours than men.
Yet, instead of being recognized and valued for combining thèse care and professional responsibilities, women continue to be penalized. Mothers especially encountersystematic discriminations and obstacles in hiring and promotion, and suffer wage discrimination linked to motherhood (the “motherhood pay gap”) and harassment.
3. Promote the equal sharing of care responsibilities between men and women, starting with paid paternity leave and shared paid parental leaves. However paternity leave alone will not do the job: it is the whole system that needs to be adapted to the new realities of fatherhood, including how boys are educated.
4. Promote diverse work and family life reconciliation policies accessible to all, including the right to request flexible working arrangements, to allow parents and other caregivers to access and stay in paid work. In particular, ensure regulations supporting quality part-time work and job sharing schemes that allow both men and women to adjust their workload to their family responsibilities; and reduce discrimination against part-time workers regarding career advancement, pay level, social security, pension rights, etc…
5. Caring and educating a child requires time! Take a life-course perspective and facilitate discontinuous career paths rather than linear ones, allowing men and women to withdraw from work partially or completely to care for their children or dependent relatives, and then re-enter the labor market without being heavily penalized.
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Asamblea 01/10
Non-Governmental Organizations
Progressive taxation, international cooperation and expand opportunities for disadvantaged groups
Tax cuts, corruption and lack of grassroots participation
Using the approach of inequalities for every sdg
Our asamblea in Mexico :)
No efforts from UN agencies addressing this goal
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cso
Non-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological Community, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
introduction of visible cheap solutions and formulas. a second-look on 3rd world technologies
for third world countries, Food.
ending hunger by introducing inexpensive technologies suitable for third world countries
for 3rd world countries nothing yet in the horizon
ending hunger is a must and a 2 dollar refrigeration & one dollar for carbon capture
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World Indigenous Teaching and Learning Centre Circle (WITLCC)
Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Education & Academic Entities, Families; Metis, Mestizaje; Environmental Health Practitioners,
Going back to WITLCC's presentation in 2007: Mandate (a) a range of contribution compensatory from the countries who benefit financially from the manufacture, cultivation and sale of products and goods that are were freely taken from people groups and their lands who are Autochthonous elsewhere be paid to the countries where the products or good originated; (b) a knowledge exchange in terms of travel, trade and paid employment; and/or (c) a form of knowledge "exchange" benefits.
The gap originates where persons and other organic and inorganic 'products' were taken without recompense from one place to another or from one people group by another such that the forms of poverty mentioned originated in the scientific, structural and cultural deficit/imbalance that was created.
* Mandated or voluntary tariffs from the 'developed' should pay for the non-development incapacities created by unfair and imbalanceed "exchanges". See our 2007 report.
*Advocate for a return complementary and alternatiave medicine that is natural to the people group and affordable in their local social economy as well as having spiritual benefits for the young and old alike.
*Which disabilities are preventable by any methods? By complementary and alternative "traditional methods"? What is the best way of acknowledgement and compensation that confers equal earning power. Which interventions are real and which are primarily money-making industries. The criminal justice and prison industries may be the greatest source of social disabilities - How can that expenditure be redirected to prevent the creation of incapacity and disability?
Despite overall declines in maternal mortality in most developing countries, women in rural areas are still up to three times more likely to die while giving birth than women living in urban centers.
*Design and implement an equivalating system for women's unpaid family work/homemaking work which is foundational for our society - for example, if a man earns $100K to support his family, shouldn't $50K of that automatically belong to his wife/helpmate whose support makes his earnings feasible?
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International Dalit Solidarity Network (IDSN)
Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Workers & Trade Unions, Business & Industry, Dalits
States must draw on the skills of Dalit civil society to raise awareness of the SDGs and set local indicators with civil society using accurate and disaggregated data. Monitoring and evaluation of these indicators should include participation of the Dalit community to ensure accurate results. Furthermore, States must disaggregate data by age, sex, disability, race caste, ethnicity, origin, occupation, religion or other economic status.

Specifically, States should ensure policy measures introduced towards socio-economic and political inclusion and promotion of gender, sexuality, caste, ethnicity and disability; increase the number of Dalits serving in the government; ensure constitutional guarantees for Dalits; enact/enforce anti-discrimination law; ensure that there are laws prohibiting manual scavenging and bonded labour; increase the action taken on complaints filed by Dalits; and increase the conviction rates for cases brought by Dalits. States should facilitate Dalit access to higher education institutions; regular, comprehensive household census; targeted budgetary provisions specifically for Dalits; increase the Dalit beneficiaries of major government schemes; increase the proportion of reservation policies in government jobs, especially for women; ensure fair and equal wages; and ensure Dalit’s cultural rights. Reducing inequalities will move towards socio-economic and political equity and erasing discriminatory mechanisms which propels inequality among the people.
Despite legislation to protect Dalit populations they are often subject to systematic discrimination both in the public and private sector. The unemployment rate for Dalits is consistently higher than that of the upper castes and it is continuing to rise. This is in addition to the loss of opportunities in the various state government areas. Although there is a quota system in many caste affected countries in the public, government and educational institutions, the positions are kept vacant. National development programmes have failed to reach the most vulnerable populations. A small fraction of Dalits have been able to escape from their ‘traditional role’ of manual scavenging, but often those with Dalit-sounding names are not even called for interviews.

With an agenda of ‘Leave No-one Behind’, the exclusion of Dalits and caste discrimination as a key factor of decent work means that this goal will never be achieved. Dalits are at the bottom of most supply chains in caste-affected countries and are forced to do the most menial, dirty and hazardous work. Addressing their labour rights in a business and human rights agenda is paramount. Furthermore, Dalits make up the majority of forced and bonded labourers in South Asia and still undertake the heinous task of collecting and removing human faeces from dry latrines, which still exist throughout India. This must end.
A state nexus with civil society, business, academia and citizens is paramount for any successful implementation of these goals. Therefore, civil society and government agencies should review domestic policy frameworks and processes to identify how they can facilitate effective implementation with the SDG.
Disaggregated data is crucial for each of the SDGs - data must be reflective of all major stakeholders within the State and collected at regular intervals. Monitoring of the implementation of the SDGs should be done by expert government officials with Dalit representation.

It is crucial that caste-based indicators are developed for each SDG as Dalits are affected by their caste in every aspect of their lives. The planning and implementation of the SDGs should focus on the intersectionalities of communities who face multiple discriminatory practices in order to reach those furthest behind. It is vital to address the importance of the intersectionalitites within the SDG model.
IDSN raises awareness of the SDGs and how they can be used to push for the improvement of Dalit’s situation throughout South Asia. IDSN helps local, grassroots members to engage with the SDGs by facilitating training on the SDGs, travel, joint submissions to the HLPF and joint sub-meetings in New York.
Excluding Dalits and caste discrimination from the SDGs means that these goals cannot be achieved.
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IndustriALL Global Union
Workers & Trade Unions
• a strong trade union movement is the most effective way to reduce inequality within and among countries
• the ILO's Decent Work Agenda could be an effective model to reduce inequalities, considering that employment remains the preferred means of distributing wealth
• sustainable industrial policies require (government) decision-makers to determine economic development strategies that fully account for the social and environmental dimensions
• equality (women, minorities)
• infrastructure - energy, water, transportation, communication
access to health care including
• unbiased reproductive information and health care for young people
• sustainable industrial policies must include strong social protection programmes, and Just Transition measures
• failure to recognize trade union rights
• corruption
• lack of opportunities for education, training
• market failure of the casino capitalist model
• tax avoidance
• grossly unequal distribution of wealth
• prioritizing ideology over science
• lack of information, suppression of information, disinformation
• repressive intellectual property laws, and a failure to transfer technology in any meaningful fashion to developing countries
• convince developed countries to accept the principle of shared but differentiated responsibilities
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Salesian Missions, Inc.
Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Persons with Disabilities
Identifying those being left behind. Mobilizing and empowering them. Strengthening Social Protection Policies, schemes and legislations.
Inadequate allocation of resources and non- implementation of policies, schemes laid out for social protection and non-compliances with legislations made to protect those at the receiving end of inequality.
The linkages help us identify LNOB constituency and can be used to bring into focus the human rights perspectives that should inform all efforts to achieve the goals.
Given the fact that Neo-liberal, market driven economy has been wholeheartedly embraced by the global community addressing inequality through state and corporate benevolence can never adequately address issue. It calls for those affected by the unequal distribution of power, resources and wealth to join hands with civil society that is committed to a just and humane world.
Goals 10 and 16 are the lynch pins of Agenda 2030. Loose them, we loose everything.
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FEDWASUN
Non-Governmental Organizations
Access to water
It is very for reaching to unreached, increasing gap, capacity development
Employment with good salary
Homestay tourism promotion in Nepal
Rights and practices of good governance
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MPIDO
Women, Indigenous Peoples
1. Increasing the voice of developing countries in global and regional negotiations to reduce the "bullying" by most developed countries
2. increase support of the independence of regional unions ( e.g. African Union) will enable them make decisions. currently the AU is influenced by external countries
1. The financial support by developed nations to Regional Unions / blocks and to developing nations makes the supporting nation influence and meddle in the affairs of the developing nation.
2. Globally, some developed countries (eg China) have a low recognition and respect to democracy, human rights and special groups rights.
A equal negotiation table at global levels enables developing nations to influence decisions and agreements that are favorable to their status. this will help hold the developed nations accountable for their effort towards the 2030 agenda.
At the UNFCCC, negotiating parties have an almost equal voice. this had realized notable global actions and agreements on climate change interventions.
China and Russia remain the biggest underminers of SDG 10.
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Lawyers' Association for human Rights of Nepalese Indigenous Peoples (LAHURNIP)
Women, Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Local Authorities, Workers & Trade Unions, Business & Industry, Volunteer Groups, Older Persons, Persons with Disabilities, Education & Academic Entities, Private Philanthropic Organizations
In Nepal, most of inequality term use for only gender inequality. It does not include caste base inequality. By one research more than 28%, indigenous peoples are in below poverty line. Being indigenous youth, indigenous women, and indigenous senior citizen facing multiples discrimination. Therefore, to reduce inequality, we have to dis aggregated each differentiation of the people such as youth, women, disability, and senior citizen as well as disadvantage indigenous groups.
There is not dis-aggregated data regarding indigenous peoples, which shows actual status of indigenous peoples. And helps to reduce inequality
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East Africa Trade Union Confederation
Workers & Trade Unions
Regional integration has played a central role in promoting equality within and among partner states
Developing countries have been signing trade agreements that have worsened the situation making them primary producers making growth of manufacturing sector difficult due to cheap imports. Also Most African countries are almost at the same level hence it is difficult to focus on competitive advantage for neighboring countries.
when the inequalities among and with countries are reduced then countries are on the playing level when it comes fully implementation of the SDGs. If not then countries will only focus on the SDGs they feel are of benefit to them.
None i know of
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Minority Rights Group International
Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
Empowering those most socio-economically excluded and marginalised – i.e. minorities and indigenous peoples – becomes a precondition for fulfilment of SDG 10, as recognised and agreed upon by all member states in target 10.2: ‘to empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status’. Not only is it impossible to achieve SDG 10 without specifically targeting minorities and indigenous peoples, prioritising those furthest behind is the single fastest and most effective way to significantly reduce socio-economic inequalities worldwide. Doing so, however, requires much stronger international efforts towards data disaggregation by ethnicity, caste, religion and language. Without a ‘significant increase’ in availability of ‘high-quality, timely and reliable data’ disaggregated by ‘income, gender, race, ethnicity, migratory status, disability, geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts’ by 2020 (target 17.18), the most vulnerable and marginalised groups will continue to be rendered invisible, becoming virtually impossible to reach. In this context, further data disaggregation efforts to facilitate prioritisation of those furthest behind is the most powerful mechanism to accelerate progress towards SDG 10 (and, as a matter of fact, all SDGs).
Given the socio-economic exclusion, marginalisation and discrimination suffered by minorities and indigenous peoples worldwide, one of the biggest obstacles hindering progress towards SDG 10 is undoubtedly the absence of disaggregated data by religion, ethnicity, caste, language and ‘other characteristics relevant in national contexts. Currently, there is a worrying mismatch between target 10.2: ‘empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status’ and indicator 10.2.1: ‘proportion of people living below 50% of median income, by age, sex and persons with disability’. Failing to disaggregate by ‘race, ethnicity, origin, religion and economic or other status’ (more than half the categories in target 10.2), indicator 10.2.1 hinders the tracking of progress by population category and intersection of categories. It is clear that the IAEG (Inter-Agency Expert Group) disappointingly retreated from the stronger language agreed by all member states in the targets, in terms of the data disaggregation requirements for the indicators. This is a collective failure that must be corrected by the IAEG if there is to be meaningful participation and involvement of socio-economically excluded ethnic, linguistic and religious minorities and indigenous peoples. In the absence of action, wide socio-economic inequalities will persist and SDG 10 will not be achieved by 2030.
If sustainable development is to reach all peoples everywhere, as advocated by the Leave No One Behind principle, the most marginalised communities must be prioritised. This is only possible by reducing worldwide inequalities through securing the meaningful participation for minorities and indigenous peoples in the development process, ensuring particularly that the free, prior and informed consent of indigenous communities is sought throughout. In essence, meaningful participation is key in addressing inequality, as it helps to identify and tackle the sources of exclusion and marginalisation, which in turn helps ensuring more effective implementation of the rest of the 2030 Agenda. Meaningful and effective participation should take place at all stages of development initiatives, including by providing the necessary information in ways that are accessible and relevant to all affected communities, including minorities and indigenous peoples, as well as involving them in measuring impact. If necessary, grievance mechanisms and any forms of redress should also be developed in meaningful consultation with all affected communities.
Minority Rights Group International (MRG) has been involved in the following multi-stakeholder processes relating to implementation of SDG 10:

UNFPA Fact sheet on Indigenous Women’s Health and Maternal Mortality, launched in 2018 and produced along with UN Women and UNICEF, drafted by MRG and Health Poverty Action. The Fact sheet presents disaggregated data on unequal maternal health outcomes for indigenous women across a range of countries. Available here: https://www.unfpa.org/resources/indigenous-womens-maternal-health-and-maternal-mortality

African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights, 'Ogiek v. Kenya' (2017). A landmark judgement affirming indigenous peoples’ customary land rights and right to development. The case involved the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights, the Ogiek People’s Development Programme (OPDP), MRG, as well as the Court and the Government of Kenya.

African Committee of Experts on the Right and Welfare of the Child (ACERWC) decision in 'Said & Yarg v. Mauritania' (2018). The ACERWC found that Mauritania’s authorities have failed to take adequate steps to prevent, investigate, prosecute, punish and remedy the widespread practice of slavery. The case involved the ACERWC, SOS Esclaves, Anti-Slavery International, MRG with the support of USAID and the EU. The case also involves the Government of Mauritania in terms of follow-up and implementation.
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Union to Union
Workers & Trade Unions
The core tools of trade unions, collective bargaining and social dialogue, are effective tools for reducing the income gap between individuals and groups. This since it addresses wage inequality as well as inequalities in the distribution of working time and access to jobs, training and career opportunities. Important is also the access to a comprehensive level of social protection, which specifically is linked to SDG 10.4. Social protection is crucial in order to ensure that people do not fall further into poverty and that no one is left behind in the development.
Ignoring the importance of decent wages and social protection policies, that undeniably may lift people out of poverty and thus reduce inequalities, can create major gaps in the progress towards this SDG.
When discussing inequality, it is also highly important to acknowledge that the shift from ‘informal’ to formal work can help lift huge numbers of people out of poverty and thereby reduce inequality. This since the incomes of informal workers tend to be below the average.
In order to make progress towards this goal, decent working conditions are needed, since this can create inclusive growth and social progress, thus creating a link between SDG 8 and SDG 10. Also, high and increasing levels of inequality in and between countries bear a substantial social and economic cost, such as poverty and gender inequality, why the fulfillment of this goal is important for the other SDGs.
An effective model of multi-stakeholder engagement for the implementation of SDG 10 is social dialogue and collective bargaining. This model bring stakeholders, such as employers and unions, into a dialogue which many times are about wages inequalities. This model are effective, since it is trying to achieve a democratic involvement among the main stakeholders, which could both reduce inequalities as well as create stable industrial relations.
Social dialogue can also be an effective tool for addressing gender inequality. For example, there are research who shows that countries with higher collective bargaining coverage and higher trade union density also have narrower gender pay gaps. Further, collective bargaining can also be used to prevent and address sexual and other forms of harassment and gender based discrimination at work, as well as a way to negotiate stronger maternity and parental leave policies, together with developed efforts to encourage men’s take up of leave. Social dialogue has also been used to improve the situation of women on the labor market through positive action and the creation of anti-discrimination measures, for example by creating incentives for employers to recruit women in sectors and industries where they are underrepresented. Several trade union actors, for example within the industry, have therefore used social dialogue through global framework agreements as a way to improve gender equality at the work place.
Women often have lower wages than men, and this needs to be prioritized in order to achieve SDG 10.
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Girls Not BridesWomen
Ensuring that a multi-sectoral approach is applied to development, with approaches to reducing inequalities aligned closely with other development priorities such as health, social protection and gender equality.

In addition, achieving progress towards SDG 10 requires a multi-stakeholder approach, including civil society, government, UN and intergovernmental agencies, and academia.
Child marriage tends to affect the most vulnerable populations, thus reinforcing inequalities across and within countries. A high prevalence of child marriage negatively affects economic, health and development outcomes of a country and perpetuates a cycle of violence and injustice, which in turn decreases a nation’s capacity to sustain democracy and stability. Girls who are married as children are less empowered, have little decision-making power within their households and communities and are less likely to participate fully in society.

In all countries, child marriage rates vary across regions. In some areas, the prevalence of child marriage may be much higher than the national average. These “hot spots” are often found among some of the most disadvantaged and vulnerable populations in the country and include high numbers of girls who are most at risk of child marriage, married girls, and girls who are simply the hardest to reach. These girls are often the most vulnerable - out of school, working as child labourers, at higher risk of being trafficked or exploited, or do not legally exist, because their births and marriages were never registered so they cannot access government services. Therefore reducing inequalities is critical in terms of ensuring these girls are not left behind in wide scale efforts to address child marriage in a country.
A lack of attention to child marriage undermined the achievement of six of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). We have since learned that child marriage is a core development and human rights issue, which hinders the achievement of many other development goals: half of the SDGs will not be achieved without significant progress on child marriage, including those related to poverty, health, education, nutrition, food security, economic growth and reduction of inequality, and other manifestations of gender inequality.
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International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD)
Local Authorities
The Mediterranean City-to-City Migration project (MC2CM) contributes to improved rights-based migration governance. MC2CM anchors migration governance to a process of urban planning addressing its policy recommendations: Urban Challenges and Opportunities for the Mediterranean Region.
Cities are called to innovate and develop solutions to empower migrants and host communities to realise inclusion and social cohesion, as enshrined in objective 16 of the Global Compact for Migration (GCM), and minimise the adverse and structural factors that compel people to leave their country of origin (Obj. 2). Through decentralised cooperation and networks they support social, political and economic changes fostering opportunities for all.
MC2CM contributes to more open and inclusive cities by drawing on migrants' potential to benefit cities and their economies. Evidence shows that local governments can contribute to SDG 10 by fostering social cohesion and more balanced territorial development. Local policies are the adequate level to implement the ‘leave no one behind’ principle, through people-centred, right-based approaches which are the founding principles of non-discrimination.
As key players, cities should be involved in developing and implementing migration-related policies and mechanisms established to ensure policy coherence and provide cities, within the remit of their competences, with the necessary role and resources to address opportunities and challenges of migration.
The conditions under which migration management takes place locally, often result in refugee and migrant communities being excluded from many of the opportunities cities can offer. Furthermore, migrants are disproportionately represented among vulnerable groups. Situations of migrants in cities are characterised by social exclusion, poorer housing conditions, discrimination and higher levels of unemployment than non-migrant populations. Furthermore, the degree of inclusion of migrants into cities and societies can be interpreted as a measure of how a society is able to generate and leverage opportunities for all.
Local authorities seek to ensure the well-being of their communities, through inclusive public policies directed at all inhabitants. As a result, although many of the services related to the inclusion of migrants and refugees are not within their competence, local authorities have an important coordinating role to play in their territory in the context of migrant and refugee inclusion.
Access to basic services is one key area where inequalities should be reduced in the first instance. MC2CM has identified gaps in access of migrants and refugees in access to the following services:
- labour market, entrepreneurship, and vocational training
- adequate and affordable housing
- health (including basic health services)
- education (language training, leisure activities, cultural interaction)
-social and political participation
-protection against discrimination
SDG 10 calls for, inter alia, facilitation of orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies. While managed primarily by national governments, migration manifests itself in cities as the places where people come together to live, work and find the opportunities sought.
Well-managed migration policies should be considered also from the local perspective, since local and regional governments are often requested, as first responders, to intervene within national frameworks, policies and resources that are not always adequately designed for the local level.
Reducing inequalities is linked to increasing opportunities and giving access to basic services for all as enshrined in 2030 and the New Urban Agenda. From the perspective of local authorities and in line with their role in migrants’ inclusion, implementing SDG 10 is directly connected to achieving SDGs that promote access to basic services: SDG 3, 4, 5, 8, 11.
The role of cities here is crucial, as 65% of the targets can only be achieved at local level. Local authorities represent thus the right level to leverage the interlinkages between SDG 10 and the rest of the 2030 Agenda locally and link it also with the effective implementation of other global Agendas such as the Global Compact for migration ( obj. 2, 7, 15, 16 and 17).
The Mediterranean City-to-City Migration (MC2CM) project contributes to improved migration governance at city level. It is implemented by a consortium led by the International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD) in partnership with the United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG) and the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat).
The project has thus far involved the cities of Amman, Beirut, Casablanca, Lisbon, Lyon, Madrid, Oujda, Rabat, Tangiers, Sfax, Sousse, Turin, Tunis and Vienna in a process of mutual learning and cooperation.
MC2CM has delved into the local context of each city by producing City Migration Profiles and Priority Papers validated by the city authority and stakeholders. This work has involved the international partners, local authorities and the local fabric in each city (comprised of public and private institutions as well as civil society). Dialogue with national level has been sought and encouraged in the spirit of achieving multi-level governance.
The project has also applied a regional approach to issues of interest through thematic events on the topics of relevance to local authorities, including: social cohesion, intercultural and interreligious dialogue; employment and entrepreneurship; human rights and access to basic services; refugees hosting; urban planning and housing; education; and inter-institutional coordination.
More examples and information available at www.icmpd.org/mc2cm
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Comision Hauirou
Women, Non-Governmental Organizations, Farmer, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
Government commitments, budget allocation, disclosure of SDG goals, inter-institutional coordination, alliances with the private sector, NGOs
Lack of commitment from governments, corruption, lack of planning, poor quality of public management (unadapted and ignorant officials of the SDGs)
Informing the population to demand compliance with the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs
The example of the women's movement. When it educates and informs, it also transforms.
Social inequality has its origins in the construction of State models,
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Unio
Workers & Trade Unions
The goals should be institutionalised nationally by way of a wide-reaching white paper as a first step towards a national plan for realising the sustainable development goals.
Further: The social partners must be involved in the planning, execution and evaluation of the government’s work on the UN’s sustainable development goals.
And: special parliamentary hearings on the realisation of the sustainable development goals should be held in connection with the presentation of the proposed annual budget.
• Weakness in coordination. Need of national plan.
• The sustainable development goals still not incorporated in education at all levels – from kindergarten to higher education – and enable the institutions to exercise this mandate.
• Cooperation through social dialogue is discussed, but not implemented
Highlight and emphasis on social dialogue.
Implement knowledge about SDG s in education om all levels. Intersectionality and interdiciplin in education embedded in practice
Focus on Just changes/transition and decrease wealth gap in society in general

• Ensure that the sustainable development goals are introduced to the social partnership.
• Use joint fora that bring together labour unions, employer organisations, civil society and business to highlight and strengthen the efforts to realise the sustainable development goals.
• co-operation with key social institutions such as research/educational institutions, museums, archives and libraries to reach the sustainable development goals.

• involve the local and regional level
• Social dialogue
• extensive financing.
35
SR Love & Care
Non-Governmental Organizations, Private Philanthropic Organizations, Healthcare
Replicable & development driven sustainable models (that can be scaled) are essential in effectively addressing disparity gaps. A focus on holistic (local) approaches & including those marginalized in development dialogue is necessary because it acts as a powerful catalyst for change. SR Love & Care advocates creating platforms to provide holistic solutions focusing on education and healthcare to those who have not been able to breakthrough the cycle of generational poverty. SR Love & Care recognizes one of the largest barriers for the underserved is access to resources which spirals into a vicious generational life cycle void of education, self-awareness and actualization and dismal physical and emotion health.
A deficit of the institutionalization of best practices exists that can potentially serve as a guide for local initiatives and a lack of opportunity for youth and young professionals to engage in decision making dialogue about their own societal status. SR Love & Care works to promote sustainable models that focus on inclusive access for the marginalized in over 50 cities worldwide with over 500 volunteers through the guiding principles of compassion. SR Love & Care believes in the inclusion of children, youth and young professionals as active participants in decision making as agents of change within their communities. Through it's holistic approach, SR Love & Care serves as a platform for civic engagement, capacity building and learning for youth and young professionals.

In addition, currently majority of development initiatives are not holistic in their approach. They solve one part of the problem. SR Love & Care provides medical care, but recognizes that it cannot work in a silo as a mere service provider by only addressing the physical needs and provides educational programs and addresses psychological needs of the marginalized along with education awareness.

SR Love & Care advocates a holistic approach to development to address emotional and spiritual dimensions along with the meeting the physical necessities.
SR Love & Care encourages member states to include civil society participants in national level boards and commissions so they can facilitate agenda setting and decision making and assist in creating or providing knowledge capital to the already established development initiatives. Further collaboration between the SDGs and the UN Agencies with civil society is advocated to leverage the inclusion of the people who are being advocated for is at the heart of sustainable development.
SR Love & Care advocates a model of active multi-stakeholder engagement by recognizing value inputs of the indigenous (tribal people) of the regions it services. SR Love & Care is guided by the principle that by gaining the trust of those who have lived in generational poverty and by including them in the dialogue and decision making, effective sustainable outcomes are achieved.

SR Love & Care recognizes the importance of private-public partnerships and through its initiatives is able to secure delivery mechanisms of social impact. SR Hospital provides medical care to those most vulnerable and excluded from the larger healthcare system and provides neonatal ICU platform to reduce infant mortality in the area (successfully by 30%). Similarly, SR Love & Care Education Trust guides children (most vulnerable segments of our population) in education from primary to university level to ensure social mobility; provides disability inclusion support to the disabled persons; and provides financial stability training through its FLOW (Financial Literacy and Opportunities for Women) program; and offers ancillary services (in education, nutritional & medical care) through mobile vans to teenage mothers. As partnerships through these initiatives provides support, they also assist in breaking the mental trust barriers (both personally and within families and communities.
Inclusion of the people who are being advocated for is at the heart of sustainable development.
36
Equipo de Relaciones Internacionales de CGT RA
Workers & Trade Unions
Empleo, educación y protección social deben ser los ejes para el logro de sociedades con justicia social.

Desarrollar políticas de ingresos que tiendan a reducir las desigualdades. En particular políticas que incrementen el salario mínimo y las trasferencias públicas a los sectores más vulnerados.

Promover políticas de empleo con eje en el Trabajo Decente contribuiría a la reducción de las desigualdades sociales y de género en las sociedades. Las políticas integrales para lograr la transición de la economía informal a la formalidad en los distintos países deben ser prioritarias.

Fortalecer las instituciones que sustentan el mundo del trabajo. El trabajo otorga al sujeto una identidad, un rol social y, sobre todo, un espacio de “ciudadanía”, en el sentido de “portador de derechos”.

Reformas progresivas de las estructuras impositivas de los países desde un enfoque de justicia fiscal.

Fortalecer y asegurar la provisión de bienes públicos, la seguridad, la educación, la salud y el medio ambiente y la igualdad de oportunidades constituyen los ejes para la reducción de la desigualdad en América latina y Caribe, tal como lo ha expresado la CEPAL (2018).

Establecer garantías para el acceso al conocimiento y facilitar los procesos de transferencia y acceso a la tecnología.

Consolidar pisos de protección social sustentables con garantías de acceso básicas en términos de derechos durante todo el ciclo de vida de las personas.
En la región, el aumento de la inequidad por la pérdida de la participación del ingreso del trabajo y de los trabajadores en las rentas nacionales plantea un serio desafío.

La desigualdad de ingresos entre los hogares y las personas se ha reducido apreciablemente desde principios de la década de 2000. Sin embargo, el ritmo de reducción se enlenteció en los años recientes: entre 2008 y 2014, del 0,8%, y entre 2014 y 2017, del 0,3% (promedio simple de los índices de Gini de 18 países de América Latina)

Desde 2014 el incremento de la participación de la masa salarial en el PIB se ha vuelto menos vigoroso como promedio de la región.

La informalidad es una dimensión que impacta considerablemente sobre la desigualdad, al dejar a importantes segmentos de la población fuera de la protección social.

Respecto del conjunto de países con información sobre la evolución de los salarios reales del empleo formal se observa una leve desaceleración de los incrementos interanuales. Esta desaceleración se concentró entre los países sudamericanos, entre ellos Argentina. ya que, en el promedio de la Argentina.

A nivel local, no se registran políticas recientes en términos fiscales ni de empleo por parte del Estado para la promoción del trabajo decente ni reducir las desigualdades generadas por la brecha de género.
Los avances que se alcancen sobre el ODS 8 relativo al crecimiento económico y el trabajo decente pueden contribuir también a lograr el ODS 10, reconociendo el rol central que tiene el Trabajo Decente a partir del ejercicio efectivo de la negociación colectiva en la participación de los trabajadores en los ingresos nacionales.

La reducción de la desigualdad también impacta sobre los progresos sobre el ODS 3 relativo a la salud en tanto la exclusión social tiene graves consecuencias en la salud de la población. Los contextos económicos y sociales ejercen una considerable influencia en el desarrollo de las enfermedades, su detección y tratamiento.

Los avances que se alcancen en relación al Objetivo 5 sobre igualdad de género y empoderamiento de la mujer contribuirán también a la reducción de la desigualdad de acuerdo al Objetivo 10.
La complementariedad productiva en los bloques regionales constituye un modelo efectivo para reducir las asimetrías en las regiones, tales como los fondos de cohesión del Mercosur.
Empleo, educación y protección social son ejes para el logro de sociedades con justicia social.
37
Comite de Juventud de CSI - Secretaria Relaciones Internacionales CGT RA
Workers & Trade Unions
Empleo, educación y protección social deben ser los ejes para el logro de sociedades con justicia social.

Desarrollar políticas de ingresos que tiendan a reducir las desigualdades. En particular políticas que incrementen el salario mínimo y las trasferencias públicas a los sectores más vulnerados.

Promover políticas de empleo con eje en el Trabajo Decente contribuiría a la reducción de las desigualdades sociales y de género en las sociedades. Las políticas integrales para lograr la transición de la economía informal a la formalidad en los distintos países deben ser prioritarias.

Fortalecer las instituciones que sustentan el mundo del trabajo. El trabajo otorga al sujeto una identidad, un rol social y, sobre todo, un espacio de “ciudadanía”, en el sentido de “portador de derechos”.

Reformas progresivas de las estructuras impositivas de los países desde un enfoque de justicia fiscal.

Fortalecer y asegurar la provisión de bienes públicos, la seguridad, la educación, la salud y el medio ambiente y la igualdad de oportunidades constituyen los ejes para la reducción de la desigualdad en América latina y Caribe, tal como lo ha expresado la CEPAL (2018).

Establecer garantías para el acceso al conocimiento y facilitar los procesos de transferencia y acceso a la tecnología.

Consolidar pisos de protección social sustentables con garantías de acceso básicas en términos de derechos durante todo el ciclo de vida de las personas.
En la región, el aumento de la inequidad por la pérdida de la participación del ingreso del trabajo y de los trabajadores en las rentas nacionales plantea un serio desafío.

La desigualdad de ingresos entre los hogares y las personas se ha reducido apreciablemente desde principios de la década de 2000. Sin embargo, el ritmo de reducción se enlenteció en los años recientes: entre 2008 y 2014, del 0,8%, y entre 2014 y 2017, del 0,3% (promedio simple de los índices de Gini de 18 países de América Latina)

Desde 2014 el incremento de la participación de la masa salarial en el PIB se ha vuelto menos vigoroso como promedio de la región.

La informalidad es una dimensión que impacta considerablemente sobre la desigualdad, al dejar a importantes segmentos de la población fuera de la protección social.

Respecto del conjunto de países con información sobre la evolución de los salarios reales del empleo formal se observa una leve desaceleración de los incrementos interanuales. Esta desaceleración se concentró entre los países sudamericanos, entre ellos Argentina. ya que, en el promedio de la Argentina.

A nivel local, no se registran políticas recientes en términos fiscales ni de empleo por parte del Estado para la promoción del trabajo decente ni reducir las desigualdades generadas por la brecha de género.
Los avances que se alcancen sobre el ODS 8 relativo al crecimiento económico y el trabajo decente pueden contribuir también a lograr el ODS 10, reconociendo el rol central que tiene el Trabajo Decente a partir del ejercicio efectivo de la negociación colectiva en la participación de los trabajadores en los ingresos nacionales.

La reducción de la desigualdad también impacta sobre los progresos sobre el ODS 3 relativo a la salud en tanto la exclusión social tiene graves consecuencias en la salud de la población. Los contextos económicos y sociales ejercen una considerable influencia en el desarrollo de las enfermedades, su detección y tratamiento.

Los avances que se alcancen en relación al Objetivo 5 sobre igualdad de género y empoderamiento de la mujer contribuirán también a la reducción de la desigualdad de acuerdo al Objetivo 10.
La complementariedad productiva en los bloques regionales constituye un modelo efectivo para reducir las asimetrías en las regiones, tales como los fondos de cohesión del Mercosur.
Empleo, educación y protección social son ejes para el logro de sociedades con justicia social.
38
ITUC
Workers & Trade Unions
- Implementing and enforcing a statutory minimum wage guaranteeing an income that allows people to live with dignity . Minimum wages should take into account the cost of living, should be evidence-based and regularly reviewed and adjusted. Real wage increases and social protection expansions can increase consumption and strengthen aggregate demand, boost productivity, contribute to the formalisation of work, and boost the economy whilst reducing inequality and creating a level playing field – without driving out investment.
- Multinationals at the top of the supply chain must respect fundamental rights and ensure fair pay and decent work at all levels across the supply chain. Cross border social dialogue and collective bargaining are essential to addressing wage inequalities across the supply chain. In this sense, international and regional wage coordination is needed to promote upward convergence on wages and take low wages out of competition.
- Robust equal pay legislation and effective enforcement is needed. Minimum wages and collective bargaining are equally important to close the gap.
- Social protection floors are essential tools in eliminating poverty, and driving factors in boosting employment, fostering skills development, formalising work (including the informal economy), reducing inequalities and achieving inclusive economic growth.
- Greater global coherence: IFIs are promoting wage cuts, reducing social protection systems, and cutbacks to vital public services.
- Working poverty remains a major challenge across the globe. Considering that the working poor account for more than 700 million people, meeting SDGs by 2030 will be impossible if this issue is left unaddressed. Implementing and enforcing a statutory minimum wage guaranteeing an income that allows people to live with dignity and is essential to reducing poverty. Furthermore, the decline in the wage share in many countries has contributed to deficiencies in aggregate demand, which has been detrimental for growth and employment at the national level as well for the global economy.
- The ILO estimates that only 29% of the world’s population enjoy a comprehensive level of social protection.
- The existence of an adequate fiscal space to support social policies and the elimination of tax havens, especially in times of crisis.
- The integration of national economies into global markets and the expansion of global supply chains have intensified competition and caused leading firms to cut labour costs through restructuring, outsourcing and off-shoring. This, in turn, has increased downward pressure on wages and working conditions. In a number of countries, these changes were accompanied by the deregulation of labour markets and a rollback in policy support for protective labour market institutions and collective bargaining.
Participation is a pillar of sustainability, and so it is recognised in the 2030 Agenda. In this light, social dialogue is a mechanism for participation that contributes to sustainability in many different ways. This process is one of the great challenges on the path to achieving decent work for all and more inclusive and sustainable societies, in line with the objectives of the 2030 Agenda.

Further information on the contribution of Social Dialogue to the SDGs: The contribution of social dialogue to the 2030 Agenda: https://www.ituc-csi.org/social-dialogue-for-sdgs-formalising-informal-economy
39
INternational Presentation Association
Religious Faith Based Communities.
Reduced inequalities between and with countries. Ireland has committed 0.56% of GNI to Official Development Aid (ODA) in the last budget and this has significantly increased our overseas commitment to reducing inequalities as they might persist abroad.
Equally for this refugees that have been offered sanctuary in Ireland from Syria (and indeed other countries) we have a favourable policy of bring the immediate relative of our re-homed refugee to Ireland should they so wish and in this way improving the lot of all who seek refuge in Ireland.
Our Direct Provision Centres (reception centres) are extremely divisive and those who seek asylum in ireland must reside in these centres for periods of up to 8 / 9 years awaiting a decision for leave to remain or work. Some children are born in Direct Provision and are therefore Irish by birth but with no entitlement to remain.
A greater emphasis by all in the SDG Agenda, from government, financing, education, civil society. We need to be led by the government properly in the SDGs or we are wasting our time.
We ,with Irish Foreign Aid have been extremely knowledgeable in obtaining the best possible value for money offered for overseas development.
Our PeaceKeeping Forces are busy at work around the world.
We need to address the homeless and those in Direct Provision now
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