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Job Title and DescriptionHow to Apply
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PhD Assistantship position in Tomato Genetics

Applications are invited for a PhD Assistantship position at the University of Florida (UF) in tomato genetics. The PhD student will lead and participate in research projects focusing on tomato genetics and its application in solving challenging problems in tomato production. A multidisciplinary team (genomics, bioinformatics, tomato breeding, and plant physiology) at the UF/Horticultural Sciences Department and Gulf Coast Research and Education Center will oversee projects.
To apply, send a cover letter, a full curriculum vitae, and email addresses for three references, in portable document format file(s) to Dr. Tong Geon Lee (tonggeonlee@ufl.edu). Dr. Lee mentors graduate students under Horticultural Sciences Department. Applicants will subsequently need to formally apply to the University of Florida for admission into appropriate departments. An anticipated enrollment is spring 2019.
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Graduate Student in Root Biology

A new position for an MSc or PhD student is available in Dr. Lorenzo Rossi’s plant root biology laboratory. The position will be affiliated with the University of Florida Department of Horticultural Sciences. Research will be conducted at UF/IFAS Indian River Research and Education Center (IRREC) located in Fort Pierce, Florida. Dr Rossi joined UF/IFAS at IRREC in early 2018, as the center’s first Horticultural Science Root Biologist. Dr. Rossi is known for his successful research experiments with fruit crop trees in Italy, North Carolina, and in Texas, where he evaluated genetic and environmental stresses on roots. His work with Florida citrus trees focuses on the roots, the first part of the tree to show symptoms of huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening infection. The accepted graduate student of root biology will conduct research on HLB-affected citrus tree roots. Research projects will include (1) growing citrus trees in greenhouse, (2) root system architecture analysis and (3) anatomical, physiological and molecular characterization of HLB infected roots. The candidate is expected to work in the laboratory as well as in the greenhouse and in the field. Strong interpersonal skills are required for a team-oriented root biology program.
Candidates with a strong background and hands-on experience (preferred) in plant biology, botany, and molecular biology are encouraged to apply. Applicants should have completed at least a BSc degree in a plant science related area (agronomy, plant biology, horticulture, soil and water sciences). Interested candidates for this position are encouraged to send an application, including a cover letter (maximum 2 pages with statement of interest), a curriculum vitae, a copy of transcripts, GRE scores (TOEFL/IELTS scores for international applicants), and the names of three references to Dr. Lorenzo Rossi (l.rossi@ufl.edu). The University of Florida (http://www.ufl.edu) is a Land-Grant and Sea-Grant institution, encompassing virtually all academic and professional disciplines, with an enrollment of more than 60,000 students
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PhD Assistantship in Passionfruit Breeding

Passionfruit (Passiflora spp.) production in southern Florida is worth $1.1-1.5M annually and is poised to expand, but is hindered by the lack of a formal germplasm trialing and improvement program. Passiflora species are valued for their aromatic, tropical fruits and beautiful flowers. The Florida passionfruit industry is primarily composed of ‘Possum Purple’, a hybrid between purple (Passiflora edulis f. edulis) and yellow (P. edulis f. flavicarpa) passionfruit types. This hybrid produces fruit with acceptable quality, but vines die from soil-borne pathogens anywhere from 3 months to 3 years after planting. Thus, most vines die too early to realize their full economic potential, and this leads to increased grower costs. In contrast, international commercial plantings can maintain productivity for 6-7 years before plant decline. Still, domestic production is favored due to increased air shipping costs and import restrictions on most passionfruit-producing countries. Further, while there is great potential for domestic passionfruit production, systematic breeding using modern phenotyping and genotyping methods is lacking in general. This proposal seeks to establish a modern passionfruit breeding program that is capable of responding to current and future industry needs and challenges both domestic and international.
This position will provide broad horticultural and applied plant breeding training. Close interaction with growers will be expected. Stipend is $22,000 per year and includes tuition, fees and research budget for four years pending satisfactory job performance evaluations. This position is located at the Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead, Florida, USA. Please contact Dr. Alan H. Chambers (ac@ufl.edu) with brief cover letter and CV if interested.
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