Accessibility compliance: Creating and selecting accessible course materials
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Creating and Selecting Accessible Course Materials
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Contact the IT and Web Accessibility Coordinating Group, accessibility@cio.wisc.edu. URL for this list: go.wisc.edu/accessible-course-materials.
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MATERIAL TYPESTEPS AND RESOURCESREFERENCES
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CAMPUS SERVICES
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Printed course packets.
Examples: Scanned printouts, PDFs, blogs, URLs, book chapters
1. Keep original files such as Word documents, electronic versions such as PDFs, and sources/URLs of originals.
2. Work with McBurney's Document Conversion Service and Library Course Pages.
http://www.mcburney.wisc.edu/services/documentconversion/facultytips.php
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Course reserves1. Keep original files such as Word documents, electronic versions such as PDFs, and sources/URLs of originals.
2. Create tagged PDFs. (See PDF resources below.)
3. Ask the library about Library Course Pages.
http://www.library.wisc.edu/lcp/
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Learn@UWThe Learn@UW (D2L) platform is quite accessible. The overall accessibility, however, depends on the accessibility of all the content you add to your courses, including audio, video, links, files, and reserves.
https://kb.doit.wisc.edu/luwmad/page.php?id=3236
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PDF (Portable Document Format)1. Make PDFs electronically from the original document rather than a scan, when possible.
2. Use tools such as Adobe Acrobat and Microsoft Office than can make tagged PDFs.
3. In Adobe Acrobat, test a file by choosing Advanced > Accessibility > Full check.
4. See how well your PDF reads in Adobe Reader or Adobe Acrobat with the Read Out Loud feature by choosing: View > Read Out Loud.
http://go.wisc.edu/accessiblepdf
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PDFs with images need alternative text.http://go.wisc.edu/accessiblepdf-images
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PDFs need a check for reading order.http://go.wisc.edu/accessiblepdf-custom
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PDF tipshttp://webaim.org/techniques/acrobat/
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Social media: Facebook, Twitter, etc.Accessibility of social media varies. Search for information on a site's accessibility or consult with DoIT Academic Technology
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Textbooks1. Ask textbook representatives what accessibility options they provide.
2. Select textbooks early to allow time for conversion when an accessible version isn't available.
3. When using e-textbooks, ask if the corresponding e-reader is accessible.
http://www.mcburney.wisc.edu/services/documentconversion/facultytips.php
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UW-Madison Google AppsGoogle apps accessibility, resources for developers and publishers, advocacyhttp://www.google.com/accessibility/
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Accessible GoogleDocshttp://accessibility.psu.edu/googledocs
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Google Apps for technical administratorshttp://support.google.com/a/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=2821355
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UW-Madison MoodleWatch development or forum pages for new features.http://docs.moodle.org/dev/Accessibility
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Video captioning (CC or closed captions)1. Select videos that already have captions when possible.
2. Keep any scripts that are created as part of the production/recording process.
3. Work with McBurney's Media Captioning Service if you have videos that are not available with captions and for further assistance.
http://www.mcburney.wisc.edu/services/captioning/mediaaccessibility.php
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Audio recordings (podcasts)1. Keep any scripts that are created as part of the production/recording
process.
2. Offer a text transcript.
3. If a transcript is not available, work with McBurney's
Media Captioning Service."
http://www.mcburney.wisc.edu/services/captioning/mediaaccessibility.php
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http://jod.id.au/tutorial/accessible-podcast.html
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Course websites1. Be sure all images and photos have alternate text.
2. Learn and work toward the other 15 Section 508 guidelines.
http://www.doit.wisc.edu/accessibility/
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Designing with web standardshttp://search.library.wisc.edu/catalog/ocn606572906
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Testing webpages with Wave.http://wave.webaim.org
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Testing webpages with the Functional Accessibility Evaluator.http://fae.cita.uiuc.edu/
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Writing alternate textDescribe photos and images. Skip alternate text for decorative elements.
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Writing tips from WebAIMhttp://webaim.org/techniques/alttext/
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Writing tips from the World Wide Web Consortiumhttp://dev.w3.org/html5/alt-techniques/#sec2Tips
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APPLICATIONS
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Adobe applicationsAccessibility resources for Adobe productshttp://www.adobe.com/accessibility/
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Adobe applications - Acrobathttps://admin.adobe.acrobat.com/_a295153/p16268622/
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Adobe applications - Flashhttp://webaim.org/techniques/flash/text.php
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http://www.adobe.com/accessibility/products/flash.html
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Microsoft Office (Word, Excel)1. Use styles (Heading 1, Heading 2, etc.) in the correct order to identify heading structure. Making tables of contents will be a snap as a result!
2. For each image, insert alternate text to describe the picture and its importance. In Word 2010, for instance, right-click an image or object, select Format, and then choose, "Alt Text."
3. Use the Accessibility Checker (File > Info > Check for Issues > Check Accessibility)
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-help/creating-accessible-word-documents-HA101999993.aspx?CTT=1#_Toc275414986
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Microsoft Office (PowerPoint)1. Use a unique title for each slide.
2. For each image, insert alternate text to describe the picture and its importance. Right-click the image or object, select Format, and then choose "Alt Text."
3. Use the Accessibility Checker (File > Info > Check for Issues > Check Accessibility)
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/powerpoint-help/creating-accessible-powerpoint-presentations-HA102013555.aspx?CTT=1
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WEB AND APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
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Websites, upgrading code with new ARIA roles for HTML5http://mcdlr.com/wai-aria-cheatsheet/
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Websites, quick testIllinois Information Technology Accessibility Act (IITAA) checklisthttp://www.dhs.state.il.us/iitaa/webaccessibilityquicktestchecklist.html
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Websites, generalDesigning with web standards, chapter 14, "Accessibility: The Soul of Web Standards"http://search.library.wisc.edu/catalog/ocn606572906
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Websites, developer testing extension, FirefoxOpenAjax Accessibility Extensionhttps://addons.mozilla.org/en-us/firefox/addon/openajax-accessibility-exte/
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Websites, developer testing extension, ChromeAccessibiity Developer Toolshttps://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/accessibility-developer-t/fpkknkljclfencbdbgkenhalefipecmb
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Javascript
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Cascading style sheets (CSS)Code for screenreaders allows a few accessibility features to be moved outside the page without interfering with the software to read pages aloud..screenreader { position:absolute; top:-1000px; left:-1000px; width:1px; height:1px; overflow:hidden; visibility:hidden; z-index:-1000; }

.hide-text { text-indent: 100%; white-space: nowrap; overflow: hidden; } /* Jeffrey Zeldman; may not collapse space in some browsers. */

.ir { font: 0/0 a; text-shadow: none; color: transparent; } /* Nicholas Gallagher */
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Mobile appsUse techniques from the W3C Web Accessibility Initiative.
http://www.w3.org/WAI/mobile/
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iPhoneSupporting the iOS Human Interface Guidelineshttps://developer.apple.com/technologies/ios/accessibility.html
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AndroidDeveloping and testing accessible appshttp://developer.android.com/guide/topics/ui/accessibility/apps.html
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JavaAn accessibility summary for Java from Oracle.http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/access/
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Perl
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Pythonhttps://wiki.gnome.org/Accessibility/PythonPoweredAccessibility
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