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1End Poverty
"People in very poor situations are told that there is no other life for them always...They accept the situation. This is very sad.This is why we need education from an early age."
(Male) Alcalá, Valle del Cauca, Colombia
“We were robbed at 8:35 last night. All young guys. I think if we had more sports equipment, or a fitness center, it might give guys who are into drugs and crime something more productive to do.”
(Male) Khayelitsha, South Africa
“Look at me! I’m 79 years old! I won’t be around much longer to look after them. Wait. Maybe I change my priority to education and more employment opportunities for my grandchildren.”
(Male) Gihembe camp, Rwanda"I wish that there were enough houses and families for everyone in the world."(Female) Madrid, Spain
My dream is for a world without poverty, where all children can go to school.
(Female) Nouakchott, Mauritania.
"My mother was the one who had to take care of my brother, sister and me. My key priority is ending poverty by ensuring decent jobs for everyone."
(Female)Lomé, Maritime, Togo.
"I have three sons,but they left me at an age when I cannot take care about myself anymore."
(Female) Yemen
When I turned 11, my parents told me: ok daughter, you don’t need to go to school anymore. I was the firstborn, so my new job was to become the babysitter for the six smaller ones. I have my own kids now.I’m doing everything I can to make sure that they go all the way to university, and get degrees.”
(Female) Kigali, Butare, Rwanda.
My parents were born in Cameroon. Three years ago I went back to visit our family over there.I saw people who didn’t have access to clean water and couldn’t afford a daily meal for the first time.
(Female) Mönchengladbach, Germany
If everything goes according to plan I will graduate next year and my plan is to start my own business afterwards. Hopefully this provides me with the means to support my family and to pay for the school fees of my younger brothers.
(Male) Cameroon
In Tanzania more than 40% of the food is left to rot. The supply chain in the country is too long and the farmer doesn’t get a fair price. So with our business we went to eliminate the the many middlemen while giving the producers a good price. We are also farmers ourselves, so we understand all the pain points. It’s not easy because the road infrastructure is poor and government support is minimal. When we started building a cold storage facility, the government suspended the construction for no obvious reasons. It delayed us, but we don’t give up. Youth entrepreneurs are like seeds that are planted in a desert with no water. It’s our battle to fight.
(Male) Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Young people in Uganda are facing challenges, especially those in the rural areas face serious unemployment issues. People finish schools, but they don’t find immediate employment. They just sit around waiting. I wanted to do something to employ more of my friends. Rural youth can be drivers of food security; they have the knowledge needed to modernize agriculture. Uganda has 60% of all arable land in East Africa. I set up my business to provide youth with the tools and knowledge needed to earn a living for themselves, and to contribute to a steady food supply.
(Male) Lugazi, Uganda
While I was at university there was an innovation challenge; that’s when my idea came to life. I’m from the rural areas where life is a struggle despite increased usage of GMOs and fertilizers. Most of these things come from the west. In 2015, the African agricultural sector was worth 50 billion dollars. By 2030 it will be 1 trillion dollars. But it’s not the Africans who benefit. In Uganda about 80% of the people work in agriculture. Yet, 64% remain poor or are vulnerable to poverty. They have little access to finance so they don’t grow. That’s the gap I stepped into: find ways to provide farmers with resources in a fair manner so that they are empowered.
(Male), Kampala, Uganda
"My country is suffering so I decided I will not just continue being a spectator."
(Female) Bad Godesberg, Bonn, Germany
“Fighting poverty is one of the most important challenges of our time. Equal resource allocation, equal welfare and social protection for all is a prerequisite for a sustainable and democratic society. Poverty is also a problem here in Sweden due to increasing inequalities between people. We are all responsible. It is about solidarity - and all of us must be prepared to lower our living standards to improve the situation for the poor and vulnerable.”
Male, Sweden
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2Zero Hunger
“I love coffee. Coffee is what keeps us all awake at night.. And when we get hungry then, coffee is our only food!”
(Male) Acala, Valle del Cauca
My biggest struggle on a daily basis: finding food..
(Male) Manila, Philippines
“I’m not from a wealthy place. I can tell you that there’s a lot of poverty in South Africa now, and a lot of hunger. I know what hunger does to people. Food is energy. Without it, you can’t do anything. You feel nauseous, and tired; you can’t focus in school, or at work.”
(Male) Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa"Because of my age, I don’t have all of my teeth - so I can’t eat just anything! I can’t eat rice, and that’s easy to buy here. I like my milk and porridge. Tell them that I need more porridge.”(Female) Gihembe camp, Rwanda
"You look all over the world and countries have problems with food. In some countries in Africa people do not even have enough food to fulfill their daily needs. In the place where I come from it is almost impossible to buy organic food - It is just too expensive."
(Female) Bidart, France
"Every year the price of food has been going, last year it reached a level that I cannot afford anymore. This has become the main concern facing my life as a humble villager."
Yemen
Young people in Uganda are facing challenges, especially those in the rural areas face serious unemployment issues. People finish schools, but they don’t find immediate employment. They just sit around waiting. I wanted to do something to employ more of my friends. Rural youth can be drivers of food security; they have the knowledge needed to modernize agriculture. Uganda has 60% of all arable land in East Africa. I set up my business to provide youth with the tools and knowledge needed to earn a living for themselves, and to contribute to a steady food supply.
(Male) Lugazi, Uganda
If people don’t have food, there will be crime and insecurity. Hunger is insecurity.
(Female), Buenos Aires, Argentina.
"Even though I am a German citizen now, my heart always longed to do something for my people of Iraq"
(Male) Bad Godesberg, Bonn, German
“More than 800 million people will go to bed hungry tonight. 800 million. The number is staggering. Poverty decreases. It gets better! And now, we and the other countries of the world have promised that hunger will be eliminated in 13 years. 13 is also a challenging number. But we will make it!”
Female, Sweden
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3 Good Health and Well Being
"My top priority is healthcare. It’s basically the right to life.When you’re living in fear, you’re just worried about survival.”
(Female) New York, New York
“My eyes have given me trouble for years and no one would help. I have no money. Finally, I ran into an old friend a few months ago, and he found this clinic for me and is taking care of everything.
(Male) Pereira, Risaralda, Colombia
"The minimum wage here is 8 lira and the doctor requires 800 lira for an appointment, well that’s just not possible for most of us."
(Male) Istanbul, Turkey"You know man, this place is behind. We have no hospital, not even a 24-hour clinic. The closest one is over 100 kilometers away. And do you know how many ambulances we have? One. "(Male) Pretoria, South Africa
"My mother died when I was only 12. My father was running around the clinic trying so hard to find a nurse or doctor to help but no one was around.I don't wish those days on anyone."
(Female) Bangkok, Thailand
“I was wounded during the genocide. The Survivor Fund used to pay for all of my hospital and doctor visits. But now that fund is dried up. For the time being I have no support.”
(Female) Mayange, Kigali, Rwanda
“I was born HIV positive. I was alone then, and excluded from almost everything. That was so painful. Once you go to the hospital and find out that you’re HIV positive, the first advice you get is to keep it secret. But if we live in shame and silence then HIV is going to keep spreading."
(Female) Kigali, Butare, Rwanda.
“If all you have around you is unhealthy fast food, how on earth are you going to be healthy? We have to find a way to make fresh, healthy food affordable and available to everyone.”
(Female) New York, New York, USA
One Sunday afternoon, I encountered a terrible, but not fatal accident as I was driving back home. The next morning my maid called and told me her son had died in that accident. He could have made it if his family had been able to pay for the expensive surgery. It was devastating and a wake up call for me. I did some research and found out that in Tanzania, of the 50 million citizens, 95% don’t have health insurance. Take Africa has a whole, and 97% has no health insurance. I brainstormed and realized that mobile phones can disrupt insurance because the penetration of it is as high as 70%. My solution has two powerful ingredients: everything is managed through a mobile policy management platform which cuts down the costs significantly, and we partner with an insurance provided and a telecom company who supports our USSD (Unstructured Supplementary Service Data). Slowly I’m changing the face of insurance in Tanzania.
(Female) Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
After I graduated I couldn’t really find a job so I worked as a freelance nutrition consultant. The hospital didn’t want to give me a permanent job which was frustrating. My clients would always give me the excuse that they couldn’t stick to their diet plans because there was no where to eat healthy food during lunch. I didn’t want to build my career as a freelancer and wanted to utilize my knowledge so I decided to start my own venture in providing healthy lunchboxes and catering services.
(Female) Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
I dropped out of school in class 4. I lived with my grandfather for three years. I admired his work and how he beat the metal into shape. It inspired me to follow in his footsteps, but with my own spin. I create solutions for the current day needs. I’ve made an environmentally friendly traditional stove, a windmill and a generator that doesn’t need fuel. All from scrap metal. When a sell a stove, I know a family will have a meal that need. When I see my windmill on a roof, I know it generates electricity for that household. It’s inspiring. That I dropped out of school has hold my business back, but I keep going. I always wanted to create my own airplane. So I designed and perfected a helicopter out of scrap metal. I flew for 200 meters at 10 feet high with a crowd of 10,000 people watching. It was amazing. Even now when we talk about it, I think about flying. It was a dream come true. The police wasn’t too pleased, but they were unable to arrest because the large crowd wouldn’t let them. Who knows maybe one day I’ll make helicopters in bulk.
(Male) Iten, Kenya
In Kenya menstruation is a taboo. We don’t talk about it at home or at school. In my family I’ve got older sisters and we would talk about it openly. It’s only when I went to high school that I discovered it’s not a topic people talk about. Even when you’ve your period, you don’t tell anyone; just suffer in silence. I thought my family was just dysfunctional. Years later when I visited a primary school, I was reminded of the inconveniences of being a school girl and having your period. In Kenya 900,000 girls miss school because of their menstruation. And 2.5 million school girls cannot afford sanitary pads. Menstruation obstructs them from obtaining quality education and it hinders their personal development. I wanted to impact their lives. Have an impact, generate revenue and give girls an equal opportunity. What’s better, I do it together with female inmates.
(Female) Nairobi, Kenya
"The most important thing for me is better healthcare. I belong to a medical group but it hardly helps."
(Female), Bogota, Colombia
I think we need a better healthcare system for regular people like me. The system is improving, basic things are free, although they take too long. But I still had to pay for this leg all on my own. It's plastic.
(Male) Colombo, Sri Lanka
I’m extremely unsatisfied with our healthcare. The public hospitals are all overcrowded, and the good doctors all work in the private hospitals anyway. When my daughters are sick, I want them to have the best care. But when the minimum wage here is 8 lira and the doctor requires 800 lira for an appointment, well that’s just not possible for most of us."
(Male), Istanbul, Turkey
My clinic has no doctor, and only one nurse. The government needs to add more staff. Last time I got there at 8 o’clock and I waited until 2 in the afternoon. When they finally saw me, of course they were rude and irritated with everyone. They’re overwhelmed.
(Male) Cape Town, South Africa
Generation Pep, GEN-PEP, is an organization that works to raise awareness and encourage commitment to the health of children and adolescents. “The ambition with Generation PEP is to encourage commitment and create change for children’s health. We are glad to have many strong partners from start, and our hope is for more to join”
Generation PEP and Prince Daniel of Sweden
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4Quality Education"I consider myself very fortunate that I come from two different worlds, two cultures".
(Female) Bad Godesberg, Bonn, Germany, Basma H.
“Schools don’t give any lessons on human values. We don’t teach our kids enough about respect, or goodness. We give a diploma, but there is no value behind it. In Colombia we have a proverb: If you educate the child, you will not have to correct the man.”
(Male) Alcalá, Valle del Cauca, Colombia
"Education allows you to dream, and it’s the only thing that no one can take away from you, because it’s completely in your mind."
(Female) Johannesburg, South Africa“I dropped out because of the genocide. Back then there were no education funds to pay for our school fees, so I just got married. My husband paid for my high school until 1992. He just never came home. By that point we had three small children, so of course finishing schooljust wasn’t a possibility.”(Female) Mayange, Kigali, Rwanda.
My parents are poor and didn’t have the money to send me to school. An older lady in our village became my sponsor when I was only six years old and still pays my university fees.My goal is to earn enough money so that I can become a sponsor as well.
(Female) Ending Poverty
When I turned 11, my parents told me: ok daughter, you don’t need to go to school anymore. I was the firstborn, so my new job was to become the babysitter for the six smaller ones. I have my own kids now.I’m doing everything I can to make sure that they go all the way to university, and get degrees.”
(Female) Kigali, Butare, Rwanda.
"My job is being a teacher and it frustrates me that 99 percent of my time goes to the standard curriculum. I am so afraid that my children - my student, don't find a job.We have to give both teachers and students more freedom. "
(Female) Bilbao, Spain
"When I was in school I had the feeling that the system tried to make a machine of me.The principles of our education system are a few hundreds years old and I think that the world is urgently in need of something new. "
(Male) Logroño, Spain
My mom didn’t have the opportunity to go to university because her family couldn’t afford it. And her mom before that couldn’t study. So I am kind of the first generation that has had this opportunity. This changed my potential to not only change my world, but the world we live in.
(Female) Sevilla, Spain
The education system in Morocco is not well organised. If I want to have a good career, I have to study in a private school and these schools are really expensive.I believe the education system should be more adjusted to the needs of the student instead of the other way around.
(Female) Marrakech, Morocco
How can you become a change maker? You should invest in yourself through non-formal education. Engage in social activities, volunteer at different organizations and go abroad. Impact your friends and your friends will impact their friends. This is the school of life and it will teach you more than your textbooks.
(Male) Marrakech, Morocco
Look at me! I’m 79 years old! I won’t be around much longer to look after my child and grandchildren. Wait. Maybe I change my priority to education and more employment opportunities for my grandchildren.”
(Male) Gihembe camp, Rwanda
My dream is for a world without poverty, where all children can go to school.
(Female) Nouakchott, Mauritania.
We need a better system of education. For me, education is directly linked with equality between men and women. Deep inside Anatolia, the situation for women is really terrifying, even by Middle East standards. Thousands of child marriages, hundreds case of suicide or homicide in the name of family honor. And the new educational system, 4+4+4, is increasing illiteracy and allowing girls to get married at even younger ages.
(Female) Istanbul, Turkey
Due to school fees, most refugee children can’t get passed Senior 6, and that’s a problem. I’m now in Senior 6 and I’m worried for the future.

Refugee youth who are out of school have formed gangs in the camp. And our sisters are getting pregnant. I’m worried I’ll fall into this crowd.
(Male) Gihembe camp, Rwanda
“If I could fix one thing here, it would be education. The schools for poor people teach you mostly that you have to stay where you are.Education is also having a family that teaches you to be hungry, and tells you that you can do bigger things.
(Male) Mexico City, Mexico
My focus is on education. Cameroon has pretty good rates of school attendance but the quality of the educational system terrible. I dream about a more equal world. In my opinion ending inequality starts with well educated young people.
(Male) Limbe, Cameroon
My family often tells me: "Stop studying, come and work on the farm to earn some money." I'm very worried about the other kids in the north of Ghana. The government officials in their communities don't motivate them to develop themselves and the teachers only teach them the local dialect. Together with some friends, I organize field trips to those rural communities, raising awareness among young children that there is an alternative."
(Male) Accra, Ghana
I have been deaf since I was one years old. It is very difficult to succeed in university. We need interpreters for our sign language and special adjusted curriculum.
(Female) Madrid, Spain
I like to read, and my favorites are history and romance novels. Sometimes I also buy work related books. I can go to the bookstore by myself, and buy a lot of the books I like.
(Person with intellectual disabilities) Male, Shenzhen, China
If the high school tuition is still so high, I can only return to my hometown to study.The 40,000 RMB sponsorship fee is too high. Migrant workers like us have contributed to urban development through our labor, why do we receive unequal treatment in return?
(Female) Guangzhou, China
Education will sustain you. Right now, we don’t have the money to go to school. Problems come from the “big hands” of this country, which are doing nothing for that.
(Female) West Point, Liberia
I am a proud Cameroonian and during my life I learned to have patience. We face many challenges as a country but I believe that we can overcome them once we get our educational system right. Currently it is too much oriented towards learning by heart rather then focused on developing the skills that are necessary to succeed in today’s society.
(Female) Limbe, Cameroon
The biggest challenge I face as an entrepreneur is my gender and age. Unfortunately, there are a lot of challenges because of my gender and age in Zanzibar. Men dominate almost everything in this society so it’s hard for them to see a woman managing everything. For example, when I went to the registrar office, they thought I was a student. Luckily the community believes in me and they show their belief in me by sending their children to my nursery. We started in 2014 and now we’ve got 53 children, and are providing underprivileged children with better prospects.
(Female), Zanzibar City
I dropped out of school in class 4. I lived with my grandfather for three years. I admired his work and how he beat the metal into shape. It inspired me to follow in his footsteps, but with my own spin. I create solutions for the current day needs. I’ve made an environmentally friendly traditional stove, a windmill and a generator that doesn’t need fuel. All from scrap metal. When a sell a stove, I know a family will have a meal that need. When I see my windmill on a roof, I know it generates electricity for that household. It’s inspiring. That I dropped out of school has hold my business back, but I keep going. I always wanted to create my own airplane. So I designed and perfected a helicopter out of scrap metal. I flew for 200 meters at 10 feet high with a crowd of 10,000 people watching. It was amazing. Even now when we talk about it, I think about flying. It was a dream come true. The police wasn’t too pleased, but they were unable to arrest because the large crowd wouldn’t let them. Who knows maybe one day I’ll make helicopters in bulk.
(Male) Iten, Kenya
"I can empathize with immigrant students because I could relate to the challenges of student life I faced when I came to Germany"
(Female) Bad Godesberg, Amal L.
“To me it is important that schools lay the foundation for people’s environmental consciousness early on. As a teacher, I do this by teaching sustainable development and allowing students to work in a creative, exploratory and fun way.
Female, Sweden
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Finally a change in the education framework. A keen supporter of STEM and NXPLORERS- FemaleLeave no one behind.
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5 Gender Equality
We need a better system of education. For me, education is directly linked with equality between men and women. Deep inside Anatolia, the situation for women is really terrifying, even by Middle East standards. Thousands of child marriages, hundreds case of suicide or homicide in the name of family honor. And the new educational system, 4+4+4, is increasing illiteracy and allowing girls to get married at even younger ages.
(Female) Istanbul, Turkey
“Women hold up half the sky. To solve our biggest problems, we need every resource and asset available. You would never leave half of your assets on the table in business, would you?”
(Female)Istanbul, Turkey
“I want a South Africa where there is true equality between men and women. What we have now is a country with the highest rape statistics in the world. As a woman here, I feel the danger just leaving the house.
(Female)Cape Town, South AfricaI got married to one of my relatives without my consent.I was under aged and my family did not prepare me for what was coming. This comes back to the customs and traditions, and also has to do with lack of awareness and illiteracy. After I got divorced, I decided to continue my education and to attend university. I have learned not to give up.(Female) Yemen
Men and women are different but equal. In our culture the wife is equal. I don't see a difference between a boy and a girl."
(Male) Cordoba, Spain
"Many women in my family are victims of abuse. Originally I am from the countryside and there, a lot of men still consider women as an object to feed their needs. Whether it is sex, cooking diner or taking care of the children. But my generation is more aware of the importance of equality between men and women.
(Female) Meknes, Morocco
Young girls here don’t always have the chance to go to school and when they do so there is very little to aspire for. From the very beginning their grandmothers impart them with the idea that they have to marry, give birth, work on the farm, sell their products, until the moment they themselves become grandmothers. Young women who inspire desire to be better everyday and want to bring change to this country!
(Female) Accra, Ghana
At the age of twelve something happened that changed my life. My father started beating my mother and there was very little I could do. It was a terrible time! I left school for a while to protect my mother and eventually it stopped. From that moment onward, I have become passionate about the empowerment of young girls and women. It’s on my mind from the moment I wake up till the very moment I go to bed.
(Female) Bitam, Woleu-Ntem, Gabon.
When I turned 11, my parents told me: ok daughter, you don’t need to go to school anymore. I was the firstborn, so my new job was to become the babysitter for the six smaller ones. I have my own kids now.I’m doing everything I can to make sure that they go all the way to university, and get degrees.”
(Female) Kigali, Butare, Rwanda.
“I had almost finished my degree in psychology when I was raped and got pregnant. I came back to my hometown in Calabria and everyone rejected me. I gave my baby up for adoption and went back to Rome. I didn’t have a place to stay so I slept on the streets. Some people stole my documents and belongings while I was sleeping. I called the police but they wouldn’t believe me—nobody believes a homeless person – so I got nervous and reacted fiercely. They sent me to an asylum for 6 months and then I was back again on the streets. I just want my life back and to be treated like a normal person. I don’t want pity, I want to finish my degree in psychology.”
(Female) Rome, Italy
I am fighting for gender equality for 8 years. Changing social norms is the only way to end up with a sustainable future for everyone.
(Male) Liege, Belgium
Don’t believe what they tell you. Women are just as capable as men. I’m going to be a doctor.
(Female) Mayange, Rwanda
my parents did not support me the same way they treated my brother.After my father passed away, my brothers took all that he left behind.My husband took everything I had, even my dignity, and left me alone with our two children and all his debt. I could not find justice.
(Female) Sana’a, Yemen
As a woman in a refugee camp I have no other choice than being strong.I don’t feel safe here at night, and people aren’t always what you think they are. Too often I’ve been disappointed.
(Female) Erbil Baharka refugee camp, Iraq
I live in a country where my blackness, my trans-ness and womanhood are under constant surveillance. These make living in this planet increasingly hard. From opening a bank account, getting your identity document issues, to navigating through public spaces – there is a strong culture that indulges on violence against transgender communities.
(Female) Cape Town, South Africa
I would say that equality between men and women is the most important. My mother and I are trying to keep this business going, but here it seems that the business world is a man’s world.
(Female) Galle, Sri Lanka
In Mexico, it is urgent to implement international programs for awareness on human rights and gender equality.The inclusion of women and men in terms of rights and responsibilities enables us to draw a line leading towards the benefits of humanity and between us as a people who live in this era.
(Male) Jalisco, Mexico
It’s men who dominate the households and it is boys who rule the schools. There is a lot of group pressure on us, especially when it comes to sexuality.Many of classmates, as young as 16, have dropped out because of pregnancies.
(Female) South Africa
In China, some men yell at or beat up women. Some women don't lift a finger at home and leave all the housework for the men to do. I don't think either is right. Men and women should be equal.
(Male) Heilongjiang, China
I lost my parents when I was very young. The person who raised me was my sister. It was tough. Here many girls are married before they finish their education or they drop out of school due to pregnancy. Girls are marginalized in this area. I’m proud that I can do something to help the community maintain their culture, but also accept change. I’m showing them that you can have a passion and take care of yourself economically. I can train these women on the differnet opportunities that are out there. I’ve found my passion in farming, but others can make jewelry, go to the market, do table banking. I also empower the boys. They need to be told what to do as well. No one in this area should get into drugs and drop out of school. In my entrepreneurial journey, what motivates me and keeps me going is the community. It has been working. When I started I had nothing, but now I’ve managed to make my own living. Young people around me are seeing that and coming to me. I don’t want Samburu to lose its culture. However, I do think that young women can participate and be empowered socially and economically. That’s the community I have in mind.
(Female) Maralal, Kenya
"I lost my parents when I was very young. The person who raised me was my sister. It was tough. Here many girls are married before they finish their education or they drop out of school due to pregnancy. Girls are marginalized in this area. I’m proud that I can do something to help the community maintain their culture, but also accept change. I’m showing them that you can have a passion and take care of yourself economically. I can train these women on the differnet opportunities that are out there. I’ve found my passion in farming, but others can make jewelry, go to the market, do table banking. I also empower the boys. They need to be told what to do as well. No one in this area should get into drugs and drop out of school. In my entrepreneurial journey, what motivates me and keeps me going is the community. It has been working. When I started I had nothing, but now I’ve managed to make my own living. Young people around me are seeing that and coming to me. I don’t want Samburu to lose its culture. However, I do think that young women can participate and be empowered socially and economically. That’s the community I have in mind"
(Female) Maralal, Kenya
In Kenya menstruation is a taboo. We don’t talk about it at home or at school. In my family I’ve got older sisters and we would talk about it openly. It’s only when I went to high school that I discovered it’s not a topic people talk about. Even when you’ve your period, you don’t tell anyone; just suffer in silence. I thought my family was just dysfunctional. Years later when I visited a primary school, I was reminded of the inconveniences of being a school girl and having your period. In Kenya 900,000 girls miss school because of their menstruation. And 2.5 million school girls cannot afford sanitary pads. Menstruation obstructs them from obtaining quality education and it hinders their personal development. I wanted to impact their lives. Have an impact, generate revenue and give girls an equal opportunity. What’s better, I do it together with female inmates.
(Female) Nairobi, Kenya
My first concern is protection against crime and violence…especially against women.
(Female), Istanbul, Turkey
“Sri Lanka is a paradise in many ways, but people and especially women still live in poverty. Therefore, I started a project that engages groups of women in the production of new, modern and useful products from recycled materials. Prices are calculated so that every woman will receive a salary that they can live on. At the same time, they are trained in circular economics and sustainable production
Female, Sweden
Domestic violence is a circle of domination, manipulation and disrespect. Toxic relationships destroy familliies. I have been a victim of domestic abuse most of my life. My
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I am Women, i will speak. She is my daughter, watch her grow.
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6Clean Water and Sanitation
"What they need to fix here is the water. The problem is half the time you go to turn on the tap and there isn't any!"
(Female) Pristina, Kosovo
"There used to be a stream of fresh water here, so clean that we could drink from it…Now it’s just a stagnant pool filled with garbage and useless gutters. I wish the government would pays attention here and clean up the place, so we can have the old beautiful Saidpur Village."
(Male) Pakistan
"I go five times a day to the water well to bring water to my house. The water in the well is polluted and not clean, and many kids die as a result of drinking it.Two of my brothers died this way. I hope for access to clean and pure water, and instead of fetching water, I wish I could go to school"
(Female) YemenThe dirty water has caused miserable diseases and smell, and we can't even open the windows of our house. Mosquitoes thrive in the still, dirty water, and so doother insects that carry diseases. I wish the sanitation office in our region could complete their work.(Male) Yemen
"One day I went to fetch water. I left my daughter sleeping at home. It was the dry season so it took me very long to get water, I did not return with the 20 litre barrel until three hours later. When I came back to my house, I found that my daughter had fallen and hurt her head. She died. I wish water could be more easily available."
(Female) Yemen
"I usually wake up at 5am to pray then I go to bring water from far away with the donkey in order to go to school on time. Today I didn't wake up on time, so I am not going to school, I will go bring water instead. I feel so sad because I want to go school. I wish we could have access to clean water and sanitation."
(Male) Yemen
The water point is very far from my house and as you can see this place is very hilly, it's impossible to carry a big container. It takes me 30 minutes to get there and another 30 to come back and people overcharge us to carry it. I would like to have running water in the house.
(Female) Rwanda
My brother inspired me to be an entrepreneur because he’s a mechanic by profession but he’s quite inventive. He explored things like perpetual engines and recycling metals. I was drawn to waste because it’s a problem all over the world, whichever country you’re in. My wife is Kenyan and the first time I came here I saw how waste was indiscriminately dumped. At my wedding, my brother said that so much money was lying around in the form of unused waste. That’s when I started developing the idea for Kenya. Right now people perceive plastic as a menace, that’s why we have problems with flooding and stagnant water in Nairobi. But if you add value to the waste, people see it differently and once you change people’s perception then you’ll find the country will be cleaner. I want to recycle plastic into diesel and start my own power plant.
(Male) Nairobi, Kenya
Kenya is facing a huge water crisis. Contaminated water is everywhere. Every Kenyan has suffered from a waterborne disease at least once in their life. I suffered from typhoid and ameba; it’s normal. Then I went to university and the tap water was brown. It irritated me. I wanted a filter, but I couldn’t afford US$40. So I made one myself. An old peanut butter jar, two buckets and some charcoal dust was all I needed. My filter removed all soil particles and I had clean water for drinking and washing. But it could only remove soil erosion and particles. Not excess minerals, chloride or heavy metals. So for the other parts of Kenya I had to find another solution. Of course there are already water filters available, but they’re not affordable for the common Kenyan. How we define low income households is different to everyone, but I want to help the majority of the people. Kenyans who have little, but they do want clean water. I’m alone in this quest, but I love doing this. I’m helping the community; giving them clean, affordable and safe drinking water.
(Female), Nairobi, Kenya
“I have no running water in my home. Everyday, my wife and kids must fill the jerry can with water, and then make the 2-kilometer trip back home. You can imagine how difficult that was before we finally got our first bicycle. Now I build bicycles! But still, running water... That would be REALLY nice.”
(Male), Mayange, Kigali, Rwanda.
“Today, more people have cell phones than access to toilets. Inadequate sanitation causes diseases and death. Water is life! Poor sanitation costs billions of dollars each year. Yet every dollar invested can bring substantial returns by keeping people healthy and productive.
Male, Sweden
11
7 Affordable Clean Energy
“Daytime is study time for my children. When night comes they can do nothing. Candles are just too expensive. If we had electricity, my kids could finally study after the sun goes down.”
(Male) Musanze District, Kigali, Rwanda
“You see this pile of firewood? This is all of the wood my son and I will have for the next month. Tell me, would you be able to survive with just this – to cook your meals, boil your water – for an entire month?
(Male) Gihembe camp, Rwanda
All the basic things at home requires electricity: To get water to the tank, light, and to watch the news to understand what is going on.We really need more reliable energy at home to reduce some of the hardship that comes with the difficult security situation.
(Male) YemenIf the village were to get electricity I could finally buy electric clippers. These old tools are so slow, and because of this I'm losing my clients to the barbershops in town.(Male) Mayange, Kigali, Rwanda.
I dropped out of school in class 4. I lived with my grandfather for three years. I admired his work and how he beat the metal into shape. It inspired me to follow in his footsteps, but with my own spin. I create solutions for the current day needs. I’ve made an environmentally friendly traditional stove, a windmill and a generator that doesn’t need fuel. All from scrap metal. When a sell a stove, I know a family will have a meal that need. When I see my windmill on a roof, I know it generates electricity for that household. It’s inspiring. That I dropped out of school has hold my business back, but I keep going. I always wanted to create my own airplane. So I designed and perfected a helicopter out of scrap metal. I flew for 200 meters at 10 feet high with a crowd of 10,000 people watching. It was amazing. Even now when we talk about it, I think about flying. It was a dream come true. The police wasn’t too pleased, but they were unable to arrest because the large crowd wouldn’t let them. Who knows maybe one day I’ll make helicopters in bulk.
(Male) Iten, Kenya
My brother inspired me to be an entrepreneur because he’s a mechanic by profession but he’s quite inventive. He explored things like perpetual engines and recycling metals. I was drawn to waste because it’s a problem all over the world, whichever country you’re in. My wife is Kenyan and the first time I came here I saw how waste was indiscriminately dumped. At my wedding, my brother said that so much money was lying around in the form of unused waste. That’s when I started developing the idea for Kenya. Right now people perceive plastic as a menace, that’s why we have problems with flooding and stagnant water in Nairobi. But if you add value to the waste, people see it differently and once you change people’s perception then you’ll find the country will be cleaner. I want to recycle plastic into diesel and start my own power plant.
(Male) Nairobi, Kenya
“Through working with wind power, I have experienced the amazing force of energy without fuel costs. I wanted to make access to affordable, reliable and modern energy for all, a reality. We think the company name has a good fit: Endless Energy.”
Male, Sweden
12
8Decent Work and Economic Growth
"I am a sex worker but not out of choice. My husband passed away when I was pregnant with our fifth child and I am doing whatever I can to sustain them. It’s a dirty job but I don’t have a choice. As a mother I want the best for my children, I don’t want them to become warlords or thieves. You know what? They are all in university!"
(Female) Ouidah, Benin
It’s always hard for a refugee to find a job. I would ask the government to advocate more for us, so there will be less discrimination for refugees to find jobs. I would ask for us to be treated more like Rwandans.
(Male) Gihembe camp, Rwanda
Just because you have all your arms and legs doesn’t mean you’re able to work. You look at me and I look fine. But I'm not.
(Male) Manilla, Philippines“Life here is all about survival.We desperately need better job opportunities. Just a few months ago I was here in the library, and I was sitting next to this guy on Google who was searching ‘plumber. job.’ I had to explain to him that this would give results for plumbers all over the world.People don’t even know where to begin.”(Female) Cape Town, South Africa
"We have a big, big problem here. People don’t care about degrees. If you know someone in the system you get a job, if you don’t know anyone you have to wait. You wait, wait, wait. One, two, three, four years…
(Male) Nouakchott, Mauritania
“After my stroke, my right side doesn’t have much mobility, The company forced me to quit a few years back, since I was too slow for them.Sometimes I do odd jobs, like picking up bottles and cans for the recycling money. But my wife still works, which is how we live. It’s stressful, but we keep going.”
(Male) Bangkok, Thailand
Selling things on the street, like this, is illegal. That’s why the police and local defense keep chasing me. They put you in jail. They put us all there. Every time they do, I must pay a fine and start over with my saving. How can I buy a stall like they say I must if I have no other way to make money in the first place?”
(Female) Musanze District, Kigali, Rwanda
"For me, having a job alone is not enough. It’s not only related to a salary, It’s about stability and having the chance to create your own life. I have a handicap and can’t drive a normal car. Buying an automatic? I just can’t afford."
Not matched
I own a poultry farm with two hundred chickens. A farm with thousands of chickens is my big project, being able to employ people and to develop our country together.I am sure that one way or another I will achieve my goal."
(Male) Ouezzane, Morocco
"Life in Côte d’Ivoire is difficult without a job. A job defines who you are, what kind of opportunities you have and even your love life depends on it. I used to have a girlfriend but with losing my job, I also lost her."
(Male) Abdijan, Côte d'Ivoire.
"My mother was the one who had to take care of my brother, sister and me. My key priority is ending poverty by ensuring decent jobs for everyone."
(Female) Lomé, Maritime, Togo.
"I have become a nomad and had to leave my parents, brothers and sister behind in search for a better life. In my hometown there are no jobs and I have found work here on the land for as long as the harvesting season last.I dream about Spain and Germany. In the summer, when the sea level is low, I might have a chance. It’s worth the risk. I can’t look forward here. "
(Male) Mdiq, Morocco
"I lost everything in the tsunami, and still years later we don't own another home. I started working in a factory as a stitcher at the age of 15. Now I have 6 employees.I have to pay my stitchers more and more, just so these ladies can eat.If food cost less, everything would be easier."
(Female) Colombo, Sri Lanka
I run the only football shop inside the camp. Selling ‘tricots’ and ‘dreams’ to local youth.It’s not easy to take care of your family here.
(Male) Kurdistan, Iraq
My child is a special child with a mental disability.I started this car wash to prove we will not become the burden of society.I want everyone to treat us like normal people.
(Male) Shenzhen, China
Africa doesn’t have any well-known animation companies. I want to change that. Creating local content is important because people can relate to it. It provides a channel to incorporate social issues and discuss politics in a different manner. A local animation house will have a positive impact on the economy, and give people confidence in Tanzania. It’s a far away dream, but one day people all over the world will watch African-made animation.
(Male), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
I lost my parents when I was very young. The person who raised me was my sister. It was tough. Here many girls are married before they finish their education or they drop out of school due to pregnancy. Girls are marginalized in this area. I’m proud that I can do something to help the community maintain their culture, but also accept change. I’m showing them that you can have a passion and take care of yourself economically. I can train these women on the differnet opportunities that are out there. I’ve found my passion in farming, but others can make jewelry, go to the market, do table banking. I also empower the boys. They need to be told what to do as well. No one in this area should get into drugs and drop out of school. In my entrepreneurial journey, what motivates me and keeps me going is the community. It has been working. When I started I had nothing, but now I’ve managed to make my own living. Young people around me are seeing that and coming to me. I don’t want Samburu to lose its culture. However, I do think that young women can participate and be empowered socially and economically. That’s the community I have in mind.
(Female) Maralal, Kenya
I dropped out of school in class 4. I lived with my grandfather for three years. I admired his work and how he beat the metal into shape. It inspired me to follow in his footsteps, but with my own spin. I create solutions for the current day needs. I’ve made an environmentally friendly traditional stove, a windmill and a generator that doesn’t need fuel. All from scrap metal. When a sell a stove, I know a family will have a meal that need. When I see my windmill on a roof, I know it generates electricity for that household. It’s inspiring. That I dropped out of school has hold my business back, but I keep going. I always wanted to create my own airplane. So I designed and perfected a helicopter out of scrap metal. I flew for 200 meters at 10 feet high with a crowd of 10,000 people watching. It was amazing. Even now when we talk about it, I think about flying. It was a dream come true. The police wasn’t too pleased, but they were unable to arrest because the large crowd wouldn’t let them. Who knows maybe one day I’ll make helicopters in bulk.
(Male) Iten, Kenya
Ten years ago there was a big forest in this area. Now you only see plain ground. The charcoal business is very attractive because you can make money quickly. Everyday busses stuffed with charcoal bags will head towards Nairobi. I, myself, also participated. While I was in school we cleared trees of my father’s farm land. I made my pocket money by selling the charcoal. But when the land was cleared I realized I had to find another venture. My parents didn’t understand why I had gone to university to only end up the fuel industry. For them the briquettes that I’m making from biomasses, is the same as charcoal. But it’s not. It’s a sustainable and viable alternative to charcoal. I’m happy I found this and would not want to be employed. I love waking up everyday and doing what I love.
(Male) Narok, Kenya
"I lost my parents when I was very young. The person who raised me was my sister. It was tough. Here many girls are married before they finish their education or they drop out of school due to pregnancy. Girls are marginalized in this area. I’m proud that I can do something to help the community maintain their culture, but also accept change. I’m showing them that you can have a passion and take care of yourself economically. I can train these women on the differnet opportunities that are out there. I’ve found my passion in farming, but others can make jewelry, go to the market, do table banking. I also empower the boys. They need to be told what to do as well. No one in this area should get into drugs and drop out of school. In my entrepreneurial journey, what motivates me and keeps me going is the community. It has been working. When I started I had nothing, but now I’ve managed to make my own living. Young people around me are seeing that and coming to me. I don’t want Samburu to lose its culture. However, I do think that young women can participate and be empowered socially and economically. That’s the community I have in mind"
(Female) Maralal, Kenya
Did you know that there is a board in New York that determines Kenyan coffee prices? It’s our coffee, why should they dictate the prices they want to buy!? It’s us as sellers that should dictate the prices we want to sell at, the prices we want them to have. This has long been a problem in the coffee industry for a long time. Nyumbani Coffee was born when we realised that farmers should benefit more from their coffee and Kenyans should be consuming our coffee. Kenyan coffee is the best in the world. You can feel it, you can taste it. It’s a shame that we don’t experience the value of our crop. My mom went to school because of coffee. But times have changed, these days there is poverty in coffee. My mission is to promote coffee in Kenya.
(Female) Nairobi, Kenya
Job opportunities. That’s why. I work here seventeen hours.”

(Male), Austin, TX
"By giving them a chance to make a living, I feel like I can make a difference".
(Female) Bad Godesberg, Farhana
“Sweden has a long history of failing to harness the influx of human capital it receives through immigration. With the refugee wave of 2015, I decided I wanted to help by founding Sync Accelerator, a multi-cultural IT recruitment bureau that focusses on immigrant tech talent."
Male, Sweden
13
9Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure"Last year, my dad and I wrote to the president to fix the roads, and now they're doing it"(Female) San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Mexico
“For my son and me, we need a cleaner environment. But that has to start with better infrastructure. Better roads, better sewage, better schools. Anything. Even a little bit would go a long way. Look around. We don’t even have garbage bins.”
(Male) Pristina, Kosovo
People in wheelchairs often have to share the road with cars and vans! I actually just helped finish a project to build a swing for kids in wheelchairs. For some of them it's the first time they'll get to use a playground. Imagine that! As a young kid you could never use a swing? That needs to change.
(Female) Pristina, Kosovo“Here, everything is run by the water. The whole town sunk during the last earthquake, and now even a bit of rain and everything is flooded. Our kids can’t go to school, and we can’t go to work. When the rain starts, our lives stop.”(Female) Dagupan, Philippines
“I want the government to fix the roads. My business is based on access. We deliver medication directly to people’s homes.If we can’t make it to areas of Khayelitsha because there are no roads, or the roads are too poor, or there is no address system, then there is a problem."
(Male) Cape Town, South Africa
“When the vegetables are ready, we have to rent a taxi to get them to the market, and that is very expensive. The closest the car can get from here is a kilometer away. This road here, you can’t even ride a bicycle up it. Getting our food to the market is harder than growing it!”
(Male) Mayange, Kigali, Rwanda.
Technology development has improved since the war ended, but still not enough people have access to computers. Since the war, technology has changed my life. I drive a taxi. Now I can easily find more customers online."
(Male) Colombo, Sri Lanka.
“My home is in a forest, 4 hours from here. When my daughter finishes school, I want her to be able to work where she lives. The hardest part about working so far from home: Missing out on so much! Sometimes when I get home, I feel more like a visitor. My daughter’s little hugs help a lot though.”
(Male) Bangkok, Thailand
I am a road inspector and sincerely believe that good infrastructure is one of the most important things for development. Look at the road ahead of us. It’s the main road between Kinshasa and Libreville and look at the status. We really have to improve it in order to foster international trade.
(Male) Niari, Congo.
One Sunday afternoon, I encountered a terrible, but not fatal accident as I was driving back home. The next morning my maid called and told me her son had died in that accident. He could have made it if his family had been able to pay for the expensive surgery. It was devastating and a wake up call for me. I did some research and found out that in Tanzania, of the 50 million citizens, 95% don’t have health insurance. Take Africa has a whole, and 97% has no health insurance. I brainstormed and realized that mobile phones can disrupt insurance because the penetration of it is as high as 70%. My solution has two powerful ingredients: everything is managed through a mobile policy management platform which cuts down the costs significantly, and we partner with an insurance provided and a telecom company who supports our USSD (Unstructured Supplementary Service Data). Slowly I’m changing the face of insurance in Tanzania.
(Female) Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Ten years ago there was a big forest in this area. Now you only see plain ground. The charcoal business is very attractive because you can make money quickly. Everyday busses stuffed with charcoal bags will head towards Nairobi. I, myself, also participated. While I was in school we cleared trees of my father’s farm land. I made my pocket money by selling the charcoal. But when the land was cleared I realized I had to find another venture. My parents didn’t understand why I had gone to university to only end up the fuel industry. For them the briquettes that I’m making from biomasses, is the same as charcoal. But it’s not. It’s a sustainable and viable alternative to charcoal. I’m happy I found this and would not want to be employed. I love waking up everyday and doing what I love.
(Male) Narok, Kenya
I dropped out of school in class 4. I lived with my grandfather for three years. I admired his work and how he beat the metal into shape. It inspired me to follow in his footsteps, but with my own spin. I create solutions for the current day needs. I’ve made an environmentally friendly traditional stove, a windmill and a generator that doesn’t need fuel. All from scrap metal. When a sell a stove, I know a family will have a meal that need. When I see my windmill on a roof, I know it generates electricity for that household. It’s inspiring. That I dropped out of school has hold my business back, but I keep going. I always wanted to create my own airplane. So I designed and perfected a helicopter out of scrap metal. I flew for 200 meters at 10 feet high with a crowd of 10,000 people watching. It was amazing. Even now when we talk about it, I think about flying. It was a dream come true. The police wasn’t too pleased, but they were unable to arrest because the large crowd wouldn’t let them. Who knows maybe one day I’ll make helicopters in bulk."
(Male) Iten, Kenya
My brother inspired me to be an entrepreneur because he’s a mechanic by profession but he’s quite inventive. He explored things like perpetual engines and recycling metals. I was drawn to waste because it’s a problem all over the world, whichever country you’re in. My wife is Kenyan and the first time I came here I saw how waste was indiscriminately dumped. At my wedding, my brother said that so much money was lying around in the form of unused waste. That’s when I started developing the idea for Kenya. Right now people perceive plastic as a menace, that’s why we have problems with flooding and stagnant water in Nairobi. But if you add value to the waste, people see it differently and once you change people’s perception then you’ll find the country will be cleaner. I want to recycle plastic into diesel and start my own power plant.
(Male) Nairobi, Kenya
"“The most important thing for us is better transportation. Not really the roads, but something to get us to work and back home. I have a motorbike because I have to have it. Of course I cannot afford to pay for all of it at once, so I’m stuck paying and paying each month and year, which ends up costing many times more.”
(Male), Alcalá, Valle del Cauca.
I’ve had first hand experience what entrepreneurship and technology can achieve. With Norrsken Foundation we’re creating an eco-system for social impact, entrepreneurship and tech to work together to solve some of the societal and environmental challenges of our time.”
Male, Sweden
14
10 Reduced Inequalities
“If I could fix one thing here, it would be education. The schools for poor people teach you mostly that you have to stay where you are.Education is also having a family that teaches you to be hungry, and tells you that you can do bigger things.
(Male) Mexico City, Mexico
I was shocked by the inequality I saw around me. Whereas I lived in an extravagant house, most of my friends lived in metal ‘shacks’ just around the corner. Many people lacked access to clean water, electricity and proper sanitation. We need better governance and more accountability to address this absurdness. "
(Male) Liege, Belgium
I dream about a more equal world. In my opinion ending inequality starts with well educated young people.
(Male) Limbe, Cameroon"There are two worlds on this planet: the world of rich people and the world of poor people. My friends in Berlin, Morocco and Lebanon struggle to survive, it’s in all societies and I am afraid that it is not something we can stop."(Male) Marrakech, Morocco
In the area were I grew up many children didn’t have access to education. My friend and I decided to change this and we started our own school. I hope to become part of a group, a generation of people that bring something new to my country and the whole of Africa. Something special!
(Female) Saint-Louis, Senegal.
My family often tells me: "Stop studying, come and work on the farm to earn some money." I'm very worried about the other kids in the north of Ghana. The government officials in their communities don't motivate them to develop themselves and the teachers only teach them the local dialect. Together with some friends, I organize field trips to those rural communities, raising awareness among young children that there is an alternative."
(Male) Accra, Ghana
As in all countries there is a small group of elites: people who have both the money and opportunities to do whatever they want. Then there is the middle class, and at the bottom there is a large group of people without money. I belong to the last group.Don’t complain too much or look up to others; instead work hard and make it happen. Everyone can do it!"
(Male) Accra, Ghana
“I want racial discrimination to be abolished. I am discriminated against because of the color of my skin... My physical appearance.It doesn’t matter that I also have a degree.”
(Female) Dagupan, Philippines
My child is a special child with a mental disability.I started this car wash to prove we will not become the burden of society.I want everyone to treat us like normal people.
(\Male) Shenzhen, China
I can’t access public transportation. Even if someone offers to take me out, I can at most stay outside for two hours before returning home, because there aren’t any bathrooms accessible. When I go abroad, I have to suffer one planes for over ten hours. The bathrooms in the airplanes are too narrow.
(Female)2008 Bronze Medal Winner for Archery in the Women’s Special Olympics Guangdong, China
We are praised for being a rainbow nation, for having stopped apartheid. I wish that I could say that this is the truth but it feels far from reality. It still makes a big difference whether you are born black, white or coloured.
(Male) South Africa
want to be the next Nelson Mandela. Not known because of freedom fighting, but known of fighting for entrepreneurs who have no education. Fighting for people who are nowhere in life. There are people in life who have education, but they left school with nothing. Then there are the people who got E’s and F’s. They are marked because a system that does not belong to them was forced upon them. You realize, when you give them things to do, that they can actually do miraculous things. I wish to stand for these people, as I’m one of them. I want to empower more youth. Because life is not about what you’ve been. It’s about what you are going to do and who you will become. That’s me. I’m my own self. I didn’t go to university, but I don’t sit down. My motto is work hard and let’s meet at the top!
(Male) Mombasa, Kenya
I dropped out of school in class 4. I lived with my grandfather for three years. I admired his work and how he beat the metal into shape. It inspired me to follow in his footsteps, but with my own spin. I create solutions for the current day needs. I’ve made an environmentally friendly traditional stove, a windmill and a generator that doesn’t need fuel. All from scrap metal. When a sell a stove, I know a family will have a meal that need. When I see my windmill on a roof, I know it generates electricity for that household. It’s inspiring. That I dropped out of school has hold my business back, but I keep going. I always wanted to create my own airplane. So I designed and perfected a helicopter out of scrap metal. I flew for 200 meters at 10 feet high with a crowd of 10,000 people watching. It was amazing. Even now when we talk about it, I think about flying. It was a dream come true. The police wasn’t too pleased, but they were unable to arrest because the large crowd wouldn’t let them. Who knows maybe one day I’ll make helicopters in bulk.
(Male) Iten, Kenya
Ten years ago there was a big forest in this area. Now you only see plain ground. The charcoal business is very attractive because you can make money quickly. Everyday busses stuffed with charcoal bags will head towards Nairobi. I, myself, also participated. While I was in school we cleared trees of my father’s farm land. I made my pocket money by selling the charcoal. But when the land was cleared I realized I had to find another venture. My parents didn’t understand why I had gone to university to only end up the fuel industry. For them the briquettes that I’m making from biomasses, is the same as charcoal. But it’s not. It’s a sustainable and viable alternative to charcoal. I’m happy I found this and would not want to be employed. I love waking up everyday and doing what I love.
(Male) Narok, Kenya
"I want to be the next Nelson Mandela. Not known because of freedom fighting, but known of fighting for entrepreneurs who have no education. Fighting for people who are nowhere in life. There are people in life who have education, but they left school with nothing. Then there are the people who got E’s and F’s. They are marked because a system that does not belong to them was forced upon them. You realize, when you give them things to do, that they can actually do miraculous things. I wish to stand for these people, as I’m one of them. I want to empower more youth. Because life is not about what you’ve been. It’s about what you are going to do and who you will become. That’s me. I’m my own self. I didn’t go to university, but I don’t sit down. My motto is work hard and let’s meet at the top!"
(Male), Mombosa, Kenya
"I know how it feels to be a stranger in a different country".
(Female) Bad Godesberg, Sandra
“What started as a football tournament for integration between newly arrived and established youth, has now become a nationwide movement for diversity. Tillsammans Cup is the Swedish National Day’s music and football festival - for diversity.
Male and Female, Sweden
15
The 21st Century - Mother is on the rise. Rachel KrynskiInsane.
16
11 Sustainable Cities
Before the tsunami, my whole family lived together, six little houses on the beach. Ten of us were lost that day. Seven children. We didn’t have land papers, so we received nothing to rebuild. Now we must rent. We live apart, and the cost is just so high.
(Male)Galle, Sri Lanka
"See all those children? They are orphans from Ebola time. I made an association to help them. I have an office here but no money to care for them. I just want to help, will the government do something to help me?"
(Male) West Point, Monrovia, Liberia
My friends once busted me while I was hugging wheat. Well in actuality I was counting the tonnage. I’m always curious to know what the soil can give. What is the crazy stuff that actually comes from these crops? We are facing a serious food crisis. We can solve our food problems easily. But not like the Americans are. America, in a way a guinea pig, the kind of food they feed their people. It’s really sad. It’s not something I want my fellow Kenyans to go through. I have this thing for food security. I can assist Kenya to go to the next level in terms of food security and food safety. Knowing what you are eating is a start. But also the production process. So that people, if they cannot be food secure, at least can be food safe. There’s so much that needs to be and can be done. It will take a while, but I won’t stop until I’m finished.
(Male) Kitengela, Kenya
I lost my parents when I was very young. The person who raised me was my sister. It was tough. Here many girls are married before they finish their education or they drop out of school due to pregnancy. Girls are marginalized in this area. I’m proud that I can do something to help the community maintain their culture, but also accept change. I’m showing them that you can have a passion and take care of yourself economically. I can train these women on the differnet opportunities that are out there. I’ve found my passion in farming, but others can make jewelry, go to the market, do table banking. I also empower the boys. They need to be told what to do as well. No one in this area should get into drugs and drop out of school. In my entrepreneurial journey, what motivates me and keeps me going is the community. It has been working. When I started I had nothing, but now I’ve managed to make my own living. Young people around me are seeing that and coming to me. I don’t want Samburu to lose its culture. However, I do think that young women can participate and be empowered socially and economically. That’s the community I have in mind.
(Female) Maralal, Kenya
"My friends once busted me while I was hugging wheat. Well in actuality I was counting the tonnage. I’m always curious to know what the soil can give. What is the crazy stuff that actually comes from these crops? We are facing a serious food crisis. We can solve our food problems easily. But not like the Americans are. America, in a way a guinea pig, the kind of food they feed their people. It’s really sad. It’s not something I want my fellow Kenyans to go through. I have this thing for food security. I can assist Kenya to go to the next level in terms of food security and food safety. Knowing what you are eating is a start. But also the production process. So that people, if they cannot be food secure, at least can be food safe. There’s so much that needs to be and can be done. It will take a while, but I won’t stop until I’m finished."
(Male), Kitengela, Kenya
“My interest in human rights and urban sustainability arose during a trip to Fiji five years ago There and then, I decided to make a difference, specifically in relation to Goal 11 - Sustainable cities and communities. As more and more people move to cities, focusing on sustainability and resilience is getting increasingly important.
Female, Sweden
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12Responsible Consumption and Productionn(Male) Germany
The materials I use for my paintings and woodcarvings all come from the streets of Saint Louis.This way I play my little part and hope that many will follow. It’s my message for the people in Africa; for all people in the world!
(Male) Rosso, Saint-Louis, Senegal.
"I am a hunter, searching the forest for animals and selling the catch of the day along the road. Some people might judge me but it’s the only way I, and with me many others, can sustain our communities. Our families have done this for decades and it’s always in harmony with nature. We don’t want to move to a city. This is our environment; this is where we belong."
(Male) Nyanga, Niari, Congo."My biggest priority is protecting the environment here in Kosovo, cleaning things up. If you don't have a clean environment, you have nothing at all.I actually helped found an organization called Lets Do It Kosovo, and we're working to do just that. We've organized a national clean-up day and we're expecting over 100,000 participants this year. The message is simple: let's clean it, and let's keep it clean. It's really not even so hard."(Female) Pristina, Kosovo
In Tanzania more than 40% of the food is left to rot. The supply chain in the country is too long and the farmer doesn’t get a fair price. So with our business we went to eliminate the the many middlemen while giving the producers a good price. We are also farmers ourselves, so we understand all the pain points. It’s not easy because the road infrastructure is poor and government support is minimal. When we started building a cold storage facility, the government suspended the construction for no obvious reasons. It delayed us, but we don’t give up. Youth entrepreneurs are like seeds that are planted in a desert with no water. It’s our battle to fight.
(Male) Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
My friends once busted me while I was hugging wheat. Well in actuality I was counting the tonnage. I’m always curious to know what the soil can give. What is the crazy stuff that actually comes from these crops? We are facing a serious food crisis. We can solve our food problems easily. But not like the Americans are. America, in a way a guinea pig, the kind of food they feed their people. It’s really sad. It’s not something I want my fellow Kenyans to go through. I have this thing for food security. I can assist Kenya to go to the next level in terms of food security and food safety. Knowing what you are eating is a start. But also the production process. So that people, if they cannot be food secure, at least can be food safe. There’s so much that needs to be and can be done. It will take a while, but I won’t stop until I’m finished.
(Male) Kitengela, Kenya
I dropped out of school in class 4. I lived with my grandfather for three years. I admired his work and how he beat the metal into shape. It inspired me to follow in his footsteps, but with my own spin. I create solutions for the current day needs. I’ve made an environmentally friendly traditional stove, a windmill and a generator that doesn’t need fuel. All from scrap metal. When a sell a stove, I know a family will have a meal that need. When I see my windmill on a roof, I know it generates electricity for that household. It’s inspiring. That I dropped out of school has hold my business back, but I keep going. I always wanted to create my own airplane. So I designed and perfected a helicopter out of scrap metal. I flew for 200 meters at 10 feet high with a crowd of 10,000 people watching. It was amazing. Even now when we talk about it, I think about flying. It was a dream come true. The police wasn’t too pleased, but they were unable to arrest because the large crowd wouldn’t let them. Who knows maybe one day I’ll make helicopters in bulk.
(Male) Iten, Kenya
Ten years ago there was a big forest in this area. Now you only see plain ground. The charcoal business is very attractive because you can make money quickly. Everyday busses stuffed with charcoal bags will head towards Nairobi. I, myself, also participated. While I was in school we cleared trees of my father’s farm land. I made my pocket money by selling the charcoal. But when the land was cleared I realized I had to find another venture. My parents didn’t understand why I had gone to university to only end up the fuel industry. For them the briquettes that I’m making from biomasses, is the same as charcoal. But it’s not. It’s a sustainable and viable alternative to charcoal. I’m happy I found this and would not want to be employed. I love waking up everyday and doing what I love.
(Male) Narok, Kenya
My friends once busted me while I was hugging wheat. Well in actuality I was counting the tonnage. I’m always curious to know what the soil can give. What is the crazy stuff that actually comes from these crops? We are facing a serious food crisis. We can solve our food problems easily. But not like the Americans are. America, in a way a guinea pig, the kind of food they feed their people. It’s really sad. It’s not something I want my fellow Kenyans to go through. I have this thing for food security. I can assist Kenya to go to the next level in terms of food security and food safety. Knowing what you are eating is a start. But also the production process. So that people, if they cannot be food secure, at least can be food safe. There’s so much that needs to be and can be done. It will take a while, but I won’t stop until I’m finished.
(Male), Kitengela, Kenya
“I feel bad every time I throw away an item that has expired without my knowledge. But expiry date management becomes a tedious task So I’ve always wanted to make an expiry-date management and notification application that is simple and easy to use, which gave rise to the project ‘Freshness’.
Female, Sweden
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I never want to be rich and I do not understand how someone could spend thousands of euros on a car or house. Stupidest of all is how we, as society, rape the earth. Why don’t people understand that we need the planet to survive and that we should preserve it for future generations?
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13Climate Action
"People in my building always talk about education reform and corruption scandals, but that will all seem like child's play when the waters start to rise, especially here along the Bosporus... Maybe then everyone will start listening."
(Female) Istanbul, Turkey
If we don’t take care of mother nature, the planet will survive. The human race, hopefully, will not. Everyone’s being affected already.
(Male) Cape Town, South Africa
In Thailand it feels like summer all the time. And natural disasters seem to be happening more and more, and that's terrifying. We aren't doing enough."
(Female) Bangkok, Thailand"It frustrates me that people neglect climate change because of money. Where I come from, the Philippines, the typhoons are getting stronger every year and our people start to suffer more and more on a daily basis because of the pollution caused by others.(Male) Brussels, Belgium
"Taking action on climate change is no longer a national issue. It has become one of the largest problems of our time and all governments should act on it.10,000 young Belgians and I are going to the climate conference in Paris to demand commitments from our leaders."
(Female) Brussels, Belgium
I never want to be rich and I do not understand how someone could spend thousands of euros on a car or house. Stupidest of all is how we, as society, rape the earth. Why don’t people understand that we need the planet to survive and that we should preserve it for future generations?
(Male) Germany
The pollution is enormous: people urinate on the streets and throw their garbage out of car windows. Look around us: how can we live in such a place? Trash is everywhere. It has become a real danger to our health situation. This is Mauritania: there are now no parks, no trees, no green spaces at all.
(Female) Nouakchott, Mauritania
The hardest thing about being a farmer is climate change. Everything is different now: the seasons, the temperatures, the rain. We used to plant things in August in preparation for the September rains, but it doesn’t rain much in September anymore.
(Female) Mayange, Kigali, Rwanda.
The river you just crossed has been dry for almost the whole year and it has become extremely hard to keep our animals alive. We have about a hundred goats and have to take them far out for grazing.We won’t survive too many years like this.
(Male) Namibia
“With all these cities going up, it’s time to slow down.”
(Male), Austin TX)
Really, climate change is my biggest fear in life. I'm worried because I have 9 grandchildren. In the short term it may actually help San Miguel, because we're getting a better spread of rain. But the long run, the long run's a different story."
(Male), San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato.
Her first priority for a better world: action taken on climate change

"People in my building always talk about education reform and corruption scandals, but that will all seem like child's play when the waters start to rise, especially here along the Bosporus... Maybe then everyone will start listening.
(Female), Istanbul, Turkey
In developing countries people aren't focused on environmental issues, and the laws against pollution aren’t strong enough
(Female), Bangkok, THailand
“From an early age I was taught that life is sacred and priceless. But at the age of four I also learned that the meat we bought at the supermarket for 59:90 SEK was made from butchered animals. How could something deemed priceless be so cheap? I came to realize that the world would be a better place if, instead of just knowing the price, everyone would know the socio-ecological costs of their purchases.
Male, Sweden
"I want to amplify the voices of ordinary people engaged un confronting the environmental challenges like climate change facing humanity" Neeshad Shafi
Male, Doha - Qatar
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14 Life Below Water
"I’d choose to protect rivers and oceans. Because there's dirty water everywhere. Then when they get the fish out of the water maybe the fish will not taste good, or maybe they will all be gone! And then how do we eat?”
(Female) Puerto Princesa, Philippines
The ocean is everything for me, you know? It's my job. It’s my life. If you put trash in this water, you may as well be putting it inside my home. I can’t stand for that.
(Male) Puerto Princesa, Philippines
In my community, everyone is a fisherman. We depend on the ocean for our livelihood. The environment is the most important: if we don’t have the environment, where will we go? Do we need to move to the moon?
(Male) China “When in India and East Africa, I saw the effects of coastal management on local communities. From beautiful beaches attracting tourists by the dozen, to coasts attracting waste by the tonnes. Marine recources play an essential role in people’s social and economic livelihoods.Male, Sweden
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15Life On Land
"I want to preserve all animal species. At home I have a dog and my dream is to become a veterinary nurse later in life. I really like animals and all species; we have to protect them before it is too late. My teacher in school told me about global warming and I am worried about it. Look around us, there is already so much pollution."
(Female) Saint-Geours-de-Maremne, France
"Côte d’Ivoire was once a country full of tropical forests but unfortunately those times have vanished. Our generation stopped caring about nature but I hope to change this. Together with my friends we inspired 5000 Ivorians to plant a tree next to their houses this year. Taking care of our planet is something we have to do ourselves."
(Female)Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire.
Over 80 per cent of Gabon’s surface is covered by forest. It’s something we have to respect, and even more important, to protect. It provides 7 billion people with clean air everyday.
(Male) Bitam, Woleu-Ntem, Gabon.What will happen if we don’t realize that cutting down forests, draining marshes and contaminate rivers, lakes and oceans is bad? It’s not only nature we ruin, it’s also ourselves. What will be left after us? What will we leave to our children?”(Female) Minsk, Belarus
“Healthy ecosystems are the basis for everything. Humans and society depend on functioning ecosystems to get clean water and clean air, food, raw materials and for our mental well-being. By getting more people, young and old, to explore the nature, and by influencing the politics, the ecosystems in forests, land and waters get healthier!”
Female, Sweden
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16Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

“The first time I got shot, I lost my kidney. I used to work on a farm, and a guerilla group approached me one night and asked me to join them. I said no thanks, I’m happy with my job and I didn’t want any trouble. Two days later, two of them were waiting for me. They shot me and left me there. I was in a coma for 15 days. I had to sell my home to pay for the medical care. When I was finally able to walk again a year and a half later, a different guerilla group confronted me, and again asked me to join. This time they shot me in the chest. I was a popular guy I guess... Now thirteen years later, there is finally a government program to support victims of the violence, like me. I’m waiting for my approval.”
(Male) Pereira, Risaralda, Colombia
In 2005, a group of striking teachers was beaten up when they tried to escape the police. The next day there was a huge protest. I was there--my mother was a teacher. I got gassed in the face. We had a new governor and he made so many big promises. It was the teachers who elected him, and now today those promises are not coming through.
(Female) Salta, Argentina
My brother was killed by a soccer gang when he was 17. If we had better security, and less corruption, this would never have happened. The ones who did it were sons of politically powerful people. They’re still out today.
(Female) Buenos Aires, Argentina.When the Serbians started to be persecuted, there were not authorities to protect us in Prishtina. We lost our houses, our communities broke apart. I had to resettle here, an animal in what do you call those things? Cages. We don't have water after 7PM. No one ever asks us how we think our own problems can be solved.(Female) Pristina, Kosovo
"Everyone in my generation is calling for a more tolerant government. One by one we’re losing our freedoms. The police keep killing us. And the government is worried about just one thing only, and that’s money.”
(Female) Istanbul, Turkey
“You can’t run a business if there’s no protection against crime. Our store is on the main road, and more and more people are being robbed by knife or gunpoint. I worry about my store, about my wife and children working there.”
(Male) Manila, Philippines
"I came home one day and someone had stolen everything. They took my clothes, my kettles, my cows, everything! Those cows were my life, and now I’ve had to move to the city to find work and start over. Crime doesn't just affect one person. When you steal from someone, you’re robbing the whole community. And you’re stealing from yourself.”
(Male) Pretoria, South Africa
He is Israeli, I am Palestinian.And even though we do not agree on political aspects, we agree on one thing: we, the new generation, need a change. Therefore we decided to start the initiative "Make Hummus Not War". A simple dinner between Palestinians and Israelis, in which we talk about this and that and try to find human in each other.
(Male and Female) Amsterdam, Netherlands
“Before the violence spread to the rest of Rwanda, there was an early massacre here. Thousands… my husband just never came home. By that point we had three small children, no income, and all the violence all around.”
(Female) Mayange, Kigali, Rwanda.
It’s been four years since I’ve been asked for my ID. During the war, it used to sometimes be four times in one day.
(Male) Colombo, Sri Lanka
One day I woke up one day and the president of Nigeria told me here, have a billion dollars to spend on the poor, on the MDGs. That’s a dream come true! But I spent the entire first year just trying to put checks and balances in to make sure I didn’t lose this money. I couldn’t spend it because I had to deal with issues of bad governance, because many of our civil servants did not have the skills required, the capacity to implement programs.
Amina Mohammed, the United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's Special Adviser on Post-2015 Development Planning.) New York, USA
The harassment from police because of my Palestinian ID card was one thing, but the Islamic State was a whole other thing. My friend died on my chest after being hit by their bullets.I am afraid; afraid about what comes next!
(Male) Kurdistan, Iraq
Before I dropped out of school, I always witnessed school violence.I have a classmate who was beaten up just because he said the wrong things.Although it’s not right to speak carelessly, but no matter what we shouldn’t resort to violence.
(Male) Guangdong Province, China
"I'd like have a more responsive government here. We pay taxes to the municipality. I would like to see more in return. We spend everyday here at our business, making and selling goods, and we don't have basic things, like water or toilets, or electricity."
(Female), Cachí, Salta, Argentina.
"More than anything else, I think we should be working toward a more honest and responsive government. There are so many great ideas going around Cape Town, and yet no one is able to implement them. Everyone knows what needs to be fixed, but there's no synthesis. Forward thinking people in the government are always the first to get shot down.
Female, Cape Town, South Africa
“With a growing family, I need the government now. The government is going to help me get most of the things that I need. Like medicine today. But that only happens when the authorities are really listening to the people, and being responsive.”
(Male), Mayange, Kigali, Rwanda
“I immigrated to Germany because of political reasons. I was well settled in Iraq"
(Male) Bad Godesberg Dishad
Sweden became the destination of people fleeing from their homes. This was the opportunity to rise. When talking to newcomers, we found that the fundamental need was human connection. Since we worked in tech we saw the potential to connect people faster, and on a large scale.
Female, Sweden
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17Partnership for the Goals
When we were chosen as the site for the Millennium Village project in Rwanda, people came here to my office everyday with questions like: we are very hungry, how can we get food for our families to eat? Now, 15 years later, people are coming to me with questions about how best to invest all the money they are making. The participation we get from the population for community development projects now exceeds the help we get from the government! Before, I was the executive secretary of this poor sector, Mayange. Now, I am executive secretary of this rich sector, Mayange. I am so proud of what we are starting to become.
(Male) Mayange, Kigali, Rwanda.
“Through the Stockholm Coordination Initiative, we enable people from all parts of society - ranging from culture, entrepreneurs, civil society and politicians - to share experiences and knowledge in the stride for a fair and sustainable world.
Female & Male , Sweden
“First, we need to have clear objectives. After that we need to create partnerships. We must have partnerships that bring benefits to our society or at least for our race that's about to go extinct due the road we are taking. I think that to end poverty, we need good education, and this comes from good political policies in real life, which is how it should be. Here in Chile there is a lot of corruption and there's a lot of people who don’t work as they should be working. People just work for their personal benefit. There's a lot of egocentrism, but I think that the best thing to do is create partnerships so we can achieve these fundamental objectives, and that they are really achieved and followed through, and not quit midway. It's important to work on the objectives from the beginning to end."
https://www.facebook.com/humansofmyworld/photos/a.505040449608339.1073741827.502956393150078/850361748409539/?type=3&theater
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