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Test NumberTiered Test?ER MappingImportance (1-3-9)Completion GoalTestTest GoalTest ProcedureHypothesisTargetAcceptance CriteriaOutcomeRegression Plan
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F1NoER1911/19/18Tensile StrengthTensile strength unidirectionalStandardized Tensile TestingMaterials with a higher ratio of stretch will have a lower tensile strength with a higher elastic modulus than a material with a lower ratio of stretch. Materials with higher weight will have higher tensile strength. MaximizeN/A--
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F2NoER1911/19/18Burst StrengthOmnidirectional yield strengthStandardized Burst Strength TestMaterials with a higher ratio of stretch will have a lower tensile strength with a higher elastic modulus than a material with a lower ratio of stretch. Materials with higher weight will have higher burst strength. MaximizeN/A--
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F3NoER1912/10/18Fabric Weight Bearing Strength of MaterialDetermine yield point of material under loadPlace weight of magnitude correlated to baby sizes onto fabric until failure or safety factor is reachedMaterials with a higher ratio of stretch will have a higher tolerance for weight than materials with a lower ratio of stretchMaximize>= 16.33 kgAll materials both parent and infant were able to hold 18.14 kg without failing.-
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F4NoER1912/10/18Snap Tensile Pull Test Determine and confirm normal and shear strength of snap closures Rig female part of snap into a grip, pull on male part of snap in normal and shear directionSnaps with larger diameters will have greater tensile and shear strengthOptimizeN/AThe 5/8" snap held the most weight at 3 kg, the 7/16" snap held 1.5 kg, and the 3/8" held 2 kg. -
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F6In Conjunction with tests 1, 2, 3, 7N/A91/25/19Parent Fabric DesirabilityDetermine user preference for garment materialsIn conjunction with testing the safety of each material we will determine which fabric is most desirable to NICU providers and parents (texture, color, pattern, weight). We will do this by choosing a few materials and creating a mock shirt out of them. We will take these mock shits into Strong NICU and have parents wear them for a short period of time and take a survey to determine desirability. Users will prefer materials which are perceived as softer and more breathableN/AN/AMock-ups of the fabrics were brought to the NICU to test fabric desirability, parents as well as nurses were polled and we were able top determine both the parents and the infant fabric for the garment. -
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F7NoER1912/3/18Tear StrengthDetermine tear strength of garment materialsStandard tear testing if possibleMaterials with higher stretch ratio will have lower tear strengthMaximizeN/A--
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F8NoER23TBDWash Cycle DurabilityStretch material in two directions. Measure initial/final length and force relationshipTBDTBDMaximizeTBD--
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F9NoN/A312/10/18Material StretchDetermine Material Stretch PropertiesStretch material in two directions. Measure initial/final length and force relationshipHigh stretch materials will stretch more than low stretch materials. High stretch materials will require less force to stretchN/AN/AThe data obtained suggests a positive correlation exists between stretch and applied force. Lower stretch materials were seen to require a higher proportional force per unit length. Overall, the highest stretch materials will stretch more with less force and vice versa-
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F5After Test 4N/A112/10/18Snap Usability StudyDetermine use case and user preference for snap closuresUsability testingSnaps with lower insertion force will have higher usabilityN/AN/ABased on 3 subjects it was determined that the 5/8" snap is the most difficult to pull apart while the 7/16" was the easiest, the 3/8" was somewhere in the middle. It is to be noted that the 5/8" is failing at the material. -
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Updated: April 10, 2019
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Textile Testing Link
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https://nptel.ac.in/courses/116102029/
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