Random sample of 200 non-spam NN filings
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text_dataSupports?
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I specifically support strong net neutrality that is my Title 2 oversight of the ISPs and every internet group needs to come together.y
3
I support strong net neutrality backed by Title II oversight of ISP’s.y
4
As an Internet user, I'm asking the FCC to protect the net neutrality protections currently in place.

The FCC should throw out Chairman Ajit Pai's proposal to give the ISP monopolies like Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon the authority to create Internet fast lanes, stripping Internet users of the meaningful access and privacy protections we fought for and just recently won.

I'm concerned about ISPs being allowed to discriminate against certain types of data or websites, because users will have fewer options and a less diverse Internet. Thankfully, the current net neutrality rules ensure that Internet providers can't slow or block our ability to see certain websites or create Internet "fast lanes" by charging websites and online service money to reach customers faster. That's exactly the right balance to ensure the Internet remains a level playing field that benefits small businesses and Internet users as well as larger players. Pai's proposed repeal of the rules would transform ISPs into Internet gatekeepers with an effective veto right on innovation and expression. That's not the kind of Internet we want to pass on to future generations of technology users.

I urge you to keep Title II net neutrality in place, and safeguard Internet users like me.

Sincerely,
Amalia Colvin
y
5
I am in support of strong net neutrality and want to make sure that ISPs are kept on Title 2. ISPs shouldn't have the right to slow down access to certain websites in order to drive traffic to other websites that are in their monetary interest.y
6
I am in support of Strong Net Neutrality backed by Title 2 oversight of ISPs!y
7
Do not change the current internet neutrality rules.y
8
Maintain title 2 net neutrality rules as they are. The current FCC chair, a former lawyer for isp Verizon, should in no way modify existing net neutrality rules. This is a gross conflict of interest and is not in the best interest of us citizens.

Thank you for your time.
y
9
Net Neutrality is very important. Please to not change any regulations that would take this away from us.y
10
As an Internet user, I'm asking the FCC to protect the net neutrality protections currently in place.

The FCC should throw out Chairman Ajit Pai's proposal to give the ISP monopolies like Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon the authority to create Internet fast lanes, stripping Internet users of the meaningful access and privacy protections we fought for and just recently won.

I'm concerned about ISPs being allowed to discriminate against certain types of data or websites, because users will have fewer options and a less diverse Internet. Thankfully, the current net neutrality rules ensure that Internet providers can't slow or block our ability to see certain websites or create Internet "fast lanes" by charging websites and online service money to reach customers faster. That's exactly the right balance to ensure the Internet remains a level playing field that benefits small businesses and Internet users as well as larger players. Pai's proposed repeal of the rules would transform ISPs into Internet gatekeepers with an effective veto right on innovation and expression. That's not the kind of Internet we want to pass on to future generations of technology users.

I urge you to keep Title II net neutrality in place, and safeguard Internet users like me.
y
11
The FCC needs to maintain Title II management of ISPs to maintain Net Neutrality! For many years ISPs have manipulated access and continue to throttle web content for average users to favor their own content. The FCC needs to maintain the Net Neutrality rules that were passed under the old Chairman Tom Wheeler.y
12
I support strong Net Neutrality backed by Title II oversight of ISPs!y
13
I support strong net neutrality backed by Title 2 oversights of ISPs.y
14
Hey FCC don't be a jerk. Please keep title 2 and a fair and open internet for everyone. Let's not let greed rule the internet too... It's already running our country. Thanks.y
15
I support strong net neutrality backed by Title II oversight of ISPs.y
16
I support strong net neutrality rules backed by Title II. Thank you for what you do.y
17
I believe in Net Neutrality, backed by Title II oversight of ISPs.y
18
I strongly support net neutrality. The ideas behind it are the same as those on which the country was built.y
19
I strongly support net neutrality backed by title 2 oversight of ISP'sy
20
I support STRONG NET NEUTRALITY BACKED BY TITLE II OVERSIGHT OF ISPs!!!y
21
We need to keep Net Neutrality under Tittle IIy
22
Conflicts of interest are real, and the government needs to take steps to monitor these proceedings on the internet.y
23
I stand in support of Net Neutrality and maintaining the stance of ISPs as Title2 carriers. The FCC should NOT deregulate ISPs and reduce them to Title1 status.y
24
We specifically support strong net nuetrality backed by the Title II oversight of ISP's.y
25
The FCC should maintain Title II classification for Internet Service Providers to support Net Neutrality and the Open Internet. Removing Title II Classification and weakening regulations will lead to less open internet.y
26
Support net neutrality and article 2 back by a strong oversight of internet service providers.y
27
Keep net neutrality, restore Title 2 !!!y
28
I support strong net neutrality regulations backed by Title II classification and oversight of ISPs.y
29
Save Internet neutrality !!!!!!!y
30
I am in support of Strong Net Neutrality backed by Title 2 oversight of ISP's!y
31
To Whom It May Concern: Hello, I am writing in regards to the issue of net neutrality and the prevention of the planned roll backs on the progress made during the Obama administration. I firmly believe that the protection of a Free and Open Internet is best achieved via strong regulation under Title II of the Federal Communications Act of 1934. While that bill was written well before our times, the SCOTUS and the Obama Administration accurately identified the fact that strong regulation of ISPs was required to protect the egalitarian nature of the Internet. As a member of a generation forged and raised by the Internet, I insist that you reconsider your stance on repealing the protections that Internet Users all over the Nation fought for years ago. If the government's job is to exercise the will of the people, then I find it incomprehensible how the FCC would plan to rollback regulations the constituents called for, unless to serve ulterior motives unclear to the public. Please, I encourage you to pursue the just, equal, and morally sound decision and maintain the status quo of housing ISPs under Title II. Thank you for your time. Sincerely, Thomas Ebrahimiy
32
Title 2 protection for net neutralityy
33
As an Internet user, I'm asking the FCC to protect the net neutrality protections currently in place.

The FCC should throw out Chairman Ajit Pai's proposal to give the ISP monopolies like Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon the authority to create Internet fast lanes, stripping Internet users of the meaningful access and privacy protections we fought for and just recently won.

I'm concerned about ISPs being allowed to discriminate against certain types of data or websites, because users will have fewer options and a less diverse Internet. Thankfully, the current net neutrality rules ensure that Internet providers can't slow or block our ability to see certain websites or create Internet "fast lanes" by charging websites and online service money to reach customers faster. That's exactly the right balance to ensure the Internet remains a level playing field that benefits small businesses and Internet users as well as larger players. Pai's proposed repeal of the rules would transform ISPs into Internet gatekeepers with an effective veto right on innovation and expression. That's not the kind of Internet we want to pass on to future generations of technology users.

I urge you to keep Title II net neutrality in place, and safeguard Internet users like me.
y
34
I specifically support strong net neutrality backed by Title II oversight of ISPs.y
35
I specifically support strong net neutrality backed by title 2 oversight of ISP'sy
36
Don't do it.y
37
Please retain the current net neutrality under Title II. I do not accept as valid Chairman's Pai's arguments on what the current regulation as burdensome.y
38
I support the preservation of net neutrality and Title II.y
39
I strongly support keeping net neutrality.y
40
I was outraged by the Obama/Wheeler FCC's decision to reclassify the Internet as a regulated "public utility" under a Depression-era law written for the old Ma Bell telephone monopoly.

Government utility regulation of the Internet risks devastating private investment, undermining competition, and stalling innovation. It also puts consumers at serious risk of being hit with a new "broadband tax" to cover the lack of private sector investment due to these regulations.

The liberal extremist groups that ginned up fake support for reclassification include the group Free Press, which was cited 62 times in the Title II order.

Free Press was founded by ultraliberal college professor Robert McChesney who has admitted: "At the moment, the battle over network neutrality is not to completely eliminate the telephone and cable companies. We are not at that point yet. But the ultimate goal is to get rid of the media capitalists in the phone and cable companies and to divest them from control."

Clearly, these extremists groups are openly hostile to America's free-market economy.

The Trump/Pai FCC is right to revisit this issue. I urge you to stand up to the radical extremists who took over the FCC under Obama and protect our free-market Internet by rescinding the Title II order.
n
41
I was outraged by the Obama/Wheeler FCC's decision to reclassify the Internet as a regulated "public utility" under a Depression-era law written for the old Ma Bell telephone monopoly.

Government utility regulation of the Internet risks devastating private investment, undermining competition, and stalling innovation. It also puts consumers at serious risk of being hit with a new "broadband tax" to cover the lack of private sector investment due to these regulations.

The liberal extremist groups that ginned up fake support for reclassification include the group Free Press, which was cited 62 times in the Title II order.

Free Press was founded by ultraliberal college professor Robert McChesney who has admitted: "At the moment, the battle over network neutrality is not to completely eliminate the telephone and cable companies. We are not at that point yet. But the ultimate goal is to get rid of the media capitalists in the phone and cable companies and to divest them from control."

Clearly, these extremists groups are openly hostile to America's free-market economy.

The Trump/Pai FCC is right to revisit this issue. I urge you to stand up to the radical extremists who took over the FCC under Obama and protect our free-market Internet by rescinding the Title II order.
n
42
Please support net neutrality and title 2y
43
Don't do away with New Neutrality - it is essential to consumers access to the internet, which has become a vital tool for citizens of the US and the world. Don't reverse good policies.y
44
Please do not end net neutrality by removing title II requirements!y
45
I support Net Neutrality. The idea that Comcast, Time Warner Cable/Spectrum, and other internet providers will provide free and open content in the interest of the public as opposed to the interest of their own bottom line, out of the good of their hearts, is absurd and childish.y
46
My Name Jeff,
and net neutrality is the most important topic
in the digital world right now, and you are trying to
completely screw everything up. don't try and put it on
"new legal footing" that is utterly moronic.
leave it as is, so that everyone has a fair slice of the pie.
ISP's need to be regulated, they are companies,
and companies don't act for the greater good of humanity, they
act for the best interests of their interests/assets (a.k.a. THEIR MONEY)
so they can not be trusted with this incredibley delicate issue, seeing as they
are completely biased towards their own financial gains.
Thanks for reading this,
MY NAME JEFF
(>'-')> <('_'<)<( ._.)>
MY NAME JEFF
(>'-')> <('_'<)<( ._.)>
MY NAME JEFF
(>'-')> <('_'<)<( ._.)>
MY NAME JEFF
(P.s. I should be writing a final essay for my class, and studying for my two other finals but that is easy and this is important, lol)
y
47
I support strong net neutrality backed by Title II's oversights of ISPs.y
48
Net Neutrality must be kept intact. An open and unrestricted internet is fundamental to technological and cultural growth. It is a necessary as electricity and water is , it should be treated as a utility, not a commodity.y
49
As an Internet user, I'm asking the FCC to protect the net neutrality protections currently in place.

The FCC should throw out Chairman Ajit Pai's proposal to give the ISP monopolies like Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon the authority to create Internet fast lanes, stripping Internet users of the meaningful access and privacy protections we fought for and just recently won.

I'm concerned about ISPs being allowed to discriminate against certain types of data or websites, because users will have fewer options and a less diverse Internet. Thankfully, the current net neutrality rules ensure that Internet providers can't slow or block our ability to see certain websites or create Internet "fast lanes" by charging websites and online service money to reach customers faster. That's exactly the right balance to ensure the Internet remains a level playing field that benefits small businesses and Internet users as well as larger players. Pai's proposed repeal of the rules would transform ISPs into Internet gatekeepers with an effective veto right on innovation and expression. That's not the kind of Internet we want to pass on to future generations of technology users.

I urge you to keep Title II net neutrality in place, and safeguard Internet users like me.

Sincerely,
Debbie B Newell
y
50
Net neutralityo
51
I believe that the internet is too ingrained in the fabric of our current society to be allowed to suffer throttling and control by ISPs based on the content that is delivered to customers. Most markets have 2 (or less) choices for an Internet Service Provider in their area. This is not a free market or 'competition' when it takes billions of dollars to setup the infrastructure needed to compete. The internet should be treated as a utility like electricity or water. Keep it Title II.y
52
I support net neutrality and title 2.y
53
I support net neutrality, with the protection under Title II.y
54
It is extremely important that we maintain Title II and keep internet neutrality. AND I vote and fund campaigns that will promote it.y
55
Dear sir,

I heard you were going to deregulate the internet, regarding Net-Neutrality. Sad. I hope you will not do this and keep the internet the open and free place it always has been. I believe that this proceeding carries risks for the internet that we don't want to take. Please don't give that much power to certain companies.

Sincerely,

Aron and everyone on Reddit, Youtube, or anywhere else on the WWW
y
56
I support strong net neutrality back by Title II.y
57
The FCC Open Internet Rules (net neutrality rules) are extremely important to me. I urge you to protect them.

Most Americans only have one choice for true high speed Internet access: our local cable company. Cable companies (and wireless carriers) are actively lobbying Congress and the FCC for the power to:

* Block sites and apps, to charge them "access fees"
* Slow sites and apps to a crawl, to establish paid "fast lanes" (normal speed) and slow lanes (artificially low speeds)
* Impose arbitrarily low data caps, so they can charge sites to escape those caps, or privilege their own services ("zero rating")

They're doing it so they can use their monopoly power to stand between me and the sites I want to access, extorting money from us both. I'll be forced to pay more to access the sites I want, and sites will have to pay a kind of protection money to every major cable company or wireless carrier—just to continue working properly! The FCC's Open Internet Rules are the only thing standing in their way.

I'm sending this to letter to my two senators, my representative, the White House, and the FCC. First, to the FCC: don’t interfere with my ability to access what I want on the Internet, or with websites' ability to reach me. You should leave the existing rules in place, and enforce them.

To my senators: you have the power to stop FCC Chair Ajit Pai from abusing the rules by refusing to vote for his reconfirmation. I expect you to use that power. Pai, a former Verizon employee, has made it clear he intends to gut the rules to please his former employer and other major carriers, despite overwhelming support for the rules from voters in both parties. I urge you publicly oppose Pai's confirmation on these grounds.

To the White House: Ajit Pai, a former Verizon employee, is acting in the interests of his former employer, not the American people. America deserves better. Appoint an FCC Chair who will protect the economic miracle that is the Internet from media monopolies like AT&T, Time Warner Cable, and Comcast/NBC/Universal.

To my representative: please publicly oppose Ajit Pai's plan to oppose the rules, and do everything you can to persuade the Senate and the White House to oppose Pai's nomination.

I would be happy to speak more with anyone on your staff about the rules and why they’re so important to me. Please notify me of any opportunities to meet with you or your staff.
vinnyninny
y
58
As an Internet user, I'm asking the FCC to protect the net neutrality protections currently in place.

The FCC should throw out Chairman Ajit Pai's proposal to give the ISP monopolies like Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon the authority to create Internet fast lanes, stripping Internet users of the meaningful access and privacy protections we fought for and just recently won.

I'm concerned about ISPs being allowed to discriminate against certain types of data or websites, because users will have fewer options and a less diverse Internet. Thankfully, the current net neutrality rules ensure that Internet providers can't slow or block our ability to see certain websites or create Internet "fast lanes" by charging websites and online service money to reach customers faster. That's exactly the right balance to ensure the Internet remains a level playing field that benefits small businesses and Internet users as well as larger players. Pai's proposed repeal of the rules would transform ISPs into Internet gatekeepers with an effective veto right on innovation and expression. That's not the kind of Internet we want to pass on to future generations of technology users.

I urge you to keep Title II net neutrality in place, and safeguard Internet users like me.

Sincerely,
Kim E Hill
y
59
Net neutrality is a critical issue to not just this country, but the world. Preserving it should be at the top of lawmaker's lists. Allowing telecom companies to dictate what information is disseminated to whom and when is throwing us back into the dark ages when the churches controlled information. We need a free and open internet for everyone.y
60
It is imperative that Net Neutrality and Title II are preserved. ISPs cannot be trusted to self-regulate and a free and open Internet is in the best interest of all Americans.y
61
I would like to express my support for net neutrality, the open internet, and Title II classification. The internet is a utility upon which more and more of the world will be built every day, and I am deeply dismayed by the current administration's attempts to allow a handful of enormous corporations pick favorites and stifle innovation.y
62
I support strong net neutrality backed by title II oversight of ISPs. As a college student, it is incredibly important to me that I have equal access to all sites, not just those that benefit my ISP.y
63
I specifically support strong net neutrality, backed by Title II oversight, of ALL ISPs.y
64
Ajit pai,
I strongly support net neutrality that is backed by Title ii oversight of ISPs.
And start doing your for job for the protection of the people and not your own pocketbook.
y
65
Save net neutrality.y
66
As an Internet user, I'm asking the FCC to protect the net neutrality protections currently in place.

The FCC should throw out Chairman Ajit Pai's proposal to give the ISP monopolies like Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon the authority to create Internet fast lanes, stripping Internet users of the meaningful access and privacy protections we fought for and just recently won.

I'm concerned about ISPs being allowed to discriminate against certain types of data or websites, because users will have fewer options and a less diverse Internet. Thankfully, the current net neutrality rules ensure that Internet providers can't slow or block our ability to see certain websites or create Internet "fast lanes" by charging websites and online service money to reach customers faster. That's exactly the right balance to ensure the Internet remains a level playing field that benefits small businesses and Internet users as well as larger players. Pai's proposed repeal of the rules would transform ISPs into Internet gatekeepers with an effective veto right on innovation and expression. That's not the kind of Internet we want to pass on to future generations of technology users.

I urge you to keep Title II net neutrality in place, and safeguard Internet users like me.

Sincerely,
Robert V Wade
y
67
As an Internet user, I'm asking the FCC to protect the net neutrality protections currently in place.

The FCC should throw out Chairman Ajit Pai's proposal to give the ISP monopolies like Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon the authority to create Internet fast lanes, stripping Internet users of the meaningful access and privacy protections we fought for and just recently won.

I'm concerned about ISPs being allowed to discriminate against certain types of data or websites, because users will have fewer options and a less diverse Internet. Thankfully, the current net neutrality rules ensure that Internet providers can't slow or block our ability to see certain websites or create Internet "fast lanes" by charging websites and online service money to reach customers faster. That's exactly the right balance to ensure the Internet remains a level playing field that benefits small businesses and Internet users as well as larger players. Pai's proposed repeal of the rules would transform ISPs into Internet gatekeepers with an effective veto right on innovation and expression. That's not the kind of Internet we want to pass on to future generations of technology users.

I urge you to keep Title II net neutrality in place, and safeguard Internet users like me.

Sincerely,
Sharon J Geiser
y
68
Preserve net neutrality and Title IIy
69
I believe the FCC should retain Title II authority over ISP providers. The FCC should work to ensure a level playing field for all providers to participate in maintaining a free and open intent available to all citizens equally without undue barriers to entry and this includes guarding against untoward manipulation of content and the means of delivering such content.y
70
Protect net neutrality and title twoy
71
Save net neutrality, isps should not be taking money on both endsy
72
I specifically support strong net neutrality backed by Title II oversight of ISPs.y
73
In my opinion we should not roll back net neutrality. I as a concerned citizen and an avid user of the internet believe in open access to the internet for everybody. Removal of net neutrality will put undo burden on new up and coming sites to reach its full potential. We want more sites like google, amazon who came from nothing and became behemoth. I hope, no I urge FCC to keep net neutrality so that we can believe in our american dream that someone (meaning any website) who is a nobody can become a big player one day through hard work and ingenuity. The only way this can happen if we keep a level playing field.y
74
preserve net neutrality!y
75
Dear FCC,

Maybe you've never been poor. Maybe you've never had to rely on McDonald's free WiFi to call your parents over Facebook so they could meet their first grandchild. Maybe you've never had to decide between a phone bill and an internet bill because you're not sure which service better serves your communication needs. Stop thinking like the rich men that run this nation and start thinking of the constituents that are its back bone. Stifling access to the internet, even just certain sites, because of corporate demand shuts down so many avenues of help for purple who are just getting by.

I beg of you, don't be the person that makes it impossible for a new parent to FaceTime their relatives because a baby is too expensive to pay the extra internet charge. Don't be the person who leaves the young veteran struggling with PTSD alone with his thoughts because he can't afford the price hike you forced on Netflix. Don't be the person who shoots themselves in the foot just because you can afford the hospital bill! Think with your brain, for once, and not your pocketbook. Stop this battle on net neutrality.
Myste Shryack
y
76
The FCC Open Internet Rules (net neutrality rules) are extremely important to me. I urge you to protect them.

Most Americans only have one choice for true high speed Internet access: our local cable company. Cable companies (and wireless carriers) are actively lobbying Congress and the FCC for the power to:

* Block sites and apps, to charge them "access fees"
* Slow sites and apps to a crawl, to establish paid "fast lanes" (normal speed) and slow lanes (artificially low speeds)
* Impose arbitrarily low data caps, so they can charge sites to escape those caps, or privilege their own services ("zero rating")

They're doing it so they can use their monopoly power to stand between me and the sites I want to access, extorting money from us both. I'll be forced to pay more to access the sites I want, and sites will have to pay a kind of protection money to every major cable company or wireless carrier—just to continue working properly! The FCC's Open Internet Rules are the only thing standing in their way.

I'm sending this to letter to my two senators, my representative, the White House, and the FCC. First, to the FCC: don’t interfere with my ability to access what I want on the Internet, or with websites' ability to reach me. You should leave the existing rules in place, and enforce them.

To my senators: you have the power to stop FCC Chair Ajit Pai from abusing the rules by refusing to vote for his reconfirmation. I expect you to use that power. Pai, a former Verizon employee, has made it clear he intends to gut the rules to please his former employer and other major carriers, despite overwhelming support for the rules from voters in both parties. I urge you publicly oppose Pai's confirmation on these grounds.

To the White House: Ajit Pai, a former Verizon employee, is acting in the interests of his former employer, not the American people. America deserves better. Appoint an FCC Chair who will protect the economic miracle that is the Internet from media monopolies like AT&T, Time Warner Cable, and Comcast/NBC/Universal.

To my representative: please publicly oppose Ajit Pai's plan to oppose the rules, and do everything you can to persuade the Senate and the White House to oppose Pai's nomination.

I would be happy to speak more with anyone on your staff about the rules and why they’re so important to me. Please notify me of any opportunities to meet with you or your staff.
Matthew Shapiro
y
77
I specifically support strong net neutrality backed by Title II oversight of ISP's.y
78
Internet should be treated the same as any utility. Net neutrality allows for the internet to be competitive. Maintain the current rules.y
79
I support strong net neutrality backed by title II oversight of ISP's.y
80
keep net neutralityy
81
Please do not allow net neutrality to be killed off. I firmly believe ALL ISP's will start "Pay for Play" deals with online providers which is totally unfair.y
82
Please keep the internet free and equal for everyoney
83
I strongly support network neutrality via Title IIy
84
Keep Net Neutrality with Title IIy
85
i, edgar abrica-león specifically support net neutrality backed by title 2 of ISP. John Oliver informed me of what this means and i agree with him.y
86
Preserve title 2 and net neutrality!y
87
I support strong net neutrality backed by title IIy
88
Keep Title II and uphold the rules and regulations in place to protect net neutrality.y
89
I strongly support net neutrality. Please maintain current laws and it's status as Title II.y
90
I feel it is very important that ISPs continue to be regulated under Title II oversight of the 1933 communications act.y
91
Please do not change the existing regulations regarding net neutrality, thank youy
92
I strongly support net neutrality backed my title II oversight of isp'sy
93
I can assure you there is not one American sitting around yearning for the days when net neutrality will end. Well, except for Steve Bannon, but I'm pretty sure he's just the reanimated burnt brick of concentrated evil at the end of "Time Bandits". If you're reading this post after the law passes, I would tell you to go to IMDB to look up that obscure movie reference, but that's impossible as they couldn't afford anything past the AOL Dial-up status. Look, all I'm saying is that if even France has better internet access than we do, you owe it to ALL Americans to offer the same.y
94
Don't let the ISP's ruin the internet please.y
95
As an Internet user, I'm asking the FCC to protect the net neutrality protections currently in place.

The FCC should throw out Chairman Ajit Pai's proposal to give the ISP monopolies like Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon the authority to create Internet fast lanes, stripping Internet users of the meaningful access and privacy protections we fought for and just recently won.

I'm concerned about ISPs being allowed to discriminate against certain types of data or websites, because users will have fewer options and a less diverse Internet. Thankfully, the current net neutrality rules ensure that Internet providers can't slow or block our ability to see certain websites or create Internet "fast lanes" by charging websites and online service money to reach customers faster. That's exactly the right balance to ensure the Internet remains a level playing field that benefits small businesses and Internet users as well as larger players. Pai's proposed repeal of the rules would transform ISPs into Internet gatekeepers with an effective veto right on innovation and expression. That's not the kind of Internet we want to pass on to future generations of technology users.

I urge you to keep Title II net neutrality in place, and safeguard Internet users like me.

Sincerely,
Clifford J Sever
y
96
Preserve title 2.y
97
Paragraph 82 asks for input on whether throttling should be regulated. In the past ISPs have throttled content based on their own determination of what was lawful or permissible, and had to be forced to stop in the courts. Isn’t it possible they could do this again? I’m also concerned by mobile providers who say a plan is “unlimited,” but when you exceed the data cap, only throttle sites and services that aren’t part of their approved zero-rating network. Thanks for reading my comment.y
98
I strongly support net neutrality, and maintaining Title II oversight of American ISPs.y
99
To Whom It May Concern:

I am not someone who comments frequently on these types of things, but have been driven to do so as I believe this is a terrible idea, and that "freedom of the Internet" is being grossly misrepresented.

Consider that we, as Americans, possess one of the greatest road systems in the world. While there are many private roads, much of our prosperity as a nation has come from the fact that we have free and public roads that allow commerce to flow unmolested.

So, now, we have the Internet, probably the most important technical innovation in generations. If I may, this 17-108 wants to undo the "public roads" of the Internet, giving just two organizations total control the vast majority of last mile delivery control over the entire broadband Internet experience for 70%+ of Americans.

This isn't encouraging competition, it's throwing away the public roads and throwing a bone to lobby organizations at the large ISPs, and we are about to lose a once in a lifetime chance to stay on top of Internet technologies (and all of the things they affect). This is going to have profound negative effects to American businesses, and drive innovative companies that rely on equal access (not pay-to-play) out of the United States. It has already been a trend in many places in the world.

In Paragraph 82 it asks for input on whether throttling should be regulated. In the past ISPs have throttled content based on their own determination of what was lawful or permissible, and had to be forced to stop in the courts. They're going to do this again. In fact, there are fewer companies and they are more centralized than when that situation went down. It's a bad idea. Don't do this.

I’m also concerned by mobile providers who say a plan is “unlimited,” but when you exceed the data cap, only throttle sites and services that aren’t part of their approved zero-rating network. I've seen what happens in markets without enough competition, and AT&T has failed to uphold their end of the bargain and creatively reduced their unlimited customers (their new plans are hardly unlimited, read the contracts) from the original iPhone-launch era plans. It's atrocious to see how brazen the company is towars their customers, but that's because there are not enough companies in the space.

The same problems affect both industries. We need deregulation. It's too difficult and overly regulated to build Internet service providers, and nearly impossible to start a cell phone company. The incumbents in both are entrenched in legislation that needs to be stripped away from them so they will actually have to compete. But 17-108 isn't about competition. This is about lobby organizations in Washington representing the powerful interests of just a handful of powerful ISPs.

17-108 flies in the face of American values of free an open markets, and is one of the most short sighted ideas I have ever read.

While I generally agree with market-driven solutions, there is not enough competition in the Internet service provider space to do so. Comcast now has more than half of all US broadband customers, and high speed broadband penetration and pricing has been woeful. For an Internet connection of 25 megabits per second, New Yorkers pay about $55 — nearly double that of what residents in London, Seoul, and Bucharest, Romania, pay. Can you imagine that the US is falling behind Eastern Europe? We are. We need substantive reform, but not in the rolling back of equal access for all, but in the rolling back of fat cat protectionist laws that are making innovation impossible in this industry and creating companies that increasingly look like they're going to need anti-trust interventions if we're going to see American free market innovation happen.

Please, network neutrality is one of the most important things that keeps our startup ecosystem and tech industry going in the US, a bright spot that's going to keep getting brighter — as long as we don't make it impossible to small companies to compete with big ones. And this is exactly what this is going to do.

Don't allow this. It's a terrible idea. We need open roads to stay on top, and that means being brave enough to kill 17-108.

Thank you.
y
100
I support strong net neutrality backed by title 2 oversight of ISP's.y
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