RESPONSES - Stakeholders E-Consultation on elements for the declaration and themes for the interactive dialogues of the 2020 United Nations Ocean Conference
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Stakeholders E-Consultation: Elements for the declaration and themes for the interactive dialogues of the 2020 United Nations Ocean Conference
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This file compiles inputs from from non-governmental organizations, civil society organizations, academic institutions, the scientific community, the private sector, philanthropic organizations, major groups and other stakeholders on elements for the declaration as well as the themes for the interactive dialogues for the 2020 UN Ocean Conference. Outcomes may contain advice, opinions and statements of various information providers. The United Nations does not represent or endorse the accuracy or reliability of any advice, opinion, statement or other information provided through this e-consultation. Our office reserves the right to delete any content/input that is not aligned with the United Nations Charter and/or the principles and purposes of the 2020 United Nations Conference to support the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 14.
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2. Name of Organization3. Country5. If you represent a major group or other stakeholder constituency, please indicate which one?What are important science-based and innovative areas of action, contributing to the conservation and sustainable use of oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development, which could be reflected in the declaration of the 2020 UN Ocean Conference? How can the 2020 UN Ocean Conference declaration advance action on concrete, science-based and innovative solutions supporting the implementation of Goal 14?How can the international community leverage synergies in the work in science-based and innovative areas of action to contribute to the conservation and sustainable use of oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable developmentWhat are the main challenges to the achievement of Goal 14, especially as it relates to science and innovationThemes for Interactive Dialogues - Please add your views on the proposed themes for the interactive dialogues to be held during the 2020 UN Ocean Conference
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CANEUS (Canada-Europe-US-Asia-Africa Network) CanadaScience & Technological CommunityCreate a new collaborative framework for sharing of interdisciplinary ocean data, derived from both space technology as well other scientific methods which is critical for ocean monitoring as well coastal transportation infrastructure.By creating common data and access standards across communities and by working together as shared system, stakeholder agencies can improve the implementation of Goal 14.To create a common platform that allows sharing of data segments with its ability to serve as a strong tool for bridging the gaps between the developed and developing countries. The eventual goal is to establish a public/private partnership, which would create a low-cost, internationally shared data platform with no barriers to entry for participating nations. A number of national agencies, NGO’s, and commercial interests have been active in deploying space based data and sensors monitoring capabilities for fisheries, pollution, marine and ocean transportation infrastructure; however, there currently exists no partnership to coordinate and organize all the disparate efforts – especially one that ensures the availability of these capabilities to otherwise underserved countries.

It’s not always clear what data, information and tools are available; how to tap into these tools; or how to find process and interpret the data in a timely manner. Then there are the unique challenges for the small island and less developed countries.
To further develop the concept of shared and coordinated approach for global data exchange standards in order to help improve fisheries management and ocean economy including transport and marine resources, CANEUS, the Global non-profit organization, is proposing a dialogue to help create requisite framework that will define and address issues, and to frame an implementation plan for achievement of Goal 14.
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Gatef organizationEgyptWomen, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Business & Industry, Science & Technological Community, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development1- Treatment of marine pollution.

2. Management, protection and conservation of marine and coastal ecosystems.

3. Reducing and treating ocean solidification.

4. Make fisheries sustainable.

5. Increase the economic benefits of small island developing States and the least developed countries and provide small-scale artisan fishermen access to marine resources and markets.

6. Increasing scientific knowledge and developing research capabilities and marine technology.

7. Promote the conservation and sustainable use of the ocean and its resources by implementing international law as set out in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.
Save our Ocean, Protect our Future
The Ocean Conference, co-hosted by the Governments of Kenya and Portugal, comes at a critical time as the world is strengthening its efforts to mobilize, create and drive solutions to realize the 17 Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. As one of the first milestones of UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres’ newly launched Decade of Action for the Sustainable Development Goals, the Conference will propel much needed science-based innovative solutions aimed at starting a new chapter of global ocean action.
The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) embodies the three pillars of sustainable development: social, economic and environmental, and clarifies the legal framework for the sustainable development of the oceans and seas. The agreement covers a wide range of issues, such as borders and the legal regime of different marine areas, including continental shelf; navigation rights and duties; peace and security; conservation and management of living marine resources; protection and preservation of the marine environment; marine scientific research; development and transfer of marine technology; activities at the bottom The sailor is outside the limits of national judicial legislation. The agreement also contains important provisions relating to overseas migration as well as the task of providing assistance (Article 98). The General Assembly consistently affirmed the unified pattern of the agreement, and reaffirmed its strategic importance as a basis for action and cooperation at the national,Human pressures on marine ecosystems, including ocean acidification and climate change, pose a challenge to the resilience of the oceans and their resources, as well as their continued ability to provide important goods and services in ecosystems. The United Nations General Assembly has noted with concern the findings of the assessment, which indicate that the world's oceans face simultaneous extreme pressures, and they affect them in a way that makes it easier to reach the limits of their endurance, which may have already been reached, and that delays in implementing solutions to specific problems , Threatens to deteriorate the world's oceans, which will lead, unnecessarily, to increased environmental, social and economic costs. The international community is increasingly aware that the development of an ocean-based economy, that is, a "blue" economy for present and future generations, requires the preservation of the oceans and seas and their resources, and that they are managed and used in a sustainable manner, including all sectors, and depends on cooperation and concerted efforts.
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Burundi Rugby League Rugby A XIII Cooperative BurundiWomen, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Farmer, I do not represent a group or constituencyEducating the population on the needs of the ocean could being changes and important results could be achieved We need a proper definition of life under water and as some of the country members are inland locked countries, their under water resources are also linked to the ocean Improving means of developing sustainable program for all the under water life, and understand this phenomenon of pollution of the sea in inland lake (case of Lake Tanganyka)Country equality is very important for this issue It's interesting when some organization has to take care of the basic needs such as hunger, no poverty, health, some impact could be observed in a near future nevertheless access to finance is very important but we have to assure the bankers as they are not humanitarian
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Kadesh InternationalSouth AfricaWomen, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental OrganizationsMost countries derives a substantial GDP income from marine resources. Over the years major fishing grounds have been decimated by overfishing and looting of this valuable resource.Educating and informing people about the pro's and cons of our oceans and how immediate action can prevent the catastrophic effects awaiting us if we don't act nowImproved and effective law enforcement is but one of the ways we can effectively improve on how we manage our oceans.To little if scientific research reach the man in the street. Major participation drives should be initiated were this information is shared.Conservation and effective law enforcement coupled with information drives should be initiatives that will be effective tools
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Muahmmad Akram & Sons Trading & InvsetmentPakistanWomen, Indigenous Peoples, Business & Industry, Science & Technological Community, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable developmentThe Org must present an Implementation Plan for the Decade to the UN General Assembly of 2020 for the conservation and sustainable use of ocean and its resources Ocean Science through his report on oceans and the law of the sea and Marine Environment and the Sustainable Development of the Coastal Areas the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity of areas Platform for Action; and the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development as does scientific and technological innovation across areas as diverse as Conserve and sustainable use the oceans, seas and marine resources its efforts to mobilize, create and drive solutions to realize the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. As one of Goals, the Conference will propel much needed science based innovative solutions aimed at starting a new chapter of global ocean action and Support the Implementation of Sustainable Development Goal Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development.integrated and science-based ocean policies STRESSES that issues related to oceans and seas regional seas conventions, regional action plans, regional fisheries United Nations 2020 Conference in Lisbon to SupportThe framework on which this work is based identifies causal and and enhancing women's rights can help achieve the targets related to better safeguard conserve and sustainable use ocean resources energy-based innovation is helping to in Oceans face the threats of marine and nutrient pollution, resource depletion and climate change, all of which are caused primarily by human actions. In order to combat these issues and promote ocean sustainability, innovative solutions that World leaders must also work to protect marine species and support the peoplePossible areas for future work relevant to SDG 14 indicators Development Goals (SDGs) and targets will guide the activities of sustainably using the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development Global monitoring should be based, to the greatest possible extent, Aquaculture Policy and Resources Division, met at regular intervals to assistance to enhance countries' capacity to collect and submit data according make estimates based on the best data available from other sources or through global trends and challenges that will influence food and agriculture in the reducing rates of undernourishment and improving levels of nutrition cuts in economy-wide and agricultural fossil fuel use, would help address.
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INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, KHARAGPURINDIAI do not represent a group or constituencyILLEGAL, UNREPORTED AND UNREGULATED FISHING AND ITS EFFECTS ON TRADECOMING TOGETHER AND TALKING ON THE SUBJECT IS THE FIRST STEPTHIS SHOULD RESULT IN REGIONAL LEVEL ARRANGEMENTSIMPLEMENTATIONYES
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International Rescue CommitteeZimbabweWomen, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, FarmerCatchment management to control pollution and siltation of main water sources that are main riversFind a financial mechanisms to support developing nationsExchange visit and seminaries the lack of funding for innovative young peoplethe themes are comprehensive and there is need to focus more on the catchment areas which is mostly inland
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Avigreen Solutions KenyaChildren & Youth, Business & Industry, Science & Technological Community
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PUBLIC'MANSFranceBusiness & Industry, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable developmentLe texte a été rédigé alors que la question cruciale des changements climatiques ne faisait pas encore partie des préoccupations majeures de la communauté internationale. Le droit de la mer doit être adapté à un monde en constante mutation. La Convention souffre aussi de ne pas être universelle. S’agissant des océans, l’arsenal juridique est certes abondant mais fragmenté en fonction des espaces couverts, des secteurs maritimes et des institutions. Un droit de la mer mal connu, y compris par les institutions censées l’utiliser. C’est un droit qui est peu enseigné dans les facultés de droit. La Convention des Nations Unies doit être réécrite dans un langage accessible et que des campagnes de sensibilisation de l’opinion publique soient menées.Bien qu’importante, la Convention sur le droit de la mer reste incomplète. Le cadre juridique nécessaire à la mise en œuvre de l’objectif 14 du Programme de développement durable à l’horizon 2030 existe déjà. Les États doivent juste l’appliquer. Cette application est insuffisante, d’où l’importance de renforcer les capacités des États Membres à cet égard. Ce renforcement de capacités doit cibler en priorité les pays en développement, La Convention des Nations Unies sur le droit de la mer fournit le cadre juridique requis pour la conservation et l’exploitation durable des océans et de leurs ressources. Rédigée en 1982, elle est entrée en vigueur le 16 novembre 1994 et compte actuellement 168 États parties. Les 320 articles de la Convention et ses neuf annexes couvrent presque tous les aspects de la gestion des océans et de leurs ressources, y compris: les limites des différentes zones maritimes et les droits et devoirs des États, la question de la navigation maritime, la conservation et la gestion des ressources marines vivantes, l’exploitation des ressources non vivantes, la recherche scientifique marine, la protection et la préservation du milieu marin, y compris de diverses sources de pollution, et le règlement pacifique des différends. Cette Convention est le reflet de notre ambition collective à trouver des solutions aux problèmes des océans. L’efficacité de ce cadre juridique international dépend de sa pleine mise en œuvre. L’objectif 14 du Programme 2030 sur l’exploitation durable des océans impose aux États Membres d’intégrer, dans leur arsenal juridique, les nouvelles orientations politiques qu’il contient.Peut-être devrions-nous nous atteler au plus vite à l’évaluation des partenariats et des mécanismes existants pour renforcer ceux qui en ont besoin et pouvoir identifier les pratiques exemplaires. Nous pouvons par exemple compléter les textes internationaux par des lois nationales et des traités régionaux, L’urgence est d’établir un accord international sur les pêches non réglementées dans l’Arctique.
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"Living Lab" Sustainability Researcher with focus on W W E _ Own = "We Own" and Visiting Professor (i) Evry Switzerland (ii) Geneva Switzerland (iii) Bangkok ThailandSingapore Marine InfraSDGructure seen through the W W E _ Own = "We Own" lens [W W E is Water Waste Energy}Marine InfraSDGructure with focus on W W E _ Own = "We Own" , where W W E _ Own is Water Waste Energy Ownership in the marine - coastline - submarine context would need "We Own", which is proactive spirit of entrepreneurial alignment among marine policy makers - marine private service providers - marine financiers - marine insurers - marine community.Water Waste Energy _ Ownership equals "We Own" is a generic enabler of science-based innovative proaction. Marine resource value chain need to align marine water cleansing through marine "generic" waste to energy as well as submarine, island states and littoral conservation with innovative marine infraSDGructure. Marine infrastructure financing, insurance promote science-based W W E _ Own innovations, while "We Own" among the marine policy-makers, marine private services and "grassroots up" small islands, sea-farers, marine-coastal community, would create the much-neded proaction with entrepreneurial spirit.InfraSDGructure conveys that "embedding" sustainable development goals, specifically SDG 14, would usher systemic positive proactive co-shared leverage. Marine disaster vulnerability unleashed by anomaly of W W E [water waste energy] Water Waste Energy _ Ownership equals "We Own" is a marine conservation triad. "Silo"-ing or "harnessing" marine waste pollution, marine debris-driven acidification and marine disaster vulnerability is a priority.
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A.N.G.E.V. - Associazione Nazionale Guardie Ecologiche VolontarieItaliaNon-Governmental OrganizationsAnalisi, Ricerca, Osservazione, Prevenzione e Repressione dei reati.Coinvolgento tutte le istituzioni pubbliche al fine di raggiungere gli obiettivi di cui alla risposta precedente (la n. 1).Attraverso una costante e stretta opera di coesione tra le parti, avvalendosi degli Uffici competenti dell'ONU.1) Eliminazione dei sussidi/finanziamenti sull'estrazione di materie/energie fossili; 2) Dismissione di tutte le piattaforme di estrazione di petrolio, di gas e similari; 3) Bonifica dei mari dalle note "isole di plastica" e dalle navi e dai vari rifiuti sommersi; 4) Riduzione del prelievo di fauna ittica e più sostenibile (ad esempio del tonno, eccetera); 5) Controllo delle specie ittiche esotiche/aliene; 6) Costruzione e circolazione di natanti a motore più sostenibili (a idrogeno, a pannelli fotovoltaici/solari, a idrogeno, con microeolico, ibridi) e con modifiche sulle eliche da non danneggiare la fauna e la flora marine; 7) Divieti di caccia ai mammiferi ed ai medi e grandi predatori marini (balene, orche, capodogli, delfini, stenelle, squali, foche e similari, eccetera); 8) Armonizzazione delle norme di divieto su scala mondiale.Idem di cui alla risposta sopra riportata (la n. 4).
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2022 Initiative FoundationSwedenI do not represent a group or constituencyBy 2022 we are halfway to 2030 since the agreement on the 2030 Agenda in 2015. It will also be the 50-year Anniversary since the Stockholm Conference and the formation of UNEP. To reach Goal 14, the world should be at least halfway in the implementation (on an average, globally). Targets and indicators for 2022 would increase the chances of holding today's leaders accountable for the long-term SDGs. The targets and indicators should be monitored, assessed and reported in 2022.By having leaders to set concrete targets and commit to concrete action NOW, in 2020, for the world to be at least halfway in the implementation of SDG 14 by 2022 (halfway to 2030 since 2015 and 50 years since the Stockholm Conference and the formation of UNEP) the 2020 UN Ocean Conference would clearly contribute to action and to holding today's leaders accountable for the long-term goals and targets for Goal 14. The 2020 UN Ocean Declaration would, by including such commitments, clearly contribute to advancing action. By using a holistic perspective that includes how all SDGs are interlinked (as in the SDGs “wedding cake”, by Stockholm Resilience Centre). Simplifying the SDGs and their interlinkages is also important. We need a compass to navigate towards achieving the SDGs. The 2022 Initiative Foundation has developed a “compass” that aligns with the “wedding cake” and that simplifies the SDGs and their interlinkages. The compass points have been changed from North, East, South, West to Nature, Economy & Education, Sustainable Societies and Wellbeing. To show that we need to turn things around and that Nature is the basis for our survival, the compass is turned upside-down. The compass shows that we need to solve the SDGs related to Nature for our and future generations' survival. It can be used to pedagogically explain that the SDGs related to Economy, Education, innovation and lifestyle can be used as tools for creating Sustainable Societies, increased Wellbeing and for solving the harm we’ve done to Nature. The partnership goal is placed in the middle of the compass as shown in the figure on this link: https://media.2022initiative.org/2019/09/cropped-Arena-for-Sustainability-Games-2022-1.jpgOne of the main challenges is related to fact that Nature, including the Oceans, do not have legal rights. Another challenge is that in the current financial system the oceans (and all natural resources), are seen as a possible source of income or sink to be used by anyone (the Tragic of Commons) and negative impacts are seen as externalities that are not necessarily reported on. Partnership for the implementation and a holistic systems perspective in the financial system are therefore key areas for a successful implementation of Goal 14.A very good proposal of themes for the interactive dialogues that could be further improved by adding the holistic and simplified systems perspective that includes the interlinkages between all the SDGs, as explained in our answer above (the "up-side-down compass"). The "compass-thinking" can be used to facilitate the dialogue related to all targets for Goal 14.
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Climate Emergency InstituteCanadaNon-Governmental OrganizationsThe effect of atmospheric CO2 and greenhouse pollution with ocean heating, de-oxygenation and acidification (fossil fuel CO2 emissions) must be stopped for survival (Humanity, oceans, most life on Earth). The priority is to rapidly reduce CO2 and other long-lived greenhouse gases, to "near zero" (IPCC 2014 AR5). Global CO2 emissions must decline from 2020 reaching a 50% reduction from 2020 by 2030, and net zero carbon with virtual elimination of fossil fuel emissions by 2050 (IPCC 2018 1.5C Report, UNEP 2019 Gap Report). Research with development of high energy dense ocean power. Also R and D for innovative safe compact modular fission power. To save oceans the world must be rebuilt for clean zero combustion replacement of all fossil fuel power. In addition some CO2 must be removed by safe direct air CO2 capture and storage. Abolition of: fossil fuels; and externalizing of socio economic costs of oceans and climate change; and their future discounting- are essential to abolish. Full very long-term economic costs of oceans change should be estimated. Plastic ocean pollution requires biodegradable substitutes regulation on land. Removal requires R&D.The conference statement should declare the Oceans CO2 and Greenhouse Gas Emergency. Atmospheric CO2 and greenhouse gas pollution are causing ocean heating, acidification and deoxygenation (triple deadly assault) that are all rapidly increasing and accelerating since 1940. This triple ocean impact is an existential threat to our survival (Humanity, ocean life and most life on Earth), in addition to the climate change existential threat. Oceans change mitigation requires atmospheric CO2 (and other GHGs) stabilization. The 1.5C limit applies to oceans. Stop fossil fuel subsidies and tax carbon. Oceans carbon mitigation requires atmospheric CO2 reduction to "near zero" (IPCC 2014 AR5), global CO2 emissions decline rapidly from 2020 reduced 50% by 2030 with 100% global zero combustion power by 2050. Conference production of public education on why the above are essential as a survival response. Continued greenhouse gas emissions (and failure to reduce CO2 emissions to near zero) would lead to oceans collapse, followed by biosphere collapse. Ocean heating causes de-oxygenation and is an amplifying feedback by reducing CO2 absorption, the latter increasing ocean acidification. Making public the full terrible truth of the science of oceans degradation is the only thing that could leverage the co-operative oceans emergency response (and climate emergency response). Make public that the oceans can be expected to collapse from heating, acidification and deoxygenation, unless CO2 and greenhouse emissions are put into rapid decline this year (2020) and reduced 50% by 2030. If global CO2 emissions continue on the current worst case scenario the oceans will collapse. There is nothing that can stop or reverse that. Main challenges are the general denial of the climate and oceans emergency and no awareness of the oceans emergency. The campaign of dangerous climate change denial makes oceans collapse much more likely. The lack of any statement that we have an oceans CO2 and greenhouse gas emergency is a SDG14 barrier, as is the lack of education at all levels of the oceans emergency. The oceans change and oceans emergency must always be linked to climate change and the climate emergency. Barriers are the continued subsidizing of fossil fuels, and continued externalizing of climate change and oceans change full economic costs (oceans change must be fully costed). The environmentally perverse world economy is a huge barrier, as is investment bank financing of climate and oceans destructive fossil fuel extraction and distribution projects (includes natural gas). In order...The CO2 greenhouse gas emergency must be declared, due to the oceans triple existential threat planetary emergency. Include the oceans emergency response requires CO2 and other long-lived greenhouse gases to be reduced to near zero (IPCC 2014 AR5). Include that oceans change mitigation requires the 1.5C limit so global CO2 emissions have to rapidly decline from 2020, reduce 50% by 2030 and be carbon neutral with virtual elimination of fossil fuel CO2 emissions by 2050 (IPCC 2018 1.5C Report).
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Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes, Faculty of Science, University of LisbonPortugalI do not represent a group or constituencyManagement of the risk posed by sea level rise for the low lying developing countriesUnderstanding the science based output to the grassroot level who alctually depend on the aqautic resources.
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Club ohada thiesSenegalNon-Governmental OrganizationsAs innovation, it is important to create a dialogue between sean marine actors and gouvernment.
Éducation is also needed by actors in many country in Africain.
By implementing the convention and creating a group in which there will have civil sociéty, phliantropic and governement. This is an important action .Mains challenges: transparency by getting permits to international entreprises. Correct Business contract are also a challenge
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Ocean-based Climate Solutions, Inc.USABusiness & IndustryThe ocean carbon cycle must be considered as a mechanism to permanently drawdown massive amounts of atmospheric CO2. The scale of the oceans is vastly larger than the land biomass. Recent research suggest the microbial carbon pump produces "recalcitrant dissolved organic matter" which persists over 5,000 years in the deep ocean. See Nature Reviews vol 8 August 2010 "Microbial production of recalcitrant dissolved organic matter: long-term carbon storage in the global ocean",
Nianzhi Jiao, et.al. doi:10.1038/nrmicro2386
Avoid restricting science-based solutions which promote natural processes that enhance ocean carbon storage. These include wave-powered upwelling and/or downwelling; and addition of small quantities of naturally-existing materials such as iron or salt.Promote and assist cooperative efforts by industry/the private sector, and ocean research institutes.Innovative technologies should be encouraged and allowed to conduct small-scale sea trials expeditiously, if accompanied by appropriate scientific oversight and involvement, and publication of all data and results. Innovations should not be prohibited in advance, nor should blanket rejection of categories of innovation be adopted by the UN or its agencies.Goal 7 should be amended to recognize that mankind has already changed the ocean chemistry by 30% through consumption of fossil fuels - therefore "conservation" needs to reflect "restoration". Just "conserving" implies status quo, whereas restoring to the former pre-industrial ocean status should be the primary goal.
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Universidad Politecnica de MadridSpainScience & Technological CommunityUse of big data combined with qualitative measurement of sustainability for developing and developed countries using existing tools, such as fisheries performance indicators, to be able to develop composite indicators for each country and also for the high seas. In order to determine the (composite) indicators it will be necessary to consider the economic, social and ecological aspects of fisheries to develop a normalized indicator(s) that will allow to measure sustainability in each country EEZs and moving downstream to the high seas bounding that EEZs. in this regard countries operating fishing vessels on the EEZs or the high seas would also need to be consider the sustainability of the EEZs or the high seas.Promoting harmonized approaches at the level of the UN Agencies dealing with the sustainability of the high seas. In this regard, and considering the matter of fisheries, closed cooperation should be sought from FAO, ILO and IMO to find and use common indicators to improve the ocean governance at the level of the UNWith the following two elements related to the maritime space: 1) The ratification and implementation of UN´s Agencies mandatory instruments such as the IMO´s 2012 Cape Town Agreement and the STCW-F, the ILO´s WFC 2007 (ILO 188) and the FAO´s Port State Measure Agreement to deter IUUf. 2) The development of control measures for enforcement of the above conventions.
As a consequence of the above mechanisms would be develop for the gathering and provision of data for scientific purposes to be able to move from qualitative to quantitative indicators. In order to do this there is a need to further engage the academia with policy makers and to assist LDCs and SIDs and to develop suitable governance structures
Data availability, data sharing and gathering and understanding the correlations between the sustainable development goals e.g. in the field of fishing vessels: SDG 8, SDG3, SDG 4, SDG 9, SDG 14 and SDG 17In addition to the above there is a need to develop interagency mechanisms to allow to measure sustainability in the same lines e.g. target 14.1 related to marine pollution from plastics is under UNEP but other agencies such as the IMO would need to consider to scale up their commitment so that pollution coming from ships and land are able to be measured consistently contributing towards that target. Furthermore the reduction of marine pollution (14.1) should contribute towards the rest of the targets (such as 14.4. to 14.6). Hence it is not only the interlinkages with other SDGs but within the targets of SDG14
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World Youth Foundation Malaysia Children & YouthLoss of biodiversity and marine life , plastic pollution on marine life and coral reef, ocean mapping and the effects of hotter temperatures to the marine ecosystem From my experience and general understanding any evidence that is supported by science will be very helpful in the implementation stage. The public are more responsive in their actions when there is science based evidence. For example, in the case of tobacco use, when graphic pictures supported by science based evidence were shown on cigarettes boxes, it was more informative. When people are aware of the consequences of their actions, they are more responsive. By building partnerships , providing grants and support and by engaging more actively and meaningful with youth led and youth focused NGOs Lack of political will, poor awareness and understanding by the general public, lack of information and poor implementation by the local authorities. The other area that we would like to highlight is that governments should work hand in hand with all NGOs and the scientific community .. The views of the scientific are often not heard. An inclusive approach is very much needed. Better governance and accountability is also an area that should be given due effort.
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Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua Foundation(ASYARFS)United States of America, Sub Sahara AfricaNon-Governmental OrganizationsPrevention of Oil Spillage in the Marine industries and waste products.The Ocean Conference serves as a medium for Enlightening and educating the people about the Current status of the Ocean and it's bodies, Proposing restrictions guiding industries on waste dumping, to protect life below water for a safer and cleaner OceanA lot Needs to be done. What does Native Born People (Rural) know about life under the water?. The Ocean Conference need to work with NGOs, CSOs that works with Rural community to educate them on life below water.Rapid changes in Climate Effects, Oil Spillage from the Marine Industries, Dumping of Waste Products.The theme of the 2020 UN Ocean Conference cover all the target areas of the Ocean which needs to be addressed.
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Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua Foundation (ASYARFS)United States of America, Sub Sahara AfricaNon-Governmental OrganizationsPrevention of Oil Spillage in the Marine industries and waste products.The Ocean Conference serves as a medium for Enlightening and educating the people about the Current status of the Ocean and it's bodies, Proposing restrictions guiding industries on waste dumping, to protect life below water for a safer and cleaner Ocean

A lot Needs to be done. What does Native Born People (Rural) know about life under the water?. The Ocean Conference need to work with NGOs, CSOs that works with Rural community to educate them on life below water.
Rapid changes in Climate Effects, Oil Spillage from the Marine Industries, Dumping of Waste Products.The theme of the 2020 UN Ocean Conference cover all the target areas of the Ocean which needs to be addressed.
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Alternative Lİfe AssociationturkeyNon-Governmental OrganizationsDivers, snorkelers , diving federations , centers, schools and dive shops with one goal (14)must be in the game actively.

“There are between 2.7 to 3.5 million active scuba divers in the US with as many as 6 million active scuba divers worldwide. There are about 11 million snorkelers in the US and about 20 million snorkelers worldwide

.”The World Underwater Federation was founded in 1959 and by now it comprises over 130 federations from 5 continents.

With more than 6,600 PADI Dive Centers and Resorts, and 137,000 individual PADI Professionals who have issued more than 27 million certifications around the world,
Our seas are crying..!!
with one motto and one GOAL(14) in every continent ,DIVING ECO SYSTEM has to come together ,by organizing their Congress and/or Symposium in order to prepare a very solid COMMITMENT to apply it simultaneously and immediately right now...Because the DIVERS are the patrols of underwater.They live there ,they earn their lives from the Ocean.They have to and they WILL protect their source of life.
With the DECLERATION and COMMITMENT of these successive meetings, AN ONLINE PLATFORM ( web Based App) has to be develop and this huge eco system of divers ,as patrols of underwater , load the photos , videos which shows pollution, disappearance of the beauty of Flora and fauna, extinction of species...They can put their ideas, feedbacks while socializing one side, but mainly like SDG17 says; They all come together to relieve the tears of the OCEAN.
and the good and innovative other thing will be gathering a big data of this eco system to use to achieve the GOAL 14 and other related ones.
Industrial Pollution, Pollution by non responsible tourism, lack of control, no sanction1. Addressing marine pollution (target 14.1);
2. Managing, protecting, conserving and restoring marine and coastalecosystems (targets 14.2 and 14.5);3. Minimizing and addressing ocean acidification (target 14.3; )
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Better Living Oasis Welfare Outreach Nigeria Non-Governmental OrganizationsUrgency in the implementation of the environmental degradation and climate change Through local innovative action with local knowledge by empowering communities to take charge of their expected ocean (environment) Through capacity building to understand the important of science based education. And involvement of private section towards innovative solutions Inability to fund the innovative Non governmental organisation and avoiding negative trade-off by ensuring that environmental and equity concerns do not take the back seat in the economic development Promoting and strengthening sustainable ocean-based economies, inparticular for small island developing States and least developed countries(target 14.7
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Origins ultimateIndiaIndigenous Peoples, Business & Industry, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable developmentReduce water pollution, carbon emission every whereWater, use, reuse to reduce and making the product available for every one living on this planet.By acknowledging, promoting, reducing taxes on environmentally friendly products, classifying, removing trade barriers for such products works over. This would facilitate easy access to every one and provide option to adapt the changes.We have not yet been able to produce fresh water at cost effective prices, until such time learn to be frugal to survive. Solutions available from www.khuba.in for implementation. You have covered major aspects, but left out innovative eco friendly product promotion and supportive methodology for them.

Machine gun was invented to kill, the profits made then are contributed for Noble prize till date. If it was for war, for survival, then today the war has gone to every ones door steps through climate change and our very existence is threatened.

Why the same support should not be available for sustainable living which was provided at time of war ?
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FAAVMCanadaWomen, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental OrganizationsA well-founded data management and monitoring systems are of vital importance for ocean observing systems as they ensure that essential data are not only collected but also retained and made accessible for analysis and application.A global ocean data system should be designed as an inter-operable system of systems that will allow data to be easily find-able, accessible, inter-operable, and allowing re-usability through thematic integrated educational resources accessibility.It is incumbent upon our global community to develop or leverage existing tools that can bridge the gap between data-producing scientists and downstream users of the data, i.e., to remove barriers from “owning data” to “sharing data” for maximal community benefit would require cultural changes. Development of Common Protocols, international treaty and adoption of common standards for data/metadata and sharing protocols.Open and free data policies are widely encouraged and increasingly required by many organizations, including the IOC and International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE), the European Commission, and the Antarctic Treaty System, as well as many funding and operational agencies. Interoperability among data services must become a priority with the development of international treaty, statues and protections laws.
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CoopeSoliDar R.LCosta RicaNon-Governmental Organizations, Cooperative of Social Economy SectorGeneration of information based on citizenship science using traditional knowledge and scientific knowledge, and using it for decisions making.
Use of participative methodologies as participative mapping using local fishers knowledge for the decision making processes towards the sustainable use of marine resources and spatial planning processes.
Development of recognition platforms of the shared governance and other community -based governance models of marine conservation areas promoted by local communities and indigenous peoples.
To make a call to governments to actualized their fisheries census, especially those that relate to small scale fisheries and their inputs for food security, climate change resilience, culture and livelihoods.

Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines for the sustainable use of small scale fisheries in the context of food security and poverty eradication, with it a human rights base approach to fisheries and marine conservation.Incorporation of traditional fishing knowledge and scientific knowledge into decision making, valuing and using the traditional fishing knowledge ( including womens knowledge).
Recognized fishing value chains and the important input towards the livelihoods of women and youth.
Human rights base approach to fishing, marine conservation and marine resources sustainable use.
We believe emphasis needs to be placed in recognizing the importance of small scale fisheries and with it the most vulnerable communities for food security and poverty eradication worldwide. Equity and just distribution of benefits derived from the use of this resources needs to be place at the main discussion table.
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Terraafont Consulting LLCUSANon-Governmental OrganizationsWhen it comes to ocean conservation, the focus is specifically on waters. However, the system of land and landscape is intrinsically connected to the ocean environment through surface and sub-surface hydrologic movements. Therefore, the issue of land conservation cannot be ignored and this is the cause being championed by our organization -Terraafont. We petition that “conservation of ocean and land interface” be duly recognized as a critical issue to ocean conservation, in 2020 UN Ocean Conference and related declarations. Terraafont believes in using the ecosystem approach in educating and emphasizing on environmental protection and conservation issues. This approach could be useful for UN in building a convincing case of ocean conservation with the broader public. Using the ecosystem approach of interconnectedness of systems, the 2020 UN Ocean Conference declaration must broadcast the (negative) impacts of non-action on ocean conservation issues on human species (in addition to other species). This should help in triggering mass-awakening. The ecosystem of funding and sustaining innovative actions, products, research and scholarship needs to be streamlined. This funding ecosystem should be open to leveraging or encouraging the engaged stakeholders in contributing with high-impact outputs, which may be subject to funding of research for proof of concept or building prototypes for conservation. The World bank group, should consider creating a category for funding/ engaging UN stakeholders to address the issue of broken funding ecosystem. Short answer is “funding” for research and innovation. In terms of themes, we suggest expansion/ re-phrasing of:

A) current theme number (1) as “ Managing, protecting, conserving and restoring marine, coastal and inland stream ecosystems (targets 14.2 and 14.5)”.

B) current theme number (6) as “Building new knowledge, research and technology impacting ocean conservation, through new partnerships and leveraging current partnerships, with UN SDG stakeholders through seed grants via the allied funding partners”.

And

D) current theme of (7) as “Enhancing the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources by re-aligning country policies with international law as reflected in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (target 14.c) , as a step towards implementation”.
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Please note that there is no any organisation or NGO registration only freelancer individual named Hitesh BHATT-indiaUSA ( since December-2019 to till date today immigrants from India due to safety and security reasons)Corruption free world with sustainable development goals and all inclusive solutions related water and sanitation for 24-25 years toiling hard-work empirical experience in India related water.My physical present speak the volume of truth and firstly my 24-25 years financial losses and expenses fullfill immediately first than I can draw the line straight turn the table in positive manner otherwise I can not working related in un Ocean conference meeting forum and my only constraints are observing related activities without any public mileage or good cause of world and national interest of law INDIA,now USA since December-2019 to till date today.Firstly eradicate corruption effects form UN Ocean conference meeting forum implementation of goal -14 & when my physical present speak the volume of truth and obersvetion base impact reports needs when whole course of action in my opinion obersvetion.People first mission always national interest of law INDIA and USA all inclusive solutions related water and sanitation and domestic electrical connection with sustainable development goals and all inclusive solutions by only spurrting idea innovation multiple action and social sciences and humanities & social security justice for 24-25 years toiling hard-work losses fullfill immediately first than I can draw the line straight turn the table in positive manner without any wrong motive.My only constraints and challenging on science and innovation are financial freedom without any office infrastructure and logistics support pathetic living conditions and empirical experience in limitations sources of income & physical peace living conditions. & Other challenge is my interpreter speaking skills and language barrier because my mother tongue is Gujarati and English language speaking very poor and also without knowing any law. These are my challenges in positive manner without any public mileage or publicly available toiling hard-work empirical evidence experience for 24-25 years toiling hard-work real life situations grass roots.Please note that there is no any organisation company or any other NGO registration only freelancer individual related water and sanitation and domestic electrical connection with sustainable development goals 24-25 years financial losses experience and freelancer individual knowledge without any office infrastructure and logistics support pathetic living conditions in India knowledge. So, please treat this information & cancel my membership or registration if you people my knowledge not found in your office invitation required than cancelled my order for Ocean conference meeting forum-2020.
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Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research Victoria Island Lagos Nigeria Non-Governmental OrganizationsMarine Spatial Planning at both the national, regional and transboundary levels need urgent focus and implementation to engage all stakeholders to sustainably utilise Ocean based resources in an amicably manner for the benefits of man and the ecosystems. The 2020 UN Ocean Conference should participating countries sign the agreement that will be reached at the end of conference. Encourage countries to implement the agreement and report progresses made from time to time. By partnership both at regional and national transboundary levels for action based thematic issues on regular basisLack of commitment by nations to fund joint scientific research to determine the state of productivity of ecosystems to determine the actual resources still available despite degradation by human activities and some natural forces. 1.integration of coastal communities leaders, youths and women into sustainable utilisation of the Ocean resources through Enlightenment programmes, Ocean literacy and implementation of result oriented programmes on the health and safety of their immediate water bodies and land based activities that indirectly or directly impart on the seas and Oceans.
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Iwi Collective PartnershipNew ZealandIndigenous PeoplesImproved understanding of the positive benefits of marine resource utilisation to the social, cultural and economic imperatives of indigenous peoples where such utilisation is consistent with strong cultural values and principles of sustainability (what the Maori people of New Zealand term, ' kaitiakitanga'). The standard international approach is too simplistic and doesn't differentiate between this type of communal utilisation versus utilisation that is strictly for private gain. Iwi and Maori of New Zealand are developing sustainable models that balance appropriate utilisation and economic benefits with the social opportunities of employment and consistent with cultural traditions and practices. An improved understanding of the Iwi Maori indigenous customary commercial and non-commercial sectors operating within the New Zealand marine / fisheries framework, and eventual support for the development of this framework as a templar for Pacific and potentially global solutions.Too much emphasis from NGOs on trying to shut down commercial fishing. A sustainable solution requires that all interest groups work together, particular as it relates to research.
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Ligue des Sacrifices Volontaires pour la Défense des Droits de l'Homme et d'environnement (LISVDHE)Democratic Republic of CongoNon-Governmental OrganizationsHuman Rights and environmentSupport local actors to stimulate the individuels and countries conscience. This can let thèse authorities to take good decisions by integrate the issues in there programmes. Support local organisation and organize with them regular conférences and trainings. Stuggle against climate change and protect thé environment
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Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition / IHRAAMUnited States / Gullah/Geechee NationIndigenous PeoplesEnvironmental Ecology Balance Activities to Reduce and Prevent Ocean AcidificationThe UN Ocean Conference declaration can advance this action by building capacity amongst the ocean actors that have been engaging in the success of this SDG. We should be the living voices presented in materials that can be broadcasted around the world via different platforms so that all global voices are heard telling these scientific details in ways that reach the average person.There needs to be more international online conferences and dialogues in which information, data, and best practices can be shared from a number of perspectives. One such conference was the "Virtual Islands Innovations Summit" which took place in 2019.Funding and having the scientific community present things in a manner that will engage the general public so that they can be part of the implementation of best practices.All of the themes that have been presented are critical and they need to be prioritized via a future survey. Making fisheries sustainable and providing access for small-scale subsistence fishers that are indigenous is not written here and should be included. In order to do that, we have to address marine pollution and ocean acidification as well. Those who are living this stories such as members of the Gullah/Geechee Fishing Association of the Sea Islands off the US southeastern coast should be brought to the conference to share in this dialogue along with other indigenous groups on small islands that are fighting for this as well and do not have the resources and representation to be a part of the major planning and dialogues about this SDG which pertains to sustaining their culture
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Proyecto STEAMexMexicoChildren & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological CommunityThe inclusion of robotics as a way to develop innovative initiatives to clean up our water bodies could potentially become a viable solution for the conservation of our oceans and marine resources. As the United Nations' General Assembly Report on its 74th session mentions, plastic is still accountable for 60%-80% of the ocean's marine litter, most of it located or deriving from polluted coasts which later, because of the tides or wind, push this debris to our oceans. Through the advancement of technological solutions, especially in the engineering field of robotics, nowadays it is viable to build machines that could clean up our coasts and use renewable energy sources (such as solar energy or lithium batteries) to work. This has already been developed and researched on an educational basis, having high school students from across the world working towards building robots that can collect marine debris, in different sizes, and simulate their functioning on a first-hand experience (https://nypost.com/2019/11/01/worlds-largest-robotics-contest-challenged-students-to-find-solutions-to-ocean-pollution/). The declaration could advance action on solutions to support to Goal 14 by increasing the awareness and promote education on the current issues that impede the accomplishment of its targets. Concrete solutions on this matter would be the impulse to develop further research on energetic solutions that reduce the need of CO2 emissions in coastal areas (such as further research on tidal energy plants), as well as encouraging nations to transition towards infrastructure on renewable energy generation, rather than dependency in petroleum refineries. Furthermore, both governments and the private sector should join in investing towards the implementation of current proposed solutions, but that are currently on hold due to lack of financing. Moreover, support must be proposed to small island nations that are currently endangered due to rising sea level. By including within the declaration the commitment and action towards investing in sustainable economic activities, small island nations will be able to generate income that could be invested in the implementation of solutions that could help their population, economic growth, as well as the conservation of their marine resources.There are two ways through which the international community can work together reinforcing the efforts for this purpose. The first one would be having governments work on an agreement, supported as a UN Convention, on specific commitments that they must do towards promoting sustainable practices in marine-related economic activities, increase investment towards research for technological and innovative solutions, transition to clean energy sources in coastal areas, as well as strengthen the legal framework towards the protection of their marine resources. Furthermore, the international stakeholder community can join to develop an extensive and thorough plan to educate and install sustainable practices, in all of our respective fields, that can raise awareness, encourage the development of solutions, and have the general population of our countries involved in the conservation of our marine bodies and its wildlife. The main challenge the scientific community faces to achieve the targets of Goal 14 is the lack of funding. As we develop new solutions and promote innovation in our countries, many governments across the world decide to reduce their public expenditures towards scientific research. This leads to companies, organizations, universities, and other research institutions to stop their current work or not be able to start it at all due to the lack of financial support needed to acquire the necessary material, transportation, and technological developments. Without these research opportunities, the scientific community cannot work upon efforts towards new and better solutions that could potentially solve the biggest issues faced to achieve Goal 14's targets. Proposed themes for the interactive dialogues are correct and indeed cover some of the most important issues that must be debated about. Two suggestions are made to complement themes that should also be covered and that could be important towards generating more efforts towards accomplishing Goal 14. As a complement for the 6th theme on the list (for Target 14.a), an interactive dialogue on the role of public education and awareness efforts could be effected to talk effective strategies towards involving the general population (especially as in education for children - Goal 4) in these efforts. Another suggestion would be the youth involvement towards generating innovative solutions and the support that could be given by governments and the United Nations towards their development.
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CPFON-AHDCA République Centrafricaine Non-Governmental Organizations
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Green MentorsIndiaNon-Governmental OrganizationsIndigenous culture not the science will help us to give better ocean on planet Indigenous ocean science can support to achieve the Goal No 14nature based solution will be far more sustainable than science based solution changing human behaviour towards ocean is the greatest challenge not innovation and science
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Mujeres de Paz en el Mundo-EspañaSpainWomen, Non-Governmental OrganizationsLa educación como herramienta principal y la perspectiva de género en el diseño de acciones Implementación de normativa
Desarrollo de acciones específicas de participación ( grupos interactivos de jóvenes que realize una acción concreta y global)
Desarrollo de Carta internacional de los océanos en la que recoja compromisos comunes internacionales y sea suscrita por todos los países en los que el compromiso de desarrollar cambios sea firme.
Campaña específica de sensibilización. (limpiezas, recogidas...)
-Normativa aplicada Real
-Acciones concretas
-Campañas especificas
-Limitación y control de accesos a contaminantes
-Desarrollo de app específica para detectar puntos en los que se necesita realizar más acciones
-incorporar la perspectiva de género en el desarrollo sostenible de los oceanos
-desarrollo de app para innovar en detección de áreas concretas en las que tenga mayor incidencia la contaminación Oceaníca
Perspectiva de genero
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LIAQAT CORP PVT LTDPakistanWomen, Business & Industry, Science & Technological Community, Farmer, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development Being private family-owned funder Ag/food Tech ORGANIZATION to small scale farmers since 1975,have innovated food-TECH industrialization for our funded survival , our R&D/in-house ind technologies reshaped EU/USA dried processing lines at 20 times less cost, innovated dried processing/production lines invented, as professional sheets failed to kill food waste, invented production lines saved/dried process our funded farming. Developed A COMMON DRIED PROCESSING SEASONAL PLANT, in 25/50 villages under food/agri/rural/urban dried processing/infrastructure partnerships for survivals , our commercial field ind/future based AG/TECH has been owned by EU/USA universities/research institutes etc , all submitted ABSTRACTS accepted .

OUR original industrial food/TECH is in a position to start dried processing, 1/3 FOOD LOSS during 2020 instead of 2030, at the turnkey basis, all SDGs industrialized by our in-house technology for sustainable marine resources.
It is a matter of fact that our R&D CLUSTERS, INNOVATED practical industrial value added dried processing TECHNOLOGICAL solutions at sourcing sites,our 40 years of food- TECH is in a position to give TURN KEY BASIS practical ZERO FOOD LOSS solutions, in any part of FOOD WASTAGE.
Similarly, 10% of $9.00 Billion spending on our least cost effective dried processing lines/ROAD MAPS/PRODUCTION SHEETS etc, the 90% of $9.00 Billion start saving under our ind food-tech partnership during 2019,instead of 2030.
Our FARMING APPLICATIONS/24 HOUR TECHNOLOGY HELPLINE, also strongly killed FOOD WASTAGE at early stage, being private funder, provided big technological multiple value added industrialized drying solutions to small scale farmers to kill food wastage at sourcing,hunger/poverty was totally removed for our future based funding .
Our PRE/POST HARVEST/ industrialized innovated food-Tech processing trials/ training's are also available for application in any part of food loss areas of AFRICA/ASIA at TURN KEY BASIS.
We also offer PRIVATE/PUBLIC INDUSTRIAL INNOVATED, food-tech processing applications/industrial based dried processing research partnership at scientific/technological practical ground realities , food/TECH abstracts acceptance are being attached for transfer of AG-TECH to ZERO FOOD WASTE, if interested contact for technological/scientific TRANSFER OF ZERO FOOD INDUSTRIALIZED INNOVATIVE DRIED PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY IN AFRICA/ASIA, to kill poverty/hunger practically in 2020 instead of 2030.
We are in a food-tech industrial technological capacity to complete your agenda 2030 under partnership in any part of FOOD LOSS and all climate problems has been industrialized,
Seeking FIELD BASED INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER partnership FOR ZERO FOOD WASTE.
original industrial food/TECH in a position to start dried processing, 1/3 FOOD LOSS during 2020 instead of 2030, all SDGs industrialized by in-house technology.
seeking to transfer industrial food-TECH to your organization , 9 billion dollars LOSSES will converted into profit by application of 10% to invented in/house industrial dried processing technologies/road maps, game changing industrial food-TECH is future of marine. SCIENTIFIC/TECHNOLOGICAL ZERO FOOD LOSS SOLUTIONS IMPLEMENTED PRACTICALLY IN FUNDED OCEAN FARMING.

R&D CLUSTERS, INNOVATED practical industrial value added dried processing TECHNOLOGICAL solutions at ocean, 40 years of food- TECH is in a position to give TURN KEY BASIS practical ZERO FOOD LOSS solutions, in any part of OCEAN WASTAGE.

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GUILD (Ground-Up Innovation Labs for Development)SingaporeChildren & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological CommunityInvention Development for Environmental Disaster Management (Oil Spills), Illegal Fishing and Energy HarvestingIn 3 ways: (1) Support data collection and monitoring of ocean ecosystem health, and making such data accessible to inventors, (2) Encourage cross-sector thinking and creative collaboration between engineer scientists, designers, creators and artists, and (3) Channel funds and investments across 3P sectors (Public, Private and People) towards achieving Goal 14 with proper effective evaluation of projects.The following 3 different synergies could be helpful: (1) Private-Public synergy towards scaling up of innovation pilots across geographies, (2) Public-People synergy towards education and community building around ocean conservation, and (3) Private-People synergy towards designing and implementing innovative solutions better with inputs from the ground, and financing CSR initiatives.(1) Lack of effective R&D financing, (2) Poor Functional Development of translating science into an innovative technology that solves, (3) Weak Adoption due to poor product-market fit or local community ownership, and (4) Business model not scalable and repeatable enough for ocean solutionsMay want to mention “marine sanctuaries”.
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Asabe Shehu Yar'adua Foundation (ASYARFS)United States of America, Sub-Sahara AfricaNon-Governmental OrganizationsMeasures to Prevent Oil Spillage from the Marine industriesThe Ocean Conference serves as a medium for educating the people about the Current status of the Ocean and it's bodies, to protect life below water for a safer and cleaner OceanA lot needs to be put in place. What does Native-Born People (Rural) know about life under the water?. Cooperation between the Ocean Conference and NGOs, CSOs that are into communities to Educate People in the Rural Area.Rapid changes in Climate Effects, Oil Spillage from the Marine Industries, Dumping of Waste Products, Sewage sludge, Chemical and Industrial waste and trash.The theme of the 2020 UN Ocean Conference covers all the target areas of the Ocean which needs to be addressed, no stone should be left unturned.
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World Social Capital MonitorCHI do not represent a group or constituencyThe conservation and use of oceans is a question of social goods such as solidarity, helpfulness, compassion, friendliness and hospitality. These goods can not be enhanced by laws and declarations wherefore we started to assessing them locally in 48 languages:
https://trustyourplace.com/
We therefore reclaim that considering local social goods is an area of action. We therefore launched proposals for funds for local SME and cooperatives at the size of € 142 billion in the UN IATF on Financing for Development that cover many ocean countries such as Papua New Guinea, Haiti, Cuba, Philippines, Indonesia, Maledives and much more:
https://developmentfinance.un.org/sites/developmentfinance.un.org/files/28_New_Funds_To_Financing_Development.pdf
(PDF 3 MB, 32 pages, countries in alphabetic order)
We hope that for the first time in history Social Capital and social goods will be part of the declaration as well.
In late 2019 we published a synopsis of the five leading SDG progress reports in 2019:
http://commons.ch/wp-content/uploads/Synopsis_SDG_Reports_Goals_Allocation_2019.pdf
Unfortunately SDG 14 is almost the less considered one in all the five reports. As well unfortunately as well all the five institutions releasing the report refused to discussing with us the results of our study.
So we hope this time that a discussion on the interlinkages and the allocation of the Goalös starts.
We think the table showing how SDG 14 is left behind should be part of the declaration.
By providing budgets that science-based and innovative projects can apply for.The main challenge is to understanding Goal 14 not as a National audit - such as the OECD States do - but as a Global task that has to consider the interlinkages between the Goals, e.g. in many cases only SDG 16 Peace can lead to a protection of the oceans and without. The funding of SDG 14 can only be provided if the OECD countries are willing to invest a share of their annual new debt at the size of € 10 trillion with the countries that need credits to finance sustainable water supply, fishery and agriculture.
If the OECD countries continue to remain in symbolic conferences and declarations, fake initiatives and commitments, SDG 14 will remain 'left behind'.
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Gatef , nonviolence international EgyptWomen, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Workers & Trade Unions, Business & Industry, Science & Technological Communityeserves protection.
What is the problem?
The increased levels of debris in
The world's oceans are having an environmental impact
And a great economist. It affects debris
Marine biodiversity
Through the intertwining of living things
With debris or swallowing it with debris,
Where you can kill those creatures
Or make it unable to reproduce.
With regard to coral reefs
In the world, it has been devastated
 Actually 20 percent of them, and no
There seem to be no chances for her to recover.
About 24 per cent of
The remaining reefs are at risk of collapse
Imminent as a result of human pressure,
While facing another 26 percent
The risk of collapse is longer.
Moreover, management performs
Improper marine to fishing
Unfair. Economic benefits are estimated
Lost from the fisheries sector
About $ 50 billion of
United States dollars annually.
The United Nations Environment Program is appreciated
The cumulative economic impact of bad
Ocean management practices in an amount
 200 billion dollars a year on
the least. And in the absence of mitigation measures
From the impacts, climate change will lead to
Increased cost of damage
Oceans for an additional $
 $ 322 billion annually by
.2050 years
It is the world's oceans - their temperature, their chemistry, their currents and life - that stand behind the global systems that make the planet Earth habitable for humankind.

Our rain water, our drinking water, our weather, our climate, our coasts, a great deal of our food, and even the oxygen in the air we breathe, is provided by the seas and ultimately regulated by all of them. Oceans and seas have historically been vital channels for trade and transport.

Careful management of this essential global resource is an essential feature of a sustainable future ,  Open ocean sites have a 26% increase in acidity levels due to pollution, and without concerted efforts it is expected that coastal areas will increase by 20% of large marine ecosystems by 2050. ,  Over 2.6 billion people depend on the oceans as a major source of protein
More than 200 million people. Subsidies to fishing contribute to the rapid depletion of many fish species and prevent efforts to save and restore global fisheries and related employment opportunities, causing losses of $ 50 billion each year that ocean fisheries could have achieved.
To do?
Sustainability cannot be achieved
For open ocean and regions
Deep navy only through
Increased international cooperation to protect
Weak habitats. It should be sought
To create comprehensive, effective and managed systems
Fairly for which areas
Protected by governments to conserve diversity
Biological and ensure a future
Sustainable fishing industry.
And at the local level, we must
Adopting ocean-sensitive options
When buying products or eating food
Derived from the ocean, and not consumed
Just what we need. It can be started
By choosing approved products.
Energy can be saved by making
Small changes in our daily lives,
Like using public transportation
And separate the electronic devices from
Electricity. These measures reduce
Our carbon footprint, a factor
Contributes to elevated surface levels
the sea.
We must eliminate the use of
Plastic as possible, and regulate
Beach cleaning campaigns.
Most importantly, we can post a message
About how important marine life is
And why should we protect it
What is the goal here?
Conservation of oceans, seas and resources
Marine and used around
Sustainable.
Why?
Oceans provide natural resources
Basic, including food
Medicines, biofuels, and more
of the products. It helps to break down
Waste removal and pollution are working
Their coastal ecosystems
As barriers to reduce the damage caused
About storms. to keep
Oceans in a healthy condition supports
Climate change mitigation and efforts
Made to adapt to it. Have you visited
seaside? It is also a great place
For tourism and recreation.
What's more, the marine areas
The reserve contributes to poverty reduction
By increasing the catch of fish and income,
And improve health. It also helps
To improve gender equality,
Where women accomplish a great deal of
Work in small fisheries.
The marine environment is also home
An amazing variety of
Beautiful creatures, which range
Between single-celled organisms to greater
An animal lived on earth
Launch - blue whale. as well as
Home to coral reefs, one of
The most diverse ecosystem on
The planet appeared
Oceans cover three quarters of the Earth's surface, contain 97% of the water on the Earth's surface, and 99% represent the planet
Over three billion people depend on marine and coastal biological diversity for their livelihoods.
 The market value of marine and coastal resources and industries is $ 3 trillion annually, or about 5% of global GDP.
Oceans contain about 200,000 specific species, but actual numbers may be in millions.
The oceans absorb about 30% of the carbon dioxide that humans produce, limiting the effects of global warming.


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I-FourthArmenia Business & Industry, Science & Technological CommunityScientific breakthroughs can save the ocean from human distortion.
As a founder of a tech startup, I do believe that the human race is capable of exploiting ocean resources in a sustainable way.
One of the solutions is our product which is called the HyperGenerator. It is an original design combining three technologies into one unit, which are clean water generation, air purification, and data collection. The device will generate more than 500 liters of drinking water a day and purify air with 99.9% efficiency, as well as collect vital environmental data and provide advanced warning of earthquakes and tsunamis.
We will put our effort into the development of smart cities, smart communities, and smart transportation as we grow.
London's Islam Channel TV covered my story as a Founder and CEO live on the "Living The Life" programme. I spoke about I-Fourth and our HyperGenerator as well as about my experience as a Climate Reality Leader (30:00 - 46:00 minutes): https://www.islamchannel.tv/programme-video/living-the-life46/ . Here is also the link from I-Fourth's Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Innovation4th/posts/2275126282778362?__tn__=-R
We will have to set precise targets to achieve otherwise the document will remain a paper. The global society needs to organize events such as conferences, debates, discussions and study visits related to the health of our oceans. It doesn't need to be just one conference or declaration, rather it should be a systematic set of meetings with various stakeholders including also the students in different countries. The main challenge to any environmental problem is the lack of will to act!Developing technologies to study the ocean floor and to clean the seabed.
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Mediterranean Protected Areas Network (MedPAN)FranceNetwork of Marine Protected Areas managersNetworks of MPA managers, at national and regional levels, are a cornerstone to achieve management effectiveness and have the potential to accelerate the implementation of MPA strategic targets with direct impact on ocean conservation at every scale. The networks allows exchanges between MPA managers with common issues in different regional and local contexts, and generate creativity, problem solving and resource sharing.The declaration can support networks of MPA managers at national and regional levels as well as cooperation between those networks at international level.Synergies can be supported by networks of MPA managers that are agile and successful in sharing knowledge and best management practices through effective regional and inter-regional lessons learnt sharing, communication and capacity building. Networks of MPA managers build "community" between managers, scientists, authorities, stakeholders, and donors, and act as intermediary structures to reinforce linkages between actions on the ground and decision-making processes.One of the main challenge is to connect actions on the ground and decision-making processes. Decision-making processes, at local, national, regional and international levels must take into account feedbacks, needs and challenges of actions on the ground at MPA local level.Related to : " Managing, protecting, conserving and restoring marine and coastal ecosystems (targets 14.2 and 14.5)" ; another element can be added : "connecting managers of marine and coastal ecosystems"
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Institut Teknologi BandungIndonesiaScience & Technological CommunityBlue Carbon Ecosystem ConservationUN Ocean Conference I think need to invite young generation, especially who study about Ocean Science and Technology (Oceanography) so they can participate to share their views and ideas to solve marine environment problems.The lack of access for young generation from developing countries to take a part and implement their ideas.The development of Smart Eco Port and Marine Based Energy
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IHRC - International Human Rights CommissionLebanonIGO
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TOGETHER FOR ENERGY,ENVIRONMENT AND WATERCAMEROONOther stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable developmentThe innovative action areas are:
- Energy
- Agriculture
- the water
- the Transport system
- Waste Management
It can advance action on concrete solutions based on innovative science and directly.
In other words, the United Nations system based in each country must launch calls for applications for truly innovative projects, in order to support the selected innovative projects.
I have an innovative project which aims at objective 14. My project is in the radiant energy field (a new form of energy for the machines which go on water). But I need the financing to implement the project.
This project liberates the oceans and seas from floating solar panels and wind turbines that disturb aquatic life.
Of course the international community will necessarily take advantage of the synergies.
The international community will be in the monitoring, development, communication and implementation of all innovative projects to save aquatic life.
She will be an accompanist and a consultant for the synergies put in place.
The main challenges are:
-The perfect mastery of resilience
- Collaboration and technology transfer
- Rigor in the choice of innovative projects
- Intelligent decentralization of the energy sector.
I'm just going to add the perfect mastery of resilience to anticipate all the evils that destroy the environment.
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Institute for the Law of the Sea and International Marine Environmental Law (ISRIM)GermanyI do not represent a group or constituencyNew formats to communicate the framework by UNCLOS in order to foster public understanding and to allow public discourse/debate on the further development, implementation and enforcement of international law/law of the sea.Call for more academic lecturing in the law of the sea and international marine environmental law; Call for more exchange between marine sciences and legal science; Call for more public funding for scientific research projects on new concepts within the law of the sea; Call for more public discourse/debate on challenges to further develop, implement and enforce international law, as reflected in UNCLOS. Regarding theme 7 on the implementation of international law, it seems not enough to mention implementation. According to our view the further development (through i.a. academic lecturing, scientific legal research and public discourse/debate), the implementation and the enforcement of international law, as reflected in UCLOS, should be seen as a comprehensive and interdependent approach to achieve target 14.c SDG.
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TLF TECH PRIVATE LIMITEDINDIALocal Authorities, Business & Industry, Science & Technological Community, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development, UNHabitat and Innovation networksSustainable ocean observations using satellites and deep ocean explorations- marine robotics and autonomous vehicles, aquaculture, marine renewable energy, biotechnologies, offshore oil and gas through ocean economy innovation networksWorking with Inter-agency and specialized agencies is more important than ever. With only less than 10 years to reach the Goal it becomes imperative that the declaration aligns itself to NEW Urban agenda too. As urban population grows so is the impact on the Ocean economy. The 2020 Ocean conference could draw the declaration that aligns itself more on the improvement of Ocean observations in parallel to predicting the impacts of rapid urbanization trends. Coastal areas must be more focused and - impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems, ocean health, strengthen the management of fisheries,
reduce waste and increase sustainable harvest from the sea, future growth of aqua culture, strengthen seafood/fish in nutrition strategies must all be focused in the declaration.
The significance of ocean observations is growing, building on traditional scientific missions to provide evidence and increase our understanding of the ocean. But now these observations also contribute to monitor the development of ocean economic activities and to improve marine spatial planning. The general public also benefits, becoming both a user of these observations (e.g. tracking algal blooms on beaches) and a provider of data via original citizen science projects. Many innovations are taking place in small to large-scale ocean observing systems, and fresh approaches are needed to close gaps in knowledge surrounding the societal impacts of publicly funded ocean observation systems. Possible solutions include improved tracking of users (both scientific and operational), the mapping of value chains, and improvements to methodologies through the development of international standards or guidelines to conduct socio-economic assessments. (source : OECD)70% of Earth is water while about 30% is land. I think even 30% may have good data as it is land. While 70% is a vast area which had no adequate Data. for example the disappearance of MH370 led to a massive ocean bed search, however lot of resources were in vain and despite the current STI and geo-satellite date we lack the comprehensive data for this 70% Earth. Inmarsat data was also not enough to track the lost plain in Oceans. There is definitely several disputes w.r.t islands that makes the administration complex. Goal 14 is achievable only if we have an in-depth Observatory data of oceans too and real time radar that is shareable and accessible just like International space station view, there must be a International Ocean station view too that can give activity of oceans real time.8. Leveraging interlinkages between Sustainable Development Goal 14 ando ther Goals towards the implementation of the 2030 Agenda - Based on the note from the Secretary-General on the Preparatory process for the 2020 UN Ocean Conference - UNSD has been working on the TIER I, II, III mappings and inter-linkages can be worked through with better involvement of Statistics and GGIM departments.
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Human Support Services (HSS)NigeriaNon-Governmental OrganizationsHabitat Modeling, I think for the declaration to be implemented, inclusion, involvement and active participation of stakeholders other than heads of government and their officials from this preparatory phase is critical. Often, policies are made, treaties/protocols are signed yet no implementation. Proper understanding from interactions at that higher level of foot soldiers will have an implementation snowball effect. They will carry forward and act on the declaration. Involvement and inclusion of stakeholders who are ordinarily not encumbered with excess red-tapeThe root problem is Vested Interest. Once that is addressed, other issues will diminishTarget 14c- Sustained community stakeholder involvement and engagement
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AMLY & CIESénégalNon-Governmental Organizations, Business & Industry, Farmer, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development, I do not represent a group or constituency
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Wildlife crime control bureauIndiaWomen, Non-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological Community
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Gallifrey FoundationSwitzerlandNon-Governmental OrganizationsProtecting as much of the sea (30x30) with no take zones to enable it to recover from overextraction and reducing all factors that contribute to ocean warming, deoxygenation and acidification By finding tangible ways to implement these goals - auditable and transparent commitment to action by nations and an agreement to strengthen UNCLOS in favour of greater preservation and less extractionBy collaborating to achieve greater efficiencies and effectivness - however unanimity will never work - it needs to be a large majority to make these actions seriously viable.National needs over global - we need to remove these barriers - the world's population needs a thriving ocean to carry it on into the next centuries (including providing half the planet's oxygen) - the UN has the power and persuasiveness to make this happen1. Marine plastic pollution will increase exponentially as long as governments support more plastic production (a heavily subsidized industry by nations) - this must stop for the sake of the oceans. Switch off the firehose rather than cope with bathwater spill.
3. We must put a stop to all shark finning practices - there is no easy legal mechanism but shipping, transportation, illegal fishing, bycatch can only be addressed by a more strident method to stop all catching of sharks.
7. Is the most important as the UNCLOS outcome will play the largest part for the future of humankind
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Chamber of Agribusiness GhanaGhanaWomen, Non-Governmental Organizations, Workers & Trade Unions, Business & Industry, FarmerAm concern about the safer use of agro chemicals and fertilizers on Agricultural lands that finds their way into the river bodies and oceans thereby killing aquatic life's.

Another major challenges are the chemicals been used in mining sectors that are seem to be dangerous to Aquaculture lives.
Life below water is not only critical to the survival of the human race for drinking water but also food production and Aquaculture hence the need to minimize the ocean acidification and this must be done by using Innovative Agriculture means to reduce the rampant application of Agro chemicals and fertilizers.

This this end there is the need to strategically push for organic production means, adoption of pameculture and other conservatory methods in food production capable of large scale commercial farming..
The global communities should find an alternative to get world presidents to sign up for global safer water Management and preservation.

Researchers and scientist's must reorganize and begin to adopt a long lasting approach to convince global leaders about the impending danger of acidification of our water bodies.


Global safer water declaration
Having enough resources to find quality research and programs in identified epidemic zones.

Strong global Advocacy on governments by civil society platforms.

Another danger is the strong will or commitment from global business whose business affects aquatic lives.

And global leaders must be more committed to work together to make resources available and protect Aquaculture bodies through strong legislations , rules and regulations.
I will want to suggest a session for Youth and Gender.

The role of world Youths and civil society organizations in attaining sdg goal 14.

Drafting of objectives and targets
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Gatef organizationEgypt Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Workers & Trade Unions, Business & Industry, Science & Technological CommunityThe first "ocean challenge", launched on January 8, 2020, is looking for innovative solutions to combat the scourge of ocean pollution. Ocean pollution nutrient loads have tripled since before the industry, now approaching around 13 million metric tons annually, leading to massive growth in eutrophication and the emergence of hypoxia (low oxygen) regions, which now number more than 500 and cause hundreds of billions of Dollars in economic damage annually.

Globally, there are only a few examples (such as the Danube / Black Sea basin) where nutrient loads have been reduced enough to reverse the oxygen-deficient areas and eliminate them, and much work remains to be done on this Goal sustainable development
Oceans Innovation Challenge (OIC) is a new and unique mechanism they design to accelerate progress towards achieving SDG 14. By identifying, financing, advising, and developing truly innovative, business and creative methods. Specifically, to restore and protect the oceans and coasts that support livelihoods and encourage the "blue economy".

Above all, the Ocean Innovation Challenge publishes a series of "ocean challenges" or calls for proposals, each focusing on a specific sustainable development goal.

Also, public or private entities will design preliminary concepts, including governments and private companies. (Including startups), NGOs / CSOs, UN entities, academic institutions, and intergovernmental organizations. The first "challenge" opens here on January 8, 2020.
It is the world's oceans - their temperature, their chemistry, their currents and life - that stand behind the global systems that make the planet Earth habitable for humankind.

Our rain water, our drinking water, our weather, our climate, our coasts, a great deal of our food, and even the oxygen in the air we breathe, is provided by the seas and eventually organized by all of them. Oceans and seas have historically been vital channels for trade and transport.

Careful management of this essential global resource is an essential feature of a sustainable future.
The Ocean Innovation Challenge, a key part of the partnership between National Geographic and Sky Ocean Ventures to reduce plastic waste, has called for problem-solving across the world to develop new solutions to tackle the global waste crisis for plastics.

More than 9 million tons of plastic waste ends up in our oceans every year, and without interference, that number will nearly double to 17 million tons annually by 2025.

The ocean plastic innovation challenge focused on three strategies for tackling this growing crisis:

Designing single-use plastic replacements,
Identify opportunities for industries to process plastic waste along supply chains, and
Effectively communicate the need to act through data visualization.
The winners of the 2019 Plastic Circuit Challenge have a good reputation for their work in tackling the global plastic pollution problem. Essentially, in providing alternatives to single-use plastic products, by encouraging companies to adopt a sustainable circular economy approach. Developing visualizations to clarify the issue of plastic pollution to stimulate movement.
okay , I AGREE
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Rutgers UniversityUnited StatesI do not represent a group or constituencyurgent need to curb plastic pollution in the oceans; need to develop environmentally sound ways of adapting to sea level rise to preserve natural features such as salt marshes and mangroves.I don't knowWork with environmental organizations to develop best plans - and then they need to be implemented.Lack of political will; difficulty in changing people's habits; inadequate knowledge.Themes are good but you could include ocean acidification within marine pollution
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LGIFranceI do not represent a group or constituencyFocusing on ocean health & less so on the ocean's role in climate mitigation
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AXA XL on behalf of the Ocean Risk and Resilience Action AllianceUnited StatesBusiness & IndustryResilience pathways that incorporate coastal ecosystems are crucial, especially in small-island developing states and least developed countries. Marine ecosystems provide an essential source of ecological biodiversity and contribute to coastal livelihoods, such as small-scale fishing. They also form a protective natural barrier for coasts, which will become even more important due to increasing storm intensity, sea level rise and extreme storm surge events. The Ocean Risk and Resilience Action Alliance was launched as an innovative multi-sector collaboration to drive investment into coastal natural capital by pioneering ground-breaking finance products that incentivise blended finance and private investment. These finance solutions include developing scalable insurance products for coral reefs and mangroves, which incentivize communities to incorporate ecosystems into risk management planning. Blue carbon resilience credits are also being developed that value the carbon sequestration and protection benefits of coastal wetlands. These nature-based solutions drive cross-sector engagement on resilience and provide an economic and social case for the protection of coastal ecosystems.To advance action on innovative and actionable solutions, the UN Ocean Conference declaration should emphasize cross-sector engagement and partnerships, stressing that the private sector will be an essential partner in mitigating ocean risk and building resilience. In the last 10 years, insurers alone have paid out more than US$ 300 billion for coastal storm damage, with significantly larger costs being borne by governments and taxpayers. It is clear that all actors are impacted by a warming ocean and coastal risk, and therefore, all sectors should be engaged in developing sustainable, nature-based solutions.
Ultimately, building resilient natural infrastructure will require investment across multiple sectors, combining private, government, philanthropic and development finance. These blended finance solutions are essential for growing investment into regions and communities that need it most. Creating partnerships with diverse sets of actors and sectors will drive this investment and incentivize innovative solutions that address the nuanced and varied risks that a warming ocean will present.
The international community should focus on leveraging the unique synergies between the private sector and resilient, nature-based solutions. Protecting and regenerating existing natural capital is one of the critical components of disaster risk management and climate adaptation in countries that often lack the financial resources to fund relief, recovery and post-disaster reconstruction efforts. There, therefore, needs to be a transformative response by the finance and insurance industries to reduce the exposure and vulnerability of coastal communities through the mobilisation of private capital and risk reduction expertise.
Research is key in driving these synergies, including developing an understanding of the consequences of ocean change in terms of the hazards it is now creating, who and what is exposed and the vulnerabilities that are increasing the impacts. This will help advance the global narrative on ocean risk and on building coastal resilience as part of the global policy agenda, with policymakers and investors around the world.
There is a need to engage private investment on ocean risk and coastal resilience to develop cross-sector solutions. However, private financing and blended finance tools, including the expansion of insurance coverage, are currently underleveraged. This is due to various barriers to private investment in natural capital. A key challenge is identifying finance products and resilience tools that can be deployed to provide a market rate return on investment over the long-term, which is essential for private finance. There is currently a lack of understanding on how investing in natural capital can provide a productive, risk-adjusted return, including insufficient modelling and data for potential investors to quantify risk. In addition, private investment in resilience is still a nascent space, and there is currently minimal research on how blended finance tools can be leveraged to address ocean risk. The pipeline of scalable projects for resilient solutions is, therefore, not large enough to attract existing finance. From a governance perspective, there are also inadequate enabling policies to shift investment away from unsustainable infrastructure and towards nature-based solutions.It is essential to highlight the synergies in these Themes. For example, Theme 5 is closely linked to Theme 2. Without healthy and sustainably-managed coastal ecosystems, it will be impossible for coastal economies that rely on fisheries, tourism, and other ecosystem dependent industries to grow. Similarly, increasing scientific knowledge underpins each Theme as research is essential to develop effective and scalable solutions to address coastal resilience. Finally, it is important to emphasize that there is a need for cross-sector dialogue on these themes. Each issue has social, economic and ecological implications that impact various actors across vulnerable communities. It is imperative that partnerships between the public, private, and non-profit sectors are developed and supported.
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AXA XL on behalf of the Ocean Risk and Resilience Action AllianceUnited StatesBusiness & IndustryResilience pathways that incorporate coastal ecosystems are crucial, especially in small-island developing states and least developed countries. Marine ecosystems provide an essential source of ecological biodiversity and contribute to coastal livelihoods, such as small-scale fishing. They also form a protective natural barrier for coasts, which will become even more important due to increasing storm intensity, sea level rise and extreme storm surge events. The Ocean Risk and Resilience Action Alliance was launched as an innovative multi-sector collaboration to drive investment into coastal natural capital by pioneering ground-breaking finance products that incentivise blended finance and private investment. These finance solutions include developing scalable insurance products for coral reefs and mangroves, which incentivize communities to incorporate ecosystems into risk management planning. Blue carbon resilience credits are also being developed that value the carbon sequestration and protection benefits of coastal wetlands. These nature-based solutions drive cross-sector engagement on resilience and provide an economic and social case for the protection of coastal ecosystems.To advance action on innovative and actionable solutions, the UN Ocean Conference declaration should emphasize cross-sector engagement and partnerships, stressing that the private sector will be an essential partner in mitigating ocean risk and building resilience. In the last 10 years, insurers alone have paid out more than US$ 300 billion for coastal storm damage, with significantly larger costs being borne by governments and taxpayers. It is clear that all actors are impacted by a warming ocean and coastal risk, and therefore, all sectors should be engaged in developing sustainable, nature-based solutions.
Ultimately, building resilient natural infrastructure will require investment across multiple sectors, combining private, government, philanthropic and development finance. These blended finance solutions are essential for growing investment into regions and communities that need it most. Creating partnerships with diverse sets of actors and sectors will drive this investment and incentivize innovative solutions that address the nuanced and varied risks that a warming ocean will present.
The international community should focus on leveraging the unique synergies between the private sector and resilient, nature-based solutions. Protecting and regenerating existing natural capital is one of the critical components of disaster risk management and climate adaptation in countries that often lack the financial resources to fund relief, recovery and post-disaster reconstruction efforts. There, therefore, needs to be a transformative response by the finance and insurance industries to reduce the exposure and vulnerability of coastal communities through the mobilisation of private capital and risk reduction expertise.
Research is key in driving these synergies, including developing an understanding of the consequences of ocean change in terms of the hazards it is now creating, who and what is exposed and the vulnerabilities that are increasing the impacts. This will help advance the global narrative on ocean risk and on building coastal resilience as part of the global policy agenda, with policymakers and investors around the world.
There is a need to engage private investment on ocean risk and coastal resilience to develop cross-sector solutions. However, private financing and blended finance tools, including the expansion of insurance coverage, are currently underleveraged. This is due to various barriers to private investment in natural capital. A key challenge is identifying finance products and resilience tools that can be deployed to provide a market rate return on investment over the long-term, which is essential for private finance. There is currently a lack of understanding on how investing in natural capital can provide a productive, risk-adjusted return, including insufficient modelling and data for potential investors to quantify risk. In addition, private investment in resilience is still a nascent space, and there is currently minimal research on how blended finance tools can be leveraged to address ocean risk. The pipeline of scalable projects for resilient solutions is, therefore, not large enough to attract existing finance. From a governance perspective, there are also inadequate enabling policies to shift investment away from unsustainable infrastructure and towards nature-based solutions.It is essential to highlight the synergies in these Themes. For example, Theme 5 is closely linked to Theme 2. Without healthy and sustainably-managed coastal ecosystems, it will be impossible for coastal economies that rely on fisheries, tourism, and other ecosystem dependent industries to grow. Similarly, increasing scientific knowledge underpins each Theme as research is essential to develop effective and scalable solutions to address coastal resilience. Finally, it is important to emphasize that there is a need for cross-sector dialogue on these themes. Each issue has social, economic and ecological implications that impact various actors across vulnerable communities. It is imperative that partnerships between the public, private, and non-profit sectors are developed and supported.
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Global Action CommitteeGuinea ConakryI am a concerned world citizen that trying to establish itself as formidable Globall Organization to bring real Global Change for the world.Congratulations to you first of all on this most fantastic Initiative. I think it is important to note that science based innovation can make life easier for entire world. We have to understand that the world is getting better today because of, it's advancement in technologies to bring up new sciences and innovations. I think if we really want to fully succeed to make life easier for all mankind across the globe, we must embark on advancing in modernize our technologies on innovations and science. Our Global Organization is open to work with our partners here to help accomplish this great global mission together.I propose that we bring the industrial countries and the non-industrial countries into a concrete negotiation technological deal. This will demand the modern industrial powers to share their technologies with those countries without technologies. In return, the non-industrial countries will always allow the nations that taught them technologies to get access to their minimal resources. This can allow both to stand stroger for themselves. Our Global Organization is proposing for us to unite the world in the establishment of Green Universal Industrial Revolution. That can be best.We must first of all unite the world in the establishment of Green Universal Industrial Revolution. And make sure that every country across the globe to adopt the Universal technological act in their respective parliaments or congresses. And at the end of our expected conference, we must come out with the formidable achievable proposal on the advancement of Green Universal Industrial Revolution. That can get it all work well as expected.What is important here is the action plan of implementation. Even we have great ideas as proposed, as long as we do not put it into action implementation on the ground, we cannot easily succeed. So, the most important at the end of our conference expected, let's make sure that our proposal is accepted and adopted by all countries across the globe. That can be the real solution to our answer.This is really a fantastic initiative. I think if we want to easily achieve our goal, I am proposing for us to establish Green Universal Industrial Revolution to advance in technologies. We must be ready to put mechanism in place that can facilitate the implementation mechanism on the ground. We must make sure that our great proposal is heard by all congresses or parliaments for real implementation on the ground. The outcome of any formidable proposal must be put into action implementation on the ground.
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AFVMC Assistance to Families and Victims of Clandestine MigrationsCameroonNon-Governmental OrganizationsOcean exploration could contribute to the conservation and sustainable use of oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development. Ocean exploration could also improve ocean literacy and inspire young people to seek careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Thus, Ocean exploration could be reflected in the declaration of the 2020 UN Ocean Conference.The 2020 UN Ocean Conference declaration could advance action by giving oceans the important dedicated attention with distinctive underlying targets of SDGs 14 which seek the conservation and sustainable use of marine resources, seas, and oceans.The international community could recognise political or international borders of our Oceans and it could deal with coastal and ocean issues internationally, using a collaborative strategy. Efforts by one company, country, region or continent to prevent ocean pollution or control overfishing can have a very small effect if others are not contributing to the solution.
1) Collaborative platforms are necessary to address ocean conservation. A good example should be an initiative for sustainable shipping, which is a collaborative effort to attain the vision of both the SDG 14 and profitable shipping industry.

2) The various ocean issues, such as pollution, overfishing and acidification, require different strategies for better solutions that are aligned closely with global expertise, supply chain or business model.

3) Existing business initiatives towards ocean conservation tend to emphasise on awareness raising, without offering a meaningful solution. In contrast, the raise of awareness on Projects about ocean issues should have rather reinforced the programs with practical actions.
I agree with all these above themes.
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Green YouthGermanyWomen, Local Authorities, Political Greens GermanyAll I hopeyesWorking as a TeamTo making new Energy Greens for doing a change also
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Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)United StatesNon-Governmental OrganizationsTheme 1 ("Addressing marine pollution"): WCS was pleased to participate actively in the 19th meeting of the United Nations Open-ended Informal Consultative Process on Oceans and the Law of the Sea (ICP-19), which focused on "Anthropogenic underwater noise." Noting that paragraph 18 of the Secretary-General's report states that, "Anthropogenic underwater noise pollution is also an area of concern requiring further attention," would encourage substantive, focused discussion of anthropogenic underwater noise as a key marine pollutant under theme 4 during the Conference. The United Nations is a critical forum through which to increase mutual understanding and build political momentum to address underwater noise pollution, and we call for actions and commitments that build on existing international initiatives. We believe this topic should also be addressed explicitly in the intergovernmentally agreed declaration.Theme 4: WCS would like to express our approval for the explicit inclusion of small-scale, artisanal fisheries, and we would urge Member States to reflect during this discussion and during the Conference on how to improve the uptake and implementation of the FAO Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries at appropriate scales, including through voluntary commitments and bilateral or multilateral initiatives.

Theme 2: While we recognize that marine biodiversity is implicit in this theme, WCS notes with concern that explicit mentions of marine biodiversity and living marine resources are occasionally under-emphasized in the Secretary-General's report. Recent global assessments from IPBES and IPCC, cited in the Secretary-General's report, highlight the immediate threats to marine biodiversity, and we hope the Conference will dedicate sufficient attention across the thematic dialogues and through the intergovernmentally agreed declaration. We would propose amending this theme to read: "Managing, protecting, conserving and restoring marine and coastal biodiversity and ecosystems."
Themes 7 and 8: We believe omitting the post-2020 global biodiversity framework (GBF), currently underway among Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), is a missed opportunity. All but two UN Member States are Party to the Convention, and the CBD's strategic plan has been recognized as central to UN system-wide efforts on biological diversity. There are critical intersections between the work to be undertaken by the 2020 Ocean Conference and issues to be addressed by the post-2020 GBF. It is therefore valuable for delegates to reflect on potential issues and synergies when crafting the intergovernmental declaration. This could extend to other highly relevant policy fora, such as CITES and CMS. We would therefore propose either the following amendment to theme 7, "Implementation of international law, [including] the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea," or the following amendment to theme 8: "Leveraging interlinkages between Sustainable Development Goal 14 and other Goals towards the implementation of the 2030 Agenda [and other international goals on sustainable development and the marine environment]." See above.
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Laboratório de Gestão Costeira - Programa de Pós Graduação em Ciência e Tecnologia Ambiental (PPCTA/UNIVALI)BrasilWomen, Science & Technological Community1) Serviços Ecossistêmicos Culturais Costeiros 2) Bem-estar humano gerados a partir de estilos de vida de bem-viver-bem.1) Educação socioambiental sobre Serviços Ecossistêmicos Culturais Costeiros que necessitam dos serviços de suporte para que possam ser vivenciados, e assim, serem promotores do bem-estar-humano (haja visto o aumento da incidência de patologias socioambinetais, doenças crônicas no mundo). Havendo melhor preservação da zona costeira, consequentemente os oceanos também serão reservados. 2) Alfabitização dos oceanos com planejamento de planilhas e curriculos escolares formais e não formais sobre os animais e pllantas dos oceanos. 3) Alfabetização dos oceanos com planejamento de planilhas e curriculos escolares com quais são e os benefícios dos Serviços Ecossistêmicos Culturais Costeiros e sua relação com a preservação ambiental e o clima.Através de redes virtuais, midias sociais e formação de grupos de trabalho em todo mundo.Conhecimento sobre os oceanos ! As pessoas conhecem muito pouco sobre todos os serviços ecossistêmicos que os oceanos e a zona costeira proporcionam.8
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Dr bahati amon foundation ugandaUgandaNon-Governmental OrganizationsIntroduction of weed eaters at the oceans
Policies on waste management into ocean.

Fishing police marines to ensure good fishing
Organise call for; proposals, innovation, grants for solution on oceans.Partnership with institutions, organization and agencies in Africa for proper implementationPolitical instability

Corruption
Weak enforcement of laws and policies
6
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CARTHAGE chad Business & IndustryWith regard to violence and war, the liberal thesis is often mentioned. According to the latter, the development of the market economy must progressively reduce the frequency and intensity of conflicts, both locally and internationally global scale. This idea has been developed by many authors since the 16th century. They argue that trade is useful because it provides us with goods that we would not have without it. It also allows communicating and maintaining relations with foreigners in Chad.
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Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI)SwedenWomen, Science & Technological Community1) Mission-oriented innovation policy for integrated coastal planning; 2) source to sea and back approach to capture circular solutions that address land, water and sea dynamics; 3) building the evidence-based on nature-based solutions for hydrometeorological risks and climate adaptation including their effectiveness, costs, benefits and co-benefits, and socio-political suitability; 4) clean energy potential in seas.1) Allocate research budgets that respond to areas where further knowledge is needed (a systematic assessment of knowledge gaps would be needed); 2) More focus on the interactions between SDG 6 and SDG 14; 3) More focus on SDG 9 and SDG 14 to explore not only the impacts from industry but also the opportunities for innovation; 4) Explore how regional governance of blue resources can be accelerated and build on successful cases (e.g., HELCOM)1) Strenghten regional seas partnerships; 2) widen the "ocean" community beyond niched ocean-based only expertise to involve other scientific backgrounds and practitioners within the social, industrial, and economic fields; 3) highlight win-win opportunities for knowledge exchange and innovation development between South-South and South-North countries.1) We dont know what we dont know; 2) many solutions to our ocean problems have to be solved in land, hence the importance of broadening the "ocean community"; 3) the most threatening problems to oceans are not ovbiously visible, and therefore communicating them and changing behaviours, is difficult; 4) a growing interest in blue resources could have detrimental consequences for ocean environments as well geopolitics; 5) maritime delimitations and flowing borders are difficult to governThe themes ovbiously correspond to the Targets in SDG 14. However, these targets (particularly if considering the indicators) are not capturing the need to build a business case to create incentives. If these themes could be broader than their description and indicators, to include for example industry and energy, circular economy, climate adaptation, and innovation opportunities, then the conversation could be more solutions-oriented and involve potential market and policy mechanisms that incentivize -and not only regulate- change.
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Gabidezin House of Fashion-BoadiGhanaOther stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
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INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR PARTNERSHIP AND EMERGENCE IN AFRICA (AIPEA) AND INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE POOR INIGNS AND ASSISTANCE (AIPIA) AND ACAEPBFRANCEScience & Technological Community, INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS RECOGNIZED BY THE UN, APPROVED BY UNESCO (IOC) AND CONFIRMED BY ITS PEERS
Faire l’alphabétisation des jeunes issus des côtes ou, originaires des 13 îles françaises, accompagnées d'organisations des conférences, séminaires,colloques et forums participatifs et pragmatisme terrains dans les domaines scientifique, recherche, technologique,écologique, économique,social, développement durable et environnemental: (énergies, environnements, économies, Climat/Océan,Protection de la biodiversité en haute mer,la Lutte contre les formes de pollution dans l'eau, Développement des aires marines protégées, l'Amélioration de la qualité de l'eau douce, de l'eau potable,des eaux usées,Transports et activités maritimes bas carbone,Pèches, Résilience climatique des cotes et des populations côtières, compétences, etc..) Car, l’Éducation des jeunes joue, un rôle très très important pour la prise de conscience,et pour doter les individus des connaissances qui leur permettront de prendre des décisions éclairées,et de traduire ces décisions en actes,AVOIR besoin d'une éducation des compétences pertinentes pour les marchés d'aujourd'hui, et de demain,et une éducation qui favorise l'esprit critique, la compréhension entre....




Notre plan d'actions communes (AIPEA et AIPIA / ACAEPB) comptera huit domaines Scientifiques prioritaires:

1 - Relayer les informations scientifiques (Océaniques, maritimes, marines et spatiales / Géo-spatial, maritimes, etc...), faire rayonner le système mondial d’observation de la terre et des océans (Système Argos, et bien d’autres) aux Etats membres de l'ONU, et a toutes les organisations/ organismes exerçant dans les domaines cités - dessus, ainsi qu'à la société civile, jeunesse, étudiants, JOUNALISME, etc...
2 -Etre un pont européen et mondial de secours de communication / marketing et d'informations scientifiques, technologiques, sociales et humaines / économiques et environnementaux entre la société civile, organisations / organismes internationaux et les États membres de l'ONU; 3-Construire la compréhension entre partenaires privés – publics – privés – privés, en renforçant leurs capacités; 4 - Cautionner et Renforcer l’Économie bleue, verte;
5 - Soutenir la coordination marine/spatiale et géo- spatiale maritime (gouvernance de l'océan, etc...);
"Remote sensing of the requirement of a soil monitoring system using OT spatial data with in situ data and modeling"

The main finding is that, despite some recent certainty about the changing environment and the causes of natural disasters, many uncertainties remain. To reduce these uncertainties, the various actors recommended a sustained modeling effort based on long-term observations. The global, continuous and sustainable measurement of the terrestrial environment thus clearly appears as the primary objective of a GMES system.


On the knowledge of global change and the associated environmental pressures, the symposium presentations confirmed two certainties. The first is the increase in the average temperature of the atmosphere near the surface. It has been evaluated at 0.6 ° C since 1860. The second is that the activity of man modifies the chemical composition of the atmosphere. Nevertheless, the stakeholders mainly mentioned numerous uncertainties:

• the role of clouds and aerosols, • on ocean / atmosphere exchanges, • on carbon sources and sinks, • on the consequences of changes in land use, • the role of the polar ice caps,
• on the multiple couplings....
All these results have since been confirmed by the latest IPCC report.

In the field of natural disasters, encouraging progress has been made over the last decade, but many uncertainties remain, particularly on the mechanisms of triggering disasters, the response of natural environments and the effects of humanization on these two processes. Here again, the priority effort must focus on coordinating the work of existing research centers.
A complete system, from observation to decision

GMES must eventually be a complete public or private decision-support system capable of acquiring, processing and disseminating useful information to address these issues. In any diplomatic negotiation, the control of information is fundamental.

Each stakeholder must be able to rely on an "environmental intelligence" device that allows them to monitor, understand, evaluate and anticipate changes in the environment, the alteration or depletion of resources, threats that this can weigh on the people.
Observation and Measurement

Space techniques are an ideal tool for global, permanent and reliable monitoring of the environment, as well as the atmosphere, the oceans and land.

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Catanduanes State UniversityPhilippinesNon-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological CommunityMangrove rehabilitation and conservationFocus on Mangroves and Fisheries linksreadiness of the local government units in Asian context
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Lanka Fundamental Rights OrganizationSri LankaNon-Governmental Organizations(1) Governments should ban the waste chemicals and agricultural pesticides, which during the rain, washes into the sea and life in the ocean becomes dangerous thus killing all species living in the ocean and under water.
(2) Government should ban the manufacture, sale, use and disposal of any polythene and plastic which are threat to the life in the ocean.
(3) Governments should ensure that the boats, ships, etc., moving on the sea does not leak or dispose fuel or any other items which might pollute the sea.
(4) CCTV should be fitted on the beaches to ensure that no waste is thrown in to the water.
The above should be made compulsory and the UN should regularly monitor.Already explained above.PoliticiansYes, the above issues should be strictly implemented and monitored. If not, we will lose our planet.
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Association for Farmers Rights Defense, AFRDGeorgiaNon-Governmental Organizations, Farmer
74
Baucau Marine Heritage AreaTimor-LesteIndigenous PeoplesIndigenous people, their cultures and eco-system centred stewardship knowledge and human rights for protecting, regenerating and surviving climate change, is critical for success of SDG 14.We would love to showcase indigenous and eco-system based marine heritage area development innovation for globally significant marine areas at this at the 2020 Ocean Conference and assist with the development of the declaration :-)What about indigenous knowledge and stewardship innovation and success, science increasingly looks to indigenous solutions for marine conservation and regenerative resource management. This should be front and centre of the 2020 Oceans Conference and the declaration. That it appears preparations are not involving indigenous marine management solutions and human rights with oceans. Indigenous knowledge and innovation is key to many of the SDGs as proven in global best practice for science and innovation development.Indigenous marine stewardship knowledge and innovation with marine cultures and biodiversity management is not featured as significantly as it should given the UN recognises such including the human rights of indigenous peoples and their solutions to climate adaptation, survival and regeneration of marine ecosystems and cultures with relationships to Target 14.2, Target 14.5, Target 14.7, Target 14.a, Target 14.b, Target 14.c We would recommend indigenous knowledge and stewardship for marine indigenous cultures, areas of global marine biodiversity significance protection and regeneration be identified and added as an enabling target for this conference and the declaration. We will also request such with the UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples & Environment
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Baucau Marine Heritage AreaTimor-LesteIndigenous PeoplesIndigenous people, their cultures and eco-system centred stewardship knowledge and human rights for protecting, regenerating and surviving climate change, is critical for success of SDG 14.We would love to showcase indigenous and eco-system based marine heritage area development innovation for globally significant marine areas at this at the 2020 Ocean Conference and assist with the development of the declaration :-)What about indigenous knowledge and stewardship innovation and success, science increasingly looks to indigenous solutions for marine conservation and regenerative resource management. This should be front and centre of the 2020 Oceans Conference and the declaration. That it appears preparations are not involving indigenous marine management solutions and human rights with oceans. Indigenous knowledge and innovation is key to many of the SDGs as proven in global best practice for science and innovation development.Indigenous marine stewardship knowledge and innovation with marine cultures and biodiversity management is not featured as significantly as it should given the UN recognises such including the human rights of indigenous peoples and their solutions to climate adaptation, survival and regeneration of marine ecosystems and cultures with relationships to Target 14.2, Target 14.5, Target 14.7, Target 14.a, Target 14.b, Target 14.c We would recommend indigenous knowledge and stewardship for marine indigenous cultures, areas of global marine biodiversity significance protection and regeneration be identified and added as an enabling target for this conference and the declaration. We will also request such with the UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples & Environment
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University of MInnesota Duluth / Okinawa Seaside LaboratoryUSA / JapanNon-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological CommunityThere are many scientific advancements and accomplishments were made in recent years. I feel that the use of genomics in coral reef conservation by Sato's team at OIST is an excellent example of that. Also, the use of e DNA for the assessment of biodiversity has been a great tool for such a survey. Satelite severance system has also become a useful tool in monitoring ocean temperature, industrial fishing monitoring, coral bleaching, and other ecological studies. Finally, ROV, AUV, and other in situ data gathering have allowed the science community to access much-needed data from the deep-sea environment and other open water areas. Many challenges are interrelated and can not be addressed independently. It seems that many problems surrounding ocean conservation depend heavily on poverty. For instance, it is not easy for the longshore fisherman to stop catching an endangered species because their livelihood depends on the catch. Poverty drives many of human activities without many choices. I believe that the effective use of scientific knowledge is to find a direct connection with such life problems. We should be able to produce a more accurate stock assessment, the interconnectivity of different species in a given ecosystem, gain more knowledge about species lifecycle and reproduction, create better recycling methods, or discovering more sustainable use of the plastic product to maximize the resources, etc... Financial stability and balance are the key issues in creating such synergies. 1. Financial support for more scientific research is needed.
2. creating an interdisciplinary collaboration of multivalent scientific fields.
3. accessibility to larger and more diverse ecological areas.
4. finding practical applications of scientific discoveries.
5. availability to scientific researches published in peer-reviewed journals.
6. creating tangible and practical information dissemination methods.
7. impacting the educational system in earlier stages.
8. working closely with a local government, industries, and corporations who may have a higher impact in the community.
Sounds good to me.
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Global Ocean reSource and Energy AssoicationJapanI do not represent a group or constituencyOcean energy and deep ocean water use are key resources that can enable sustainable regional development. On Kumejima in Okinawa, Deep Ocean Water Use Industries provide 30% of the island's revenue. A model to combine renewable ocean energy and Deep Ocean Water use has been under development as the islands future. Enabling, promoting, and supporting such municipal projects that work toward sustainable development using ocean resources is one potential action area.Raising awareness of technologies and sustainable systems that can enable energy transition, can speed understanding by government and financial institutions and bridge the development support gap between concept and commercialization.Many technologies that have been demonstrated at small scale require large-scale cooperation to ready them for difficult ocean environments. International cooperation can reduce waste through repetitive research and focus on technologies that provide resources to islands and ocean communities. A financial or project support structure to enable international cooperation and or development could speed technological development.Subsidies to fossil fuels make energy transitions economically challenging. This includes production, storage, and transportation. Though long-term strategic energy storage may be based on crude, the ocean can drive economic clean energy production and storage if provided an equal cost basis. In addition, a lack of clear understanding of the needs of local communities, and how the international community's joint technologies and resources can guide the establishment of technology and project to help communities adopt sustainable practices while increasing economic development. There seems not to be a clear support structure for screening and implementing innovations. A panel to accept, screen, and recommend technologies or projects that support achievement of Goal 14 could help direct investment to actionable areas or at least encourage such projects to succeed. Number 3 is a focus on adaptation and effect, rather than cause. While it represents a major issue, its cause lies mostly outside the ocean, and restoration is included in theme 2. Ocean Energy could also be included in 5. as a method of strengthening sustainable economies.
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Cruise Co., LTD.JapanNon-Governmental OrganizationsChanging the garbage disposal method.
Stop garbage incineration and turn organic waste into carbon particles.
Use the grains as soil conditioners on farmland in the islands.

It is quite difficult to replace present plastic with naturally decomposable material in near future, and it is also difficult to recycle plastic waste of complicated composition mixed with other organic matter. Furthermore, incinerating this will further accelerate global warming. Meanwhile, there is an organic waste carbonization system that solves this problem.
Grant subsidies to devices that significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions from garbage incineration.The theme,such as, protecting certain fish species is not effective.
First, we need to change our actions that make the environment worse.
Because rising sea temperatures, acidification, and anoxia are caused by global warming,
, we should focus on preventing global warming. To that end, stopping garbage incineration is also important.
The warm seawater, flowing from the Pacific Ocean to the Arctic Ocean through the Bering Strait, is melting the sea ice covering the Arctic Ocean, and recently, ice area has reduced to the half of the 1980’s one, in the summer. The Arctic Ocean, which has turned from white to black, absorbs sunlight, warms up rapidly, and has a major impact on the climate. The Bering Strait is a relatively shallow and narrow place where human beings can make a dam. We must start dam construction as soon as possible and control warm water from the south. Many countries are starting investigation of the Bering Strait.No.14 after"across the entire plastics" ,please add ",materials and fossil fuel". Reducing the use of plastics will increase the use of wood. The use of fossil fuels as materials at high costs may need to be continued to stabilize the world economy.

In order to create the funds required for combating global warming, and in order to carry out carbon pricing worldwide to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, a global monopoly corporation for fossil resources needs to be established. In this case, the use of plastic will continue.
79
Centro Intercultural de Estudios de Desiertos y Océanos (CEDO Intercultural)MexicoI do not represent a group or constituency, Local communities at the Peñasco-Lobos sustainable fisheries corridorCoastal and marine spacial planningBy promoting tools such as coastal and marine spacial planning, fish refugees, marine protected areas, fish stock management.Promoting capacity building and share lessons amongst partners.Sustainable development of fisheries, contribute to avoid Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, capacity building in artisanal fisheries and promote economic tools.I do agree about the themes, include regional approaches.
80
Baucau Marine Heritage AreaTimor-LesteIndigenous PeoplesIndigenous people, their cultures and eco-system centred stewardship knowledge and human rights for protecting, regenerating and surviving climate change, is critical for success of SDG 14.We would love to showcase indigenous and eco-system based marine heritage area development innovation for globally significant marine areas at this at the 2020 Ocean Conference and assist with the development of the declaration :-)What about indigenous knowledge and stewardship innovation and success, science increasingly looks to indigenous solutions for marine conservation and regenerative resource management. This should be front and centre of the 2020 Oceans Conference and the declaration. That it appears preparations are not involving indigenous marine management solutions and human rights with oceans. Indigenous knowledge and innovation is key to many of the SDGs as proven in global best practice for science and innovation development.Indigenous marine stewardship knowledge and innovation with marine cultures and biodiversity management is not featured as significantly as it should given the UN recognises such including the human rights of indigenous peoples and their solutions to climate adaptation, survival and regeneration of marine ecosystems and cultures with relationships to Target 14.2, Target 14.5, Target 14.7, Target 14.a, Target 14.b, Target 14.c We would recommend indigenous knowledge and stewardship for marine indigenous cultures, areas of global marine biodiversity significance protection and regeneration be identified and added as an enabling target for this conference and the declaration. We will also request such with the UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples & Environment
81
LYSECONCEPTFrance Women, Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Local Authorities, Workers & Trade Unions, Business & Industry, Science & Technological Community, Farmer, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development, Waste watersThe World's unique Lyseconcept Biotechnology in Biotech Wastewater Treatment is a very easy example of how its natural mode of action contributes significantly to the conservation and sustainable use of oceans, seas and resources. Marines for Sustainable Development, which could be replicated in the statement of the United Nations Ocean Conference 2020.
Its scientific field of action of 'destructing-destruction-elimination' of organic matter, scientifically proven is: the biodegradation of organic matter by microorganisms.
The oceans, the seas, the resources of underground drinking water, are now used as a waste bin for sanitation. Current management systems are unable to do anything other than produce feces mud that eventually pollutes the environment.
Simply by the enactment of an inextinguishable right that any wastewater management system must demonstrate in its balance sheet, a purifying performance based on the obligation of results.
No more domestic waste water will be discharged into surface hydraulic environments, preserving the oceans, seas, groundwater from all domestic pollution for a sustainable development objective,
1 recognising that the current wastewater management is totally infuriating as it is
2 that there is a biotechnology of wastewater treatment with an off-ground purifying performance, reducing pollution contained in wastewater, by more than 98% without any production of residues while producing a natural fertilizer to infinity.
Man has always disinterested himself in the fate of his excrement leaving MERE NATURE to accomodate it, without ever asking the question, how it was used. The grouping of populations was a security necessity, but the problem of its waste was never taken seriously. Modern engineering is in a hurry without a definitive solution and is almost always outdated.
In the early 1900s, the chemical industrialist thought he would replace organic. This was not the case everywhere, it is simply complementary to it. Except that the chemical generates collateral damage everywhere.
the collective wastewater management infrastructure at a financial cost of implantation and maintenance pharaonic, with lost funds, disempowering the user individual, to a purifying performance close to ZERO.
individual management infrastructure at a lower financial cost of implementation, a purifying performance also close to ZERO while having a certain share of user accountability.
In between there is Biotechnology, which is enough to promote in a bond way.
Biotechnology reduces the removal of drinking water from underground reserves,
its liquid becomes the ultimate resource against famine.
All domestic wastewater is a source of marine pollution. Removing land use to dispose of wastewater fluid reduces marine pollution.
All wastewater discharged from the ground or infiltrated into the soil or subsoil is a source of pollution in marine and coastal ecosystems. Removing land use to dispose of wastewater fluid reduces marine pollution.
The grouping of urine, the chemicals used for domestic domestic ate housekeeping, give a very high toxicity rate to the liquid released into the hydraulic environment that flows into the marine environment increasing the acidity of this medium. . Removing any dispersal of wastewater from the surface hydraulic environment significantly reduces the acidity of this marine environment.
Any chemical pollutant released into the marine environment will
82
ULTRAMARINE: Necker Island Ocean Action SummitUnited StatesI represent a group of influential ocean leadersThe protection of the Antarctic Waters. We need to vote yes in october!The conference should focus on uniting groups focused on 30x30. It starts by getting more protected areas. We have a huge chance to protect Antarctic waters and that will help get us closer to 30% by 2030.Lack of leadership, Failure to remove the ego, and ocean groups unwilling to work together.Honestly, I dont want to complicate things. We need to convince Russia to vote yes on Antarctica2020
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Communities Organized for Resource Allocation (CORA)PhilippinesWomen, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Business & Industry, Farmer1. Establishment of marine protected areas that involves placing a sustainable use and science-based management in delineated coastal and marine areas to ensure and encourage regenerative growth and improvement of marine resources and marine habitats

2. Institutional arrangement on recycling mechanism to prevent accumulation of marine litter and remove plastic litter in the oceans
Supporting different sectors by providing venues and events for sectors and groups for network building and linkagesProvide funding opportunities to scientific groups that develops scientific innovations and resources to advocacy group that focuses on conservationThe practice of single-use economy in developing countries is inevitable due to it's moI agree and support the themes proposed and believe that these themes will be effective in addressing the goals of the conference.
84
OceanX GroupAustraliaScience & Technological CommunityEducational initiativesSolutions must be easily made available to the communitySupport and promote platforms which showcase innovation in relation to Goal 14Education is missing, we should prioritize actions which aim to educate the communityEducation in relation to the targets
85
Environmental Service Providers Association
Ghana
Non-Governmental Organizations, Business & Industry
Sustainable management of plastics waste
It need to find innovative fundraising mechanism to invest into possible plastic waste management
Adopt some countries to pilot innovative solutions generated from the conference
Inadequate funds, lack of national strategic plan, inadequate investment in human capital
The interlinkage between plastic polution and the attainment of SDG's 14 needs to be highlighted. Issues pertaining to opportunities to access financial instruments available for local organizations needs to be showcased. One of the putputs of the conference is to have identified some countries, like Ghana to pilot some thematic plastic management models. They could be supported with adequate financing.
86
Schmidt Ocean Institute
United States
Non-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological Community, philanthropic foundations
technology innovation while be at sea, data sharing, building partnership with foundations and other international partners,
By including partners in the discussion that can bring resources to the table (for example Schmidt Ocean Institute has a research vessel and shares its data). The declaration must not only state the importance of partnerships but also state mechanisms and processes for including them in the actions and conference events.
Work with foundations! Schmidt Ocean Institute has resources and wants to be at the table, but it and ohter organizations need help being brought to the table. Simply attending the meeting is not enouhg, find ways to encourage collaboration and to hear from other partners.
Getting the word of innovation and science activites known so that they can carry into achieving SDG 14.
Schmidt Ocean Instituate can help in dialgue 6; we frequently bring technology out at sea on our research vessel would look forward to contributing.
87
Surgery SaharaKenya
I do not represent a group or constituency
Rain Serial killer Toxic
We have a serial killer mass Murderer in Globally Rain Brings Cancer u lik it or not the smart serial killer is responsible 2m. Deaths annually, this is murder after murder after murder after as .

Rain water is no good for Livestock no blessings for Humanity Colony wellness be careful be safe from killer rain consumptions as we need you.
Polluted rain heavy metals cirycle soil plants suck all and leaves breaths Pollution metals in air.
Contaminated plants Globally to our system of Polluted veins grows Cancer as they store growth hood toxicated colony.
Your Peace Keepers are too lazy they should be planting peace roots plants to
It's all contaminated waste , Air polluted toxicated rain .
Equipments funding , Researches , models , patents , convey .
This is peace mission on nature's surgery restoration , peace keepers should plant peace trees suitable social economic development.
I don't see there work of peace keeping with nature and economy guns free in Africa we need no guns we need suitability for peace.
88
African Caribbean and Pacific Secretariat
Belgium
Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
1. Prioritize science and innovations to support fish stock assessments essential to inform harvest strategies particularly for data limited multi species fish stocks in tropical developing countries.

2. Accord priority to science and innovations that enhance surveillance and control measures to deter and eliminate IUU fishing, support information exchanges between authorities and ensure compliance to national or regionally agreed conservation and management measures.

3. Prioritize science to enhance understanding and forecasting of the impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems and marine resources

4. Prioritize innovative technologies to minimize food losses and waste and for increased value addition for marine food products to ensure the sustainable development of aquatic resources for communities that rely on them.

5. Recognize and strengthen the use of traditional and indigenous knowledge and innovations in the conservation and sustainable use of ocean resources as a complement to modern science and innovations

6. Prioritize science and innovations for the sound management of small scale fisheries and enhanced value addition for value chain actors
1. The declaration can set the agenda with concrete priorities which can mobilize and catalyze relevant actors to support ocean science and innovation in order to support the attainment of sustainable SDG 14 and the support the sustainable utilization of the ocean as a global common.

2. The declaration can revitalize cooperation among the scientific community and support the generation of the scientific knowledge and innovations for the attainment of SDG 14
1. Support partnerships, networks and joint research program in ocean science and innovation between developed and developing countries and through sharing of research findings and also infrastructure for research and innovation
89
International Ocean Institute
Malta
I do not represent a group or constituency
Improved applicable Marine Spatial Planning plus Area Based Management Tools.

Advanced science based on climatological, meteorological and oceanographic early warning systems that are robust and sustainable to address challenges of storm surges, sea level rise, hurricanes, and other natural hazards. Such ocean and climate warning systems should be widely accessible through modern communication technologies to people in coastal areas and coastal cities.

Ecosystem based fisheries management; and others

Gaps in scientific knowledge should not be used as an excuse to postpone or avoid necessary conservation or management actions, especially in those areas where the situation requires collective and immediate action. Science and innovation can advance solutions to the challenges, political will and appropriate support programmes (including funding) are required to take on board and implement such scientific advice
The Declaration should call for ocean capacity development, and national and regional information data sharing systems to support private individuals and collective action. The information and data should be readily available to support the implementation of measures to address the targets based in SDG14 and other cross cutting SDGs.
The outcome document should mobilise and engage developing countries to adopt capacity development measures. Additionally, surveillance and compliance should be ensured by taking actions and concrete measures which are then disseminated and reported to an UN body. The conference is uniquely positioned to call on every state to ensure compliance with the UN Law of the Sea and to report to an UN body on such progress.
The conference should call for greater transparency by facilitating the sharing of data in a manner that allows for the application of the tools necessary for compliance. The main challenges are to monitor and enforce; to make funding available and to increase and emphasise capacity development. Funding still remains a problem, and the conference should call on donors and financial supporters to assist in the achievement of SDG14 and its cross cutting themes.
There is a:
- Need for dialogue on challenges posed to conservation and sustainable use of marine living resources, on state subsidies for fishing, and best practices.
- Greater awareness raising through education, capacity development and early schooling curricula.
- Need for a global fund sufficient to protect and preserve natural sources and promote sustainable use.
- Requirement that policy makers should act on scientific best knowledge and scientists should form part of decision-making bodies.
- The IOI emphasizes themes 6. 7. and 8 from the above list
90
The Turkish Marine Research Foundation
Turkey
Non-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological Community
Positive developments with regards to blue economy such as economic benefits of clean energy alternatives and increased small scale sustainable fisheries. Regardless of positive impacts it is also important to explore negative impacts of increasing offshore energy to the sustainability of the marine environment and conservation. Proper cost benefit analysis are strongly encouraged.
Combatting alien species are an important issue for sustainable fisheries and marine conservation. We believe that there are many success stories in identifying,, sorting and analyzing impacts of aline species in the Mediterranean such as lion fish and puffer fish through the use of efficient and innovative management techniques. However, increased risks are expected.
Loss of marine biodiversity, overfishing, alien invasive species and impacts of climate change to the marine environment are our major concerns within SDG14.
It is critical to find concrete solutions for the inadequate monitoring at the global level, poor databases and lack of connectivity to deal with these concerns. 2020 UN Oceans Conference can give increased focus to discussing alternative solutions to increase monitoring, information management and global connectivity.
A Global Ocean Marine Protected Areas Network needs be established and links must be strengthened between existing networks.
Global connectivity should be strengthened including for fisheries, impacts of climate change to the marine environment and conservation.
Global Marine Alien Species Database must be established and existing small networks must be connected.
Illegal, unreported, unregulated fishing must be monitored on a global level for which a global network needs to be established.
Lack of coordination between policy and science at the local, national and international level needs to be improved on issues such as on MPAs, impacts of climate change on the marine environment, IUU and sustainable fisheries.
Lack of dependable and effectively scientific databases for effective global management of resources.

Difficulty in encouraging countries to introduce or improve legation on issues such as increasing Marine Protected Areas and new challenges introduced by climate change.
Insufficient formal and informal education to enable effective adaptation to the challenges of climate change and on marine conservation in general.
91
Brazilian Naval War College
Brazil
Children & Youth, Science & Technological Community, Academics
The 2020 UN Ocean Conference should highlight that the decade of the oceans (2021-2030) must be interpreted from a broader perspective, not focusing only on variables of biological and environmental nature. Thus, it is important to highlight the interface of these sectors traditionally analyzed with the concept and industries of the "Economy of the Sea", such as logistics and port infrastructure, maritime transport, offshore energy and mineral exploration, and activities related to tourism and leisure.
It is important to highlight the interface of these discussions, often generic and associated with global institutions and international organizations, to activities and economic sectors, highlighting their impacts on job creation, income, value, as well as their contribution to countries' GDP. Therefore, looking for concrete actions, it is necessary to provide policy suggestions involving public, private, banking and civil society in a broad way, as well as precise metrics and indicators to evaluate results.
Rather than contributing to the implementation of SDG 14, the 2020 UN Ocean Conference must OVERCOME the common sense that ONLY associates SDG 14 to issues of seas and oceans. Several SDGs, such as 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 16 and 17 are directly or indirectly related to activities linked to the maritime environment. By associating the decade-long effort with the achievement of just one SDG, the UN and media approach to this conference to be held in Lisbon undermines its real relevance.
First of all, the international community must understand that the participation of civil society and academia is essential in this debate. Prioritizing the participation and speeches of state actors does not represent the new global governance. In addition, the international community has to understand its inequalities and difficulties in attending events in Europe, especially on the part of developing countries, whose distance and exchange rate make access quite difficult. Therefore, there will be no adequate ways to leverage synergies at work in the various innovative and science-based action areas to contribute to the conservation and sustainable use of the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development, if the debate does not count effectively on actors from different sectors from different countries and from different areas of activity. Diversity must be considered so that the global proposal really takes into account the particularities and is not just another global document signed and ratified by different countries in the world.
- Incentives to education in strategic sectors, stimulating the participation of different individuals to create an environment favorable to innovation and creativity;
- Investment in research and development (R&D), particularly given the longer-term profile for results in research of this nature; and
- Transfer of knowledge and technology to developing countries of the Global South, which could be facilitated through exchanges of students and professionals, as well as through procurement clauses in international contracts.
- Again, I disagree that it applies only to SDG 14.
Themes 1, 5, 6 and 7 seem to me more general and propitious to provide effective and measurable results to evaluate the effectiveness and success of the proposals.
92
Environmental Defense Fund
United States
Non-Governmental Organizations
Recent science confirms the likelihood that by the end of the century, the world’s wild fish production will change dramatically, even under the most favorable climate scenarios. This will have tremendous political, economic, social and ecological ramifications that have the potential to threaten food security, jeopardize livelihoods and exacerbate equity concerns in fishing nations large and small — especially for the most vulnerable human populations.

We must arm Member States with the tools to adapt to these changes and make their fisheries resilient. Dedicated capacity and resources to implement such approaches should be made available to those small island, coastal and developing states most dependent on wild fisheries — especially in cases where climate impacts are projected to be severe.

Finally, as Target 14.4 is expiring at the end of the year, we should take this opportunity to update our shared definition of sustainable fishing and explicitly call out the intrinsic link with climate change and the need for immediate action.
In order to achieve sustainable fisheries in a climate-altered ocean, we must shift to a new paradigm of climate-resilient fisheries governance, which will require new guidance to Member States from institutions like FAO, and more nimble and adaptive international management authorities.
There are no explicit references to climate change or climate resilience in any of the Targets, yet this is a critical barrier to success for Targets 14.2, 14.3, 14.4, 14.5, 14.7, and 14.B.
We are in strong support of Theme #4 (Sustainable Fisheries), and believe climate change/climate resilience should be a central topic of this dialogue.
93
World Youth Bank Network
Bolivia
Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Workers & Trade Unions, Science & Technological Community, Farmer
Sharing our experiences and ideas with others in conference @ Lisbon.
Required more about for the future.
Training Development, Field Coordnation and Exchanges..
Data Centre Development and Training Exchanges Globally ...
Programme and Policy Coordination
94
ICENECDEV-International Centre for Environmental Education and Community Development
CameroonFarmer
Actions to reflected in the 200 UN Ocean Conference include Reducing marine pollution,Combating Marine Plastic litter and reducing Ocean Acidification and research on endangered marine wildlife species and the creation of Marine santuary.
integrating the coastal communities and indigenous people to provide local knowledge and information to support research in marine ecosystem and protect the Ocean biodiversity for sustainable Development.
The international community should Incorporate nature based solution and collective multilateral actions on research with businesses, civil society organisations,governments at different frontiers to contribute to the conservation and sustainable use of oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development and promote interlinkages between Sustainable Development Goal 14 and other Goals towards the implementation of the 2030 Agenda
Inadequate scientific knowledge, and research capacity on marine ecosystem. insufficient capacity to assess and address ocean issues(pollution ,climate change,acidification) inadequate capacity for the implementation of international law as reflected in UNCLOS
Migration and Oceans, Waste management in Coastal communities, Ecosystem adaptation approach in coastal regions. Disaster Risk Management in Marine ecosystem.
95
International Ocean Institute
Malta
Non-Governmental Organizations
Marine Spatial Planning at both regional and transboundary levels
Promotion of international partnership in Ocean science research
Ensure countries sign and implement relevant Ocean regulations and uses at transboundary level
Joint ocean sustainability researches on stock assessment are expensive and countries most times fail to meet their obligations
Joint stock assessment research is overdue. There is great dealth of data. Estimated data has been used over the years.
96
International Human Rights Commission Relief Fund Trust
United States
Non-Governmental Organizations
Robust Survellance with technology to jointly monitor terrains that is not usual traveled . The efforts can be a open data source that will mandate all parties to adhereto
The process must be grounded thru ratification at the conference. This process must mandated to run through period review yearlly to ensure targeted goals are in line with goal#14 of Unsdgs 2030 .
Open data source . Information sharing among stakeholders that will ensure full transprency at all tines
Limited resouces for LDCs to do monitoring for compliance and lack of cooperation from major stakeholders or Member states who have resources playing passive roles in upholding the spirit of the agreed declaration, could hinder objective goals being achieved
(14 C and 8 ) will give the broader scope providing open doors policy for collaborations, which will assist to maximum implementation efforts
97
UNPKFC-UN Peace Keeping Forces Council
Thailand
Women, Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Science & Technological Community
guarding the sea with legal regulations that forbid taking natural resources at sea
Every country must obey the law to preserve nature at sea
The communities must unite to preserve and preserve the natural wealth of the sea
Technology must be able to overcome problems in the ocean, especially to sea criminals
Agreed to preserve and preserve the natural sea without taking and without utilizing the contents of the sea for group purposes
98
Universal Versatile Society
India
Non-Governmental Organizations
99
CESAM - Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, University of Aveiro
Portugal
Science & Technological Community
Adding to what was already delivered by the several participants at the preparatory meeting, CESAM acknowledges the need to:
- Establish standardized methodologies to monitor marine plastic contamination, including micro and nanoplastics, in seafood and the marine environment in line with ISO and REACH regulations being discussed at EU level.
- Integration of the deep sea into existing ecological models, and ocean system models (e.g., nutrient cycling, fisheries, species distribution, or other types of models) to make reliable and robust forecast for management decisions.
- Showcase science-policy-stakeholders interface success stories of Marine Protected Areas considering environmental conservation, economic activities (multiple uses) and social values and cultural heritage.
- Foster the mariculture of non-fed species (seaweeds and bivalves).
Adding to what was already delivered by the several participants at the preparatory meeting, CESAM propose the following actions:
- Promote water cycle literacy to fight marine pollution (not just ocean literacy as a silo) (Target 14.1)
- Promote the integration of marine food webs dynamics knowledge in adaptive fisheries management (Target 14.2)
- Promote seaweed aquaculture as a complementary way for blue carbon sequestration (Target 14.3)
- Promote the use of geographic origin traceability tools to fight IUU (Illegal, unreported and unregulated) fisheries (Target 14.4)
- Measure the impact of the displacement of efforts due to the implementation of area-based conservation measures on achieving general conservation targets; involve and empower resource-users (Target 14.5)
- Enforce existing laws and legislation, and international agreements
- Agree upon and promote a framework for socioeconomic data collection, especially for ‘data poor’ fisheries
- Adopt a global modular design, including standardised methods, a single method of open access archiving and storage of data and samples, to characterize the deep seafloor
Adding to what was already delivered by the several participants at the preparatory meeting, CESAM propose the following actions:
- Built upon existing multi-sectoral international networks, open access, technology and data sharing, along with capacity building
- Showcase success stories to foster wider implementation and report failures to avoid duplication and maximise efforts
- Facilitate access to research vessels and other oceanographic infrastructures (both public and private) through an international agreement between operators.
Adding to what was already delivered by the several participants at the preparatory meeting, CESAM acknowledges the following challenges:
- Active open access, technology and data sharing, as well as capacity building
- Effective cooperation between natural and social sciences
- Lack of a ‘common language’ for inter- and trans-disciplinary understanding.
Adding to what was already delivered by the several participants at the preparatory meeting, CESAM suggest adding the following topics to existing interactive dialogues:
-Concerning theme 1, address marine pollution also in the context of multiple stressors (e.g. climate change)
- Concerning theme 2, manage, protect, conserve and restore marine ecosystems, including those in international waters and Sea beds.
- Concerning theme 4, include sustainable aquaculture
- Concerning theme 6, include fostering open scientific knowledge and data sharing
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(UNPKFC S.E.A) United Nation Peace Keeping Force Council South East Asia
ThailandWomen
Important,we have a gret idea and innovation about Recycle to supporting for the better place
Creating a network of social media partners and giving importance to public relations The glorification of the policy is clear. And able to create possibilities with modern technology or innovation. Social media is considered an important pocket to help drive enthusiasm for the environment. Create experiences that consistently reinforce awareness. By creating a model starting from communities, districts, provinces, countries, etc.
Recycle from old clothes Or unused goods to recycle, starting from 1 community and 1 product and creating that community to have income from recycling Creater
Actions are challenges That would be willingly offered as volunteers around the world Therefore there must be serious sacrifices in order to achieve the desired objectives. Theories and related innovations are therefore very important. That must be rhyme together with public relations and access to all sectors related to the environment, including people from all areas, to start small models, Country Model ,Wotld models It is possible, but it takes some effort and dedication.
That's good enough
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