U. Kentucky Master Plan
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COMPLETED?REQUIREMENTSUB-REQUIREMENT 1SUB-REQUIREMENT 2SUB-REQUIREMENT 3SUB-REQUIREMENT 4Recommended
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PHI 740: Proseminar on Teaching1st year, fall
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3/36 Total credits3/18 PHI seminar 3/18 PHI credits3/9 Contemporary credits3/3 Contemporary M&E credits1st year, fall
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6/36 Total credits6/18 PHI seminar6/18 PHI credits6/9 Contemporary credits3/3 Contemporary Value credits1st year, spring
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9/36 Total credits9/18 PHI seminar9/18 PHI credits9/9 Contemporary credits3/3 Contemporary (elective)2nd year, fall
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12/36 Total credits12/18 PHI seminar12/18 PHI credits3rd year, fall
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15/36 Total credits15/18 PHI seminar15/18 PHI credits1st year, spring
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18/36 Total credits18/18 PHI seminar18/18 PHI credits4th year, fall
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21/36 Total credits21/24 Total credits3rd year, spring
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24/36 Total credits21/24 Total credits2nd year, fall
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27/36 Total creditsPHI ind study or elective2nd year, spring
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30/36 Total creditsPHI ind study or elective2nd year, spring
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33/36 Total creditsPHI ind study or elective2nd year, spring
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36/36 Total credits3/3 Logic PHI 520 credits3rd year, fall
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3.0 or higher on coursework3rd year, fall
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3.4 or higher on all PHI coursework3rd year, fall
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M&E Comprehensive exam2nd year, spring
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Value Theory Comprehensive exam1st year, spring
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Language requirement 1/42nd year, fall
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Language requirement 2/42nd year, spring
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Language requirement 3/43rd year, fall
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Language requirement 4/43rd year, spring
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3/12 Total credits (post-MA)3/9 PHI seminar1st year, fall
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6/12 Total credits (post-MA)6/9 PHI seminar1st year, spring
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9/12 Total credits (post-MA)9/9 PHI seminar2nd year, fall
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12/12 Total credits (post-MA)2nd year, spring
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2/4 PHI 767 Dis Residency (post-MA)4th year, fall
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4/4 PHI 767 Dis Residency (post-MA)4th year, spring
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Area Proposal written and submitted4th year, fall
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Area Proposal orally defended4th year, fall
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Qualifying exam written and submitted4th year, spring
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Qualifying exam orally defended4th year, spring
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Dissertation proposal written and submitted4th year, spring
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Dissertation proposal orally defended4th year, spring
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Dissertation written and submitted5th year, spring
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Dissertation orally defended5th year, spring
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If applicable, required revisions submitted and accepted by committee5th year, spring
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Build professional website with best papers on it
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Try to become the category editor for a relevant category at www.philpapers.org. - See more at: http://philosopherscocoon.typepad.com/blog/2012/05/this-is-copied-over-from-what-i-wrote-on-my-own-blog-here-it-seemed-relevant-this-isnt-what-i-did-and-its-not-what-any.html#sthash.5mquGMaz.dpuf
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Send (suitably revised) chapters of your dissertation to journals. They will almost certainly be rejected the first time, but you’ll (usually) get feedback that is (occasionally) informed and (even) helpful for revision.
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Send (suitably revised) chapters of your dissertation to conferences. Be sure to talk to as many people as you can. You never know when a connection will turn out to be helpful later on.
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Send other work not from your dissertation (such as revisions of your seminar papers or history paper) to journals and conferences too! If you are trying to establish an AOS, the easiest way is to have at least one publication in the area.
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Start preparing your job talk by presenting it at internal colloquia and conferences.
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Finish a draft of your dissertation and prepare to defend it.
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Ask your advisors for letters of recommendation, providing them both your full CV and a “brag sheet” that lists in bullet form the items from the CV you think that particular letter writer may want to mention in the letter. Don’t make demands, but do make suggestions. You should aim to have at least three letters, as well as one letter devoted to your teaching. More would be good, as long as they’re (very) positive. Bear in mind that negative letters do get written. Whatever you do, don’t get one of those. Your Placement Director should look at all of your letters and advise as to which to send and which not to send, as well as the order in which they should be included in your dossier.
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Craft your job documents by the end of the month. You don’t want to be working on these while applying – that’s stressful enough on its own! You’ll need a surprisingly large collection, listed below:
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Cover Letter Template. A cover letter should be short and sweet – at most one page unless you have strong indications that a long letter is required. Put it on electronic letterhead, and be sure to include inside addresses and a scan of your signature.
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Curriculum Vitae (CV). A CV lists all of your many accomplishments as succinctly as possible.
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Biographical Sketch. This is a one-paragraph description of you and your research, written in the third person.
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Dissertation Abstract, short. You will want a one-paragraph abstract of your dissertation, which will typically be included in your CV.
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Dissertation Abstract, long. You will also need a longer abstract of your dissertation, approximately two double-spaced pages.
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Statement of Research. A research statement of your most prominent research so far, as well as laying out your plans for future projects. At most two pages single-spaced.
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Statement of Pedagogy / Statement of Teaching Philosophy. A pedagogy statement describes your strengths and experiences as an instructor. At most two pages single-spaced.
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Statement of Faith. If you plan to apply to religious institutions, you will want a statement of faith. Not all religious institutions require such a statement, but many do. One or two pages single-spaced.
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Teaching Portfolio. A teaching portfolio is not the same thing as a teaching statement. The portfolio lays out as succinctly as possible which courses you have already taught, includes your student and faculty evaluations, and describes any curriculum development efforts in which you’ve been involved.
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Sample Syllabi. A sample syllabus is not a syllabus. It’s basically a one-paragraph course description followed by a reading list of at most two pages, sequenced into about 13 weeks with thematic headings. You will want sample syllabi for every course in the union of your AOSs and AOCs, and perhaps for more. Some schools will want syllabi included in the initial application; others may ask for syllabi prior to the first-round interview; still others will want (even if they don’t say so!) syllabi during the first-round interview.
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Transcripts. Get scans of both undergraduate and graduate transcripts, which you may be required to submit with your applications.
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List of References. This is a comprehensive list of all your letter-writers, including mailing addresses, email addresses, and phone numbers.
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Writing Samples. Yes, samples. You should aim to have two or three AOSs, so you will want at least one writing sample for each (between 15 and 25 pages, double spaced). Most schools require at least one writing sample with the initial application. Some (the more prestigious ones) want several. In a recent year, the University of Chicago allowed (read: required) applicants to submit as many as six. Your writing samples can be publications, money chapters from your dissertation, or even other research that you think is of the highest quality. Revise them. Revise them again. Edit the revisions. Proofread the edits. You want your writing sample to be so tight you could bounce a quarter off its ass.
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Research Proposals. If you plan to apply for post-doctoral fellowships, you will need a research proposal. It might be good to have a couple. The most common thematic fellowships for philosophers are in bioethics, but most fellowships are interdisciplinary. That means your research proposal should be intelligible to a non-specialist audience. About 2 pages double-spaced.
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Amass a small fortune. You should expect to spend between $400 and $2000 on applications, depending on how many you send and how many you need to send via express or priority mail. You should also expect to spend several hundred on getting to and finding a hotel at the APA
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