Emeriti Project
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TimestampFNameLNameProjectStatusCommentContact
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2/1/2011 12:18:41ToddWipkeEmeriti AwardsConceptTo create a database of emeriti that have recently received major awards.wipke@ucsc.edu
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7/1/2017 8:58:51PamelaRobyA GOVERNESS' STORY: THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF JOANNA YOUNG SCAMMON OF MAINE, 1821-1892OngoingA GOVERNESS' STORY: THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF JOANNA YOUNG SCAMMON OF MAINE, 1821-1892.
Relatively little first hand information exists about working women in the 1800s. This book, which I'm working on, is based on 57 long letters Joanna wrote and over 300 letters from her family, the family of my great, great, great grandparents, Joanna Young Scammon, born in East Pittston, Maine, in 1791 and Eliakim Scammon born in 1785 in Stratham, New Hampshire. The letters span much of the nineteenth century. This collection provides an unusually rich historical and sociological picture of 19th century life.
roby@ucsc.edu
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2/1/2011 17:12:45michaelnauenbergEarly history of the calculusOngoingThe role of Isaac Barrow in the development of the calculus and his impact on the work of Leibniz has been a subject of much controversy in the past, but it is believed to have been settled. Recently, however, I complete a new analysis comparing the mathematical proofs of the fundamental theorem of the calculus by Barrow and by Leibniz, and according to correspondence I received from the editor of Historia Mathematica, and two referees of my work, it is expected that I will bring the controversy "back to the table". michael@physics.ucsc.edu
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2/1/2011 21:34:41VirginiaJansenBuilt Environment of UCSCConceptTo investigate the spatial environment of the UCSC campus to determine its features and their historical contexts. Interested faculty invited to join me, Jim Clifford, and Frank Zwart. At the moment (February 2011) in its discussion stage.goth@ucsc.edu
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3/15/2011 12:08:15ToddWipkeEmeriti AwardsOngoingEmeriti can now submit information about awards the have received in the past three years. This facility is located under Resources>Emeriti Input>Emeriti Awards.
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3/15/2011 17:48:16HarryBerger JrA Fury in the WordsCompletedA Fury in the Words: Love and Embarrassment in Shakespeare's Venice, is a study of two Shakespeare plays, The Merchant of Venice and Othello. It will be published by Fordham University Press and will probably appear next summer. It follows Caterpillage, the book about 17th century Dutch still life painting I just published with Fordham Press. Fordham Press will also publish a third book next year: The Perils of Uglytown: Structural Misanthropology in Plato's Republichberger@ucsc.edu
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11/7/2012 10:50:43DomMassaroAcquiring Literacy NaturallyOngoingTechnology Assisted Reading Acquisition: Acquiring Literacy Naturally

Society faces increasing challenges in the ability to support the infrastructure of a literate world. Virtual teachers, the internet, and the ceaseless access to information hold promise. To date, however, these potential solutions do not consider research in cognitive science and the potential of the learning brain. This talk illustrates how universal literacy can be achieved with minimal cost, allowing a revolutionary new age that challenges the survival of our educational institutions and society as we know them. It questions the commonly held belief that written language requires formal instruction and schooling whereas spoken language is seamlessly acquired from birth onward by natural interactions with persons who talk. The objectives are to prototype physical systems that exploit developments in behavioral science and technology to a) automatically recognize objects and meaningful events, and b) to display written descriptions of the events to the child. The goal is to create an interactive system TARA to allow infants, toddlers, and preschool children to acquire literacy naturally.
massaro@ucsc.edu
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5/15/2014 0:35:43michaelnauenbergStudy the formation of conical cusp in frozen dropsOngoingThis problem dates back at least to 1667 when Christopher Wren sketched the
conical shape of hailstones during a storm in London.
An article on this project has been submitted to the journal Physics of Fluid,
and can be obtained from the Cornell archive at

http://arxiv.org/pdf/1404.4425v1.pdf

A video description of this project can be seen on youtube at

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vekG7rotwy4


On May 22 at 4 pm., I will be giving a Physics Colloquium on this project
at the Physical Sciences auditorium (for a title and abstract, see the
notice on the Physics website)
michael@physics.ucsc.edu
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