Computer Proficiencies Assessment Spreadsheet
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Teacher Name:
Module #:As a pretest and at the end of each Ag-ACS module #1-4, report on the competencies of your students. Complete one of these surveys for each student in the class being studied. Students can self-assess.

These proficiency benchmarks come from the 31001 "Introduction to Computer Coding" course in the IT and STEM career clusters. Ag-ACS modules are not meant to cover all of these, so don't feel as though you are missing something if many items remain low. Mark the level of knowledge or skills that you have observed during this module.
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Student Name:
Title of class:
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School Name:
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3 = Can do independently with minimal help
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2 = Can do with occasional help/guidance
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1 = Can do with step-by-step guidance
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0 = Can not do / No exposure in this course
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Score 0-3
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1. Solicit and integrate peer feedback as appropriate to develop or refine a program.
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2. Compare different algorithms that may be used to solve the same problem, but one might be faster than the other. (e.g., different algorithms solve the same problem, but one might be faster than the other). [Clarification: Students are not expected to quantify these differences.]
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3. Interpret the flow of execution of algorithms and predict their outcomes. [Clarification: Algorithms can be expressed using natural language, flow and control diagrams, comments within code, and pseudocode.]
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4. Design, develop, and present computational artifacts such as mobile applications that address social problems both independently and collaboratively.
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5. Develop programs, both independently and collaboratively, that include sequences with nested loops and multiple branches. [Clarification: At this level, students may use block-based and/or text-based programming languages.]
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6. Create variables that represent different types of data and manipulate their values.
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7. Define and use procedures that hide the complexity of a task and can be reused to solve similar tasks. [Clarification: Students use and modify, but do not necessarily create, procedures with parameters.]
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8. Decompose a problem into parts and create solutions for each part.
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9. Use an iterative design process (e.g., define the problem, generate ideas, build, test, and improve solutions) to solve problems, both independently and collaboratively.
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10. Use a systematic process to identify the source of a problem within individual and connected devices (e.g., follow a troubleshooting flow diagram, make changes to software to see if hardware will work, restart device, check connections, swap in working components).
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11. Explain the processes used to collect, transform, and analyze data to solve a problem using computational tools (e.g., use an app or spreadsheet form to collect data, decide which data to use or ignore, and choose a visualization method.).
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12. Explain how computer science fosters innovation and enhances nearly all careers and disciplines.
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13. Describe ethical issues that relate to computing devices and networks (e.g., equity of access, security and plagiarism), hacking, intellectual property, copyright, Creative Commons licensing.
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14. Summarize security risks associated with weak passwords, lack of encryption, insecure transactions, and persistence of data.
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