Plant-Based Research and Ethics
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2018Wiley Online Library https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/clc.22863A defined plant‐based diet can be used as an effective therapeutic approach in the clinical setting in the treatment of HTN, hypercholesterolemia, and other cardiovascular risk factors while simultaneously reducing overall medication usage.
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2017US National Library of Medicinehttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28728684Higher intake of a plant-based diet index rich in healthier plant foods is associated with substantially lower CHD risk, whereas a plant-based diet index that emphasizes less-healthy plant foods is associated with higher CHD risk. Healthy plant foods (whole grains, fruits/vegetables, nuts/legumes, oils, tea/coffee) received positive scores, whereas less-healthy plant foods (juices/sweetened beverages, refined grains, potatoes/fries, sweets) and animal foods received reverse scores
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2017The Association of UK Dietitianshttps://www.bda.uk.com/news/view?id=179British Dietetic Association confirms well-planned vegan diets can support healthy living in people of all ages
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2016Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
https://www.eatrightpro.org/practice/position-and-practice-papers/position-papers/vegetarian-diets
It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that appropriately planned vegetarian, including vegan, diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate and may provide health benefits for the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. These diets are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, older adulthood and for athletes. Plant-based diets are more environmentally sustainable than diets rich in animal products because they use fewer natural resources and are associated with much less environmental damage.
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2014American Journal of Clinal Nutritionhttps://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/100/suppl_1/496S/4576707Early human food cultures were plant-based. Major religions such as Hinduism and Buddhism have recommended a vegetarian way of life since their conception. The former prejudices that vegetarianism leads to malnutrition were replaced by scientific evidence showing that vegetarian nutrition reduces the risk of most contemporary diseases.
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2017Physicians Committee
https://www.pcrm.org/health/medNews/American-Diabetes-Association-Promotes-Plant-Based-Diets
In its 2017 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes, the American Diabetes Association maintains that a plant-based eating pattern is an effective option for type 2 diabetes management and encourages clinicians to always include education on lifestyle management.
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2014American Diabetes Association
http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/meal-planning-for-vegetarians/
People with diabetes can choose to follow this type of vegetarian diet (VEGAN)
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2013US National Library of Medicinehttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3662288/Healthy eating may be best achieved with a plant-based diet, which we define as a regimen that encourages whole, plant-based foods and discourages meats, dairy products, and eggs as well as all refined and processed foods.
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2016US National Library of Medicinehttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5638464/We humans do not need meat. In fact, we are healthier without it, or at least with less of it in our diets. The Adventist Health Studies provide solid evidence that vegan, vegetarian, and low-meat diets are associated with statistically significant increases in quality of life and modest increases in longevity. The world that we inhabit would also be healthier without the commercial meat industry. Factory farms are a waste of resources, environmentally damaging, and ethically indefensible. It is time to accept that a plant-predominant diet is best for us individually, as a race, and as a planet.
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2016Stanford Prevention Research Center
https://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2016/07/5-questions-randall-stafford-advocates-a-plant-based-diet.html
"The health benefits of specific components of plants have been documented, as have the harms associated with constituents largely unique to meat,” he wrote. “Vegetarian diets have been associated with a reduction in cardiovascular disease mortality by as much as 29 percent and cancer incidence by 18 percent.”
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2009American Journal of Clinal Nutritionhttps://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/89/5/1627S/4596952Compared with other vegetarian diets, vegan diets tend to contain less saturated fat and cholesterol and more dietary fiber. Vegans tend to be thinner, have lower serum cholesterol, and lower blood pressure, reducing their risk of heart disease.
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2003
Journal of Agricultural & Environmental Ethics
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FA%3A1026354906892Davis makes a mathematical error in using total rather than per capita estimates of animals killed; second, he focuses on the number of animals killed in production and ignores the welfare of these animals; and third, he does not count the number of animals who may be prevented from existing
https://www.veganoutreach.org/enewsletter/matheny.html
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http://www.gfi.org/images/uploads/2018/03/EmoryAlmyPNASFullReply.pdf
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