2019 AP Summer Assignment (Responses)
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TimestampTeacher's NameTeacher's EmailSubjectDescription of summer assignment
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Casey Fengcasey@ibsh.twAP Computer ScienceThe textbook you will use is Barron's AP Computer Science (8th edition).
Please study chapter 1&2 during your summer vacation. Chapter 2 is a very important and very basic chapter of CS. So please study hard during your vacation and WE WILL HAVE AN EXAM IN THE BEGINNING OF NEXT SEMESTER.
If you fail the exam, I will recommend you not to take this class..
Here is an online course website which can helps you to start CS quickly.
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL484D73FA74A11AC9
Video 1-13 and 18-24 are related to chapter 1.
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Seth Robertss.roberts@ibsh.twAP EconomicsTo: All IBSH 2019-2020 AP Economics Students,

Congratulations on signing up for one of the most exciting and strenuous courses you will take in high school. It is one of the greatest pleasures of my life to be able to teach this course at the International Bilingual School of Hsinchu. I cannot wait to meet you and work with you.

This course is one of the most exciting ones that you will ever take because you will get to examine the way businesses and markets operate and then explain why they work that way. We will be examining a new way of thinking through an economic lens.

Economics is a way of thinking and to understand it, we must understand its history, so I would like you to do a little reading over the summer. I will include questions to help guide your reading and our discussion of the material in August. The answers to the discussion, multiple choice, and true/false questions will be collected on the first day of school for a completion grade only, but finishing them is important to being prepared for the rigors of this course.

The essay questions (of which you must answer 3 from 3 DIFFERENT chapters) will be collected via turnitin.com and graded. They should be written and cited using MLA 8 format. They are DUE THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL. There will also be a quiz on this material after we have discussed it.

Class ID: 21433654
Enrollment Key: AdamSmith

Please read ALL of The Worldly Philosophers by Robert Heilbroner and answer the questions that I have provided.
You will be reading about the economists who shaped the modern era including Smith, Marx, Veblen, Keynes, and Schumpeter in that order. As you read, try to take notes right on the passages that you are reading. That is why I have given you a pdf file that you can print or annotate. Break down the ideas that you don’t understand by taking notes, and highlight and underline the parts that you like the most while making notes right on the paper. This skill is imperative for success at American universities, so you should start now.

If you have any questions about this assignment or the course, please feel free to contact me through email: s.roberts@ibsh.tw . Thank you in advance for your hard work and enthusiasm I look forward to working with you next year

Sincerely,


Seth A. Roberts


II
THE ECONOMIC REVOLUTION


I. Discussion Questions

1. The market system released tremendous energy and the truly revolutionary idea that change is an essential part of our society. Discuss how students’ plans for their own futures differ from or coincide with the parents’ occupations or their grandparents’. Do students believe that the so-called “generational split” has always existed in human history or just inn societies that are based on rapid and continuous change?

2. An economic system can be directed by tradition, command, or the market. Discuss how different societies in history and in the world today organize their economies.

3. The growth of the market system has been described as violent albeit unplanned; what event in our own history can be interpreted as part of this process?

4. An important obstacle to the development of the market system was religious opposition to profit-making. From your knowledge of the Bible discuss what aspects of Christianity bear this out. Can you account for the antibusiness tone of early Christian literature?

5. Modern economic society is characterized by very large corporations within which a great deal of “organization man” behavior is supposedly required. It also depends very heavily on economic policies determined in Washington. Do you think the present system is best described as an economy of tradition, command, or market?




III. The Wonderful World of Adam Smith


I. Discussion Questions

1. Adam Smith made certain assumptions about human nature. What are they? Are they universally valid? In this society? In all societies, at all times in history?

2. What is meant by the title of the chapter, “The Wonderful World of Adam Smith”?

3. Do the Laws of the Market still apply to our society?

4. How much of Smith’s Law of Accumulation is still valid?

5. “The basis of capitalism is that it uses private gain for public good.” What does the statement mean? Do you agree?


II. Multiple Choice

1. Smith differed from the Physiocrats in that he did not believe that wealth derived mainly from:
A. Gold.
B. Silver.
C. Colonies.
D. Land.

2. In The Wealth of Nations, decisions as to how much of a commodity is to be produced are ultimately made by:
A. The government.
B. Businessmen.
C. Traders.
D. The “invisible hand” of the market.

3. The “invisible hand” is:
A. The hand of God.
B. The interaction of self-interest and competition.
C. The manipulation of behind-the-scenes speculators.
D. None of the above.
4. Smith assumed that as industrialists earned larger profits they would:

A. Reinvest them in the factories.
B. Save them.
C. Give them to charity.
D. Spend them on consumption.

5. The term “market” in “market system” refers to:

A. Markets in medieval trade fairs.
B. Any place of exchange.
C. A system in which money prices are used to allocate resources.
D. A society in which goods are sold in markets.

6. Which problem was not of central concern to Smith?

A. Consumer well-being.
B. Division of labor.
C. Finding laws of society beneath seeming chaos.
D. Unemployment.

7. Smith saw society advancing with:

A. An increase in knowledge.
B. An increase in the division of labor and greater productivity.
C. The growing perfection of man.
D. None of the above.

8. Smith favored above all:

A. Business.
B. Labor.
C. The consumer.
D. Landlords.

9. According to the Laws of the Market, if there were too few shoes produced to satisfy society’s demand:

A. Shoe prices would rise.
B. Shoe prices would fall.
C. Shoes would cease to be produced.
D. Shoes would be overproduced.

10. According to Smith, if glove manufacturing were very profitable:

A. Glove manufacturers would make big profits.
B. Other manufacturers would begin to make gloves.
C. The supply of gloves would begin to rise.
D. All of the above.


CHAPTER V: THE INEXORABLE SYSTEM OF KARL MARX

SUMMARY:
We have seen how the brutal and gloomy conditions of nineteenth-century Europe produced a group of thinkers who tried to persuade the rulers of Europe to institute changes in society in order to make it a better place to live in. Toward this end the Utopian Socialists evolved grand schemes about the workings of the perfect society. Marx went further and along a different path than the Utopian Socialists he despised. Marx stated that change was not only desirable but also inevitable;
“He attempted to show that those who worked for a communist
revolution were not only on the "correct" side but also on the winning side.”
The basis of Marx"s theory was his analysis of history based on dialectical materialism. Engels explained it in the following manner: the materialist conception of history starts from the principle that production and exchange are the basis of every social order; that in every society that has appeared in history, the division of society into classes or estates is determined by what is produced and how it is produced, and by how the product is exchanged. According to this conception, he wrote, "the " ultimate causes of all social changes and political revolutions are to be sought, not in the minds of men, but in changes in the mode of production and exchange; not in the philosophy but the economics of the epoch concerned."
In other words, the basic force in history, according to Marx is the economic structure of society. This does not rule out the impact of ideas, but it stresses that ideas are mere reflections of society.
Ironically, one can say that Marx himself gave the cap1tahst system a longer lease on life by his stimulus to socialism­ thereby prodding capitalism into effecting the reforms that saved its life.

II. Discussion Questions
1) What is the role of the state in Marx's analysis? What can it do? What can it not do? Why is this important for his whole analysis? Do you think it is true?
2) The Utopians believed that ideas could change history. What did Marx believe?
3) To what extent did Marx's predictions about the downfall of capitalism come true?


1) What is meant by Surplus Value?
2) According to Marx, what makes Capitalism crash?
3) Marx’s contribution to economics does not lie in his connection with communism, but with capitalism." Discuss.
4) What is the basic process creating change under capitalism, according to Marx?

III. Multiple Choice: Please choose the MOST correct answer for the following questions.
1) Marx believed that capitalism was doomed because:
A. The ruling class would be forced to institute reforms in order to stay in power.
B. The state would wither away.
C. The inner dynamic of the system led inevitably to crisis
D. Working class organizations would vote themselves into power.

2) For Smith, Ricardo and Marx, the value of a commodity was which of the following?
A. The price it would fetch in the market place
B. The amount of labor that went into producing it
C. The price the capitalist set it at
D. The result of supply and demand
3) According to Marx, the Government was which of the following?
A. the instrument of the ruling class
B. the neutral arbiter between warring classes
C. the instrument by which the poor may gam power
D. withering away in capitalist society

4) According to Marx, capitalism creates its own destructive force in the form of which of the following?
A. Market
B. Proletariat
C. Strong central state
D. Ideas it generates
5) According to Marx, unemployment was created by which of the following?
A. Overpopulation
B. Lazy Workers
C. Industrialization
D. Capitalist Greed


CHAPTER VIII: THE SAVAGE SOCIETY OF THORSTEIN VEBLEN

SUMMARY:
The capitalism of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America was a hurly-burly affair, but academic economics had little to say about the realities of the day. One might read such leading texts as John Bates Clark’s Distribution of Wealth and never know that America was a land of millionaires; one could peruse F. H. Taussig's Economics and never come across a
rigged stock market.
Thorstein Veblen, an eccentric and an academic nomad forced to move from university to university (as much for his personal idiosyncrasies as for his views) challenged the nice formulations of official economics. Economics for Veblen had no relation to the mannerly and precise game of the Victorians in which the ways of the world were justified by differential calculus, and it bore little kinship to the efforts of earlier economists to explain how things worked themselves out. The basic challenge Veblen presented was in his exposure of the irrational nature of our society, in his concentration on our primitive modes of behavior. This flew directly in the face of the
spirit of the times.
His central thesis was that in any primitive societies the leisure class exists by living off stolen booty or by conquest and war, and that these primitive attributes were reflected in the ways of American society. The leisure class had changed its occupation from war to business, it had refined its method s, but its aim was still the same-the predatory seizure of wealth. Not only was the new leisure class still following the old pattern of seizure without work, but it was upheld by the old attitudes of admiration for personal strength. Everyone, workmen and middle-class citizens as well as capitalists, sought through the conspicuous expenditure of money-indeed - through its con­ conspicuous waste-to demonstrate his predatory prowess. Economic behavior, says Veblen, can be better understood in terms of these deep-buried irrationalities than in terms of the nineteenth-century prettification of behavior into reasonableness and "common sense."
Ironically. Veblen's caustic critique showed, in contradiction to Marx, why modern society did not fly apart in class conflict.

I. Discussion Questions
1) Why was the engineer the hero of Veblen’s works?
2) What was the nature of the conflict that Veblen saw in society? Was it a Marxian conflict?
3) According to Veblen, what held society together?



CHAPTER IX: THE HERESIES OF JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES
SUMMARY:
Because to save meant to invest-that is, it meant that the money one did
not spend on consumption for oneself one spent on new physical assets for one's business.
In order to understand Keynes's thinking, about how saving could cause trouble, we must understand how a nation's well­being is determined. Essentially, national prosperity depends on the flow of incomes from hand to hand. With every purchase that we make, we transfer a part of our incomes into someone else's pocket. Similarly, every penny of our own incomes, be it
wages, salaries, rents, profits, or interest, ultimately derives from money which someone else has spent.
Viewed from this perspective, we see that if we tucked our savings into mattresses or hoarded them in cash, we should obviously break the circular flow of income. For then we should be simply freezing some part of the income system that was handed to us, and returning to society less than it gave to us. 0f course, we do not put our savings under our mattresses, but in banks or in securities, where they can be tapped by business for investment purposes and thus reintroduced into the income stream.
Keynes in his brilliant and epoch-making book, The General


Keynes presented in his Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, four essential ideas:
1) Prosperity depended on investment; for if savings were not put to use, the dread spiral of contraction would begin.
2) That investment was an undependable drive wheel for the economy; through no fault of the businessman it was constantly threatened with satiety, and satiety spelled economic shrinkage.
3) An economy in depression might well stay there-there was nothing inherent in the situation to pull it out.
4) There was a need for public intervention in order to maintain the level of spending in the economy when investment spending faltered.

I. Discussion Questions
1) In what way did Keynes's General Theory represent a sharp break witl1the main stream of economic thought?
2) For a long time, Keynes was considered a dangerous radical. Today this is no longer true. Discuss why you think this change has taken place.
3) In what way is the management of modern capitalism made easier because Keynesian economics is now taught in virtually all colleges?
4) Why is investment so important in the Keynesian system?
5) In what way does Keynesian economics provide a rationale for increased government intervention in the economy?

II. True/False: Choose if the statement is true or false. If false, rewrite it to be true.

1) An increase in savings lowers the interest rate and therefore automatically leads to an increase in investment.
2) Investment is emphasized in the Keynesian system because it is the most volatile element of total spending.
3) Keynes agreed with Ricardo that savings were not a problem, because an increase in savings would lower the price of capital and thus induce more investment.
4) Keynes was a good economist, but a poor businessman.
5) Government spending during the New Deal pulled this country out of the Depression.
6) The key to prosperity is the level of spending in the economy.
7) Keynes's proposals called for the replacement of capitalism by socialism.
8) All money that is received by someone is spent.
9) All money that is spent is received by someone.
10) Saving and investment are processes carried on by different persons in our economy.

Essay Questions: You MUST complete three essays answering THREE questions total from three DIFFERENT chapters. They will be assessed for academic integrity by turnitin.com and by me. Please do your own work and do not share it with others. They will be assessed for economic insight, historical thinking, and overall reasoning. This will be your first assessment grade.

Chapter 2 The Economic Revolution
1. In what sense must land and labor be mobile in a market economy?

2. Traders operation for their own private gain existed in the ancient world and in medieval society, yet we do not describe these societies as market economies. Why not?

3. An essential feature of the market system is the fact that it is organized with the idea of gain as a motivating force. What other ideas have motivated society?

4. What obstacles did the evolving market system have to overcome before it dominated society?

5. What social, political and religious forced aided the development of the market system?



CHAPTER 3: Adam Smith
1. What is the “invisible hand”?

2. “The market, which is the acme of individual economic freedom, is the strictest taskmaster of all.” Explain.

3. What were the principal barriers to competition in Adam Smith’s day? Today?

4. Explain how the laws of the market impose a competitive price. What happens if someone tries to “overcharge”?

5. “Adam Smith was a spokesman for the rising bourgeoisie.” In what sense is this statement true? Not true?

Chapter 5- Karl Marx
1) What is meant by Surplus Value?
2) According to Marx, what makes Capitalism crash?
3) Marx’s contribution to economics does not lie in his connection with communism, but with capitalism." Discuss.
4) What is the basic process creating change under capitalism, according to Marx?

Chapter 8: Thorstein Veblen
1) What is a leisure class? Does it only exist in an industrialized society?
2) Who were the “Robber Barrons” and what role do theyt play in Veblen’s analysis?
3) Is conspicuous waste important in our economy today? Is it a public or a private attribute, or both?
4) Do you think that engineers would, as Veblen thought, run society better if they could direct its economic life?

Chapter 9: John Maynard Keynes
1) In what way was The General Theory the product of its time?
2) In what way did savings constitute a problem for the economy in the views of Malthus and Keynes?
3) What was the historical change between Malthus' and Keynes's times that increased the validity of the fear of over saving?
4) Do you believe that government spending poses a threat to capitalism? What sorts of things does the government spend its money on? What sorts of things might it spend its money on?



The Turnitin.com Information below should be used for this class.

You MUST use your IBSH student email for Turnitin.com and for all class communications including access to the Google Drive:

AP Economics:
Class ID: 18218166
Enrollment Key: AdamSmith





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Seth Robertss.roberts@ibsh.twAP European HistoryTo: All IBSH AP European History Students

Thank you for taking AP European History, if you work hard, you will get a lot from this course this year. We do however have a few stumbling blocks in our path to success. We basically have about 140 classes to learn 700 years of European History. This is a Herculean task.
I am very excited about your interest in European History, and I hope to feed that interest so that it grows with your understanding of the topic. I wish to share a summer reading list/assignment list with all of you. There are THREE SEPARATE ASSIGNMENTS. There is one REQUIRED Reading, The Prince, by Niccolò Machiavelli. There is no assignment for the book, but you will be required to know its contents and apply them to your analysis of rulers throughout the course.
You will also be asked to choose a book from a list of three books and write a historical book review for that book. Finally, you will be asked to read one chapter of A Preface to History, and write a reaction to it.

Required Readings:
The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli can be found at:
http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/m/machiavelli/niccolo/m149p/ You should gain valuable insights by reading the work and interpreting it yourself. I will cover the contents in lecture. (You may also buy it at a local bookstore-I recommend the Penguin Press edition)

Choose ONE of the following books to review for your book review assignment. You and others who chose that book will have a day during the school year to present your findings on this book to the class. Additionally all of your reviews will be shared with other students in the class via Google Drive.
Choices: (All 3 are available to download for free online or at any major bookstore- You may read abridged editions)

Hugo, Victor: Les Miserables. * (Classic tale of 19th century French society. If you like the musical you will love the book. One of my favorites!)- abridged version is okay and encouraged.

Tolstoy, Leo War and Peace- The classic tale of the decline of Russian monarchy and the struggles of the Russian people during this period.

Remarque, Erich Maria. * All Quiet on the Western Front. (Depicts the experiences of a group of young German soldiers fighting and suffering during the last days of the First World War.)

Sincerely,


Seth A. Roberts

SUMMER READING BOOK REVIEW GUIDELINES

You are learning one of the social studies power standards by “creating a product that uses social studies content to support a thesis and presents the product in an appropriate manner to a meaningful audience.”
1. Write a one page, typed summary of your book. (No more than one page please; learn to condense.) The summary must include two (or more) of the following power standards:
A. Understands historical chronology. Summarize the major or minor historical events present in book/movie.
B. Understands and analyzes causal factors that have shaped major events in history. Explain how events caused other events to happen.
C. Understands that there are multiple perspectives and interpretations of historical events. Discuss PERSIA (Political, Economic, Religious, Social, Intellectual, Artistic) things that occurred in book/movie
D. Use your own words. Combine ideas from the book into new sentences of your own. Avoid copying the original language, and put quotes around any that you do borrow. Summarizing is a good way to learn and to assimilate material, but the process doesn’t work very well unless you translate the original into your own language.
E. Please remember to use proper grammar, spelling, and paragraph structure.

2. Write a one page, typed critique of your book. (Again, keep it to one page.) “Uses critical reasoning skills to analyze and evaluate positions”
A. A critique consists of your thoughts, responses, and reactions to what you have read.
B. The following questions are examples of the kind you should consider as you read your book and prepare the critique.
1) How well did the book include historical issues, background, or setting to create a story?
2) What is your overall opinion of the book, and why?
3) Does the author seem historically accurate? Is there any distortion, exaggeration, or diminishing of material? Is the overall interpretation biased, subjective, slanted, objective? Does the author try to look at both sides of the issue?
4) Is the book interesting or boring, and why? Does the material presented raise your curiosity about the historical subject, and why?
5) Is there enough information in the book? Is the subject treated thoroughly or summarily?
6) Did you feel satisfied, disappointed, or puzzled by the book, and why?
C. Make sure to include examples from the book/ movie to illustrate your opinion.
3. Make sure to proofread your 2 pages. Proper grammar, spelling, and paragraphs are expected.

**This assignment will be due the first week of school in August and it will be submitted to Turnitin.com. Have a good summer, enjoy your book, and get ready to challenge yourself!


Preface to History Novice Historian Assignment:
Read the first chapter of Gustavson’s Preface to History entitled, The Novice Historian. Use that reading and your experiences in other social studies classes to explain how we gain knowledge in history. You should read at least two evaluations of Gustavson on the internet and examine how his ideas have shaped the study of history. Please support your assessment of how we gain knowledge in history and how we assess that knowledge with at least three citations in an essay of 300-650 words. You may bring in ideas from any of the readings that we have done to this point. Please dazzle me with your brilliance. Link to the text: https://archive.org/details/in.gov.ignca.5634. I also am attaching a pdf file of the entire book. Although the first chapter is the only one assigned, the entire book will help you understand history and historical perspectives better. Please feel free to read as much or as little of the rest of the book as you see fit.

**This assignment will be due the first week of school in August and it will be submitted to Turnitin.com.
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Matt Chenmatt@ibsh.twAP StatisticsBarron's AP Statistics Topic One: Graphical Displays test on the first day when the new semester starts.
6
Alex Fishmanalexfda@gmail.comAP Lit. and Composition12AP Literature and Composition
Mr. Fishman
2019-2020

Name_______________________________________ Date____________________

“Paging a Main Character Summer Assignment”
(50 Points)

For this assignment, I would like you to complete the following activities for Jane Eyre and The Awakening.

1. Which page(s)? (Passage can cover two to three paragraphs at most)
2. A plot summary as to what is taking place on that page. (No more than a paragraph of 4 to 5 sentences.)
3. A list and brief explanation of any significant details (references to historical, cultural, mythological, or biblical events, people, or things) on that page. (This should be a list with brief explanations.)
4. In no more than one spectacular paragraph (4 to 5 sentences each), and possibly two, please explain the page’s function in the story. Does the action (or lack of action) do more to define a character, define the theme, or establish a setting that is appropriate for character or theme? In other words, what’s the importance of this page to the story? You have already summarized the plot, what happens; now it’s your job to tell what readers are supposed to have learned thematically about your character from what happens. If you’re feeling stumped, try to relate the information on your page to another section of the narrative that deals with a similar theme. That way I can see the development or “treatment” of the theme within the story.
5. Explain your choice of the best language/word usage/diction or sensory image on the page and your explanation as to why that phrase or image is effective. (No less than a solid paragraph here.)

Model Response (to F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby)
“Paging Nick Carraway”

1. Page 3

2. This page explains Nick’s background. He is supposed to look like a great-uncle, but he never met him. He’s well educated and graduated from Yale. He fought in World War I. He was bored with the Midwest when he came back from the service, so he moves east to enter the bond business. His father is supporting him, should he need it, and he comes in the spring. Nick is 22 years old. Upon his arrival, he and an office friend were going to rent a bungalow together. His friend, however, is sent to Washington, and so he moves to the country alone. He has a dog, a Dodge and a Finnish servant. (Notice past tense is used for events that take place before the novel begins and that present tense is used for everything that takes place in the novel.)

3.
a. New Haven - Yale University
b. Teutonic - German
c. Teutonic migration - a rather jaded phrase to describe Germany’s aggression in WWI.
d. Bond business - the sale of bonds on Wall Street.

4. The first main paragraph serves to give the reader an understanding of Nick, our narrator. In the characterization on page 3, we learn that Nick is at least a little bit jaded. His reference to World War I as a “Teutonic migration” is glib at best, and cold-hearted at worst. After all, many people died terrible deaths. He discusses the war as a game, even going as far as to say he “enjoyed the counter-raid.” This detached manner seems like arrogance, but he is smart enough to acknowledge at the end of the paragraph that he doesn’t know everything. We get the feeling that he learned that he doesn’t know everything in the story he is about to tell us. The reader is set up to believe that we aren’t dealing with a fool, but that Nick may have been a fool in the story he is about to relate.
The reference to New Haven leads us to believe, perhaps wrongly, that we are dealing with an intelligent person. However, most of the paragraph discusses Nick’s lack of passion, or implies a lack of passion, instead of focusing on whether he is smart or not. Descriptions and events clearly indicate that he is a solitary figure who can’t feel his life. The reference to the painting of his great-uncle shows that he has a family, but he’s not connected to it. He shows very little remorse for leaving his family, and his main connection with his father is financial. Furthermore, he’s disillusioned. What had been a “warm center” for him is now the “ragged edge.” He wants action, so he heads to where the action is. Of course, Nick (and the reader) find the action we’re looking for, but he remains detached from it except for a few isolated moments near the end of the novel.
The second paragraph on the page delivers an interesting description of setting. Nick rents a bungalow with a dog, a Dodge and an old Finnish woman who mutters to herself over the stove. Here again, he has people to whom he could be connected, but the description makes him seem quite alone. His dog runs away. His friend would have been a roommate, but he gets sent away by the business. The woman has wisdom, but she speaks the wisdom in Finnish. Our narrator, Nick, is perfectly alone and perfectly unspectacular.

5. “Wide lawns and friendly trees” is an outstanding sensory image, even though it is not particularly spectacular. Those five words are not terribly specific, but they conjure the safety of the Midwest better than some descriptions that reach a full page. “Wide lawn” is easy enough, but “friendly trees” brings out a whole neighborhood of people who are just as friendly and welcoming. What may be most interesting about the passage is that Nick moves to the suburbs of New York to capture something that resembles the Midwest. However, he moved to the East out of boredom attributable to the safety and tranquility found in the Midwest.




7
Alex Fishmanalexfda@gmail.com12 AP English Lit. and Cmposition12AP Literature and Composition
Mr. Fishman
2019-2020

Name_______________________________________ Date____________________

“Paging a Main Character Summer Assignment”
(50 Points)

For this assignment, I would like you to complete the following activities for Jane Eyre and The Awakening.

1. Which page(s)? (Passage can cover two to three paragraphs at most)
2. A plot summary as to what is taking place on that page. (No more than a paragraph of 4 to 5 sentences.)
3. A list and brief explanation of any significant details (references to historical, cultural, mythological, or biblical events, people, or things) on that page. (This should be a list with brief explanations.)
4. In no more than one spectacular paragraph (4 to 5 sentences each), and possibly two, please explain the page’s function in the story. Does the action (or lack of action) do more to define a character, define the theme, or establish a setting that is appropriate for character or theme? In other words, what’s the importance of this page to the story? You have already summarized the plot, what happens; now it’s your job to tell what readers are supposed to have learned thematically about your character from what happens. If you’re feeling stumped, try to relate the information on your page to another section of the narrative that deals with a similar theme. That way I can see the development or “treatment” of the theme within the story.
5. Explain your choice of the best language/word usage/diction or sensory image on the page and your explanation as to why that phrase or image is effective. (No less than a solid paragraph here.)

Model Response (to F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby)
“Paging Nick Carraway”

1. Page 3

2. This page explains Nick’s background. He is supposed to look like a great-uncle, but he never met him. He’s well educated and graduated from Yale. He fought in World War I. He was bored with the Midwest when he came back from the service, so he moves east to enter the bond business. His father is supporting him, should he need it, and he comes in the spring. Nick is 22 years old. Upon his arrival, he and an office friend were going to rent a bungalow together. His friend, however, is sent to Washington, and so he moves to the country alone. He has a dog, a Dodge and a Finnish servant. (Notice past tense is used for events that take place before the novel begins and that present tense is used for everything that takes place in the novel.)

3.
a. New Haven - Yale University
b. Teutonic - German
c. Teutonic migration - a rather jaded phrase to describe Germany’s aggression in WWI.
d. Bond business - the sale of bonds on Wall Street.

4. The first main paragraph serves to give the reader an understanding of Nick, our narrator. In the characterization on page 3, we learn that Nick is at least a little bit jaded. His reference to World War I as a “Teutonic migration” is glib at best, and cold-hearted at worst. After all, many people died terrible deaths. He discusses the war as a game, even going as far as to say he “enjoyed the counter-raid.” This detached manner seems like arrogance, but he is smart enough to acknowledge at the end of the paragraph that he doesn’t know everything. We get the feeling that he learned that he doesn’t know everything in the story he is about to tell us. The reader is set up to believe that we aren’t dealing with a fool, but that Nick may have been a fool in the story he is about to relate.
The reference to New Haven leads us to believe, perhaps wrongly, that we are dealing with an intelligent person. However, most of the paragraph discusses Nick’s lack of passion, or implies a lack of passion, instead of focusing on whether he is smart or not. Descriptions and events clearly indicate that he is a solitary figure who can’t feel his life. The reference to the painting of his great-uncle shows that he has a family, but he’s not connected to it. He shows very little remorse for leaving his family, and his main connection with his father is financial. Furthermore, he’s disillusioned. What had been a “warm center” for him is now the “ragged edge.” He wants action, so he heads to where the action is. Of course, Nick (and the reader) find the action we’re looking for, but he remains detached from it except for a few isolated moments near the end of the novel.
The second paragraph on the page delivers an interesting description of setting. Nick rents a bungalow with a dog, a Dodge and an old Finnish woman who mutters to herself over the stove. Here again, he has people to whom he could be connected, but the description makes him seem quite alone. His dog runs away. His friend would have been a roommate, but he gets sent away by the business. The woman has wisdom, but she speaks the wisdom in Finnish. Our narrator, Nick, is perfectly alone and perfectly unspectacular.

5. “Wide lawns and friendly trees” is an outstanding sensory image, even though it is not particularly spectacular. Those five words are not terribly specific, but they conjure the safety of the Midwest better than some descriptions that reach a full page. “Wide lawn” is easy enough, but “friendly trees” brings out a whole neighborhood of people who are just as friendly and welcoming. What may be most interesting about the passage is that Nick moves to the suburbs of New York to capture something that resembles the Midwest. However, he moved to the East out of boredom attributable to the safety and tranquility found in the Midwest.
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Crystal wucrystal@ibsh.twAP chemPlease email Ms Crystal to get the assignment!
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Christine Yin, Peggy Wuchristineyin@ibsh.twAP Calculus AB & BCBarron's chapter 1~2
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Marina Linmlin@ibsh.twAP English LiteratureI will use the same assignment as Alex Fishman for this year.
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Ryan Kastnerr.kastner@ibsh.twAP World HistoryRead the introduction to "Novice Historian" by Gustavson
Complete the "How to DBQ" work sheet using the provided DBQ on Ancient China.
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Alex Bleecker & Conor Morrisona.bleecker@ibsh.tw & conor@ibsh.twAP English G11FREAKONOMICS: readings, summaries, written responses, outside source analyses (TEDx talks, newspaper articles)
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Mr. Krystalkrystal@ibsh.twAP US HistoryStudents will have three articles to read and answer questions about. They will have a DBQ to write. They will have a geography quiz the first week of school. I will email the assignment to the students listed on the spreadsheet.
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7/16/2019 2:12:33Elizabeth Yanceye.yancey@ibsh.twAP Human Geography
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1xD7RXJ3WzHc9ZtUhtZ4eLaPnTJ8VpFi9/view?usp=sharing
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7/16/2019 2:13:29Elizabeth Yanceye.yancey@ibsh.twAP Psychology
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1AUFwvjgV9vadjMPTdbN6j0h7_PNW3XPb/view
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