9. Scope and Sequence 2016-17
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
Still loading...
ABCDEFGHIJ
1
OUSD 9th Grade Biology
Yearlong Scope and Sequence
2
Curriculum Instructions - How to Use This Curriculum
3
Curriculum Tool folder
4
Instructional Tool Kit
5
Overarching Question:
6
Unit of Study:Unit 0 - How Do Biologists Learn?Unit 1 - Healthy Oakland TeensUnit 2 - DNA: Ancestry or Destiny?Unit 3 - Food for ThoughtBenchmark 1 - OUSD ONLYUnit 4: Evolving in Climate ChangeUnit 5: Systems in CrisisUnit 6 - Biology & SocietyExhibition
7
Table of Contents:Unit 0 - ToCUnit 1 ToCUnit 2 ToCUnit 3 ToCTeacher OverviewUnit 4 ToCUnit 5 ToCUnit 6 ToC
8
Unit Feedback:Unit 0 FeedbackUnit 1 FeedbackUnit 2 Feedback Unit 3 FeedbackBenchmark FeedbackUnit 4 FeedbackUnit 5 FeedbackUnit 6 Feedback
9
Unit Length & Dates:2 weeks
Marking Period 1
August 22-September 2
5 weeks
Marking Period 1
September 6-October 7
6 Weeks
Marking Period 2
October 10-November 18
*Sex Ed: October 24-28
5 Weeks
Marking Period 3
November 28-January 13
*Winter Break: December 19-30
3 hours
Jan. 13-20
6 Weeks
Marking Period 4
January 23-March 3
6 Weeks
Marking Period 5
March 6-April 21
*Spring Break: April 3-7
6 Weeks
Marking Period 6
April 24-June 2
1 Week
June 5-9
10
Essential Question:How do biologists learn, think, and act?Is stress good or bad?Do our genes determine who we are?Does it matter what we eat?Could eating like our ancestors make us healthier?
Who survives in a changing climate and why?
How does life maintain balance?How can we use biological science to make the world a better place?
11
Anchor Phenomenon:Characteristics of LifeThe Stress ResponseSkin Color VariationPrevalance of Corn: C12 in Human HairPaleo Diet Survivalist SpeciesStudent-Choice
12
Storyline: (Students' role)You are a biologist studying the living creatures and systems around you.You are a physiologist hired by Oakland Unified School District to evaluate stress management claims being proposed for a Teen Stress Campaign for Oakland Youth.You are a genetic counselor presenting a case study to the National Society of Genetic Counselors on the use of ancestral evolutionary evidence and genetic models in genetic counseling.You are an ecologically conscious nutritionist hired by OUSD's Wellness Department to research the physiological and ecological impacts of a meal option available in the school cafeteria.You are a nutritional anthropologist examining evolutionary and physiological data in order to evaluate the health claims of different diets.You are a bioclimatologist discussing how the earth’s changes in climate over time have been a main driver of the evolution of species and how projections of climate conditions can be used to model and predict the evolution of extant species. You are a Principal Investigator (PI) writing a grant and presenting to a National Science Foundation (NSF) panel to secure funding for a scientific issue you hope to research.
13
Learning Tasks:Entry Task - Is it Alive? Part 1Entry Task - Stressed OutEntry Task - What We InheritEntry Task - You Are What You Eat9.4.0 - Survivalist Species9.5.0 - Ecological Footprints9.6.0 - NSF Funding SAC
14
Task 1 - Artifact InvestigationTask 1 - The Teen BrainTask 1 - InheritanceTask 1 - Farm Food Webs9.4.1 - Early Earth9.5.1 - Bird Genomics9.6.1 - Secondary Research
15
Task 2 - Classmate & Community DataTask 2 - Homeostasis InvestigationsTask 2 - DNA DiscoveriesTask 2 - The Power of Photosynthesis9.4.2 - Biodiversity & The Fossil Record9.5.2 - Insect Habitats9.6.2 - IGNITE Presentation
16
Task 3 - The Classroom SystemTask 3 - The Stress ResponseTask 3 - Race: The Power of an IllusionTask 3 - Calorimetry: Food as Fuel9.4.3 - Evidence for Evolution: Whales9.5.3 - Bees in Decline9.6.3 -
17
Task 4 - Is it Alive? Part 2Summative Task - Teen Stress CampaignTask 4 - Visible and Invisible TraitsTask 4 - Food Waste Audit9.4.4 - Evidence for Evolution: Hominids9.5.4 - Succession9.6.4 -
18
Task 5 - Bay Area BiologistsSummative Task - Genetic Counselor ReportTask 5 - Food Inc. and Foodprints9.4.5 - Darwin's Finches9.5.S - 9.6.S - NSF Grant Proposal
19
Summative Task: Our Biology ResearchSummative Task - The Story of a Meal9.4.6 - Evolution in Action: Salamanders
20
9.4.7 - Evolution in Action: Flies
21
9.4.8 - Climate Capsules
22
9.4.9 - Evolution to the Rescue!
23
9.4.S - Bioclimate Symposium
24
NGSS Alignment
25
HS-LS2-2. Use mathematical representations to support and revise explanations based on evidence about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems of different scales.
26

Performance Expectations:
HS-LS1-2. Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems that provide specific functions within multicellular organisms.HS-LS1-1. Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the structure of DNA determines the structure of proteins which carry out the essential functions of life through systems of specialized cells.HS-LS1-2. Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems that provide specific functions within multicellular organisms.HS-LS1-2. Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems that provide specific functions within multicellular organisms.HS-LS2-3. Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence for the cycling of matter and flow of energy in aerobic and anaerobic conditions.HS-LS1-1. Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the structure of DNA determines the structure of proteins which carry out the essential functions of life through systems of specialized cells.HS-LS1-4. Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex organisms.
27
HS-LS1-3. Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis.HS-LS3-1. Ask questions to clarify relationships about the role of DNA and chromosomes in coding the instructions for characteristic traits passed from parents to offspring.HS-LS1-5. Use a model to illustrate how photosynthesis transforms light energy into stored chemical energy. HS-LS2-3. Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence for the cycling of matter and flow of energy in aerobic and anaerobic conditions.HS-LS2-5. Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere. HS-LS1-3. Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis.HS-LS3-1. Ask questions to clarify relationships about the role of DNA and chromosomes in coding the instructions for characteristic traits passed from parents to offspring.
28
HS-ETS1-3 - Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and trade-offs that account for a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics as well as possible social, cultural, and environmental impacts.HS-LS3-2. Make and defend a claim based on evidence that inheritable genetic variations may result from: (1) new genetic combinations through meiosis, (2) viable errors occurring during replication, and/or (3) mutations caused by environmental factors.HS-LS1-6. Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence for how carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen from sugar molecules may combine with other elements to form amino acids and/or other large carbon-based molecules. HS-LS1-7. Use a model to illustrate that cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and the bonds in new compounds are formed resulting in a net transfer of energy. HS-LS2-1. Use mathematical and/or computational representations to support explanations of factors that affect carrying capacity of ecosystems at different scales.HS-LS2-3. Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence for the cycling of matter and flow of energy in aerobic and anaerobic conditions.
29
HS-LS2-8. Evaluate the evidence for the role of group behavior on individual and species’ chances to survive and reproduce.HS-LS3-3. Apply concepts of statistics and probability to explain the variation and distribution of expressed traits in a population.HS-LS1-7. Use a model to illustrate that cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and the bonds in new compounds are formed resulting in a net transfer of energy. HS-LS2-2. Use mathematical representations to support and revise explanations based on evidence about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems of different scales.HS-LS2-2. Use mathematical representations to support and revise explanations based on evidence about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems of different scales.HS-LS2-4. Use mathematical representations to support claims for the cycling of matter and flow of energy among organisms in an ecosystem.
30
HS-LS4-3. Apply concepts of statistics and probability to support explanations that organisms with an advantageous heritable trait tend to increase in proportion to organisms lacking this trait.HS-LS2-4. Use mathematical representations to support claims for the cycling of matter and flow of energy among organisms in an ecosystem. HS-LS2-4. Use mathematical representations to support claims for the cycling of matter and flow of energy among organisms in an ecosystem. HS-LS2-6. Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.HS-LS2-5. Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere.
31
HS-LS2-5. Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere. HS-ESS3-1. Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the availability of natural resources, occurrence of natural hazards, and changes in climate have influenced human activity.HS-LS2-7. Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.*HS-LS2-1. Use mathematical and/or computational representations to support explanations of factors that affect carrying capacity of ecosystems at different scales.
32
HS-LS2-6. Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.HS-LS3-2. Make and defend a claim based on evidence that inheritable genetic variations may result from: (1) new genetic combinations through meiosis, (2) viable errors occurring during replication, and/or (3) mutations caused by environmental factors.HS-LS4-6. Create or revise a simulation to test a solution to mitigate adverse impacts of human activity on biodiversity.HS-LS2-6. Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.
33
HS-LS2-7. Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.*HS-LS3-3. Apply concepts of statistics and probability to explain the variation and distribution of expressed traits in a population.HS-LS3-3. Apply concepts of statistics and probability to explain the variation and distribution of expressed traits in a population.HS-LS2-7. Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.*
34
HS-LS4-6. Create or revise a simulation to test a solution to mitigate adverse impacts of human activity on biodiversity.HS-LS4-3. Apply concepts of statistics and probability to support explanations that organisms with an advantageous heritable trait tend to increase in proportion to organisms lacking this trait.HS-LS4-1. Communicate scientific information that common ancestry and biological evolution are supported by multiple lines of empirical evidence.HS-LS4-6. Create or revise a simulation to test a solution to mitigate adverse impacts of human activity on biodiversity.
35
HS-ESS2-6. Develop a quantitative model to describe the cycling of carbon among the hydrosphere, atmosphere, geosphere, and biosphere. HS-LS4-4. Construct an explanation based on evidence for how natural selection leads to adaptation of populations.HS-LS4-2. Construct an explanation based on evidence that the process of evolution primarily results from four factors: (1) the potential for a species to increase in number, (2) the heritable genetic variation of individuals in a species due to mutation and sexual reproduction, (3) competition for limited resources, and (4) the proliferation of those organisms that are better able to survive and reproduce in the environment .HS-ESS2-5. Plan and conduct an investigation of the properties of water and its effects on Earth materials and surface processes.
36
HS-ESS3-1. Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the availability of natural resources, occurrence of natural hazards, and changes in climate have influenced human activity.HS-LS4-3. Apply concepts of statistics and probability to support explanations that organisms with an advantageous heritable trait tend to increase in proportion to organisms lacking this trait.HS-ESS2-6. Develop a quantitative model to describe the cycling of carbon among the hydrosphere, atmosphere, geosphere, and biosphere.
37
HS-ESS3-3. Create a computational simulation to illustrate the relationships among management of natural resources, the sustainability of human populations, and biodiversity.HS-LS4-4. Construct an explanation based on evidence for how natural selection leads to adaptation of populations.HS-ESS3-5. Analyze geoscience data and the results from global climate models to make an evidence-based forecast of the current rate of global or regional climate change and associated future impacts to Earth systems.
38
HS-ESS3-4. Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural systems.HS-LS4-5. Evaluate the evidence supporting claims that changes in environmental conditions may result in: (1) increases in the number of individuals of some species, (2) the emergence of new species over time, and (3) the extinction of other speciesHS-ESS3-6. Use a computational representation to illustrate the relationships among Earth systems and how those relationships are being modified due to human activity.
39
HS-ESS1-5. Evaluate evidence of the past and current movements of continental and oceanic crust and the theory of plate tectonics to explain the ages of crustal rocks.
40
HS-ESS1-6. Apply scientific reasoning and evidence from ancient Earth materials, meteorites, and other planetary surfaces to construct an account of Earth’s formation and early history.
41
HS-ESS2-7. Construct an argument based on evidence about the simultaneous coevolution of Earth’s systems and life on Earth.
42
HS-ESS3-1. Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the availability of natural resources, occurrence of natural hazards, and changes in climate have influenced human activity.
43
Science and Engineering Practices:1 - Asking Questions & Defining Problems1 - Asking Questions & Defining Problems
44
2 - Developing & Using Models 2 - Developing & Using Models
45
3 -Planning & Carrying Out Investigations
46
4. Analyzing and Interpreting Data
47
48
49
7 - Engaging in Argument from Evidence7 - Engaging in Argument from Evidence7 - Engaging in Argument from Evidence
50
8 - Obtaining, Evaluating, & Communicating Information8 - Obtaining, Evaluating, & Communicating Information
51
Disciplinary Core Ideas:LS1 - From Molecules to OrganismsLS1.A - Structure & FunctionDCI LS1.A - Structure & Function
52
LS1.D - Information ProcessingDCI LS1.C - Organization in Organisms
53
ETS1.A - Defining & Delimiting an Engineering Problem
DCI LS2.A - Ecosystem Relationships
54
ETS1.B -Developing Possible SolutionsDCI LS2.B - Cycles in Ecosystems
55
ETS1.C -Optimizing the Design SolutionDCI LS3.B - Variation in Traits
56
ETS2.A - Interdependence of Science, Engineering...
DCI LS4.C - Adaptation
57
ETS2.B - Influence of Engineering, Technology, &...
58
Crosscutting Concepts1 -Patters
59
2 -Cause and Effect2 -Cause and Effect
60
61
4 -Systems and System Models4 -Systems and System Models
62
63
6 -Structure and Function
64
7 -Stability and Change
Loading...
 
 
 
2016-17 Scope & Sequence
2015-16 Scope & Sequence