Bay Math Course of Study Grade 1 FINAL
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Content Domain/SubheadingContent Statement
(Standard)
Learning Target (I can statements) You can have multiple learning targets for one content statement. Put them all in the box. Use CTRL+ENTER to move to a second line within one box.Month/UnitEveryDay MathSupplemental Resources
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AssessmentTier 3 Vocab (Content specific words)
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Numbers Operations Base 10/Extend the counting sequence.1. Count to 120, starting at any
number less than 120. In this range,
read and write numerals and
represent a number of objects with a
written numeral.
I can count to 120, starting at any number that is less than 120.
I can read and write numbers up to 120.
I can represent a number of ojbects with a written number.
Content Domain - Number and Operations in Base Ten
numerals, one digit number, two-digit numbers, tens place, ones place, bundles of tens, longs, cubes, less than (symbol), greater than (symbol), equal to (=), place value, strategy(ies), mentally
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Numbers Operations Base 10/Understand place value.2. Understand that the two digits of a
two-digit number represent amounts of
tens and ones. Understand the
following as special cases:
a. 10 can be thought of as a bundle of
ten ones — called a “ten.”
b. The numbers from 11 to 19 are
composed of a ten and one, two,
three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or
nine ones.
c. The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60,
70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three,
four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine
tens (and 0 ones). 3. Compare two
two-digit numbers based on meanings
of the tens and ones digits, recording
the results of comparisons with the
symbols >, =, and <.
I can identify numbers in the tens place.
I can identify numbers in the ones place.
I can compare two two-digit numbers with the symbols less than, greater than and equal to.
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3. Compare two two-digit numbers based on
meanings of the tens and ones digits,
recording the results of comparisons with the
symbols >, =, and <.
I can compare two-digit numbers by looking at the tens and ones digits.
I can use >,<, and = to write down my comparison of two-digit numbers.
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Numbers Operations Base 10/Use place value understanding and
properties of operations to add and
subtract.
4. Add within 100, including adding a
two-digit number and a one-digit
number, and adding a two-digit
number and a multiple of 10, using
concrete models or drawings and
strategies based on place value,
properties of operations, and/or the
relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a
written method and explain the
reasoning used.
I can count to 120, starting at any number that is less than 120.
I can read and write numbers up to 120.
I can represent a number of ojbects with a written number
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Numbers Operations Base 10/Understand that in adding two-digit
numbers, one adds tens and tens,
ones and ones; and sometimes it is
necessary to compose a ten.
5. Given a two-digit number, mentally
find 10 more or 10 less than the
number, without having to count;
explain the reasoning used.
I can mentally count by 10 when given a two-digit number.
I can explain how I got my answer.
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Numbers Operations Base 10/Understand that in adding two-digit
numbers, one adds tens and tens,
ones and ones; and sometimes it is
necessary to compose a ten.
6. Subtract multiples of 10 in the range
10-90 from multiples of 10 in the range
10-90 (positive or zero differences),
using concrete models or drawings
and strategies based on place value,
properties of operations, and/or the
relationship between addition and
subtraction; relate the strategy to a
written method and explain the
reasoning used.
I can subtract multiples of 10 in the range of 10-90 using models and drawings.
I can explain how I got my answers.
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Operations and Algebraic Thinking/Represent and solve problems
involving addition and subtraction.
1. Use addition and subtraction within 20
to solve word problems involving
situations of adding to, taking from,
putting together, taking apart, and
comparing, with unknowns in all positions,
e.g., by using objects, drawings, and
equations with a symbol for the unknown 2
number to represent the problem.
By using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown, I can add and subtract within 20 to solve word problems.Content Domain - Operations and Algebraic Thinking
addition, subtraction, comparing, unknown number, solve, word problems, whole numbers, symbols, commutative property of addition, associative property of addition, unknown-addend, skip counting, fluency, equivalent, equations, whole number
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Operations and Algebraic Thinking/Represent and solve problems
involving addition and subtraction.
2. Solve word problems that call for
addition of three whole numbers whose
sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by
using objects, drawings, and equations
with a symbol for the unknown number to
represent the problem.
By using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown, I can solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20.
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Operations and Algebraic Thinking/Understand and apply properties of
operations and the relationship
between addition and subtraction.
3. Apply properties of operations as
strategies to add and subtract

Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 =
11 is also known. (Commutative property of
addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two
numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6
+ 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of
addition.)
I can apply properties of operations when adding and subtracting.
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Operations and Algebraic Thinking/Understand and apply properties of
operations and the relationship
between addition and subtraction.
4. Understand subtraction as an
unknown-addend problem.

For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the
number that makes 10 when added to 8.
I can explain how I got the answer to a subtraction problem.
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Operations and Algebraic Thinking/Add and subtract within 20.5. Relate counting to addition and
subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add
2).
I can skip count by 2's when adding and subtracting.
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Operations and Algebraic Thinking/Add and subtract within 20.6. Add and subtract within 20,
demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8
+ 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten
(e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 –1 = 10 – 1 =9); using
the relationship between addition and subtraction

(e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 –
8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier
or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by
creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1= 12 +
1 = 13).
I can add within 20 demonstrating fluency within 10.
I can subtract within 20 demonstrating fluency within 10.
I can use a variety of strategies for adding and subtracting.
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Operations and Algebraic Thinking/Work with addition and subtraction
equations.
7. Understand the meaning of the equal
sign, and determine if equations involving
addition and subtraction are true or false.

For example, which of the following equations
are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 – 1,
5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.
I can explain the meaning of the equal, addition and subtraction signs and give examples of each.
I can figure out if an equation that involves adding and subtracting is true or false.
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Operations and Algebraic Thinking/Work with addition and subtraction
equations.
8. Determine the unknown number in a
whole-number addition or subtraction
equation.

For example, determine the unknown number
that makes the equation true in each of the
equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = ������ – 3, 6 + 6 = ������.
I can determine the unknown number in a whole-number additon or subtraction equation.
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Geometry/Reason with shapes and their
attributes.
1. Distinguish between defining
attributes (e.g., triangles are closed
and three-sided) versus non-defining
attributes (e.g., color, orientation,
overall size) ; build and draw shapes
to possess defining attributes.
I can distinguish between defining attributes vs. non-defining attributes by building and drawing shapes to show differences. Content Domaine - Geomentry
defining attributes, non-defining attributes, two dimensional (retangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, quarter circles), three dimensional (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, right circular cylinders), partition (divide), equal shares, whole, smaller shares, halves, fourths, quarters, half of, fourth of, quarter of,
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Geometry/Reason with shapes and their
attributes.
2. Compose two-dimensional
shapes (rectangles, squares,
trapezoids, triangles, half-circles,
and quarter-circles) or three-
dimensional shapes (cubes, right
rectangular prisms, right circular
cones, and right circular cylinders) to
create a composite shape, and
compose new shapes from the
composite shape.
I can draw two or three dimensional shapes to create a new composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape.
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Geometry/Reason with shapes and their
attributes.
3. Partition circles and rectangles
into two and four equal shares,
describe the shares using the words
halves, fourths, and quarters, and
use the phrases half of, fourth of,
and quarter of. Describe the whole
as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing into more equal
shares creates smaller shares.
I can divide circles and rectangles into two or four equal parts.
I can show that I understand by using words such as, halves, fourths, quarters.
I can use pharses like half of, fourth of, and quarter of when discussing objects.
I can describe how to break down a whole into smaller, equal shares or how a whole is made up of smaller, equal shares.
halves, fourths, quarters, half of, fourth of, quarter of; whole; share; equal shares; smaller shares
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Measurement and Data/ Measure lengths indirectly
and by iterating length
units.
1. Order three objects by
length; compare the lengths
of two objects indirectly by
using a third object.
I can compare the length of three objects and place them in order.
I can use a third object to compare the lengths of two other objects.
Content Domaine - Measurement and Data
units, measure, lenghts, compare, lenght units, gaps, overlaps, hour, half-hour, analog, digital, data, interpret, organize, data points, category, more, less, object
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Measurement and Data/ Measure lengths indirectly
and by iterating length
units.
2. Express the length of an
object as a whole number of
length units, by laying
multiple copies of a shorter
object (the length unit) end to
end; understand that the
length measurement of an
object is the number of same-
size length units that span it
with no gaps or overlaps.

Limit to contexts where the object
being measured is spanned by a
whole number of length units with
no gaps or overlaps.
I can order three objects by length.
I can compare the lenghts of two objects indirectly by using a third object.
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Measurement and Data/Tell and write time.3. Tell and write time in hours
and half-hours using analog
and digital clocks.
I can tell time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks.
I can write time in hours and half-hours.
2.05; 2.06; 3.07; 4.08
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Measurement and Data/Represent and interpret data.4. Organize, represent, and
interpret data with up to three
categories; ask and answer
questions about the total
number of data points, how
many in each category, and
how many more or less are in
one category than in another.
I can organize and complete a graph/chart for and interpret data collected in up to three categories.
I can answer and ask questions about graph including total number of data points.
I can explain each category - which has more or less and explain why.
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