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7. Why do you think we can only tonicize major or minor triads? (But I want to tonicize vii°!)8. Why do think composers used chromatic pitches that create what we call secondary dominant chords? What might be their expressive purpose(s)?9. Why do you think music theorists take these chromatic pitches so seriously that they create new labels for these chords? Put another way, why can't we call a V/V just a major II chord?10. What do you think about this quiz? Did you like this more or less than the quizzes we have done in class?First NameLast Name
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Because diminished chords suck.They like them.Theorists are stupid.I hate this.KulmaDavid
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Because the relative chord that we make using a major or minor will always be a major or minor. If we tonicized diminished chords the new chords that we make would come out to be a different type of chord that wouldn't fit into the music. If we tried to tonicize a vii diminished in C major we would end up with something that wouldn't sound musically correct. The whole point of tonicizing these chords is to get more interesting sounds that sound musically "right" to the ear.So that they have more variety in their music. If the composer is writing in major and they want major sounding chords they shouldn't be stuck with just I IV and V because that would get pretty boring. The expressive purposes of these secondary dominant chords gives a kind of powerful effect that isn't expected. It's hard to be expressive while using the same 3 chords over and over again. Because the composer wasn't just saying "hey i want this ii chord to be major". They were thinking in terms of relative keys, because most compositions don't stay in the same key with the same 7 chords throughout the whole peice. These chords make the piece more interesting and they are more than simply making a minor two chord major, and the music theorists know thisThis quiz helped, I definitley like this more than what we've done in class because it reinforces information that we learned and forced me to rewatch the videos. Instead of saying "oh yeah i already know this" i had to make sure that I did.
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I think that we can only tonicize major or minor triads because it's mimicking the sound of cadences. You never really see a cadence that ends with a diminished vii chord. (Maybe they exist, but I haven't seen them ever.) So resolving anything to a diminished chord would not work, because there may not be a strong tendency tone at all to be resolved. Composers may have used secondary dominant chords to emphasize the chord they lead to. For example, if you have a V7/IV going to a IV chord, the IV chord becomes more harmonically important for a moment. Expressive purposes could be that they want to create a powerful moment of tension and release, but they don't want it to be a cadence point because they have more of a phrase to write.I think that using these new terms for secondary dominants is important, because it makes more sense when thinking about the way that chord progressions work. You never see a II chord going to V. If someone told me that there was a major II chord going to a V chord, my musical brain would just go into panic mode because when learning about chord progressions, I've always stuck to what makes logical sense from what I've learned.I think that this quiz was fine. I like the ones that we do in class a little more, because whenever I have to type something or do something on the computer, my mind wanders a little bit. In class, seeing a quiz in front of me, I can focus a little bit more. But really, I'm not opposed to either form of quiz-taking. I also thinks it's helpful to have the power point for us to look at while we're working, that way we can read the information for ourselves and help ourselves commit it to memory.
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To me, if we start tinkering too much with the key, it will eventually start sounding like a different key. It would almost be easier to just switch the key maybe?I think their purpose is kind of like what we talked about in class, where maybe they wanted to pull their audience in by using more 7th chords, but not just the V7, to make the music more interesting to the ear.I think they take it seriously because, just with math, you have certain formulas, that when seen by mathematicians, will know exactly what it is.Yes. I enjoyed the videos very much. They were so much easier because you could rewind and listen an watch again, unlike in a lecture.
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A diminished triad is not very tonal. It is hard to hear it being tonicized.A chromatic passage has a definite feel of leading somewhere.Using labels like V7/V may help make modulation easierI feel bad that I missed class on Tuesday... but since everything was online, it was very easy to access all of the material I missed. I don't really like theory quizzes online because, if needed, it is hard to notate a diminished symbol or other symbols.
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I am not really sure why we can only tonicize major or minor triads. I think that maybe by adding chromaticism to non major or minor triads the new tendency tones would not resolve as well as Ti, Fi, Fa, and Te do in major or minor triads. They might would become too chromatic creating a displeasing sound.I think composers used chromatic pitches to create stronger tendencies towards resolutions. The secondary dominant chords seem to have a strong tendency to resolve and allow the composer to express tension and anticipation towards the resolution.I think music theorists label these chords as they do to show that the composers deliberately wrote pitches outside of the key. It emphasizes that the composers were well aware they were not writing in their original key; they wanted a particular sound and chose to write a secondary dominant chord specifically to achieve that sound.I liked the quiz more than the quizzes we have done in class because it directly relates to what we are currently learning and serves as a reinforcement to the material we covered in the videos.
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You can only tonicize major or minor triads because of the relationship to the relative scale degree it's resolving to. If there was consistent tonicization then it would turn into a gradual modulation. Probably to create a different mood or air for the piece. Tonicization sounds like the music changing keys but then reverting back to the original. The composer might use that to try to create a push or pull in the music. Who knows. Certainly not I.Theorists take these chromatic pitches seriously because there is a fine line between modulation and tonicized chords.I like this better to be honest. I also like having the material online so that I can print it out and study it or pull it up on my phone between classes because I obviously don't have anything better to do than study. But I digress, I think this quiz, especially the short answer is genius.
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If we were to try and tonicize anything other than the major or minor triads it would not follow the part writing rules and I think it would lead to a lot of augmented seconds or intervals that's are just generally unpleasant.I believe that they serve as an emphasis to certain parts in music where it might be a dramatic moment or a word that needs to be emphasized to show meaning or emotion.
They take these chords seriously because they followed a certain set of guidelines and if they had just written it as a major 2 chord it would have disrupted the set theory rules. Also a major 2 chord does not sound quite the same as a V/V. I honestly enjoyed this format of the quiz. I felt less nervous than when I do in class and I felt like I was able to focus more and (hopefully!) do well on this quiz because I was able to take time and be sure that I was understanding what I was analyzing and writing down.
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You would get parallel octaves and bad voice leading.They did it for a temporary change of key.Because 2 is not major in any key.I like this because you can look at it over again.
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There has to be a leading tone in order to tonicize. Making M/m the only option. Probably way off on that though.Tension and release. More dramatic resolution of dissonance. Because a II would imply that the chord is diatonic. These are strictly for non diatonic chords. I enjoyed it. If I was confused on something I could go back multiple times to double check. This way of teaching also gives us unlimited options of research on this topic if anything you said was unclear. I also enjoyed the essay questions that challenged me to look beyond the written text and think deeply about the music. I look forward to seeing how you will incorporate these concepts in class on Thursday. Overall, I feel that I got a lot out of this online lesson. Keep up the good work.
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I suppose it would lead to really messy part writing and all kinds of weird augmented and diminished leaps. So it wouldn't resemble V7 - ITo create a moment of tension that has a different sound to V7 - I. Because secondary dominants are not diatonic, they stick out to the ear more.Because it is not acting as some II chord, by giving it a new name it is easier to grasp the chords purpose. The videos were helpful (mostly when showing the sheet music examples and writing out the chords on a staff). The bullets were a little bit more difficult to follow because I am a visual learner.

The quiz was alright, and I prefer it more because it isn't timed and gives me a chance to think things through. Although I would like, after clicking submit, to see the correct answers. (you might have it programmed in this way but I won't know until after I click submit)
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